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What Happens When You Have Ketones In Your Urine?

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What is DIABETIC KETOACIDOSIS? What does DIABETIC KETOACIDOSIS mean? DIABETIC KETOACIDOSIS meaning - DIABETIC KETOACIDOSIS definition - DIABETIC KETOACIDOSIS explanation. Source: Wikipedia.org article, adapted under https://creativecommons.org/licenses/... license. SUBSCRIBE to our Google Earth flights channel - https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC6Uu... Diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) is a potentially life-threatening complication of diabetes mellitus. Signs and symptoms may include vomiting, abdominal pain, deep gasping breathing, increased urination, weakness, confusion, and occasionally loss of consciousness. A person's breath may develop a specific smell. Onset of symptoms is usually rapid. In some cases people may not realize they previously had diabetes. DKA happens most often in those with type 1 diabetes, but can also occur in those with other types of diabetes under certain circumstances. Triggers may include infection, not taking insulin correctly, stroke, and certain medications such as steroids. DKA results from a shortage of insulin; in response the body switches to burning fatty acids which produces acidic ketone bodies. DKA is typically diagnosed when testing finds high blood sugar, low blood pH, and ketoacids in either the blood or urine. The primary treatment of DKA is with intravenous fluids and insulin. Depending on the severity, insulin may be given intravenously or by injection under the skin. Usually potassium is also needed to prevent the development of low blood potassium. Throughout treatment blood sugar and potassium levels should be regularly checked. Antibiotics may be required in those with an underlying infection. In those with severely low blood pH, sodium bicarbonate may be given; however, its use is of unclear benefit and typically not recommended. Rates of DKA vary around the world. About 4% of people with type 1 diabetes in United Kingdom develop DKA a year, while in Malaysia the condition affects about 25% a year. DKA was first described in 1886 and, until the introduction of insulin therapy in the 1920s, it was almost universally fatal. The risk of death with adequate and timely treatment is currently around 1–4%. Up to 1% of children with DKA develop a complication known as cerebral edema. The symptoms of an episode of diabetic ketoacidosis usually evolve over a period of about 24 hours. Predominant symptoms are nausea and vomiting, pronounced thirst, excessive urine production and abdominal pain that may be severe. Those who measure their glucose levels themselves may notice hyperglycemia (high blood sugar levels). In severe DKA, breathing becomes labored and of a deep, gasping character (a state referred to as "Kussmaul respiration"). The abdomen may be tender to the point that an acute abdomen may be suspected, such as acute pancreatitis, appendicitis or gastrointestinal perforation. Coffee ground vomiting (vomiting of altered blood) occurs in a minority of people; this tends to originate from erosion of the esophagus. In severe DKA, there may be confusion, lethargy, stupor or even coma (a marked decrease in the level of consciousness). On physical examination there is usually clinical evidence of dehydration, such as a dry mouth and decreased skin turgor. If the dehydration is profound enough to cause a decrease in the circulating blood volume, tachycardia (a fast heart rate) and low blood pressure may be observed. Often, a "ketotic" odor is present, which is often described as "fruity", often compared to the smell of pear drops whose scent is a ketone. If Kussmaul respiration is present, this is reflected in an increased respiratory rate.....

Diabetes: Diabetic Ketoacidosis

www.CardioSmart.org When you have diabetes (especially type 1 diabetes), you are at risk for diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA). This is a dangerous illness that happens when the body does not have enough insulin to use sugar for fuel, and so it breaks down fat and muscle instead. This process breaks down fat into fatty acids, which are turned into another type of acid called ketones. The ketones build up in your blood and change the chemical balance in your body. If not treated, DKA can lead to a coma or even death. DKA can happen if you have little or no insulin in your body and your blood sugar level gets too high. This can happen when you do not take enough insulin or when you have an infection or other illness such as the flu. Being severely dehydrated can also cause it. DKA occurs mostly in people with type 1 diabetes. It occurs less often in people with type 2 diabetes. Symptoms of DKA Symptoms include: • You have flushed, hot, dry skin. • You have a strong, fruity breath odor. • You have loss of appetite, belly pain, and vomiting. • You feel restless. • You have rapid, deep breathing. • You feel confused. • You feel very sleepy, or you hav Continue reading >>

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  1. Sally

    ketone confusion

    Ok, here is what is going on with me. ANY info anyone has will be much appreciated. I was (a few days ago) haveing light ketones show up in my urine. My bs was great, 100 fasting and not over 145 post meals. I figured not enough carbs, looking back on my recent meals. I upped my carbs to 110 yesterday, ketones in urine went away. I thought I had it figured out. This morning, bs was 115, but ketones in my urine was in the high color zone, plus I am having frequent urination. Are there any other things that would cause ketones besides bs issues? I unfortunately do not have insurance and money is tight, cannot see any docs. I have checked with the health dept here and they most they can offer a diabetic is sugar screenings twice a week. This is by a reg doc, not an endo, same with the only free clinic here. When I talked to them, they suggested I see an endo. So I am back to square one. Any advice at all???

