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What Is Dka Medical Term?

Diabetic Ketoacidosis Or Dka

Diabetic Ketoacidosis Or Dka

Diabetic ketoacidosis, often referred to as ketoacidosis or simply DKA, is a short term complication of high blood glucose levels in people with diabetes. It most commonly occurs in people with type 1 diabetes but it can also affect some people with type 2 diabetes who are also reliant on insulin (insulin-dependent). Ketoacidosis is a serious medical condition and can advance very quickly within a matter of hours, or sometimes as quickly as within one hour. It is therefore important to know whether you are at risk of ketoacidosis and, if so, to be able to spot the signs and react accordingly. What causes diabetic ketoacidosis? Ketoacidosis occurs when the body starts running out of insulin – the hormone responsible for regulating levels of blood sugar. Without enough insulin, the cells cannot access glucose from the blood and so the body responds by breaking down protein and fat to produce an alternative form of energy called ketones. Whilst the body can cope with lower levels of ketones, higher levels can turn the blood acidic and pose an immediate danger to health, often causing severe illness. Am I at risk of ketoacidosis? People with type 1 diabetes or LADA (Latent Autoimmune Diabetes of Adulthood) who require insulin injections are most at risk of developing ketoacidosis. Type 2 diabetics who need to take meal time insulin (short or rapid-acting insulin) in addition to long term (basal) insulin may also be at risk. What the signs of diabetic ketoacidosis? The symptoms of ketoacidosis include: Lethargy Nausea and/or stomach pains Vomiting Dehydration Laboured breathing Confusion If you have any of the symptoms of ketoacidosis contact your health care provider immediately. Early detection and treatment is vital in cases of DKA, as failure to treat the condition qui Continue reading >>

Hyperglycaemic Crises And Lactic Acidosis In Diabetes Mellitus

Hyperglycaemic Crises And Lactic Acidosis In Diabetes Mellitus

Hyperglycaemic crises are discussed together followed by a separate section on lactic acidosis. DIABETIC KETOACIDOSIS (DKA) AND HYPERGLYCAEMIC HYPEROSMOLAR STATE (HHS) Definitions DKA has no universally agreed definition. Alberti proposed the working definition of “severe uncontrolled diabetes requiring emergency treatment with insulin and intravenous fluids and with a blood ketone body concentration of >5 mmol/l”.1 Given the limited availability of blood ketone body assays, a more pragmatic definition comprising a metabolic acidosis (pH <7.3), plasma bicarbonate <15 mmol/l, plasma glucose >13.9 mmol/l, and urine ketostix reaction ++ or plasma ketostix ⩾ + may be more workable in clinical practice.2 Classifying the severity of diabetic ketoacidosis is desirable, since it may assist in determining the management and monitoring of the patient. Such a classification is based on the severity of acidosis (table 1). A caveat to this approach is that the presence of an intercurrent illness, that may not necessarily affect the level of acidosis, may markedly affect outcome: a recent study showed that the two most important factors predicting mortality in DKA were severe intercurrent illness and pH <7.0.3 HHS replaces the older terms, “hyperglycaemic hyperosmolar non-ketotic coma” and “hyperglycaemic hyperosmolar non-ketotic state”, because alterations of sensoria may be present without coma, and mild to moderate ketosis is commonly present in this state.4,5 Definitions vary according to the degree of hyperglycaemia and elevation of osmolality required. Table 1 summarises the definition of Kitabchi et al.5 Epidemiology The annual incidence of DKA among subjects with type 1 diabetes is between 1% and 5% in European and American series6–10 and this incidence appear Continue reading >>

