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What Is Alcoholic Ketosis?

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What is DIABETIC KETOACIDOSIS? What does DIABETIC KETOACIDOSIS mean? DIABETIC KETOACIDOSIS meaning - DIABETIC KETOACIDOSIS definition - DIABETIC KETOACIDOSIS explanation. Source: Wikipedia.org article, adapted under https://creativecommons.org/licenses/... license. SUBSCRIBE to our Google Earth flights channel - https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC6Uu... Diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) is a potentially life-threatening complication of diabetes mellitus. Signs and symptoms may include vomiting, abdominal pain, deep gasping breathing, increased urination, weakness, confusion, and occasionally loss of consciousness. A person's breath may develop a specific smell. Onset of symptoms is usually rapid. In some cases people may not realize they previously had diabetes. DKA happens most often in those with type 1 diabetes, but can also occur in those with other types of diabetes under certain circumstances. Triggers may include infection, not taking insulin correctly, stroke, and certain medications such as steroids. DKA results from a shortage of insulin; in response the body switches to burning fatty acids which produces acidic ketone bodies. DKA is typically diagnosed when testing finds high blood sugar, low blood pH, and ketoacids in either the blood or urine. The primary treatment of DKA is with intravenous fluids and insulin. Depending on the severity, insulin may be given intravenously or by injection under the skin. Usually potassium is also needed to prevent the development of low blood potassium. Throughout treatment blood sugar and potassium levels should be regularly checked. Antibiotics may be required in those with an underlying infection. In those with severely low blood pH, sodium bicarbonate may be given; however, its use is of unclear benefit and typically not recommended. Rates of DKA vary around the world. About 4% of people with type 1 diabetes in United Kingdom develop DKA a year, while in Malaysia the condition affects about 25% a year. DKA was first described in 1886 and, until the introduction of insulin therapy in the 1920s, it was almost universally fatal. The risk of death with adequate and timely treatment is currently around 1–4%. Up to 1% of children with DKA develop a complication known as cerebral edema. The symptoms of an episode of diabetic ketoacidosis usually evolve over a period of about 24 hours. Predominant symptoms are nausea and vomiting, pronounced thirst, excessive urine production and abdominal pain that may be severe. Those who measure their glucose levels themselves may notice hyperglycemia (high blood sugar levels). In severe DKA, breathing becomes labored and of a deep, gasping character (a state referred to as "Kussmaul respiration"). The abdomen may be tender to the point that an acute abdomen may be suspected, such as acute pancreatitis, appendicitis or gastrointestinal perforation. Coffee ground vomiting (vomiting of altered blood) occurs in a minority of people; this tends to originate from erosion of the esophagus. In severe DKA, there may be confusion, lethargy, stupor or even coma (a marked decrease in the level of consciousness). On physical examination there is usually clinical evidence of dehydration, such as a dry mouth and decreased skin turgor. If the dehydration is profound enough to cause a decrease in the circulating blood volume, tachycardia (a fast heart rate) and low blood pressure may be observed. Often, a "ketotic" odor is present, which is often described as "fruity", often compared to the smell of pear drops whose scent is a ketone. If Kussmaul respiration is present, this is reflected in an increased respiratory rate.....

Alcoholic Ketoacidosis

Go to: CHARACTERISATION In 1940, Dillon et al1 described a series of nine patients who had episodes of severe ketoacidosis in the absence of diabetes mellitus, all of whom had evidence of prolonged excessive alcohol consumption. It was not until 1970 that Jenkins et al2 described a further three non‐diabetic patients with a history of chronic heavy alcohol misuse and recurrent episodes of ketoacidosis. This group also proposed a possible underlying mechanism for this metabolic disturbance, naming it alcoholic ketoacidosis. Further case series by Levy et al, Cooperman et al, and Fulop et al were subsequently reported, with remarkably consistent features.3,4,5 All patients presented with a history of prolonged heavy alcohol misuse, preceding a bout of particularly excessive intake, which had been terminated several days earlier by nausea, severe vomiting, and abdominal pain. Clinical signs included tachypnoea, tachycardia, and hypotension. In 1974, Cooperman's series of seven ketoacidotic alcoholic patients all displayed diffuse epigastric tenderness on palpation.4 In contrast to patients with diabetic ketoacidosis, the patients were usually alert and lucid despite the severity of Continue reading >>

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  1. Mrsollie

    I tried to do a search about waking up hot and sweaty, but all of them talk about this happening BEFORE keto. I started keto almost 2 weeks ago and during that time I have woken up 4 different times drenched in sweat and I was hot. My husband even commented on it one night asking if I was ok when I woke up. Is this normal?? Is this part of keto flu, I haven't really had any symptoms of keto flu.

  2. Jacquie

    Do you mind me asking your age?

  3. Mrsollie

    I am 30.

