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What Is Dka Protocol?

My Site - Chapter 15: Hyperglycemic Emergencies In Adults

My Site - Chapter 15: Hyperglycemic Emergencies In Adults

Diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) and hyperosmolar hyperglycemic state (HHS) should be suspected in ill patients with diabetes. If either DKA or HHS is diagnosed, precipitating factors must be sought and treated. DKA and HHS are medical emergencies that require treatment and monitoring for multiple metabolic abnormalities and vigilance for complications. A normal blood glucose does not rule out DKA in pregnancy. Ketoacidosis requires insulin administration (0.1 U/kg/h) for resolution; bicarbonate therapy should be considered only for extreme acidosis (pH7.0). Note to readers: Although the diagnosis and treatment of diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) in adults and in children share general principles, there are significant differences in their application, largely related to the increased risk of life-threatening cerebral edema with DKA in children and adolescents. The specific issues related to treatment of DKA in children and adolescents are addressed in the Type 1 Diabetes in Children and Adolescents chapter, p. S153. Diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) and hyperosmolar hyperglycemic state (HHS) are diabetes emergencies with overlapping features. With insulin deficiency, hyperglycemia causes urinary losses of water and electrolytes (sodium, potassium, chloride) and the resultant extracellular fluid volume (ECFV) depletion. Potassium is shifted out of cells, and ketoacidosis occurs as a result of elevated glucagon levels and absolute insulin deficiency (in the case of type 1 diabetes) or high catecholamine levels suppressing insulin release (in the case of type 2 diabetes). In DKA, ketoacidosis is prominent, while in HHS, the main features are ECFV depletion and hyperosmolarity. Risk factors for DKA include new diagnosis of diabetes mellitus, insulin omission, infection, myocardial infarc Continue reading >>

Transitioning Safely From Intravenous To Subcutaneous Insulin

Transitioning Safely From Intravenous To Subcutaneous Insulin

Current Diabetes Reports Authors Kathryn Evans Kreider, Lillian F. Lien Abstract The transition from intravenous (IV) to subcutaneous (SQ) insulin in the hospitalized patient with diabetes or hyperglycemia is a key step in patient care. This review article suggests a stepwise approach to the transition in order to promote safety and euglycemia. Important components of the transition include evaluating the patient and clinical situation for appropriateness, recognizing factors that influence a safe transition, calculation of proper SQ insulin doses, and deciding the appropriate type of SQ insulin. This article addresses other clinical situations including the management of patients previously on insulin pumps and recommendations for patients requiring glucocorticoids and enteral tube feedings. The use of institutional and computerized protocols is discussed. Further research is needed regarding the transition management of subgroups of patients such as those with type 1 diabetes and end-stage renal disease. Introduction Intravenous (IV) insulin is used in the hospitalized patient to control blood sugars for patients with and without diabetes who may exhibit uncontrolled hyperglycemia or for those who need close glycemic attention. Common hospital uses for IV insulin include the perioperative setting, during the use of high-risk medications (such as corticosteroids), or during crises such as diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) [1,2]. Other conditions such as hyperglycemic hyperosmolar state (HHS) and trauma frequently require IV insulin, as well as specific hospital units such as the cardiothoracic intensive care unit [3,4]. The correlation between hyperglycemia and poor inpatient outcomes has been well described in the literature [5,6]. The treatment of hyperglycemia using an IV Continue reading >>

Diabetic Emergencies, Diabetic Ketoacidosis In Adults, Part 3

Diabetic Emergencies, Diabetic Ketoacidosis In Adults, Part 3

Clinical Management Treatment consists of rehydration with intravenous fluids, the administration of insulin, and replacement of electrolytes. General medical care and close supervision by trained medical and nursing staff is of paramount importance in the management of patients with DKA. A treatment flowchart (Table 1.3) should be used and updated meticulously. A urine catheter is necessary if the patient is in coma or if no urine is passed in the first 4 hours…. Replacement of water deficit Patients with DKA have severe dehydration. The amount of fluid needing to be administered depends on the degree of dehydration (Table 1.4). Fluid replacement aims at correction of the volume deficit and not to restore serum osmolality to normal. Isotonic solution NaCl (0.9%) (normal saline; osmolality 308 mOsm/kg) should be administered even in patients with high serum osmolality since this solution is hypotonic compared to the extracellular fluid of the patient. 10 The initial rate of fluid administration depends on the degree of volume depletion and underlying cardiac and renal function. In a young adult with normal cardiac and/or renal function 1 L of normal saline is administered intravenously within the first half- to one hour. In the second hour administer another 1 L, and between the third and the fifth hours administer 0.5–1 L per hour. Thus, the total volume in the first 5 hours should be 3.5–5 L [1]. If the patient is in shock or blood pressure does not respond to normal saline infusion, colloid solutions together with normal saline may be used.1,6 Some authors suggest replacement of normal saline with hypotonic (0.45%) saline solution after stabilization of the hemodynamic status of the patient and when corrected serum sodium levels are normal.8 However, this appro Continue reading >>

