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What Is Ketoacidosis Hyperglycemia

Why Do I Experience Tiredness And Fatigue After Eating?

Why Do I Experience Tiredness And Fatigue After Eating?

EDIT: My very first century upvote. Thank you ALL for your upvotes and encouragement! One word: insulin. Insulin is a kind of hormone produced by your body to keep your blood sugar level under control. Whenever you eat, your body starts digesting the food and releases tiny bouts of micronutrients (glucose, fatty acids or amino acids) into your blood stream. To counter this increase, your body triggers an insulin response to instruct the liver to absorb the extra amount of glucose to bring your blood sugar level to normal. As insulin is a hormone, it becomes tricky because different people react differently to hormones. Some people are very sensitive to a certain kind of hormone. Other people can be virtually immune to that kind of hormone. Same for insulin. In your case it sounds like your body is very sensitive to insulin. Either your body produces more insulin than normal, or your body reacts more sensitively to a given level of insulin. Either way, your liver would overwork to bring down your blood glucose level below normal in the short term, until it slowly recovers back to the normal level. This short term overshoot of blood glucose reduction causes fatigue and lethargy. See more: Sugar crash (Wikipedia)- A second possibility is that your diet is typically full of high GI food. GI stands for glycemic index which measures how much of insulin response a particular type of food triggers. The lower the GI, the less insulin required by your body to digest that food. Low GI food is typically slow-digesting food such as whole grain as opposed to refined grain, ie complex carb vs simple sugar. Vegetables are also low GI as it contains very few simple carbohydrates. In fact, most natural food tends to be complex and thus slower to digest and low GI; modern processed food t Continue reading >>

Diabetic Ketoacidosis: Evaluation And Treatment

Diabetic Ketoacidosis: Evaluation And Treatment

Diabetic ketoacidosis is characterized by a serum glucose level greater than 250 mg per dL, a pH less than 7.3, a serum bicarbonate level less than 18 mEq per L, an elevated serum ketone level, and dehydration. Insulin deficiency is the main precipitating factor. Diabetic ketoacidosis can occur in persons of all ages, with 14 percent of cases occurring in persons older than 70 years, 23 percent in persons 51 to 70 years of age, 27 percent in persons 30 to 50 years of age, and 36 percent in persons younger than 30 years. The case fatality rate is 1 to 5 percent. About one-third of all cases are in persons without a history of diabetes mellitus. Common symptoms include polyuria with polydipsia (98 percent), weight loss (81 percent), fatigue (62 percent), dyspnea (57 percent), vomiting (46 percent), preceding febrile illness (40 percent), abdominal pain (32 percent), and polyphagia (23 percent). Measurement of A1C, blood urea nitrogen, creatinine, serum glucose, electrolytes, pH, and serum ketones; complete blood count; urinalysis; electrocardiography; and calculation of anion gap and osmolar gap can differentiate diabetic ketoacidosis from hyperosmolar hyperglycemic state, gastroenteritis, starvation ketosis, and other metabolic syndromes, and can assist in diagnosing comorbid conditions. Appropriate treatment includes administering intravenous fluids and insulin, and monitoring glucose and electrolyte levels. Cerebral edema is a rare but severe complication that occurs predominantly in children. Physicians should recognize the signs of diabetic ketoacidosis for prompt diagnosis, and identify early symptoms to prevent it. Patient education should include information on how to adjust insulin during times of illness and how to monitor glucose and ketone levels, as well as i Continue reading >>

What Is The Longest A Diabetic Can Go Without An Injection?

What Is The Longest A Diabetic Can Go Without An Injection?

Type one diabetes at the most two to three days, by that time they would be severely ketotic, risking a sometimes fatal diabetes hyperglycemic ketoacidotic coma. For type 2 diabetes mostly that can be for months, even years, like we see in those war torn areas. My erstwhile partner, when I met him already a senior physician, told me that the experience during WW II in The Netherlands, those mostly type 2 diabetics who couldn’t get insulin didn’t die from not having insulin (which at the end was air-dropped by the British into German occupied territories), in fact did quite well with their blood sugars, unfortunately for a very sad reason: the Dutch famine of 1944–45 - Wikipedia costing about 18,000 people their lives. Of course not having their diabetes well controlled would cause them to develop a lot more complications so would shorten their lifespan appreciably. Continue reading >>