What You Should Know About Diabetic Ketoacidosis

What You Should Know About Diabetic Ketoacidosis

Diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) is a serious condition that can occur in diabetes. DKA happens when acidic substances, called ketones, build up in your body. Ketones are formed when your body burns fat for fuel instead of sugar, or glucose. That can happen if you don’t have enough insulin in your body to help you process sugars. Learn more: Ketosis vs. ketoacidosis: What you should know » Left untreated, ketones can build up to dangerous levels. DKA can occur in people who have type 1 or type 2 diabetes, but it’s rare in people with type 2 diabetes. DKA can also develop if you are at risk for diabetes, but have not received a formal diagnosis. It can be the first sign of type 1 diabetes. DKA is a medical emergency. Call your local emergency services immediately if you think you are experiencing DKA. Symptoms of DKA can appear quickly and may include: frequent urination extreme thirst high blood sugar levels high levels of ketones in the urine nausea or vomiting abdominal pain confusion fruity-smelling breath a flushed face fatigue rapid breathing dry mouth and skin It is important to make sure you consult with your doctor if you experience any of these symptoms. If left untreated, DKA can lead to a coma or death. All people who use insulin should discuss the risk of DKA with their healthcare team, to make sure a plan is in place. If you think you are experiencing DKA, seek immediate medical help. Learn more: Blood glucose management: Checking for ketones » If you have type 1 diabetes, you should maintain a supply of home urine ketone tests. You can use these to test your ketone levels. A high ketone test result is a symptom of DKA. If you have type 1 diabetes and have a glucometer reading of over 250 milligrams per deciliter twice, you should test your urine for keton Continue reading >>

Diabetic Ketoacidosis

Diabetic Ketoacidosis

Initial Evaluation Initial evaluation of patients with DKA includes diagnosis and treatment of precipitating factors (Table 14–18). The most common precipitating factor is infection, followed by noncompliance with insulin therapy.3 While insulin pump therapy has been implicated as a risk factor for DKA in the past, most recent studies show that with proper education and practice using the pump, the frequency of DKA is the same for patients on pump and injection therapy.19 Common causes by frequency Other causes Selected drugs that may contribute to diabetic ketoacidosis Infection, particularly pneumonia, urinary tract infection, and sepsis4 Inadequate insulin treatment or noncompliance4 New-onset diabetes4 Cardiovascular disease, particularly myocardial infarction5 Acanthosis nigricans6 Acromegaly7 Arterial thrombosis, including mesenteric and iliac5 Cerebrovascular accident5 Hemochromatosis8 Hyperthyroidism9 Pancreatitis10 Pregnancy11 Atypical antipsychotic agents12 Corticosteroids13 FK50614 Glucagon15 Interferon16 Sympathomimetic agents including albuterol (Ventolin), dopamine (Intropin), dobutamine (Dobutrex), terbutaline (Bricanyl),17 and ritodrine (Yutopar)18 DIFFERENTIAL DIAGNOSIS Three key features of diabetic acidosis are hyperglycemia, ketosis, and acidosis. The conditions that cause these metabolic abnormalities overlap. The primary differential diagnosis for hyperglycemia is hyperosmolar hyperglycemic state (Table 23,20), which is discussed in the Stoner article21 on page 1723 of this issue. Common problems that produce ketosis include alcoholism and starvation. Metabolic states in which acidosis is predominant include lactic acidosis and ingestion of drugs such as salicylates and methanol. Abdominal pain may be a symptom of ketoacidosis or part of the inci Continue reading >>