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What is KETOACIDOSIS? What does KETOACIDOSIS mean? KETOACIDOSIS meaning - KETOACIDOSIS definition - KETOACIDOSIS explanation. Source: Wikipedia.org article, adapted under https://creativecommons.org/licenses/... license. SUBSCRIBE to our Google Earth flights channel - https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC6Uu... Ketoacidosis is a metabolic state associated with high concentrations of ketone bodies, formed by the breakdown of fatty acids and the deamination of amino acids. The two common ketones produced in humans are acetoacetic acid and ß-hydroxybutyrate. Ketoacidosis is a pathological metabolic state marked by extreme and uncontrolled ketosis. In ketoacidosis, the body fails to adequately regulate ketone production causing such a severe accumulation of keto acids that the pH of the blood is substantially decreased. In extreme cases ketoacidosis can be fatal. Ketoacidosis is most common in untreated type 1 diabetes mellitus, when the liver breaks down fat and proteins in response to a perceived need for respiratory substrate. Prolonged alcoholism may lead to alcoholic ketoacidosis. Ketoacidosis can be smelled on a person's breath. This is due to acetone, a direct by-product of the spontaneous decomposition of acetoacetic acid. It is often described as smelling like fruit or nail polish remover. Ketosis may also smell, but the odor is usually more subtle due to lower concentrations of acetone. Treatment consists most simply of correcting blood sugar and insulin levels, which will halt ketone production. If the severity of the case warrants more aggressive measures, intravenous sodium bicarbonate infusion can be given to raise blood pH back to an acceptable range. However, serious caution must be exercised with IV sodium bicarbonate to avoid the risk of equally life-threatening hypernatremia. Three common causes of ketoacidosis are alcohol, starvation, and diabetes, resulting in alcoholic ketoacidosis, starvation ketoacidosis, and diabetic ketoacidosis respectively. In diabetic ketoacidosis, a high concentration of ketone bodies is usually accompanied by insulin deficiency, hyperglycemia, and dehydration. Particularly in type 1 diabetics the lack of insulin in the bloodstream prevents glucose absorption, thereby inhibiting the production of oxaloacetate (a crucial molecule for processing Acetyl-CoA, the product of beta-oxidation of fatty acids, in the Krebs cycle) through reduced levels of pyruvate (a byproduct of glycolysis), and can cause unchecked ketone body production (through fatty acid metabolism) potentially leading to dangerous glucose and ketone levels in the blood. Hyperglycemia results in glucose overloading the kidneys and spilling into the urine (transport maximum for glucose is exceeded). Dehydration results following the osmotic movement of water into urine (Osmotic diuresis), exacerbating the acidosis. In alcoholic ketoacidosis, alcohol causes dehydration and blocks the first step of gluconeogenesis by depleting oxaloacetate. The body is unable to synthesize enough glucose to meet its needs, thus creating an energy crisis resulting in fatty acid metabolism, and ketone body formation.

Alcoholic Ketoacidosis

Increased production of ketone bodies due to: Dehydration (nausea/vomiting, ADH inhibition) leads to increased stress hormone production leading to ketone formation Depleted glycogen stores in the liver (malnutrition/decrease carbohydrate intake) Elevated ratio of NADH/NAD due to ethanol metabolism Increased free fatty acid production Elevated NADH/NAD ratio leads to the predominate production of β–hydroxybutyrate (BHB) over acetoacetate (AcAc) Dehydration Fever absent unless there is an underlying infection Tachycardia (common) due to: Dehydration with associated orthostatic changes Concurrent alcohol withdrawal Tachypnea: Common Deep, rapid, Kussmaul respirations frequently present Nausea and vomiting Abdominal pain (nausea, vomiting, and abdominal pain are the most common symptoms): Usually diffuse with nonspecific tenderness Epigastric pain common Rebound tenderness, abdominal distension, hypoactive bowel sounds uncommon Mandates a search for an alternative, coexistent illness Decreased urinary output from hypovolemia Mental status: Minimally altered as a result of hypovolemia and possibly intoxication Altered mental status mandates a search for other associated conditions s Continue reading >>

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  1. peuleu

    Hi fellow ketoers of Reddit!
    I've been doing Keto for about a month (practice what you preach, eh?) so I'm still a noobie. I've been pretty strict recording everything and keeping carbs <30g. I've noticed the changes as to where I know I've entered ketosis. I've been on (an active) vacation for a week, doing lazy keto. Think I've stayed under 30g a day in food, but might have gone over a bit with alcohol (red wine), though I don't think I've gone over 50g total. The thing I'm finding difficult to figure out is if I can tell if my body is out of ketosis or not. A lot of people here say stuff like they can eat up to 80-100g on an active day and still be in ketosis. I gather this is different for everyone, especially if you're not Keto adapted yet, but my question is: how do you KNOW you're still in ketosis when you eat that many carbs? What happens to your body and how you feel when you go over?
    TL;DR: how can you tell if your body is out of ketosis? What changes do you experience?
    Thanks!
    Edit: thanks for all the responses! To clarify: I'm not worried at all! Just curious! I'm on a vacation where I hike all day and visit vineyards. I know I'm not gonna be strict Keto at the moment. I will be when I get back. I just noticed some bodily changes, and wanted to know what people experienced when they're out of ketosis. KCKO!