Diabetic Ketoacidosis (dka)

Diabetic Ketoacidosis (dka)

Tweet Diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) is a dangerous complication faced by people with diabetes which happens when the body starts running out of insulin. DKA is most commonly associated with type 1 diabetes, however, people with type 2 diabetes that produce very little of their own insulin may also be affected. Ketoacidosis is a serious short term complication which can result in coma or even death if it is not treated quickly. Read about Diabetes and Ketones What is diabetic ketoacidosis? DKA occurs when the body has insufficient insulin to allow enough glucose to enter cells, and so the body switches to burning fatty acids and producing acidic ketone bodies. A high level of ketone bodies in the blood can cause particularly severe illness. Symptoms of DKA Diabetic ketoacidosis may itself be the symptom of undiagnosed type 1 diabetes. Typical symptoms of diabetic ketoacidosis include: Vomiting Dehydration An unusual smell on the breath –sometimes compared to the smell of pear drops Deep laboured breathing (called kussmaul breathing) or hyperventilation Rapid heartbeat Confusion and disorientation Symptoms of diabetic ketoacidosis usually evolve over a 24 hour period if blood glucose levels become and remain too high (hyperglycemia). Causes and risk factors for diabetic ketoacidosis As noted above, DKA is caused by the body having too little insulin to allow cells to take in glucose for energy. This may happen for a number of reasons including: Having blood glucose levels consistently over 15 mmol/l Missing insulin injections If a fault has developed in your insulin pen or insulin pump As a result of illness or infections High or prolonged levels of stress Excessive alcohol consumption DKA may also occur prior to a diagnosis of type 1 diabetes. Ketoacidosis can occasional Continue reading >>

1. Start Iv Fluids (1 L Of 0.9% Nacl Per Hr Initially) 2. If Serum K+ Is <3.3 Meq/l Hold Insulin

1. Start Iv Fluids (1 L Of 0.9% Nacl Per Hr Initially) 2. If Serum K+ Is <3.3 Meq/l Hold Insulin

DKA Diagnostic Criteria (See page 3 for more details):  Blood glucose >250 mg/dl,  Arterial pH <7.3,  Bicarbonate ≤18 mEq/l,  Anion Gap Acidosis  Moderate ketonuria or ketonemia.  Give 40 mEq/h until K ≥ 3.3 mEq/L 3. Initiate DKA Order Set Phase I 4. Start insulin 0.14 units/kg/hr IV infusion (calculate dose) RN will titrate per DKA protocol Insulin Potassium Bicarbonate IVF Look for the Cause - Insulin deficiency - Infection/Inflammation (PNA, UTI, pancreatitis, cholecystitis) - Ischemia/Infarction (myocardial, cerebral, gut) - Intoxication (EtOH, drugs) - Iatrogenic (drugs, lack of insulin) - Pregnancy DKA/HHS Pathway Phase 1 (Adult) Approved by Diabetes Steering Committee, MMC, 2015 Initiate and continue insulin gtt until serum glucose reaches 250 mg/dl. RN will titrate per protocol to achieve target. When sugar < 250 mg/dl proceed to DKA Phase II (reverse side) DKA/HHS Pathway Phase 2 (Adult) Non-ICU Patients Phase 2: Blood sugar now less than 250mgd/dl. If Anion Gap Normalized* If Anion Gap Elevated* Critical Illness (ICU) Follow guidelines to the right when gap has normalized.* Approved by Glycemic Steering Committee, MMC, 2015  Transition to DKA Order Set Phase 2  Discontinue Phase 1 insulin infusion order and DKA nursing titration protocol from phase 1.  Change to fixed dose insulin infusion at suggested rate of 2.5 units/hr (Adjust as needed for individual patient with typical dose range of 0.02 to 0.05 units/kg/hr based on drip rate and response in phase 1). Do not discontinue insulin therapy.  Start dextrose containing IV fluid such as D5 ½ NS and adjust dextrose to goal blood sugar 150- 200.  Continue to check labs regularly.  Reevaluate for underlying causes a Continue reading >>