Understanding The Presentation Of Diabetic Ketoacidosis

Understanding The Presentation Of Diabetic Ketoacidosis

Hypoglycemia, diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) and hyperglycemic hyperosmolar nonketotic syndrome (HHNS) must be considered while forming a differential diagnosis when assessing and managing a patient with an altered mental status. This is especially true if the patient has a history of diabetes mellitus (DM). However, be aware that the onset of DKA or HHNS may be the first sign of DM in a patient with no known history. Thus, it is imperative to obtain a blood glucose reading on any patient with an altered mental status, especially if the patient appears to be dehydrated, regardless of a positive or negative history of DM. In addition to the blood glucose reading, the history — particularly onset — and physical assessment findings will contribute to the formulation of a differential diagnosis and the appropriate emergency management of the patient. Pathophysiology of DKA The patient experiencing DKA presents significantly different from one who is hypoglycemic. This is due to the variation in the pathology of the condition. Like hypoglycemia, by understanding the basic pathophysiology of DKA, there is no need to memorize signs and symptoms in order to recognize and differentiate between hypoglycemia and DKA. Unlike hypoglycemia, where the insulin level is in excess and the blood glucose level is extremely low, DKA is associated with a relative or absolute insulin deficiency and a severely elevated blood glucose level, typically greater than 300 mg/dL. Due to the lack of insulin, tissue such as muscle, fat and the liver are unable to take up glucose. Even though the blood has an extremely elevated amount of circulating glucose, the cells are basically starving. Because the blood brain barrier does not require insulin for glucose to diffuse across, the brain cells are rece Continue reading >>

Diabetic Ketoacidosis In Dogs

Diabetic Ketoacidosis In Dogs

My dog is diabetic. He has been doing pretty well overall, but recently he became really ill. He stopped eating well, started drinking lots of water, and got really weak. His veterinarian said that he had a condition called “ketoacidosis,” and he had to spend several days in the hospital. I’m not sure I understand this disorder. Diabetic ketoacidosis is a medical emergency that occurs when there is not enough insulin in the body to control blood sugar (glucose) levels. The body can’t use glucose properly without insulin, so blood glucose levels get very high, and the body creates ketone bodies as an emergency fuel source. When these are broken down, it creates byproducts that cause the body’s acid/base balance to shift, and the body becomes more acidic (acidosis), and it can’t maintain appropriate fluid balance. The electrolyte (mineral) balance becomes disrupted which can lead to abnormal heart rhythms and abnormal muscle function. If left untreated, diabetic ketoacidosis is fatal. How could this disorder have happened? If a diabetic dog undergoes a stress event of some kind, the body secretes stress hormones that interfere with appropriate insulin activity. Examples of stress events that can lead to diabetic ketoacidosis include infection, inflammation, and heart disease. What are the signs of diabetic ketoacidosis? The signs of diabetic ketoacidosis include: Excessive thirst/drinking Increased urination Lethargy Weakness Vomiting Increased respiratory rate Decreased appetite Weight loss (unplanned) with muscle wasting Dehydration Unkempt haircoat These same clinical signs can occur with other medical conditions, so it is important for your veterinarian to perform appropriate diagnostic tests to determine if diabetic ketoacidosis in truly the issue at hand Continue reading >>

Diabetes Glossary

Diabetes Glossary

The following is a list of diabetes-related terms and their definitions. These words, listed in alphabetical order, are the most common ones you will hear when you are discussing diabetes. *Please note many of these definitions are product specific. A A1C (HbA1c) - Glycosylated hemoglobin. A1C (HbA1c) test - A 2-3 month average of blood glucose values expressed in percent. The normal range varies with different labs and is expressed in percent (such as 4 - 6%). AACE - American Association of Clinical Endocrinologists. A professional organization devoted to the field of clinical endocrinology. ACE - American College of Endocrinology. *Accept - Pressing the ACT button to approve the selection or setting. *Active insulin - Bolus insulin that has been delivered to your body, but has not yet been used. ADA - American Diabetes Association®. Adult-onset diabetes - Former term for Type 2 diabetes. Adverse reaction - An unexpected, unpleasant or dangerous reaction to a sensor when it is inserted into the body. An adverse reaction may be sudden or may develop over time. *Alarm - Audible or vibrating (silent) notice that indicates the pump is in Attention mode and immediate attention is required. Alarms are prefixed in the alarm history with the letter A. *Alarm clock - Feature you can set to go off at specified times of the day. *Alarm history - Screen that displays the last 36 alarms/errors that have occurred on your pump. *Alarm icon - A solid circle that shows at the top of the screen and the pump beeps or vibrates periodically until the condition is cleared (see Attention mode). *Alert - Audible or vibrating (silent) indicator that notifies you the pump needs attention soon or that you should be reminded of something. Insulin delivery continues as programmed. *Alert icon - A Continue reading >>

