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What Is Compensated Respiratory Acidosis?

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Assessment Of Compensation In Acute Respiratory Acidosis - Deranged Physiology

Assessment of Compensation in Acute Respiratory Acidosis Mechanisms and classification of metabolic acidosis This chapter is concerned with the changes in pH and serum bicarbonate which result from acute fluctuations in dissolved CO2, as a consequence of acute changes in ventilation. It is a more detailed look at the wayCO2interacts with the human body fluid, and the resulting changes which develop in theserum bicarbonate concentration and pH. The discussion which follows builds upon and benefits from someof thebackground knowledgeoffered in otherchapters: Let us consider the favoured model of acute respiratory acidosis, the patient who has stopped breathing. Conventional wisdom dictates that so long as the oxygen supply continues to mass-transfer its way into the patient, then the patient will continue to produce CO2, and as a result of this metabolic activity the PaCO2will rise at a rate of around 3mmHg every minute. This technique of "apnoeic anaesthesia" is well known to anaesthetists, and has enjoyed a fluctuating level of interest since the sixties. With a high PEEP and a sufficient attention to detail one may go through the entire hour-long case without any breaths being ta Continue reading >>

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Popular Questions

  1. treehorn+bunny

    You don't need to be in DKA to get ketosis. It's probably because he hasn't been eating enough/is sick. It is not uncommon for people who have stomach viruses to burn ketones.
    In nondiabetic persons, ketonuria may occur during acute illness or severe stress.

  2. PorcineWithMe

    GERD/reflux/"heartburn" can cause that smell and so can taking Prilosec (or other PPIs). My husband had THE WORST breath from taking Prilosec. Ugh.

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Acute Renal Response To Rapid Onset Respiratory Acidosis

Acute Renal Response to Rapid Onset Respiratory Acidosis Jayanth Ramadoss , Randolph H. Stewart , and Timothy A. Cudd Department of Veterinary Physiology and Pharmacology and Michael E. DeBakey Institute, College of Veterinary Medicine and Biomedical Sciences, Texas A&M University, College Station, Texas, 77843, USA Send correspondence to: Timothy A. Cudd, DVM, PhD, Department of Veterinary Physiology and Pharmacology, Hwy 60, Building VMA, Rm 332, College of Veterinary Medicine and Biomedical Sciences, Texas A&M University, College Station, TX 77843-4466 Fax: 979-845-6544 [email protected] The publisher's final edited version of this article is available at Can J Physiol Pharmacol See other articles in PMC that cite the published article. Renal strong ion compensation to chronic respiratory acidosis has been established but the nature of the response to acute respiratory acidosis is not well defined. We hypothesized that the response to acute respiratory acidosis in sheep is a rapid increase in the difference in renal fractional excretions of chloride and sodium (FeCl-FeNa). Inspired CO2 concentrations were increased for one hour to alter significantly PaCO2 and pHa from 32 1 mm Continue reading >>

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  1. Carolyn B

    High fasting blood sugar on keto

    Hi. I was diagnosed with pre-diabetes in November 2016. My brother has Type 2 so I knew I had to do something to stop my pre-diabetes from progressing I started to eat low carb and saw a slow reduction in my BS numbers. Then a month or so ago I started adding fat to my diet and am now eating keto. I am in low ketosis (urine test). My daily carb intake is approximately 40-60 grams.
    The results have been nothing short of miraculous! I've lost 17 pounds, my triglycerides have plummeted from 240 to 60, BP is way down, cholesterol dropped. All of my numbers look better than they have my entire adult life. My body seems to love this way of eating. It's been amazing and not difficult at all!
    My A1C went from 5.9 to 5.4. I am guessing it's around 5.2 now but I haven't tested since I went full keto. My only problem is that my morning fasting number has inched up. It was 95-99 when I was diagnosed. Then when I started to change my diet it dropped to the 88-95 range. After I started keto it's moved up to the 100-105 range. I'd like to work on getting this number down. My one and two hour post meal numbers are good, usually in the 100-120 range. Any suggestions on how I can lower the fasting number?
    Thanks so much.

  2. jdm1217

    Originally Posted by Carolyn B
    Hi. I was diagnosed with pre-diabetes in November 2016. My brother has Type 2 so I knew I had to do something to stop my pre-diabetes from progressing I started to eat low carb and saw a slow reduction in my BS numbers. Then a month or so ago I started adding fat to my diet and am now eating keto. I am in low ketosis (urine test). My daily carb intake is approximately 40-60 grams.
    The results have been nothing short of miraculous! I've lost 17 pounds, my triglycerides have plummeted from 240 to 60, BP is way down, cholesterol dropped. All of my numbers look better than they have my entire adult life. My body seems to love this way of eating. It's been amazing and not difficult at all!
    My A1C went from 5.9 to 5.4. I am guessing it's around 5.2 now but I haven't tested since I went full keto. My only problem is that my morning fasting number has inched up. It was 95-99 when I was diagnosed. Then when I started to change my diet it dropped to the 88-95 range. After I started keto it's moved up to the 100-105 range. I'd like to work on getting this number down. My one and two hour post meal numbers are good, usually in the 100-120 range. Any suggestions on how I can lower the fasting number?
    Thanks so much. I've been there at times and I don't even worry about it, especially if your A1C is still good.

  3. Nicoletti

    Originally Posted by Carolyn B
    My one and two hour post meal numbers are good, usually in the 100-120 range. Any suggestions on how I can lower the fasting number? Give it more time. Fasting numbers are usually the last to come down. It took me about a year of low-carb eating to get fastings in the 80s, and that's common for others here, too; it takes time.

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Respiratory Acidosis

(Video) Overview of Acid-Base Maps and Compensatory Mechanisms By James L. Lewis, III, MD, Attending Physician, Brookwood Baptist Health and Saint Vincents Ascension Health, Birmingham Respiratory acidosis is primary increase in carbon dioxide partial pressure (Pco2) with or without compensatory increase in bicarbonate (HCO3); pH is usually low but may be near normal. Cause is a decrease in respiratory rate and/or volume (hypoventilation), typically due to CNS, pulmonary, or iatrogenic conditions. Respiratory acidosis can be acute or chronic; the chronic form is asymptomatic, but the acute, or worsening, form causes headache, confusion, and drowsiness. Signs include tremor, myoclonic jerks, and asterixis. Diagnosis is clinical and with ABG and serum electrolyte measurements. The cause is treated; oxygen (O2) and mechanical ventilation are often required. Respiratory acidosis is carbon dioxide (CO2) accumulation (hypercapnia) due to a decrease in respiratory rate and/or respiratory volume (hypoventilation). Causes of hypoventilation (discussed under Ventilatory Failure ) include Conditions that impair CNS respiratory drive Conditions that impair neuromuscular transmission and other Continue reading >>

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Popular Questions

  1. cobracock1979

    Hi Bros,
    Im on a CKD diet - only carbs I have is 20mg oats PWO + veg and a carb Bulking day once a week.
    I find I tend to go into Ketosis after eating High fats (ie nuts) but I never seem to go fully into Ketosis, only half way (I use Ketostix to tell).
    Anyone have any other methods to kick start ketosis/ supplements to help insulin etc?
    Thanks in advance

  2. GUARDIAN

    have u gone 2 straight strict weeks yet without a carb up day?

  3. cobracock1979

    Quote posted by GUARDIAN
    have u gone 2 straight strict weeks yet without a carb up day? Been on for 3 weeks - 2 weeks straight then 1 carb up day last week. I just got some ALA as well

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