The Management Of Diabetic Ketoacidosis In Adults

The Management Of Diabetic Ketoacidosis In Adults

Action 1: Commence 0.9% sodium chloride solution (use large bore cannula) via infusion pump. See Box 2 for rate of fluid replacement Action 2: Commence a fixed rate intravenous insulin infusion (IVII). (0.1unit/kg/hr based on estimate of weight) 50 units human soluble insulin (Actrapid® or Humulin S®) made up to 50ml with 0.9% sodium chloride solution. If patient normally takes long acting insulin analogue (Lantus®, Levemir®) continue at usual dose and time Action 3: Assess patient o Respiratory rate; temperature; blood pressure; pulse; oxygen saturation o Glasgow Coma Scale o Full clinical examination Action 4: Further investigations • Capillary and laboratory glucose • Venous BG • U & E • FBC • Blood cultures • ECG • CXR • MSU Action 5: Establish monitoring regimen • Hourly capillary blood glucose • Hourly capillary ketone measurement if available • Venous bicarbonate and potassium at 60 minutes, 2 hours and 2 hourly thereafter • 4 hourly plasma electrolytes • Continuous cardiac monitoring if required • Continuous pulse oximetry if required Action 6: Consider and precipitating causes and treat appropriately BOX 1: Immediate management: time 0 to 60 minutes (T=0 at time intravenous fluids are commenced) If intravenous access cannot be obtained request critical care support immediately Systolic BP (SBP) below 90mmHg Likely to be due to low circulating volume, but consider other causes such as heart failure, sepsis, etc. • Give 500ml of 0.9% sodium chloride solution over 10-15 minutes. If SBP remains below 90mmHg repeat whilst requesting senior input. Most patients require between 500 to 1000ml given rapidly. • Consider involving the ITU/critical care team. • Continue reading >>

Treatment Of Diabetic Ketoacidosis With Subcutaneous Insulin Aspart

Treatment Of Diabetic Ketoacidosis With Subcutaneous Insulin Aspart

Abstract OBJECTIVE—In this prospective, randomized, open trial, we compared the efficacy and safety of aspart insulin given subcutaneously at different time intervals to a standard low-dose intravenous (IV) infusion protocol of regular insulin in patients with uncomplicated diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA). RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS—A total of 45 consecutive patients admitted with DKA were randomly assigned to receive subcutaneous (SC) aspart insulin every hour (SC-1h, n = 15) or every 2 h (SC-2h, n = 15) or to receive IV infusion of regular insulin (n = 15). Response to medical therapy was evaluated by assessing the duration of treatment until resolution of hyperglycemia and ketoacidosis. Additional end points included total length of hospitalization, amount of insulin administration until resolution of hyperglycemia and ketoacidosis, and number of hypoglycemic events. RESULTS—Admission biochemical parameters in patients treated with SC-1h (glucose: 44 ± 21 mmol/l [means ± SD], bicarbonate: 7.1 ± 3 mmol/l, pH: 7.14 ± 0.09) were similar to those treated with SC-2h (glucose: 42 ± 21 mmol/l, bicarbonate: 7.6 ± 4 mmol/l, pH: 7.15 ± 0.12) and IV regular insulin (glucose: 40 ± 13 mmol/l, bicarbonate 7.1 ± 4 mmol/l, pH: 7.11 ± 0.17). There were no statistical differences in the mean duration of treatment until correction of hyperglycemia (6.9 ± 4, 6.1 ± 4, and 7.1 ± 5 h) or until resolution of ketoacidosis (10 ± 3, 10.7 ± 3, and 11 ± 3 h) among patients treated with SC-1h and SC-2h or with IV insulin, respectively (NS). There was no mortality and no differences in the length of hospital stay, total amount of insulin administration until resolution of hyperglycemia or ketoacidosis, or the number of hypoglycemic events among treatment groups. CONCLUSIONS—Ou Continue reading >>

