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What Is Ketoacidosis Definition

Is Detoxing For 10 Days Harmful To Your Body?

Is Detoxing For 10 Days Harmful To Your Body?

It is not harmful for you to go for a short period of time without food, however you shouldn't go for 10 days without food without medical supervision. What happens is the first 3 days your body is in starvation mode because it is waiting for you to give it more nutrition. You will feel hungry and may feel faint. After that time, your body will begin consuming itself starting with the unwanted parts - tumors, moles, etc. - it is call bloodless surgery. You will begin to not feel hungry and you may even have energy and feel just fine. I listened to a lecture by a Naturopathic physician describing his supervision of one man on a 40 day water fast. The man was extremely obese and wanted to loose weight (a hard way to do it I'd say). After the first few days he was encouraged to begin walking short distances and after the first week he was able to begin working for short periods around the property. He had one small BM/day which was the output from his body consuming itself. I've also had experience in a cancer support group where one member did a 30 day water fast. I was diagnosed with thyroid cancer in the year 2000. I chose to follow a natural diet and juicing plan. I joined an on-line support group of women with acute and chronic illnesses. One lady in the group who also had thyroid cancer did the water fast, as I said, for 30 days. Her tumor was gone at the end of the 30 days. I was not brave enough to do that and don't know of anyone who would supervise me anyway. I've found this site How to Detox Your Body to be very informative about how to detox your body. Continue reading >>

What Is The Origin/mechanism Of Abdominal Pain In Diabetic Ketoacidosis?

What Is The Origin/mechanism Of Abdominal Pain In Diabetic Ketoacidosis?

Other than all papers I could find citing the depth of the keto-acidosis (and not the height of the blood glucose levels) correlating with abdominal pain, nothing else to explain how these two are linked. Decades ago, I was taught that because of the keto-acidosis causing a shift of intracellular potassium (having been exchanged for H+ protons of which in keto-acidosis there were too many of in the extracellular fluid) to the extracellular, so also the blood compartment, resulting in hyperkalemia, paralyzing the stomach, which could become grossly dilated - that’s why we often put in a nasogastric drainage tube to prevent vomiting and aspiration - and thus cause “stomach pain”. This stomach pain in the majority of cases indeed went away after the keto-acidosis was treated and serum electrolyte levels normalized. In one patient it didn’t, she remained very, very metabolically acidotic, while blood glucose levels normalized, later we found her to have a massive and fatal intestinal infarction as the underlying reason for her keto-acidosis….. Continue reading >>

Diabetic Ketoacidosis

Diabetic Ketoacidosis

Diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) is a serious problem that can occur in people with diabetes if their body starts to run out of insulin. This causes harmful substances called ketones to build up in the body, which can be life-threatening if not spotted and treated quickly. DKA mainly affects people with type 1 diabetes, but can sometimes occur in people with type 2 diabetes. If you have diabetes, it's important to be aware of the risk and know what to do if DKA occurs. Symptoms of diabetic ketoacidosis Signs of DKA include: needing to pee more than usual being sick breath that smells fruity (like pear drop sweets or nail varnish) deep or fast breathing feeling very tired or sleepy passing out DKA can also cause high blood sugar (hyperglycaemia) and a high level of ketones in your blood or urine, which you can check for using home-testing kits. Symptoms usually develop over 24 hours, but can come on faster. Check your blood sugar and ketone levels Check your blood sugar level if you have symptoms of DKA. If your blood sugar is 11mmol/L or over and you have a blood or urine ketone testing kit, check your ketone level. If you do a blood ketone test: lower than 0.6mmol/L is a normal reading 0.6 to 1.5mmol/L means you're at a slightly increased risk of DKA and should test again in a couple of hours 1.6 to 2.9mmol/L means you're at an increased risk of DKA and should contact your diabetes team or GP as soon as possible 3mmol/L or over means you have a very high risk of DKA and should get medical help immediately If you do a urine ketone test, a result of more than 2+ means there's a high chance you have DKA. When to get medical help Go to your nearest accident and emergency (A&E) department straight away if you think you have DKA, especially if you have a high level of ketones in Continue reading >>