  2. lipsie

    Sally, I dunno much at all about this stuff but just wanted to wish you well, hope it all works its way out for you and you feel better. *Hugs* Love yassssss Sheila

  3. kdroberts

    Ketones are 'created' when your body burns fat for energy rather than carbohydrates. Briefly, when you don't have enough insulin in your body burns fat for energy and you spill ketones. If you eat very low carb you will spill ketones, some people on low carb diets aren't satisfied until they are. If you fast, you may spill ketones. If you are pregnant and don't eat enough, you can spill ketones. If you have LOW blood sugar you can spill ketones (opposite to when you have not enough insulin, you have too much and it's used all the glucose so burns fat). Illness and stress can cause you to spill ketones. Exercise can cause you to spill ketones.
    Now, spilling ketones in your urine (ketosis) is very different to ketoacidosis because ketosis doesn't cause your blood pH to drop which is the issue with DKA. Ketosis is not (well not been shown to be) dangerous, ketoacidosis is. I would buy some fresh ketostix and monitor things and pay very carful attention to the DKA symptoms like extreme tiredness, extreme thirst, constant urination, hyperventilation, nausea and pain in the upper body. If you have multiple ones of those you really need to go to a doctor. If you have any of the following, you really need to go to the ER. Vomiting, abdominal pain, symptoms of the flu, weakness and fast/normal but deep breathing like you are gasping for air.

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What is KETOACIDOSIS? What does KETOACIDOSIS mean? KETOACIDOSIS meaning - KETOACIDOSIS definition - KETOACIDOSIS explanation. Source: Wikipedia.org article, adapted under https://creativecommons.org/licenses/... license. SUBSCRIBE to our Google Earth flights channel - https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC6Uu... Ketoacidosis is a metabolic state associated with high concentrations of ketone bodies, formed by the breakdown of fatty acids and the deamination of amino acids. The two common ketones produced in humans are acetoacetic acid and ß-hydroxybutyrate. Ketoacidosis is a pathological metabolic state marked by extreme and uncontrolled ketosis. In ketoacidosis, the body fails to adequately regulate ketone production causing such a severe accumulation of keto acids that the pH of the blood is substantially decreased. In extreme cases ketoacidosis can be fatal. Ketoacidosis is most common in untreated type 1 diabetes mellitus, when the liver breaks down fat and proteins in response to a perceived need for respiratory substrate. Prolonged alcoholism may lead to alcoholic ketoacidosis. Ketoacidosis can be smelled on a person's breath. This is due to acetone, a direct by-product of the spontaneous decomposition of acetoacetic acid. It is often described as smelling like fruit or nail polish remover. Ketosis may also smell, but the odor is usually more subtle due to lower concentrations of acetone. Treatment consists most simply of correcting blood sugar and insulin levels, which will halt ketone production. If the severity of the case warrants more aggressive measures, intravenous sodium bicarbonate infusion can be given to raise blood pH back to an acceptable range. However, serious caution must be exercised with IV sodium bicarbonate to avoid the risk of equally life-threatening hypernatremia. Three common causes of ketoacidosis are alcohol, starvation, and diabetes, resulting in alcoholic ketoacidosis, starvation ketoacidosis, and diabetic ketoacidosis respectively. In diabetic ketoacidosis, a high concentration of ketone bodies is usually accompanied by insulin deficiency, hyperglycemia, and dehydration. Particularly in type 1 diabetics the lack of insulin in the bloodstream prevents glucose absorption, thereby inhibiting the production of oxaloacetate (a crucial molecule for processing Acetyl-CoA, the product of beta-oxidation of fatty acids, in the Krebs cycle) through reduced levels of pyruvate (a byproduct of glycolysis), and can cause unchecked ketone body production (through fatty acid metabolism) potentially leading to dangerous glucose and ketone levels in the blood. Hyperglycemia results in glucose overloading the kidneys and spilling into the urine (transport maximum for glucose is exceeded). Dehydration results following the osmotic movement of water into urine (Osmotic diuresis), exacerbating the acidosis. In alcoholic ketoacidosis, alcohol causes dehydration and blocks the first step of gluconeogenesis by depleting oxaloacetate. The body is unable to synthesize enough glucose to meet its needs, thus creating an energy crisis resulting in fatty acid metabolism, and ketone body formation.

Diabetic Ketoacidosis

Diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) is a serious problem that can occur in people with diabetes if their body starts to run out of insulin. This causes harmful substances called ketones to build up in the body, which can be life-threatening if not spotted and treated quickly. DKA mainly affects people with type 1 diabetes, but can sometimes occur in people with type 2 diabetes. If you have diabetes, it's important to be aware of the risk and know what to do if DKA occurs. Symptoms of diabetic ketoacidosis Signs of DKA include: needing to pee more than usual being sick breath that smells fruity (like pear drop sweets or nail varnish) deep or fast breathing feeling very tired or sleepy passing out DKA can also cause high blood sugar (hyperglycaemia) and a high level of ketones in your blood or urine, which you can check for using home-testing kits. Symptoms usually develop over 24 hours, but can come on faster. Check your blood sugar and ketone levels Check your blood sugar level if you have symptoms of DKA. If your blood sugar is 11mmol/L or over and you have a blood or urine ketone testing kit, check your ketone level. If you do a blood ketone test: lower than 0.6mmol/L is a normal reading Continue reading >>

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  1. chelseyRN

    This is my 13th day on the ketogenic diet. I bought ketone test strips to test my urine. I've been testing a few times a day and been in the low range. This morning I've tested twice and it says "Large" and correlates with the "8 mmol/L" color on the test strips. I've been "high fat, moderate whole foods carbs" for months, if not longer. I'm not diabetic but have a glucometer to test for blood sugar spikes to know what foods to avoid. My blood sugars have been 60-90s consistently. Is there any concern about spilling too many ketones? Educate me please!!