Episode 63 – Pediatric Dka

Episode 63 – Pediatric Dka

Pediatric DKA was identified as one of key diagnoses that we need to get better at managing in a massive national needs assessment conducted by the fine folks at TREKK – Translating Emergency Knowledge for Kids – one of EM Cases’ partners who’s mission is to improve the care of children in non-pediatric emergency departments across the country. You might be wondering – why was DKA singled out in this needs assessment? It turns out that kids who present to the ED in DKA without a known history of diabetes, can sometimes be tricky to diagnose, as they often present with vague symptoms. When a child does have a known history of diabetes, and the diagnosis of DKA is obvious, the challenge turns to managing severe, life-threatening DKA, so that we avoid the many potential complications of the DKA itself as well as the complications of treatment – cerebral edema being the big bad one. The approach to these patients has evolved over the years, even since I started practicing, from bolusing insulin and super aggressive fluid resuscitation to more gentle fluid management and delayed insulin drips, as examples. There are subtleties and controversies in the management of DKA when it comes to fluid management, correcting serum potassium and acidosis, preventing cerebral edema, as well as airway management for the really sick kids. In this episode we‘ll be asking our guest pediatric emergency medicine experts Dr. Sarah Reid, who you may remember from her powerhouse performance on our recent episodes on pediatric fever and sepsis, and Dr. Sarah Curtis, not only a pediatric emergency physician, but a prominent pediatric emergency researcher in Canada, about the key historical and examination pearls to help pick up this sometimes elusive diagnosis, what the value of serum Continue reading >>

Management Of Feline Diabetic Ketoacidosis - Wsava2013 - Vin

Management Of Feline Diabetic Ketoacidosis - Wsava2013 - Vin

Management of Feline Diabetic Ketoacidosis World Small Animal Veterinary Association World Congress Proceedings, 2013 Pru Galloway, BVSc(Distinction), MANZCVS, FANZCVS, Registered Specialist in Feline Medicine Massey University, Catmed, Lower Hutt, New Zealand Diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) is a complication of diabetes mellitus with concurrent and often severe metabolic derangements associated with hyperglycaemia, glucosuria, metabolic acidosis, ketonaemia +/- ketonuria. Patients with ketonaemia/ketosis are usually still bright, eating and maintaining their hydration. Those with ketoacidosis are dehydrated, clinically unwell (e.g., anorexia, vomiting, lethargy) and typically require hospitalisation and intensive management. DKA is distinguished from uncomplicated diabetes mellitus (DM) by a relative insulin lack and increased counter-regulatory hormones. The latter are thought to occur secondary to intercurrent disease. Concurrent disease has been documented in approximately 90% of cats with DKA, with the most common being hepatic lipidosis, chronic kidney disease, acute pancreatitis, bacterial or viral infections and neoplasia (Bruskiewicz et al. 1997). Heinz bodies, neutrophilia with a left shift, increased ALT and azotaemia is common. Most cats presenting with DKA are newly diagnosed diabetics or recently diagnosed but poorly controlled diabetics. Hyperglycaemia, Glucosuria, Metabolic Acidosis Plus Ketones in Plasma and/or Urine Traditionally DKA has been diagnosed using urinary ketone dipsticks, which detect acetoacetate but not beta-hydroxybutyrate. However as the latter is the principle ketone body in DKA, measuring serum beta-hydroxybutyrate is a more sensitive indicator of DKA. In humans portable meters that measure beta-hydroxybutyrate in whole blood have largel Continue reading >>

Diabetic Ketoacidosis Protocol Is It Beneficial?

Diabetic Ketoacidosis Protocol Is It Beneficial?

Diabetic Ketoacidosis Protocol Is It Beneficial? Tiffany M. Osborn, MD reviewing Bull SV et al. Crit Care Med 2007 Jan Implementing a comprehensive mandatory protocol reduced hospital and ICU stay and increased the rate of ED discharge to home. Diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) accounts for more than 100,000 hospital admissions in the U.S. yearly, with estimated costs exceeding $1 billion. Previous studies have shown limited value of DKA protocols, but the studies were limited by poor protocol adherence, suboptimal timing or quantity of insulin and fluid administration, and focus on individual components of therapy rather than on the entire treatment regimen. These authors evaluated the effects of a comprehensive mandatory protocol for treating critically ill DKA patients on hospital and intensive care unit (ICU) length of stay, time to ketone and anion gap clearances, and incidence of hypoglycemia. They reviewed the charts of consecutive patients treated before (131 patients) and after (111 patients) a protocol was implemented at a single academic hospital. The protocol standardized monitoring and the timing and quantity of administration of fluids, insulin, glucose, and electrolyte replacement. Compliance with the protocol was 100%. Use of the protocol significantly shortened hospital stay (by 30%), ICU stay (by 23%), time to anion gap clearance (by 33%), and time to ketone clearance (by 34%). The number of patients who experienced anion gap resurgence was reduced by 79%. The incidence of hypoglycemic episodes did not change. The proportion of patients discharged directly from the emergency department increased significantly from 6% to 16%. Treatment of DKA varies widely in terms of monitoring (nature and frequency of blood testing) and therapy (insulin rates and fluid rep Continue reading >>