What Is Dka? - Definition, Symptoms & Treatment

What Is Dka? - Definition, Symptoms & Treatment

Diabetic ketoacidosis is a life threatening condition for patients with diabetes. Learn the trigger for, the symptoms of, and the treatment for this terrifying condition in this lesson. What Is Diabetic Ketoacidosis? Everything that goes needs fuel. Your car needs gas, your laptop needs a battery, and you need food! When we eat food, not only are we enjoying something yummy, but we are fueling our body for all the thousands of tasks it is asked to do. We ingest whole food, and our digestive system breaks it down into different components - sugars, fats, proteins - that can be used as fuel. One of the most common types of fuel our bodies use is glucose (a sugar). Now, once the body has broken down the food into glucose, a hormone named insulin helps get the glucose from the bloodstream into the cells. Just like the hose and nozzle at the gas pump help you get gasoline into the tank of your car. Think if you pulled up to a gas station and there was no hose or nozzle; could you get gas? Of course not! And the same is true in our bodies. If there is no insulin, then the glucose is unable to enter the cells to be used as fuel. When the body lacks insulin, like in type 1 diabetes, it cannot use glucose as a fuel. So, it must use something else instead. The glucose is left in the bloodstream, and the body begins to breakdown fats. A byproduct of fat breakdown is ketones. Ketones are highly acidic. As the body continues to breakdown fats, the level of ketones continues to rise making the person's blood highly acidic. This leads to a condition known as diabetic ketoacidosis, commonly abbreviated as DKA. Symptoms of Diabetic Ketoacidosis The symptoms of DKA can be subtle and develop gradually over 24 hours or they can occur much more quickly if a patient is already suffering from Continue reading >>

Alcoholic Ketoacidosis

Alcoholic Ketoacidosis

A.D.A.M., Inc. is accredited by URAC, also known as the American Accreditation HealthCare Commission (www.urac.org). URAC's accreditation program is an independent audit to verify that A.D.A.M. follows rigorous standards of quality and accountability. A.D.A.M. is among the first to achieve this important distinction for online health information and services. Learn more about A.D.A.M.'s editorial policy, editorial process and privacy policy. A.D.A.M. is also a founding member of Hi-Ethics and subscribes to the principles of the Health on the Net Foundation (www.hon.ch). The information provided herein should not be used during any medical emergency or for the diagnosis or treatment of any medical condition. A licensed physician should be consulted for diagnosis and treatment of any and all medical conditions. Call 911 for all medical emergencies. Links to other sites are provided for information only -- they do not constitute endorsements of those other sites. Copyright 1997-2017, A.D.A.M., Inc. Duplication for commercial use must be authorized in writing by ADAM Health Solutions. Continue reading >>

Ketosis Vs. Ketoacidosis: Understanding The Differences

Ketosis Vs. Ketoacidosis: Understanding The Differences

Introduction to Ketosis vs Ketoacidosis Historically, ketosis has been one of the most vaguely defined and poorly understood concepts of the last century. There are different scenarios in which are body can be in a state of ketosis (including ketoacidosis). The most basic definition of ketosis is a general increase in blood levels of ketone bodies to 0.5 mmol or above. However, the reasons for the development of ketosis, the resultant levels of blood ketones, and the associated outcomes (health versus possible death) differ drastically between different situations of ketosis. Failure to understand the differences between various incidents of ketosis has led to the common misconceptions we have today that ultimately has made educating the masses on the ketogenic diet difficult. The single most important take home from this article should be that diabetic ketoacidosis is not the same as the ketosis experienced from a ketogenic diet. Diabetic Ketoacidosis Whenever I speak about ketogenic dieting, almost inevitably I am asked the question: “But shouldn’t you be worried about going into a state of ketoacidosis?” Ketoacidosis occurs when the formation ketone bodies are uncontrolled (15-25 mmol) and acidity in the blood increases (1). It is important to understand that our body regulates blood acid concentrations tightly. We typically measure blood acidity vs. alkalinity using the pH scale. If your blood’s pH is less than 7 it is acidic, and if greater it is basic, or alkaline. Our blood is usually slightly alkaline with a pH ranging from 7.35 to 7.45. Any deviation up or down from the norm by even the smallest amount can prove fatal! The most common form of ketoacidosis to occur is known as diabetic ketoacidosis. This usually occurs in type I diabetics but can also oc Continue reading >>

