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What Is Alcoholic Ketoacidosis?

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What is DIABETIC KETOACIDOSIS? What does DIABETIC KETOACIDOSIS mean? DIABETIC KETOACIDOSIS meaning - DIABETIC KETOACIDOSIS definition - DIABETIC KETOACIDOSIS explanation. Source: Wikipedia.org article, adapted under https://creativecommons.org/licenses/... license. SUBSCRIBE to our Google Earth flights channel - https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC6Uu... Diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) is a potentially life-threatening complication of diabetes mellitus. Signs and symptoms may include vomiting, abdominal pain, deep gasping breathing, increased urination, weakness, confusion, and occasionally loss of consciousness. A person's breath may develop a specific smell. Onset of symptoms is usually rapid. In some cases people may not realize they previously had diabetes. DKA happens most often in those with type 1 diabetes, but can also occur in those with other types of diabetes under certain circumstances. Triggers may include infection, not taking insulin correctly, stroke, and certain medications such as steroids. DKA results from a shortage of insulin; in response the body switches to burning fatty acids which produces acidic ketone bodies. DKA is typically diagnosed when testing finds high b

Alcoholic Ketoacidosis

Alcoholic ketoacidosis is a common reason for admission of alcohol dependent persons in hospitals emergency rooms. The term refers to a metabolic acidosis syndrome caused by increased ketone levels in serum . Glucose concentration is usually normal or a little lower. In 1940, Drs Edward S. Dillon, W. Wallace, and Leon S. Smelo, first described alcoholic ketoacidosis as a distinct syndrome . They stated that "because of the many and complex factors, both physiologic and pathologic , which influence the acid-base balance of the body, a multitude of processes may bring about the state of acidosis as an end result." [1] In the 1971, David W. Jenkins and colleagues described cases of three nondiabetic patients with a history of chronic heavy alcohol misuse and recurrent episodes of ketoacidosis . This group also proposed a possible underlying mechanism for this metabolic disturbance, naming it alcoholic ketoacidosis. [2] Patients regularly report nausea , vomiting, and pain in abdomen which are the most commonly observed complaints. This syndrome is rapidly reversible and, if taken care of has a low mortality. Other patients present tachypnoea , tachycardia , and hypotension . [3] The Continue reading >>

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  1. ski

    Ketogenic diets

    After reading about ketogenic diets and many saying how hunger was no longer there after being in ketosis for a while, and not even thinking about food sweets etc, at first i thought doubt it but OK being a food addict myself and obese, but after being in ketosis for about 5-6 weeks where my diet was 5% carbs 10-15 protein and 80-85% fat i finally realized what they said was right, the hunger went away and the thought of food sweets carbs and overeating was not there anymore.
    Another thing i read was complaints of hair loss while in a ketosis, some saying they didn't have hair loss while others saying they did especially thinning of the hair.
    3 months later and 60 lbs weight lose i noticed thinning if the hair and losing hair so i stopped being in ketosis thinking i try just adding some carbs via vegetables.
    So i did and the thinning stopped as did the hair loss 5 month later still adding vegetables and other little carb foods.
    But the diet is much harder to control not being in ketosis the extra carbs keep bringing me back to the old way of binging and always being hungry.
    Now some will say add more fat, i did but i never lost weight eating extra fat and need to count my calories if i don't count them i simply don't lose weight, even after 5-6 months on High fat 10-15 protein i still don't lose weight unless i counted calories.
    So i'm thinking of cutting back the carbs again and being in ketosis but at the same time thinking will it go back to losing hair :-(
    any comments?

  2. foxl

    Yeah if that is what caused my hair loss, I will sacrifice my hair! (I noted it at diagnosis, was not low carb at first, but also starting menopause then). I also have seen people blame hair loss on metformin. Who knows .... ?

  3. smorgan

    Adding some carbs stopped hair loss? It just doesn't sound right. What could be the relationship between glucose and hair? Hair is made of protein, as is the scalp and what connects them. Before resorting to glucose from carbs, I would have tried upping the protein slightly first. In any case, if that protein added was above the actual immediate need for it, it would mostly be turned into glucose, anyway, but in a safer manner than the carbs. I just can't imagine any relationship between hair and glucose.

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What is KETOACIDOSIS? What does KETOACIDOSIS mean? KETOACIDOSIS meaning - KETOACIDOSIS definition - KETOACIDOSIS explanation. Source: Wikipedia.org article, adapted under https://creativecommons.org/licenses/... license. SUBSCRIBE to our Google Earth flights channel - https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC6Uu... Ketoacidosis is a metabolic state associated with high concentrations of ketone bodies, formed by the breakdown of fatty acids and the deamination of amino acids. The two common ketones produced in humans are acetoacetic acid and ß-hydroxybutyrate. Ketoacidosis is a pathological metabolic state marked by extreme and uncontrolled ketosis. In ketoacidosis, the body fails to adequately regulate ketone production causing such a severe accumulation of keto acids that the pH of the blood is substantially decreased. In extreme cases ketoacidosis can be fatal. Ketoacidosis is most common in untreated type 1 diabetes mellitus, when the liver breaks down fat and proteins in response to a perceived need for respiratory substrate. Prolonged alcoholism may lead to alcoholic ketoacidosis. Ketoacidosis can be smelled on a person's breath. This is due to acetone, a direct by-product of the sp