Type 1 Diabetes Complications

Type 1 Diabetes Complications

Type 1 diabetes is complicated—and if you don’t manage it properly, there are complications, both short-term and long-term. “If you don’t manage it properly” is an important if statement: by carefully managing your blood glucose levels, you can stave off or prevent the short- and long-term complications. And if you’ve already developed diabetes complications, controlling your blood glucose levels can help you manage the symptoms and prevent further damage. Diabetes complications are all related to poor blood glucose control, so you must work carefully with your doctor and diabetes team to correctly manage your blood sugar (or your child’s blood sugar). Short-term Diabetes Complications Hypoglycemia: Hypoglycemia is low blood glucose (blood sugar). It develops when there’s too much insulin—meaning that you’ve taken (or given your child) too much insulin or that you haven’t properly planned insulin around meals or exercise. Other possible causes of hypoglycemia include certain medications (aspirin, for example, lowers the blood glucose level if you take a dose of more than 81mg) and alcohol (alcohol keeps the liver from releasing glucose). There are three levels of hypoglycemia, depending on how low the blood glucose level has dropped: mild, moderate, and severe. If you treat hypoglycemia when it’s in the mild or moderate stages, then you can prevent far more serious problems; severe hypoglycemia can cause a coma and even death (although very, very rarely). The signs and symptoms of low blood glucose are usually easy to recognize: Rapid heartbeat Sweating Paleness of skin Anxiety Numbness in fingers, toes, and lips Sleepiness Confusion Headache Slurred speech For more information about hypoglycemia and how to treat it, please read our article on hy Continue reading >>

Diabetes: Preventing Complications

Diabetes: Preventing Complications

Diabetes complications can be divided into two types: acute (sudden) and chronic (long-term). This article discusses these complications and strategies to prevent the complications from occurring in the first place. Acute complications Diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) Hyperglycemic hyperosmolar non-ketotic syndrome (HHNS) Acute complications of diabetes can occur at any time in the course of the disease. Chronic complications Cardiovascular: Heart disease, peripheral vascular disease, stroke Eye: Diabetic retinopathy, cataracts, glaucoma Nerve damage: Neuropathy Kidney damage: Nephropathy Chronic complications are responsible for most illness and death associated with diabetes. Chronic complications usually appear after several years of elevated blood sugars (hyperglycemia). Since patients with Type 2 diabetes may have elevated blood sugars for several years before being diagnosed, these patients may have signs of complications at the time of diagnosis. Basic principles of prevention of diabetes complications: Take your medications (pills and/or insulin) as prescribed by your doctor. Monitor your blood sugars closely. Follow a sensible diet. Do not skip meals. Exercise regularly. See your doctor regularly to monitor for complications. Results from untreated hyperglycemia. Blood sugars typically range from 300 to 600. Occurs mostly in patients with Type 1 diabetes (uncommon in Type 2). Occurs due to a lack of insulin. Body breaks down its own fat for energy, and ketones appear in the urine and blood. Develops over several hours. Can cause coma and even death. Typically requires hospitalization. Nausea, vomiting Abdominal pain Drowsiness, lethargy (fatigue) Deep, rapid breathing Increased thirst Fruity-smelling breath Dehydration Inadequate insulin administration (not getting Continue reading >>