  2. anbeav

    Most don't, they speculate. If they gain any water weight or feel more hungry than usual, they conclude they are not in ketosis when that's not necessarily true. I wouldn't stress it, avoid the ketosis anxiety and focus on how you feel.

  3. peuleu

    Good to know! Thanks!

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People always freak out when I tell them I am doing keto. I even have one friend that refers to my diet as "The Ketoacidosis Diet". I can't get him to understand the difference, but maybe this will help you! Find Me On Twitter: www.twitter.com/HeavyKevi Instagram: www.instagram.com/TheHeavyTruthTV Follow My Macros on MyFitnessPal @The HeavyTruth Facebook Group: Facebook.com/Groups/TheHeavyTruthTV Subscribe to my Essential Oils Channel: https://goo.gl/El053Q Send Questions or Testimonials By Mail: Kevin Gillem P.O.Box 291517 Phelan, CA 92329 My Favorite Low Carb Sweetener - http://amzn.to/2smCmDM I recommend Smackfat Ketone Strips - http://amzn.to/2laB9MG I use the Match DNA Milk Frother - http://amzn.to/2klHt4o I use NOW MCT Oil - http://amzn.to/2kOs48S I'm Kevin and I have used a Ketogenic diet, Intermittent Fasting and Extended Fasting to successfully lose 160 pounds and I am still shrinking. I hope to one day be half the man I was at 400 pounds. During this journey I have learned a lot about weight loss, Metabolic syndrome, Insulin Resistance, LCHF dieting and overall health in general. I am greatly interested in continuing to learn about health related topics and sharing what I learn with others so that all of our lives can be improved. Please like and subscribe to my channel so that I can share the things I learn that I think are important for all of our well being. I would also appreciate feedback from you all so I can share it with other subscribers and we can all grow as a community. I am not a doctor. I am not licensed. I do not hold any qualifications for giving medical advice. This is an account of my own experiences and does not apply to anyone else. All information, content, and material of this channel is for informational purposes only and are not intended to serve as a substitute for the consultation, diagnosis, and/or medical treatment of a qualified physician or healthcare provider. If you have questions about your own personal situation it is recommended that you discuss them with your own licensed healthcare professional. If you think you are having an emergency, dial 911 immediately.

Ketoacidosis

Ketoacidosis is a metabolic state associated with high concentrations of ketone bodies, formed by the breakdown of fatty acids and the deamination of amino acids. The two common ketones produced in humans are acetoacetic acid and β-hydroxybutyrate. Ketoacidosis is a pathological metabolic state marked by extreme and uncontrolled ketosis. In ketoacidosis, the body fails to adequately regulate ketone production causing such a severe accumulation of keto acids that the pH of the blood is substantially decreased. In extreme cases ketoacidosis can be fatal.[1] Ketoacidosis is most common in untreated type 1 diabetes mellitus, when the liver breaks down fat and proteins in response to a perceived need for respiratory substrate. Prolonged alcoholism may lead to alcoholic ketoacidosis. Ketoacidosis can be smelled on a person's breath. This is due to acetone, a direct by-product of the spontaneous decomposition of acetoacetic acid. It is often described as smelling like fruit or nail polish remover.[2] Ketosis may also give off an odor, but the odor is usually more subtle due to lower concentrations of acetone. Treatment consists most simply of correcting blood sugar and insulin levels, wh Continue reading >>

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  1. Karin

    Hi guys,
    I can't see anything with the topic "KETO FLU". I started eating the Maria way two days ago, and am now super nauseous and vomiting. I am also weak and shaky. Is the vomiting a typical symptom of the Keto Flu, which should just be pushed through, or is something else going on?
    I was already gluten and sugar free before starting the keto diet, but was still eating a lot of carbs from gluten free breads, rice and potatoes. Should I have cut back slowly, rather than jumping in? I have been drinking plenty of water, and eating lots of salt, so I doubt that's the problem.
    Any suggestions and/or experiences would be very much appreciated, as I am miserable right now!

  2. jollyjollyme

    I've never experienced the nausea or vomiting and I've never heard of anyone else experiencing that with low carb or nutritional ketosis. I've had shakes and felt weak when just getting into it. I wasn't getting enough sodium and fluids. I've also felt shaky and weak when trying to go too low on calories at the urging of my doctor.
    Are you sure you don't have the flu or some stomach bug?

  3. savethewhales

    I experienced some nausea in the beginning, but never actually vomited. In my case, I think I started using MCT oil too quickly. Have you introduced new oils that you weren't eating before? Hope you feel better and be kind to yourself in the beginning.

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