Alcoholic Ketoacidosis

Alcoholic ketoacidosis is a metabolic complication of alcohol use and starvation characterized by hyperketonemia and anion gap metabolic acidosis without significant hyperglycemia. Alcoholic ketoacidosis causes nausea, vomiting, and abdominal pain. Diagnosis is by history and findings of ketoacidosis without hyperglycemia. Treatment is IV saline solution and dextrose infusion. Alcoholic ketoacidosis is attributed to the combined effects of alcohol and starvation on glucose metabolism. Alcohol diminishes hepatic gluconeogenesis and leads to decreased insulin secretion, increased lipolysis, impaired fatty acid oxidation, and subsequent ketogenesis, causing an elevated anion gap metabolic acidosis. Counter-regulatory hormones are increased and may further inhibit insulin secretion. Plasma glucose levels are usually low or normal, but mild hyperglycemia sometimes occurs. Diagnosis requires a high index of suspicion; similar symptoms in an alcoholic patient may result from acute pancreatitis, methanol or ethylene glycol poisoning, or diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA). In patients suspected of having alcoholic ketoacidosis, serum electrolytes (including magnesium), BUN and creatinine, glucose, Continue reading >>

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  1. Tj_Slattery

    Here are my 90 day pics. Down 22# but have literally been stuck there for 3 weeks.

    Can't deny the progress but was hoping for some more consistent progress. A bit afraid of fasting, so any direction from "lifers" would be appreciated.

  2. djindy

    you should probably put this in the "Stall Point" sub category, as that's what your topic is about.

    In any case, can you provide some more information about what you are doing?
    Are you tracking what you eat, macros, etc?
    Have you adjusted what you eat based on your new bodyweight/lbm etc?

  3. Fiorella

    You will continue to lose with keto, just at a slower pace. Hitting plateaus, and then seeing another weight reduction is very common. But, it takes patience. Some people have to wait weeks or months to see the needle move again. This is because your body is "moving furniture around" if I may use that analogy.
    To move the needle much faster, fasting is employed to set autophagy at a more rapid pace. For instance, your body needs to now get rid of the extra skin that went around your tummy. With keto alone, it is slower. By fasting, the autophagy of the unneeded skin cells is accelerated.
    Here's the diagram at this link
    227 that I use to express this sort of dynamic. The longer the fasting window, the more weight loss. And then keto helps to sustain your weight loss. If the only fasting you are doing is a couple of hours between meals, then the rock is barely rolled up the hill. A longer fasting window induces greater weightloss, and then you can use keto to sustain your loss.

    So, the question becomes this: are you okay with slow weightloss, or do you want a more rapid approach to your target weight? Either answer is ok. Just need to be honest with yourself with what you want to do. It is completely normal to plateau on keto, and then experience slower weightloss. But, you need to be ok with this. If not, then fasting is another strategy you may want to try.

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More info: https://goo.gl/iVdl1V?34348

Alcoholic Ketoacidosis: A Case Report And Review Of The Literature

Alcoholic ketoacidosis (AKA) is a condition that presents with a significant metabolic acidosis in patients with a history of alcohol excess. The diagnosis is often delayed or missed, and this can have potentially fatal consequences. There are a variety of non-specific clinical manifestations that contribute to these diagnostic difficulties. In particular, cases of AKA can be misdiagnosed as diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA). Subsequent mismanagement can lead to increasing morbidity and mortality for patients. AKA typically presents with a severe metabolic acidosis with a raised anion gap and electrolyte abnormalities, which are treatable if recognized early and appropriate management instituted. Given the increasing epidemic of alcohol-related healthcare admissions, this is an important condition to recognize and we aim to offer guidance on how to approach similar cases for the practising clinician. We present a 64-year-old female who presented with generalized abdominal pain, nausea, vomiting and shortness of breath. Arterial blood gas analysis showed significant acidaemia with a pH of 7.10, bicarbonate of 2.9 mmol/l and lactate of 11.7 mmol/l. Serum ketones were raised at 5.5 mmol/l. Continue reading >>

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  1. rosieleavy

    Hi! I'm a 21 y/o female (former youth professional football player with Arsenal FC) so come from a huge sporty background and used to be fit as a fiddle. Long story short during a game I was tackled to the ground and the cartilage in my right knee essentially split into two. 2 operations, years of physio etc later agony has increased as my spine has begun to twist. I can't do any physical exercise apart from swimming (which I aim to do 3 hours of a week) but can barely even stand for more than 15 mins or so without pain. I also suffer from IBS and find Keto is fab for curing the symptoms! I like the diet (as long as I get a few breaks here and there) but was just wondering if keto would aid me to lose weight even without intense exercise to boot? I'm a Biomedical Scientist so understand the biomechanics behind it but it's a little out of my field- thoughts on keto without exercising? Thanks guys!

  2. CarnivoreForLife

    I lost about 100lbs before thinking about exercise. Losing the weight made exercise easier, not the other way around, as so many people seem to think.

  3. Gaiacreation

    I think many people think that way because for them it in fact does work that way. By exercising from the start I have not had any cravings or temptations to cheat, and while the lbs don't come off as fast the body fat is absolutely melting away. To each their own though, there is no one rule that works for everyone! Congrats on your loss btw!

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