Diabetic Ketoacidosis

Diabetic Ketoacidosis

Also known as: DKA Severe diabetic ketoacidosis is a medical emergency and requires prompt treatment to correct dehydration, electrolyte disturbances and acidosis. It is a complication of insulin dependent Diabetes Mellitus. DKA is the result of marked insulin deficiency, and ketonaemia and ketoacidosis occur approximately 15 days after insulin concentrations are suppressed to fasting levels. Marked insulin suppression occurs on average 4 days after fasting glucose levels reach 30mmol/L. Many cats with DKA have other intercurrent conditions which may precipitate the condition including: infection, pancreatitis or renal insufficiency. Pathophysiology Insulin deficiency leads to increased breakdown of fat that releases fatty acids into the circulation. Free fatty acids are oxidised in the liver to ketones that are used by many tissues as an energy source instead of glucose. This occurs when intracellular levels of glucose are insufficient for energy metabolism as a result of severe insulin deficiency. In the liver, instead of being converted to triglycerides, free fatty acids are oxidised to acetoacetate, which is converted to hydroxybutyrate or acetone. Ketones are acids that cause central nervous system depression and act in the chemoreceptor trigger zone to cause nausea, vomiting and anorexia. They also accelerate osmotic water loss in the urine. Dehydration results from inadequate fluid intake in the face of accelerated water loss due to glucosuria and ketonuria. Dehydration and subsequent reduced tissue perfusion compounds the acidosis through lactic acid production. There is whole body loss of electrolytes including sodium, potassium, magnesium and phosphate and there is also intracellular redistribution of electrolytes following insulin therapy which may compound p Continue reading >>

Understanding And Treating Diabetic Ketoacidosis

Understanding And Treating Diabetic Ketoacidosis

Diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) is a serious metabolic disorder that can occur in animals with diabetes mellitus (DM).1,2 Veterinary technicians play an integral role in managing and treating patients with this life-threatening condition. In addition to recognizing the clinical signs of this disorder and evaluating the patient's response to therapy, technicians should understand how this disorder occurs. DM is caused by a relative or absolute lack of insulin production by the pancreatic b-cells or by inactivity or loss of insulin receptors, which are usually found on membranes of skeletal muscle, fat, and liver cells.1,3 In dogs and cats, DM is classified as either insulin-dependent (the body is unable to produce sufficient insulin) or non-insulin-dependent (the body produces insulin, but the tissues in the body are resistant to the insulin).4 Most dogs and cats that develop DKA have an insulin deficiency. Insulin has many functions, including the enhancement of glucose uptake by the cells for energy.1 Without insulin, the cells cannot access glucose, thereby causing them to undergo starvation.2 The unused glucose remains in the circulation, resulting in hyperglycemia. To provide cells with an alternative energy source, the body breaks down adipocytes, releasing free fatty acids (FFAs) into the bloodstream. The liver subsequently converts FFAs to triglycerides and ketone bodies. These ketone bodies (i.e., acetone, acetoacetic acid, b-hydroxybutyric acid) can be used as energy by the tissues when there is a lack of glucose or nutritional intake.1,2 The breakdown of fat, combined with the body's inability to use glucose, causes many pets with diabetes to present with weight loss, despite having a ravenous appetite. If diabetes is undiagnosed or uncontrolled, a series of metab Continue reading >>

Diabetic Ketoacidosis

Diabetic Ketoacidosis

Definition Diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) is an acute metabolic complication of diabetes that is potentially fatal and requires prompt medical attention for successful treatment. It is characterized by absolute insulin deficiency and is the most common acute hyperglycemic complication of type 1 diabetes mellitus. [1] Triad of DKA Classification Diagnostic criteria and classification: Mild DKA Plasma glucose: >250 mg/dL Arterial pH: 7.25 to 7.30 Serum bicarbonate: 15 to 18 mEq/L Urine ketone: positive Serum ketone: positive Effective serum osmolality: variable Anion gap: >10 Mental status: alert. Moderate DKA Plasma glucose: >250 mg/dL Arterial pH: 7.00 to <7.24 Serum bicarbonate: 10 to <15 mEq/L Urine ketone: positive Serum ketone: positive Effective serum osmolality: variable Anion gap: >12 Mental status: alert and/or drowsy. Severe DKA Plasma glucose: >250 mg/dL Arterial pH: <7.00 Serum bicarbonate: <10 mEq/L Urine ketone: positive Serum ketone: positive Effective serum osmolality: variable Anion gap: >12 Mental status: stupor and/or coma. Continue reading >>