Diabetic Ketoacidosis

Diabetic Ketoacidosis

Print Overview Diabetic ketoacidosis is a serious complication of diabetes that occurs when your body produces high levels of blood acids called ketones. The condition develops when your body can't produce enough insulin. Insulin normally plays a key role in helping sugar (glucose) — a major source of energy for your muscles and other tissues — enter your cells. Without enough insulin, your body begins to break down fat as fuel. This process produces a buildup of acids in the bloodstream called ketones, eventually leading to diabetic ketoacidosis if untreated. If you have diabetes or you're at risk of diabetes, learn the warning signs of diabetic ketoacidosis — and know when to seek emergency care. Symptoms Diabetic ketoacidosis signs and symptoms often develop quickly, sometimes within 24 hours. For some, these signs and symptoms may be the first indication of having diabetes. You may notice: Excessive thirst Frequent urination Nausea and vomiting Abdominal pain Weakness or fatigue Shortness of breath Fruity-scented breath Confusion More-specific signs of diabetic ketoacidosis — which can be detected through home blood and urine testing kits — include: High blood sugar level (hyperglycemia) High ketone levels in your urine When to see a doctor If you feel ill or stressed or you've had a recent illness or injury, check your blood sugar level often. You might also try an over-the-counter urine ketones testing kit. Contact your doctor immediately if: You're vomiting and unable to tolerate food or liquid Your blood sugar level is higher than your target range and doesn't respond to home treatment Your urine ketone level is moderate or high Seek emergency care if: Your blood sugar level is consistently higher than 300 milligrams per deciliter (mg/dL), or 16.7 mill Continue reading >>

Hyperglycemic Crises

Hyperglycemic Crises

What They Are and How to Avoid Them One type results in about 100,000 hospitalizations a year with a mortality rate of under 5%. The other is thought to cause fewer hospitalizations, yet the mortality rate is about 15%. Severe hyperglycemic conditions, known as diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) and hyperosmolar hyperglycemic state (HHS), involve very serious imbalances in blood chemistry and usually require that a person be hospitalized until normal blood chemistry is restored. Because they can occur in anyone with diabetes, everyone should know what causes them, how to prevent them, how they are treated, and when to seek medical attention. The body in balance Glucose metabolism is a complex balancing act. In people who don’t have diabetes, a number of interconnected processes help the body to use glucose and keep blood glucose levels in the normal range. The body constantly balances glucose extracted from foods and produced by the liver with glucose utilization by the body’s tissues. When there is ample glucose in the bloodstream, the liver converts some of it into glycogen for storage. When the body needs more energy, such as during a prolonged period of fasting or activity, the liver converts stored glycogen back into glucose so that it can be used by the body’s tissues. The liver also can create glucose from amino acids and fats. Insulin lowers blood glucose levels both by slowing down the liver’s glucose production and by helping the body’s tissues to use glucose for energy. If the blood glucose level goes too low, other hormones, called counterregulatory hormones, work against the action of insulin to raise blood glucose levels. These hormones include glucagon, epinephrine, growth hormone, and cortisol. All work by prodding the liver to release glucose and by Continue reading >>

Hyperglycemia (high Blood Sugar)

Hyperglycemia (high Blood Sugar)

Hyperglycemia is a hallmark sign of diabetes (both type 1 diabetes and type 2 diabetes) and prediabetes. Other conditions that can cause hyperglycemia are pancreatitis, Cushing's syndrome, unusual hormone-secreting tumors, pancreatic cancer, certain medications, and severe illnesses. The main symptoms of hyperglycemia are increased thirst and a frequent need to urinate. Severely elevated glucose levels can result in a medical emergency like diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) or hyperglycemic hyperosmolar nonketotic syndrome (HHNS, also referred to as hyperglycemic hyperosmolar state). Insulin is the treatment of choice for people with type 1 diabetes and for life-threatening increases in glucose levels. People with type 2 diabetes may be managed with a combination of different oral and injectable medications. Hyperglycemia due to medical conditions other than diabetes is generally treated by treating the underlying condition responsible for the elevated glucose. Blood Sugar Swings: Tips for Managing Diabetes & Glucose Levels A number of medical conditions can cause hyperglycemia, but the most common by far is diabetes mellitus. Diabetes affects over 8% of the total U.S. population. In diabetes, blood glucose levels rise either because there is an insufficient amount of insulin in the body or the body cannot use insulin well. Normally, the pancreas releases insulin after a meal so that the cells of the body can utilize glucose for fuel. This keeps blood glucose levels in the normal range. Type 1 diabetes is responsible for about 5% of all cases of diabetes and results from damage to the insulin-secreting cells of the pancreas. Type 2 diabetes is far more common and is related to the body's inability to effectively use insulin. In addition to type 1 and type 2, gestational diabe Continue reading >>

Relationship Between Severity Of Hyperglycemia And Metabolic Acidosis In Diabetic Ketoacidosis