Diabetes With Ketone Bodies In Dogs

Diabetes With Ketone Bodies In Dogs

Diabetes Mellitus with Ketoacidosis in Dogs Diabetes is a medical condition in which the body cannot absorb sufficient glucose, thus causing a rise the blood sugar levels. The term “ketoacidosis,” meanwhile, refers to a condition in which levels of acid abnormally increased in the blood due to presence of “ketone bodies”. In diabetes with ketoacidosis, ketoacidosis immediately follows diabetes. It should be considered a dire emergency, one in which immediate treatment is required to save the life of the animal. This condition typically affects older dogs as well as females. In addition, miniature poodles and dachshunds are predisposed to diabetes with ketoacidosis. Symptoms and Types Weakness Lethargy Depression Lack of appetite (anorexia) Muscle wasting Rough hair coat Dehydration Dandruff Sweet breath odor Causes Although the ketoacidosis is ultimately brought on by the dog's insulin dependency due to diabetes mellitus, underlying factors include stress, surgery, and infections of the skin, respiratory, and urinary tract systems. Concurrent diseases such as heart failure, kidney failure, asthma, cancer may also lead to this type of condition. Diagnosis You will need to give a thorough history of your dog’s health, including the onset and nature of the symptoms, to your veterinarian. He or she will then perform a complete physical examination, as well as a biochemistry profile and complete blood count (CBC). The most consistent finding in patients with diabetes is higher than normal levels of glucose in the blood. If infection is present, white blood cell count will also high. Other findings may include: high liver enzymes, high blood cholesterol levels, accumulation in the blood of nitrogenous waste products (urea) that are usually excreted in the urine (azo Continue reading >>

Diabetic Ketoacidosis

Diabetic Ketoacidosis

Diabetic Ketoacidosis Definition Diabetic ketoacidosis is a dangerous complication of diabetes mellitus in which the chemical balance of the body becomes far too acidic. Description Diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) always results from a severe insulin deficiency. Insulin is the hormone secreted by the body to lower the blood sugar levels when they become too high. Diabetes mellitus is the disease resulting from the inability of the body to produce or respond properly to insulin, required by the body to convert glucose to energy. In childhood diabetes, DKA complications represent the leading cause of death, mostly due to the accumulation of abnormally large amounts of fluid in the brain (cerebral edema). DKA combines three major features: hyperglycemia, meaning excessively high blood sugar kevels; hyperketonemia, meaning an overproduction of ketones by the body; and acidosis, meaning that the blood has become too acidic. Insulin deficiency is responsible for all three conditions: the body glucose goes largely unused since most cells are unable to transport glucose into the cell without the presence of insulin; this condition makes the body use stored fat as an alternative source instead of the unavailable glucose for energy, a process that produces acidic ketones, which build up because they require insulin to be broken down. The presence of excess ketones in the bloodstream in turn causes the blood to become more acidic than the body tissues, which creates a toxic condition. Causes and symptoms DKA is most commonly seen in individuals with type I diabetes, under 19 years of age and is usually caused by the interruption of their insulin treatment or by acute infection or trauma. A small number of people with type II diabetes also experience ketoacidosis, but this is rare give Continue reading >>

What Is The Best Device To Measure My Blood Sugar Levels With?

What Is The Best Device To Measure My Blood Sugar Levels With?

The Diabetes Forum - find support, ask questions and share your experiences with 250,009 people. Join the Forum A Choosing the right meter will depend on the products available to you, the cost of test strips (if you need to buy you our own), NHS prescription availability and the most suitable device for your individual requirements. Some blood glucose meters can also check for the presence of ketones which is useful for people with type 1 diabetes or those who are otherwise susceptible to ketoacidosis. The following independent blood glucose meter reviews detail the types of blood glucose meters available in the UK, who they are made by, the range of features each meter brings and how to get one. In addition, you can read user reviews or leave your own review. Learn more about the recommended blood glucose level ranges as advised by the National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE) and the International Diabetes Federation (IDF). This will depend on the design interface favoured by the manufacturer, but some blood glucose monitors are definitely easier to use than others. For instance, some meters require a smaller drop of blood to give a reading and others have easier to navigate results and menus. In 2013, new and tighter accuracy standards (ISO standards) were issued for blood glucose meters to achieve. The previous accuracy guidelines were issued in 2003. Where a blood glucose has met the 2013 ISO standards, we have included this fact within our meter reviews. Because of the possible implications if they are inaccurate, most manufacturers make certain that their products give accurate readings. However, testing the meter regularly to ensure that it is still accurate is a good idea, as meters can become less accurate over time. You can check on the accura Continue reading >>

