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What Is Hhs In Diabetes?

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Hyperglycemic crises: Hyperglycemic hyperosmolar nonketotic coma (HHNK) versus DKA. See DKA video here: https://youtu.be/r2tXTjb7EqU This video and similar images/videos are available for instant download licensing here https://www.alilamedicalmedia.com/-/g... Voice by: Penelope Hammet Alila Medical Media. All rights reserved. All images/videos by Alila Medical Media are for information purposes ONLY and are NOT intended to replace professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Always seek the advice of a qualified healthcare provider with any questions you may have regarding a medical condition. Support us on Patreon and get FREE downloads and other great rewards: patreon.com/AlilaMedicalMedia Hyperosmolar hyperglycemic state, or HHS, is another ACUTE and life-threatening complication of diabetes mellitus. It develops slower than DKA, typically in the course of several days, but has a much higher mortality rate. Like DKA, HHS is triggered when diabetic patients suffer from ADDITIONAL physiologic stress such as infections, other illness, INadequate diabetic treatment or certain drugs. Similar to DKA, the RISE in COUNTER-regulatory hormones is the major culprit. These hormones

Hyperosmolar Hyperglycemic State

A serious metabolic complication of diabetes characterized by severe hyperglycemia, hyperosmolality, and volume depletion, in the absence of severe ketoacidosis. Occurs most commonly in older patients with type 2 diabetes. Contributes to less than 1% of all diabetes-related admissions. However, mortality is high (5% to 15%). Presents with polyuria, polydipsia, weakness, weight loss, tachycardia, dry mucus membranes, poor skin turgor, hypotension, and, in severe cases, shock. Altered sensorium (lethargy, disorientation, stupor) is common and correlates best with effective serum osmolality. Coma is rare and, if seen, is usually associated with a serum osmolality >340 mOsm/kg. Treatment includes correction of fluid deficit and electrolyte abnormalities, and IV insulin. Hyperosmolar hyperglycemic syndrome (HHS), also known as non-ketotic hyperglycemic hyperosmolar syndrome (NKHS), is characterized by profound hyperglycemia (glucose >600 mg/dL), hyperosmolality (effective serum osmolality 320 mOsm/kg), and volume depletion in the absence of significant ketoacidosis (pH >7.3 and HCO3 >15 mEq/L), and is a serious complication of diabetes. HHS may be the first presentation of type 2 diabe Continue reading >>

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  1. treehorn+bunny

    You don't need to be in DKA to get ketosis. It's probably because he hasn't been eating enough/is sick. It is not uncommon for people who have stomach viruses to burn ketones.
    In nondiabetic persons, ketonuria may occur during acute illness or severe stress.

  2. PorcineWithMe

    GERD/reflux/"heartburn" can cause that smell and so can taking Prilosec (or other PPIs). My husband had THE WORST breath from taking Prilosec. Ugh.

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Hyperglycemic hyperosmolar nonketotic syndrome (HHNS or HHS) nursing diabetes & pathophysiology NCLEX review on endocrine disorders of the body. HHNS vs DKA are two complications of diabetes mellitus. HHNS presents with extreme hyperglycemia (blood glucose greater than 600 mg/dL) and dehyrdation. Ketones and acidosis are not present in this condition as with diabetic ketoacidosis. The hyperglycemia hyperosmolar state can lead to a coma and even death if not treated promptly. HHNS treatment includes intravenous fluids, insulin therapy,and electrolyte replacement. This video will highlight the patho, causes, signs and symptoms, and nursing interventions for HHS. Please see the previous videos on DKA and DKA vs HHS (see the playlist below) Quiz on HHNS: http://www.registerednursern.com/hhns... Lecture Notes for this Video: http://www.registerednursern.com/hhns... Diabetes Lecture Videos: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list... Subscribe: http://www.youtube.com/subscription_c... Nursing School Supplies: http://www.registerednursern.com/the-... Nursing Job Search: http://www.registerednursern.com/nurs... Visit our website RegisteredNurseRN.com for free quizzes, nursing care plans, sala

Hyperosmolar Hyperglycemic State (hhs)

By Erika F. Brutsaert, MD, Assistant Professor, Albert Einstein College of Medicine; Attending Physician, Montefiore Medical Center Hyperosmolar hyperglycemic state is a metabolic complication of diabetes mellitus (DM) characterized by severe hyperglycemia, extreme dehydration, hyperosmolar plasma, and altered consciousness. It most often occurs in type 2 DM, often in the setting of physiologic stress. HHS is diagnosed by severe hyperglycemia and plasma hyperosmolality and absence of significant ketosis. Treatment is IV saline solution and insulin. Complications include coma, seizures, and death. Hyperosmolar hyperglycemic state (HHSpreviously referred to as hyperglycemic hyperosmolar nonketotic coma [HHNK] and nonketotic hyperosmolar syndrome) is a complication of type 2 diabetes mellitus and has an estimated mortality rate of up to20%, which is significantly higher than the mortality for diabetic ketoacidosis (currently < 1%). It usually develops after a period of symptomatic hyperglycemia in which fluid intake is inadequate to prevent extreme dehydration due to the hyperglycemia-induced osmotic diuresis. Acute infections and other medical conditions Drugs that impair glucose to Continue reading >>