What You Should Know About Diabetic Ketoacidosis

What You Should Know About Diabetic Ketoacidosis

Diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) is a buildup of acids in your blood. It can happen when your blood sugar is too high for too long. It could be life-threatening, but it usually takes many hours to become that serious. You can treat it and prevent it, too. It usually happens because your body doesn't have enough insulin. Your cells can't use the sugar in your blood for energy, so they use fat for fuel instead. Burning fat makes acids called ketones and, if the process goes on for a while, they could build up in your blood. That excess can change the chemical balance of your blood and throw off your entire system. People with type 1 diabetes are at risk for ketoacidosis, since their bodies don't make any insulin. Your ketones can also go up when you miss a meal, you're sick or stressed, or you have an insulin reaction. DKA can happen to people with type 2 diabetes, but it's rare. If you have type 2, especially when you're older, you're more likely to have a condition with some similar symptoms called HHNS (hyperosmolar hyperglycemic nonketotic syndrome). It can lead to severe dehydration. Test your ketones when your blood sugar is over 240 mg/dL or you have symptoms of high blood sugar, such as dry mouth, feeling really thirsty, or peeing a lot. You can check your levels with a urine test strip. Some glucose meters measure ketones, too. Try to bring your blood sugar down, and check your ketones again in 30 minutes. Call your doctor or go to the emergency room right away if that doesn't work, if you have any of the symptoms below and your ketones aren't normal, or if you have more than one symptom. You've been throwing up for more than 2 hours. You feel queasy or your belly hurts. Your breath smells fruity. You're tired, confused, or woozy. You're having a hard time breathing. Continue reading >>

Management Of Adult Diabetic Ketoacidosis

Management Of Adult Diabetic Ketoacidosis

Go to: Abstract Diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) is a rare yet potentially fatal hyperglycemic crisis that can occur in patients with both type 1 and 2 diabetes mellitus. Due to its increasing incidence and economic impact related to the treatment and associated morbidity, effective management and prevention is key. Elements of management include making the appropriate diagnosis using current laboratory tools and clinical criteria and coordinating fluid resuscitation, insulin therapy, and electrolyte replacement through feedback obtained from timely patient monitoring and knowledge of resolution criteria. In addition, awareness of special populations such as patients with renal disease presenting with DKA is important. During the DKA therapy, complications may arise and appropriate strategies to prevent these complications are required. DKA prevention strategies including patient and provider education are important. This review aims to provide a brief overview of DKA from its pathophysiology to clinical presentation with in depth focus on up-to-date therapeutic management. Keywords: DKA treatment, insulin, prevention, ESKD Go to: Introduction In 2009, there were 140,000 hospitalizations for diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) with an average length of stay of 3.4 days.1 The direct and indirect annual cost of DKA hospitalizations is 2.4 billion US dollars. Omission of insulin is the most common precipitant of DKA.2,3 Infections, acute medical illnesses involving the cardiovascular system (myocardial infarction, stroke) and gastrointestinal tract (bleeding, pancreatitis), diseases of the endocrine axis (acromegaly, Cushing’s syndrome), and stress of recent surgical procedures can contribute to the development of DKA by causing dehydration, increase in insulin counter-regulatory hor Continue reading >>