Diabetic Ketoacidosis

Diabetic Ketoacidosis

Diabetic Ketoacidosis Definition Diabetic ketoacidosis is a dangerous complication of diabetes mellitus in which the chemical balance of the body becomes far too acidic. Description Diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) always results from a severe insulin deficiency. Insulin is the hormone secreted by the body to lower the blood sugar levels when they become too high. Diabetes mellitus is the disease resulting from the inability of the body to produce or respond properly to insulin, required by the body to convert glucose to energy. In childhood diabetes, DKA complications represent the leading cause of death, mostly due to the accumulation of abnormally large amounts of fluid in the brain (cerebral edema ). DKA combines three major features: hyperglycemia, meaning excessively high blood sugar kevels; hyperketonemia, meaning an overproduction of ketones by the body; and acidosis, meaning that the blood has become too acidic. Insulin deficiency is responsible for all three conditions: the body glucose goes largely unused since most cells are unable to transport glucose into the cell without the presence of insulin; this condition makes the body use stored fat as an alternative source instead of the unavailable glucose for energy, a process that produces acidic ketones, which build up because they require insulin to be broken down. The presence of excess ketones in the bloodstream in turn causes the blood to become more acidic than the body tissues, which creates a toxic condition. Causes and symptoms DKA is most commonly seen in individuals with type I diabetes, under 19 years of age and is usually caused by the interruption of their insulin treatment or by acute infection or trauma. A small number of people with type II diabetes also experience ketoacidosis, but this is rare giv Continue reading >>

Is A Ketogenic Diet Effective?

Is A Ketogenic Diet Effective?

The short answer to your question, is yes, a ketogenic diet is safe and effective for most people. Of course, as with any major change in diet or exercise, you should consult with your doctor so that he or she can help you understand whether this diet is safe for YOU. And especially if you are a Type 1 diabetic, I would be concerned about you starting keto without being under close supervision by a doctor because you could go into ketoacidosis which is a dangerous condition. (Ketoacidosis is different than ketosis, which is a safe metabolic condition that your body enters when you cut carbs and raise your fat levels. It’s important not to confuse the two because while ketoacidosis is very dangerous, ketosis is healthy and is actually the goal for most people on the keto diet. Check out this research for the science behind ketosis vs. ketoacidosis.) Basically, a ketogenic diet is very low carb, moderate protein, and high fat. On keto, you should start out eating less than 20 net carbs per day - which is usually what everyone focuses on. But you also need to focus on your protein and fat levels. Women should eat between 50 and 75 grams of protein per day and men should stay between 100–125 grams of protein per day. And then for the fun part of keto - the FAT - your fat should be between a 1:1 and 1:2 ratio of protein to fat. Which means that if I eat 50 grams of protein a day, I should be eating between 50 and 100 grams of fat per day. And this is the yummy kind of fat - saturated fat is great on keto. So eat that bacon and slather on the butter because eating all that fat will help you lose weight and get healthy - as long as you have cut the carbs. And the fat helps you feel full so you won’t get hungry as often and you won’t feel deprived. And don’t worry tha Continue reading >>

Ketoacidosis

Ketoacidosis

ke·to·a·ci·do·sis pl. ke·to·a·ci·do·ses, Metabolic acidosis caused by an abnormally high concentration of ketone bodies in the blood and body tissues. This condition occurring as a complication of untreated or improperly controlled diabetes mellitus, especially type 1 diabetes, characterized by thirst, fatigue, a fruity odor on the breath, and other symptoms, and having the potential to progress to coma or death. Also called diabetic ketoacidosis . THE AMERICAN HERITAGE® DICTIONARY OF THE ENGLISH LANGUAGE, FIFTH EDITION by the Editors of the American Heritage Dictionaries. Copyright © 2016, 2011 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved. ketoacidosis Continue reading >>