  2. Jason_v

    Just due to the nature of the presence of the 3 different versions of circulating ketones, some will always spill over to the urine. how detectable they are will depend on your hydration level more than anything else. So no there is no concern, which is good because you can't do anything about it anyway. If you are producing ketones, some will show up in the urine:period. if you are hyper hydrated you won't see many, if you are dehydrated you will see dark purple. Exercise tends to reduce the amount of ketones in the urine, in my experience. There is a falsehood that circulates that your body "learns" to use ketones more effectively thus "spilling less" into the urine but that's not technically correct. Although the use of ketones by different tissues can be up regulated (made more efficient depending on demand) there will always be some in the urine if you are producing them at all.

  3. ketohealthclub

    I'd love to read the data explaining that. Do you have any links? I've definitely read the opposite: that over time your body wastes fewer ketones, which renders the ketostix pretty useless after a few weeks.

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Ketones in Urine, all what you need to know! https://alinepilani.com/ketones-in-ur... Ketones are beneficial in many ways, but they are perhaps the most misunderstood compounds in medicine. Medical school biochemistry textbooks only touch on ketone metabolism briefly, which explains why most physicians are not familiar with their benefits. Ketones in Urine https://alinepilani.com/ketones-in-ur...

Everything You Need To Know About Ketones

Ketone is an organic compound that the body produces when fats are broken down for energy. People with diabetes may not be able to regulate the level of ketones in their blood, so ketone testing is an essential part of managing their condition. There are three types of ketone, which are collectively known as ketone bodies, or ketones. In this article, we explain when to check for ketones, the types of tests available, and how to understand the results. Contents of this article: What are ketones? The body uses a range of nutrients for energy, including carbohydrates, fats, and proteins. It will use carbohydrates first, but if none are available, the body will burn fat for energy. When this happens, ketones are produced. Ketones have gained attention in recent years due to the popularity of ketogenic diets, in which people eat a low carbohydrate diet so that their body will burn fat instead of carbohydrates. There is currently a lack of clear evidence on the benefits of this diet, and there may be some risks, such as high acidity in the blood and loss of muscle. Typically, carbohydrates are broken down into different nutrients, including blood sugar (glucose), by an enzyme called amy Continue reading >>

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  1. Sally

    ketone confusion

    Ok, here is what is going on with me. ANY info anyone has will be much appreciated. I was (a few days ago) haveing light ketones show up in my urine. My bs was great, 100 fasting and not over 145 post meals. I figured not enough carbs, looking back on my recent meals. I upped my carbs to 110 yesterday, ketones in urine went away. I thought I had it figured out. This morning, bs was 115, but ketones in my urine was in the high color zone, plus I am having frequent urination. Are there any other things that would cause ketones besides bs issues? I unfortunately do not have insurance and money is tight, cannot see any docs. I have checked with the health dept here and they most they can offer a diabetic is sugar screenings twice a week. This is by a reg doc, not an endo, same with the only free clinic here. When I talked to them, they suggested I see an endo. So I am back to square one. Any advice at all???

  2. lipsie

    Sally, I dunno much at all about this stuff but just wanted to wish you well, hope it all works its way out for you and you feel better. *Hugs* Love yassssss Sheila

  3. kdroberts

    Ketones are 'created' when your body burns fat for energy rather than carbohydrates. Briefly, when you don't have enough insulin in your body burns fat for energy and you spill ketones. If you eat very low carb you will spill ketones, some people on low carb diets aren't satisfied until they are. If you fast, you may spill ketones. If you are pregnant and don't eat enough, you can spill ketones. If you have LOW blood sugar you can spill ketones (opposite to when you have not enough insulin, you have too much and it's used all the glucose so burns fat). Illness and stress can cause you to spill ketones. Exercise can cause you to spill ketones.
    Now, spilling ketones in your urine (ketosis) is very different to ketoacidosis because ketosis doesn't cause your blood pH to drop which is the issue with DKA. Ketosis is not (well not been shown to be) dangerous, ketoacidosis is. I would buy some fresh ketostix and monitor things and pay very carful attention to the DKA symptoms like extreme tiredness, extreme thirst, constant urination, hyperventilation, nausea and pain in the upper body. If you have multiple ones of those you really need to go to a doctor. If you have any of the following, you really need to go to the ER. Vomiting, abdominal pain, symptoms of the flu, weakness and fast/normal but deep breathing like you are gasping for air.

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