Diabetic Ketoacidosis

Diabetic Ketoacidosis

Also known as: DKA Severe diabetic ketoacidosis is a medical emergency and requires prompt treatment to correct dehydration, electrolyte disturbances and acidosis. It is a complication of insulin dependent Diabetes Mellitus. DKA is the result of marked insulin deficiency, and ketonaemia and ketoacidosis occur approximately 15 days after insulin concentrations are suppressed to fasting levels. Marked insulin suppression occurs on average 4 days after fasting glucose levels reach 30mmol/L. Many cats with DKA have other intercurrent conditions which may precipitate the condition including: infection, pancreatitis or renal insufficiency. Pathophysiology Insulin deficiency leads to increased breakdown of fat that releases fatty acids into the circulation. Free fatty acids are oxidised in the liver to ketones that are used by many tissues as an energy source instead of glucose. This occurs when intracellular levels of glucose are insufficient for energy metabolism as a result of severe insulin deficiency. In the liver, instead of being converted to triglycerides, free fatty acids are oxidised to acetoacetate, which is converted to hydroxybutyrate or acetone. Ketones are acids that cause central nervous system depression and act in the chemoreceptor trigger zone to cause nausea, vomiting and anorexia. They also accelerate osmotic water loss in the urine. Dehydration results from inadequate fluid intake in the face of accelerated water loss due to glucosuria and ketonuria. Dehydration and subsequent reduced tissue perfusion compounds the acidosis through lactic acid production. There is whole body loss of electrolytes including sodium, potassium, magnesium and phosphate and there is also intracellular redistribution of electrolytes following insulin therapy which may compound p Continue reading >>

Review Of Evidence For Adult Diabetic Ketoacidosis Management Protocols

Review Of Evidence For Adult Diabetic Ketoacidosis Management Protocols

1Department of Endocrinology, Austin Health, Melbourne, VIC, Australia 2Department of Medicine, Austin Health, University of Melbourne, Melbourne, VIC, Australia 3Department of Intensive Care, Austin Health, Melbourne, VIC, Australia 4Menzies School of Health Research, Darwin, NT, Australia Background: Diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) is an endocrine emergency with associated risk of morbidity and mortality. Despite this, DKA management lacks strong evidence due to the absence of large randomised controlled trials (RCTs). Objective: To review existing studies investigating inpatient DKA management in adults, focusing on intravenous (IV) fluids; insulin administration; potassium, bicarbonate, and phosphate replacement; and DKA management protocols and impact of DKA resolution rates on outcomes. Methods: Ovid Medline searches were conducted with limits “all adult” and published between “1973 to current” applied. National consensus statements were also reviewed. Eligibility was determined by two reviewers’ assessment of title, abstract, and availability. Results: A total of 85 eligible articles published between 1973 and 2016 were reviewed. The salient findings were (i) Crystalloids are favoured over colloids though evidence is lacking. The preferred crystalloid and hydration rates remain contentious. (ii) IV infusion of regular human insulin is preferred over the subcutaneous route or rapid acting insulin analogues. Administering an initial IV insulin bolus before low-dose insulin infusions obviates the need for supplemental insulin. Consensus-statements recommend fixed weight-based over “sliding scale” insulin infusions although evidence is weak. (iii) Potassium replacement is imperative although no trials compare replacement rates. (iv) Bicarbonate replacement Continue reading >>

Diabetic Ketoacidosis (dka)

Diabetic Ketoacidosis (dka)

Diabetic ketoacidosis is an acute metabolic complication of diabetes characterized by hyperglycemia, hyperketonemia, and metabolic acidosis. Hyperglycemia causes an osmotic diuresis with significant fluid and electrolyte loss. DKA occurs mostly in type 1 diabetes mellitus (DM). It causes nausea, vomiting, and abdominal pain and can progress to cerebral edema, coma, and death. DKA is diagnosed by detection of hyperketonemia and anion gap metabolic acidosis in the presence of hyperglycemia. Treatment involves volume expansion, insulin replacement, and prevention of hypokalemia. Diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) is most common among patients with type 1 diabetes mellitus and develops when insulin levels are insufficient to meet the body’s basic metabolic requirements. DKA is the first manifestation of type 1 DM in a minority of patients. Insulin deficiency can be absolute (eg, during lapses in the administration of exogenous insulin) or relative (eg, when usual insulin doses do not meet metabolic needs during physiologic stress). Common physiologic stresses that can trigger DKA include Some drugs implicated in causing DKA include DKA is less common in type 2 diabetes mellitus, but it may occur in situations of unusual physiologic stress. Ketosis-prone type 2 diabetes is a variant of type 2 diabetes, which is sometimes seen in obese individuals, often of African (including African-American or Afro-Caribbean) origin. People with ketosis-prone diabetes (also referred to as Flatbush diabetes) can have significant impairment of beta cell function with hyperglycemia, and are therefore more likely to develop DKA in the setting of significant hyperglycemia. SGLT-2 inhibitors have been implicated in causing DKA in both type 1 and type 2 DM. Continue reading >>

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