Diabetic Ketoacidosis

Diabetic Ketoacidosis

Introduction Diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) is a dangerous complication of diabetes caused by a lack of insulin in the body. Diabetic ketoacidosis occurs when the body is unable to use blood sugar (glucose) because there isn't enough insulin. Instead, it breaks down fat as an alternative source of fuel. This causes a build-up of a by-product called ketones. Most cases of diabetic ketoacidosis occur in people with type 1 diabetes, although it can also be a complication of type 2 diabetes. Symptoms of diabetic ketoacidosis include: passing large amounts of urine feeling very thirsty vomiting abdominal pain Seek immediate medical assistance if you have any of these symptoms and your blood sugar levels are high. Read more about the symptoms of diabetic ketoacidosis. Who is affected by diabetic ketoacidosis? Diabetic ketoacidosis is a relatively common complication in people with diabetes, particularly children and younger adults who have type 1 diabetes. Younger children under four years of age are thought to be most at risk. In about 1 in 4 cases, diabetic ketoacidosis develops in people who were previously unaware they had type 1 diabetes. Diabetic ketoacidosis accounts for around half of all diabetes-related hospital admissions in people with type 1 diabetes. Diabetic ketoacidosis triggers These include: infections and other illnesses not keeping up with recommended insulin injections Read more about potential causes of diabetic ketoacidosis. Diagnosing diabetic ketoacidosis This is a relatively straightforward process. Blood tests can be used to check your glucose levels and any chemical imbalances, such as low levels of potassium. Urine tests can be used to estimate the number of ketones in your body. Blood and urine tests can also be used to check for an underlying infec Continue reading >>

Diabetic Ketoacidosis Forecasts Inferior Long-term Diabetes Management

Diabetic Ketoacidosis Forecasts Inferior Long-term Diabetes Management

Recognizing early signs of type 1 diabetes is crucial in the early prevention of diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA). Diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) is a very serious condition that leads to diabetic coma or even leads to death. A recent research published online was carried out by Lindsey M Duca, PhD, at the Barbara Davis Center for Diabetes and the University of Colorado, Aurora. It revealed that children who had diabetic ketoacidosis during type-1 diabetes diagnosis were at a high risk for poor long term glycemic control. Glycemic control refers to the levels of glucose (blood sugar) in a person living with diabetes mellitus (DM). Glycemic control is still substandard for a number of patients diagnosed with type 1 diabetes. Long-term complications of diabetes results from many years of hyperglycemia. A study published online to determine the Factors Predicting Glycemic Control in Type 1 Diabetic Patient, DCCT and the follow-up study Epidemiology of Diabetes Interventions and Complications (EDIC) suggested that proper glycemic management over a long period slows the onset as well as slowing the progression of microvascular and macro vascular complications in those who have type 1 diabetes. The method used involves the study of 188 patients who had diabetes type 1 and who showed several factors related to the disease. The results were a negative correlation between the age at diabetes onset and HbA1c value (p=0.02). Results show that youths had higher HbA1c value (10.8±2.9%) compared to adults (9.2±2.8%, p=0.02). There was no relationship found between the average HbA1c value and the number of daily insulin injections. Results reveal that average HbA1c was increased in patients with a lack of compliance (11.1±3.3%) to insulin therapy (8.9±2.4%, p<0.0001), in people with under Continue reading >>

Management Of Diabetic Ketoacidosis In Adults

Management Of Diabetic Ketoacidosis In Adults

Diabetic ketoacidosis is a potentially life-threatening complication of diabetes, making it a medical emergency. Nurses need to know how to identify and manage it and how to maintain electrolyte balance Continue reading >>

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