Ketosis Vs. Ketoacidosis: What You Should Know

Ketosis Vs. Ketoacidosis: What You Should Know

Despite the similarity in name, ketosis and ketoacidosis are two different things. Ketoacidosis refers to diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) and is a complication of type 1 diabetes mellitus. It’s a life-threatening condition resulting from dangerously high levels of ketones and blood sugar. This combination makes your blood too acidic, which can change the normal functioning of internal organs like your liver and kidneys. It’s critical that you get prompt treatment. DKA can occur very quickly. It may develop in less than 24 hours. It mostly occurs in people with type 1 diabetes whose bodies do not produce any insulin. Several things can lead to DKA, including illness, improper diet, or not taking an adequate dose of insulin. DKA can also occur in individuals with type 2 diabetes who have little or no insulin production. Ketosis is the presence of ketones. It’s not harmful. You can be in ketosis if you’re on a low-carbohydrate diet or fasting, or if you’ve consumed too much alcohol. If you have ketosis, you have a higher than usual level of ketones in your blood or urine, but not high enough to cause acidosis. Ketones are a chemical your body produces when it burns stored fat. Some people choose a low-carb diet to help with weight loss. While there is some controversy over their safety, low-carb diets are generally fine. Talk to your doctor before beginning any extreme diet plan. DKA is the leading cause of death in people under 24 years old who have diabetes. The overall death rate for ketoacidosis is 2 to 5 percent. People under the age of 30 make up 36 percent of DKA cases. Twenty-seven percent of people with DKA are between the ages of 30 and 50, 23 percent are between the ages of 51 and 70, and 14 percent are over the age of 70. Ketosis may cause bad breath. Ket Continue reading >>

What Do You Miss The Most In Modern Medical Doctors?

What Do You Miss The Most In Modern Medical Doctors?

What I miss in many of today's newer doctors is the absolute commitment to the patient. I blame the modern American residency programs with the hour restrictions starting about 15 years ago. This was done to try to reduce fatigue and medical errors. Studies show that the restricted hours did not do either. Somehow even with restricted hours, residents find other things to do besides sleep. But restricted hours have given newer doctors the idea that medicine is somehow shift work. The unintended consequence of restrictions in training hours makes one of the priorities in a training program getting the resident out the door to avoid accreditation penalties. Unfortunately, with very complicated ill patients, that priority can impact patient wellbeing. Studies show that the handoff during shift change is a leading cause of major medical errors in any hospital. This is likely to be even more dangerous in a teaching hospital. The new doctor coming on, particularly one in training, takes time getting up to speed on a complicated unstable patient. Safer Patient Handoffs | HMS When I was an intern at UCLA way back when, I admitted a woman in diabetic ketoacidosis and shock into the intensive care unit. She was also in kidney failure from severe dehydration. It was 3 am and I had started work at 7 am the morning before. There were no blood draw teams after the routine blood draws in the morning or computer lab results. In addition to ordering and monitoring her fluids, ordering insulin and adjusting electrolytes, I had to draw her labs hourly, run them to the lab requesting a STAT run and then called for the results so I could make adjustments. I did all this while also taking care of my other patients going into my 2nd day, the day after call. About 11 pm on my 2nd day, I consid Continue reading >>

Euglycemic Diabetic Ketoacidosis, A Misleading Presentation Of Diabetic Ketoacidosis

Euglycemic Diabetic Ketoacidosis, A Misleading Presentation Of Diabetic Ketoacidosis

Go to: Introduction Hyperglycemia and ketosis in diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) are the result of insulin deficiency and an increase in the counterregulatory hormones glucagon, catecholamines, cortisol, and growth hormone. Three processes are mainly responsible for hyperglycemia: increased gluconeogenesis, accelerated glycogenolysis, and impaired glucose utilization by peripheral tissues. This might also be augmented by transient insulin resistance due to hormone imbalance, as well as elevated free fatty acids.[1] DKA is most commonly precipitated by infections. Other factors include discontinuation of or inadequate insulin therapy, pancreatitis, myocardial infarction, cerebrovascular accident, and illicit drug use. The diagnostic criteria of DKA, established by the American Diabetic Association, consists of a plasma glucose of >250 mg/dL, positive urinary or serum ketones, arterial pH of <7.3, serum bicarbonate <18 mEq/L, and a high anion gap. The key diagnostic feature of DKA is elevated circulating total blood ketone concentration. Hyperglycemia is also a key diagnostic criterion of DKA; however, a wide range of plasma glucose levels can be present on admission. Continue reading >>

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