Relationship Between Severity Of Hyperglycemia And Metabolic Acidosis In Diabetic Ketoacidosis

We evaluated 114 hospital admissions for diabetic ketoacidosis (occurring in 78 patients) retrospectively by using the Mayo Clinic medical records system. Initial plasma glucose and serum bicarbonate values were examined by using regression analysis. No correlation was found between these two measurements (r = −0.03). The reason for this dissociation between hyperglycemia and hyperketonemia needs further elucidation, but it may be related to impaired hepatic glucose production in some patients. Copyright © 1988 Mayo Foundation for Medical Education and Research. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved. Continue reading >>

Diabetic Ketoacidosis

Diabetic Ketoacidosis

Practice Essentials Diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) is an acute, major, life-threatening complication of diabetes that mainly occurs in patients with type 1 diabetes, but it is not uncommon in some patients with type 2 diabetes. This condition is a complex disordered metabolic state characterized by hyperglycemia, ketoacidosis, and ketonuria. Signs and symptoms The most common early symptoms of DKA are the insidious increase in polydipsia and polyuria. The following are other signs and symptoms of DKA: Nausea and vomiting; may be associated with diffuse abdominal pain, decreased appetite, and anorexia History of failure to comply with insulin therapy or missed insulin injections due to vomiting or psychological reasons or history of mechanical failure of insulin infusion pump Altered consciousness (eg, mild disorientation, confusion); frank coma is uncommon but may occur when the condition is neglected or with severe dehydration/acidosis Signs and symptoms of DKA associated with possible intercurrent infection are as follows: See Clinical Presentation for more detail. Diagnosis On examination, general findings of DKA may include the following: Characteristic acetone (ketotic) breath odor In addition, evaluate patients for signs of possible intercurrent illnesses such as MI, UTI, pneumonia, and perinephric abscess. Search for signs of infection is mandatory in all cases. Testing Initial and repeat laboratory studies for patients with DKA include the following: Serum electrolyte levels (eg, potassium, sodium, chloride, magnesium, calcium, phosphorus) Note that high serum glucose levels may lead to dilutional hyponatremia; high triglyceride levels may lead to factitious low glucose levels; and high levels of ketone bodies may lead to factitious elevation of creatinine levels. Continue reading >>

What Is The Difference Between Hyperglycemia And Hypoglycemia?

What Is The Difference Between Hyperglycemia And Hypoglycemia?

What Is the Difference Between Hyperglycemia and Hypoglycemia? What Is the Difference Between Hyperglycemia and Hypoglycemia? In relation to diabetes , hyperglycemia refers to chronically high blood glucose levels. Most medical professionals define hyperglycemia by using the blood glucose goals that you and your physician have established and combining those goals with the blood glucose target ranges set by the American Diabetes Association . It's important to understand that you'll probably experience high blood glucose levels from time to time, despite your best efforts at control. As with any chronic disease , talk with your physician and diabetes care team if the pattern of your blood glucose readings is consistently higher or lower than your blood glucose goals. Persistent hyperglycemia can cause a wide range of chronic complications that affect almost every system in your body. When large blood vessels are affected, it can lead to: Heart attack or Congestive Heart Failure (coronary heart disease) Circulation disorders and possible amputation (peripheral vascular disease) When smaller blood vessels are affected, it can lead to: Museums and art tours , including touch galleries and touch tours Painting and crafting , including ways to set up and adapt your work area Check out our Getting Started Kit for more ideas to help you live well with low vision. Sign up with VisionAware to receive free weekly email alerts for more helpful information and tips for everyday living with vision loss. Very high blood glucose levels can also lead to the following acute, life-threatening conditions, both of which require immediate medical attention: Diabetic Ketoacidosis (DKA) occurs most frequently in persons with type 1 diabetes. DKA results from dehydration during a state of rel Continue reading >>

What Is The Difference Between Hyperglycemia And Hypoglycemia?

What Is The Difference Between Hyperglycemia And Hypoglycemia?