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  1. Santosh Anand

    Insulin plays a key role in helping sugar (glucose) enter your cells, thus providing them energy. When your cells don't get the glucose they need for energy, your body begins to burn fat for energy, which produces ketones. Ketones are acidic and so when they build up in the blood, they make the blood more acidic, leading to the condition called diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA).
    Now, in type-1 diabetes, there is no insulin production whereas in type-2, there is impairment of insulin production. Thus why Type-2 diabetic people hardly get DKA.
    Note: Diabetic ketoacidosis is a serious condition that might lead to diabetic coma or even death.

  2. Lucas Verhelst

    In order for the cells in your body to access the glucose in your bloodstream so they can use it as energy they need insulin. Insulin acts like a key, opennin the cell door to allow the entry of glucose. Type 1 diabetics produce no insulin and need to inject it, thus the amount of insulin they have is strictly limited. Once they run out of insulin the glucose remains in the blood stream. If this occurs over a long period of time their blood glucose levels will rise due to the release of glucose from the liver. High blood sugar levels causes ketoacidosis which leads to coma and death.

  3. Keith Phillips

    Although type 2 diabetics suffer from insulin resistance, the condition rarely has an absolute negative effect on the bodies ability to convert glucose to usable energy. Type 1 diabetics have little or no ability to produce insulin. With the exception of neural cells, the rest of the body which without insulin is experiencing starvation, will consume its own tissues. (this is how people have endured periods of famine). This process however produces by products that eventually overwhelm the body's ability to process toxins.

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Hyperosmolar Hyperglycaemia State (HHS) Master of Clinical Pharmacy

Hyperosmolar Hyperglycemic State (hhs)

Severely uncontrolled type 2 diabetes, usually over a relatively short period of time, can lead to a dangerous rise in blood glucose known as hyperosmolar hyperglycemic state, or HHS. This condition—and the enormous dehydration that accompanies it—occurs most often in older persons with type 2 diabetes, including nursing home residents. Patients are likely to develop HHS if they forget to take their medicines or develop an underlying illness. This illness can range from something as mild as a urinary tract infection to a major event such as a heart attack. Patients with diabetes should alert their health care provider as soon as they become ill because of the risk of HHS. Patients with HHS have extremely high blood glucose levels, often over 600 mg/dl. If you notice any of these signs or symptoms, seek medical attention: Dry mouth Cool hands and feet Fast heart rate Feeling thirsty Urinating often Nausea, vomiting, or stomach ache Mental changes including confusion, slurred speech, or weakness on one side of the body (similar to the symptoms of a stroke) Seizures Patients with HHS are usually admitted to the hospital’s intensive care unit (ICU) because they must be watched ve Continue reading >>

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  1. qmotion

    A website with weekly "Keto Plans"

    Hi Guys,
    At the moment I'm busy working on a website where me and a Keto buddy of mine would send out weekly "Keto Plans".
    Basically what it is is a website with info & tools on Keto, a collection of recipes but we would also make plans consisting of:
    - Shopping list with all necessary ingredients for the week
    - Meal plans (so which meal should be cooked/eaten at which time in the week)
    - Recipes, each meal plan would have a variety of meals throughout the week and you would have the recipe for each meal.
    What we are trying to do is to make it easier for people to follow Keto. We both thought it was difficult at times to find out what to eat and to keep a variety of different foods in the diet without a plan to follow.
    So basically you have your entire week planned out for you and wouldnt need to think about what to eat anymore (plus we're focussing on getting the best recipes and utilizing leftovers for meals)
    If you were new to Keto (or already following keto), what would you look for on a website like the one mentioned above. Is there anything specific you would want to receive/know/learn?
    Let me hear your ideas guys. Would it be something you would be interested in?
    Thanks!

  2. GazzyB

    Sounds like a great idea. If I were you I'd stress the simplicity of everything, because at first it can be a bit overwhelming!

  3. qmotion

    Originally Posted by GazzyB
    Sounds like a great idea. If I were you I'd stress the simplicity of everything, because at first it can be a bit overwhelming!

    Yes that's exactly what we were thinking! It can be overwhelming in the beginning, but when you get the basic gist of it you can see that it can be easy too!
    Thanks for the feedback

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