By Debra A. Sokol-McKay, MS, CVRT, CDE, CLVT, OTR/L, SCLV What Is Hyperglycemia? In relation to diabetes, hyperglycemia refers to chronically high blood glucose levels. Most medical professionals define hyperglycemia by using the blood glucose goals that you and your physician have established and combining those goals with the blood glucose target ranges set by the American Diabetes Association. It's important to understand that you'll probably experience high blood glucose levels from time to time, despite your best efforts at control. As with any chronic disease, talk with your physician and diabetes care team if the pattern of your blood glucose readings is consistently higher or lower than your blood glucose goals. Complications from Hyperglycemia Persistent hyperglycemia can cause a wide range of chronic complications that affect almost every system in your body. When large blood vessels are affected, it can lead to: Stroke (cerebral vascular disease) Heart attack or Congestive Heart Failure (coronary heart disease) Circulation disorders and possible amputation (peripheral vascular disease) When smaller blood vessels are affected, it can lead to: Kidney disease (nephropathy) Nerve damage (neuropathy) Diabetic eye disease (retinopathy) Joseph Monks: Writer, Producer, and Film Director Joseph Monks, who has diabetic retinopathy, creates and produces films for his production company Sight Unseen Pictures. He is also the first blind filmmaker to direct a feature film. Says Joe, "I'm not uncomfortable with the term 'blind.' I'm not thrilled about it, of course, but it's accurate. The lights went out for me in early 2002 as a result of diabetic retinopathy—the death of my retinas. It is what it is, so when it happened, I decided that I wasn't going to let it put an en Continue reading >>

Ketosis Vs. Ketoacidosis: What You Should Know

Ketosis Vs. Ketoacidosis: What You Should Know

Despite the similarity in name, ketosis and ketoacidosis are two different things. Ketoacidosis refers to diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) and is a complication of type 1 diabetes mellitus. It’s a life-threatening condition resulting from dangerously high levels of ketones and blood sugar. This combination makes your blood too acidic, which can change the normal functioning of internal organs like your liver and kidneys. It’s critical that you get prompt treatment. DKA can occur very quickly. It may develop in less than 24 hours. It mostly occurs in people with type 1 diabetes whose bodies do not produce any insulin. Several things can lead to DKA, including illness, improper diet, or not taking an adequate dose of insulin. DKA can also occur in individuals with type 2 diabetes who have little or no insulin production. Ketosis is the presence of ketones. It’s not harmful. You can be in ketosis if you’re on a low-carbohydrate diet or fasting, or if you’ve consumed too much alcohol. If you have ketosis, you have a higher than usual level of ketones in your blood or urine, but not high enough to cause acidosis. Ketones are a chemical your body produces when it burns stored fat. Some people choose a low-carb diet to help with weight loss. While there is some controversy over their safety, low-carb diets are generally fine. Talk to your doctor before beginning any extreme diet plan. DKA is the leading cause of death in people under 24 years old who have diabetes. The overall death rate for ketoacidosis is 2 to 5 percent. People under the age of 30 make up 36 percent of DKA cases. Twenty-seven percent of people with DKA are between the ages of 30 and 50, 23 percent are between the ages of 51 and 70, and 14 percent are over the age of 70. Ketosis may cause bad breath. Ket Continue reading >>

Understanding And Treating Diabetic Ketoacidosis

Understanding And Treating Diabetic Ketoacidosis

Diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) is a serious metabolic disorder that can occur in animals with diabetes mellitus (DM).1,2 Veterinary technicians play an integral role in managing and treating patients with this life-threatening condition. In addition to recognizing the clinical signs of this disorder and evaluating the patient's response to therapy, technicians should understand how this disorder occurs. DM is caused by a relative or absolute lack of insulin production by the pancreatic b-cells or by inactivity or loss of insulin receptors, which are usually found on membranes of skeletal muscle, fat, and liver cells.1,3 In dogs and cats, DM is classified as either insulin-dependent (the body is unable to produce sufficient insulin) or non-insulin-dependent (the body produces insulin, but the tissues in the body are resistant to the insulin).4 Most dogs and cats that develop DKA have an insulin deficiency. Insulin has many functions, including the enhancement of glucose uptake by the cells for energy.1 Without insulin, the cells cannot access glucose, thereby causing them to undergo starvation.2 The unused glucose remains in the circulation, resulting in hyperglycemia. To provide cells with an alternative energy source, the body breaks down adipocytes, releasing free fatty acids (FFAs) into the bloodstream. The liver subsequently converts FFAs to triglycerides and ketone bodies. These ketone bodies (i.e., acetone, acetoacetic acid, b-hydroxybutyric acid) can be used as energy by the tissues when there is a lack of glucose or nutritional intake.1,2 The breakdown of fat, combined with the body's inability to use glucose, causes many pets with diabetes to present with weight loss, despite having a ravenous appetite. If diabetes is undiagnosed or uncontrolled, a series of metab Continue reading >>

Ketosis Vs Ketoacidosis: Differences, Symptoms, And Causes

Ketosis Vs Ketoacidosis: Differences, Symptoms, And Causes

Ketosis and ketoacidosis both involve the production of ketones in the body. However, while ketosis is generally safe, ketoacidosis can be life-threatening. Nutritional ketosis occurs when the body starts burning fat instead of glucose. Inducing ketosis is the aim of a ketogenic diet, or "keto" diet, which is a high-fat, very-low-carb diet that can help people lose weight. Ketoacidosis occurs when the body produces dangerously high levels of ketones, and it is often a complication of type 1 diabetes . In this article, we discuss the differences between ketosis and ketoacidosis, including their symptoms. We also explain when to see a doctor and how to treat and prevent ketoacidosis. A doctor may recommend blood or urine tests to determine if someone is experiencing ketosis or ketoacidosis. Nutritional ketosis occurs when the body uses fat instead of glucose as fuel. The liver breaks down this fat into chemicals called ketones and releases them into the bloodstream. The body is then able to use the ketones as an energy source. The ketogenic diet aims to induce nutritional ketosis. People do this by eating foods that are high in fat but very low in carbohydrates . Adopting this diet has become a popular way to burn fat and lose weight. Doctors originally developed the ketogenic diet to treat children with epilepsy . The "classic" ketogenic diet involves eating 34 grams (g) of fat for every 1 g of carbohydrate and protein. According to the Epilepsy Foundation , studies show that more than 50 percent of children who try the diet have half the number of seizures or fewer, while 1015 percent become seizure-free. Doctors do not know why the ketogenic diet reduces some symptoms of epilepsy. Research suggests that this diet may also help with some other neurological disorders, s Continue reading >>

What Are Symptoms Of Diabetic Ketoacidosis?

What Are Symptoms Of Diabetic Ketoacidosis?

Diabetic ketoacidosis is a serious complication typically faced by people with type-1 diabetes, which occurs when body starts running out of insulin. This condition can leave the patient in coma or even death if not treated immediately. Diabetic ketoacidosis occurs when body is lacking lacking insulin to allow sufficient glucose to enter cells. Therefore the body absorbs energy by burning fatty acids and in turn produce acidic ketone bodies. Blood containing high levels of ketone bodies can cause serious illness. Diabetic ketoacidosis is itself a symptom of undiagnosed type-1 diabetes. Other symptoms of diabetic ketoacidosis include: 1. Dehydration 2. Vomiting 3. Nausea 4. Blurred vision 5. Fatigue & sleepiness 6. Frequent urination 7. Rapid heartbeat 8. Unusual smell on the breath (similar to that of pear drops) 9. Confusion and disorientation 10. Hyperventilation or deep laboured breathing 11. Coma The symptoms of diabetic ketoacidosis usually develop over a 24-hour period if blood glucose levels are and remain very high (hyperglycemia). Continue reading >>

Diabetic Ketoacidosis And Hyperosmolar Hyperglycemic Syndrome: Review Of Acute Decompensated Diabetes In Adult Patients

Diabetic Ketoacidosis And Hyperosmolar Hyperglycemic Syndrome: Review Of Acute Decompensated Diabetes In Adult Patients

Diabetic ketoacidosis and hyperosmolar hyperglycemic syndrome: review of acute decompensated diabetes in adult patients Diabetic ketoacidosis and hyperosmolar hyperglycemic syndrome: review of acute decompensated diabetes in adult patients BMJ 2019; 365 doi: (Published 29 May 2019) Cite this as: BMJ 2019;365:l1114 Esra Karslioglu French, clinical assistant professor of medicine 1 , Amy C Donihi, associate professor of pharmacy and therapeutics 2 , Mary T Korytkowski, professor of medicine 1 1Division of Endocrinology and Metabolism, Department of Medicine, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA, USA 2University of Pittsburgh School of Pharmacy, Pittsburgh, PA, USA Correspondence to: M Korytkowski mtk7{at}pitt.edu Diabetic ketoacidosis and hyperosmolar hyperglycemic syndrome (HHS) are life threatening complications that occur in patients with diabetes. In addition to timely identification of the precipitating cause, the first step in acute management of these disorders includes aggressive administration of intravenous fluids with appropriate replacement of electrolytes (primarily potassium). In patients with diabetic ketoacidosis, this is always followed by administration of insulin, usually via an intravenous insulin infusion that is continued until resolution of ketonemia, but potentially via the subcutaneous route in mild cases. Careful monitoring by experienced physicians is needed during treatment for diabetic ketoacidosis and HHS. Common pitfalls in management include premature termination of intravenous insulin therapy and insufficient timing or dosing of subcutaneous insulin before discontinuation of intravenous insulin. This review covers recommendations for acute management of diabetic ketoacidosis and HHS, the complications associated with these disorders, Continue reading >>

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