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What Happens To The Excess Glucose In The Body?

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"You can't eat too much carbohydrates in the long run" - crazy good stuff! :) By taking his sugar water / juice bottle as an example, Harley includes refined carbs in that statement. From my point of comprehension & logic, I would maybe add something to it: "You can't eat too much carbohydrates FROM WHOLE FOODS in the long run". Because let's say someone almost only ate refined carbs - that means we have less fiber pro 100 kcals than we had if we ate whole foods and thereby can fit more food including more calories into our stomach which otherwise we couldn't. Do you know what I mean? :D Can you then still not eat too many carbohydrates? I understand excess carbs get burned off as dietary thermogenesis etc but you get my point: Refined carbs let you git in more food = more calories & the question I ask myself and YOU is DOES IT MATTER? :) What do you think? I really find this super interesting & would love us to have a discussion about this! No Im not skinny because I move so much ;) Follow me on Strava: www.strava.com/athletes/carbundance Impressions of my everydaylife - Follow me on Instagram: www.instagram.com/carbundance/ @carbundance DIE BESTEN Datteln GUTSCHEINCODE - bestes Preis-/Leistungsverhltnis im ganzen Internet - Bio Medjoul Jumbo Datteln, cremig, weich, schmecken wie Nougat-Marzipan-Schokolade : www.israel-spezialitten.de 5% Gutscheincode DattelCarbundance :) The amazing recovery tool I use to make sure I get fitter vs. overtrained, sick and burned out Im absolutely stoked, its my new coach all kinds of elite athletes use it (video coming soon): http://goo.gl/LzeX4x http://goo.gl/TP0zHq The heart rate monitor I use to measure my heart rate variability as one factor of my recovery score: http://goo.gl/EPcxJ7 Bester Mixer, 10 Jahre Garantie! http://goo.gl/vHy5kE Beste Anschaffung fr die Kche neben einem Mixer - Instant Pot: http://goo.gl/Mf30Qn Maisnudeln bestes Preis-/Leistungsverhltnis, das ich kenne: http://goo.gl/fYtHll Shea Moisture mildestes Shampoo ever gibt kein besseres fr mich, meine Haare LIEBEN es nutze es zu alternativen Haarwachmethoden, weil ich so extrem hartes kalkhaltiges Wasser habe: http://goo.gl/b1Obe7 Olaplex the first product that can actually repair hair for real! Saved my deadbleached hair (video coming soon): http://goo.gl/wc9qGQ How to eat away heart disease! http://goo.gl/4U3PEu So kannst man Herzinfarkt wegessen! http://goo.gl/hMS8vU Abnehmen mit so vielen Kohlenhydraten wie du willst - nie wieder Dit und dabei lebenslang schlank & gesund: http://goo.gl/rPwizi How to lose the weight for good with as much as you want from the foods you love http://goo.gl/fui5qc Exactly how to eat for maximum weight loss: http://goo.gl/urOkSy Why whole foods are the way: Vegan alone does not mean healthy - how to be a HEALTHY vegan: http://goo.gl/xmc2mZ As Audio book here perfect for busy people to listen to it while doing something else: http://goo.gl/LE4fqr China study (deutsch) - Die wissenschaftliche Begrndung warum vegan der Weg ist: http://goo.gl/Cwo3Oi Hier also Hrbuch perfekt fr Vielbeschftigte & Pendler, die es nebenher schaffen! http://goo.gl/vkdJDw Das offizielle High Carb Kochbuch zur China Study - ber 120 vegane Rezepte: http://goo.gl/2kFXHJ The China Study (english): The Most Comprehensive Study of Nutrition The Reason why vegan is the way for Weight Loss, And Long-term Health: http://goo.gl/M6PGVq Warum die Makronhrstoffverteilung 80/10/10 und ein groer Anteil an Rohkost in unserer Ernhrung gut fr uns ist: http://goo.gl/Dy849K Warum gekochtes Essen aber alles andere als bse ist (wenn es vollwertig, pflanzlich & fettarm ist): http://goo.gl/HBRfm3 Bin ein Fan von Transparenz: Beim Kauf ber die Amazon-Links erhalte ich einen kleinen %-Satz (ohne, dass ihr mehr zahlt!), der mir hilft, diesen Kanal aufrechtzuerhalten.

What Happens To Excess Glucose?

Science Biology When the body detects increased levels of glucose or amino acids in the small intestine, beta cells in the pancreas secrete a hormone called insulin that promotes the absorption of glucose by cells in the body. Insulin is also responsible for signalling the conversion of glucose into glycogen. Another method the body has for handling excess glucose is to eliminate some of the glucose in the urine. In most cases, the glucose that makes its way to the urine is reabsorbed through the sodium-glucose cotransporter 2 channels in the kidney nephrons. These transporters reabsorb glucose and send it back into the bloodstream. If these transporters become saturated by high levels of glucose, the excess glucose is excreted in the urine. Certain medications, like the anti-diabetic drug canagliflozin, are specifically designed to inhibit the action of SGLT-2 and promote glucose loss. One of the hallmark symptoms of diabetes is glucose in the urine. Learn more about Biology Continue reading >>

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  1. Aaron1963

    Ketosis: What Happens to Excess Glucose?

    This is something I've always wondered about. When one is in ketosis, what exactly happens to excess glucose beyond what's needed by the few cells that require glucose? Well, I imagine some (or perhaps all of the initial excess) goes to replenishing glycogen stores that may have been previously depleted. But there's definitely a limit to how much can go towards that. After your glycogen has been topped off, does the glucose just go into the blood stream, or is it used by cells first, rather than utilizing ketones? Or does it just go to fat storage?
    A bit of a background as to why I'm asking this question now. I've been in ketosis for at least the past 8 months or so. I've had a few slipups along the way, but nothing major I'd say. My weight dropped rapidly, and I ended up being noticeably underweight. As a result I added more protein in my diet (due to my previous protein intake being way below recommended levels) and my weight's been quite stable for maybe 6 months or so, after regaining enough to put my right smack in the middle of my ideal weight range. Then in the past month I've been traveling a lot. On my first trip I suspect I ate too many carbs and gained about 5 kg (11 lbs). I was fairly confident that some or maybe even almost all of that was due to replenishing my glycogen stores. I came back from my trip, but my weight didn't go down. Then I went on a few more trips, and gained another 5kg, so 10kg total (22 lbs). 5kg, I could live with, but 10kg is just way too much, and most of it was added to my thighs and waist. Some of my tighter fitting pants are now almost too tight, so I'm most definitely not imagining it, nor is the scale lying.
    During my most recent trips, I felt like I ate pretty good, along the same lines as what I was eating when my weight was stable. There were a few questionable meals where I tried to select the lowest carb option, but imagine there could have been more carbs than I suspected. That's common when I go on travel, and I try to supplement by consuming more fats than normal. In this case I ended up having lots of coffee with fresh cream. I also ended up buying macadamia nuts and snacking on them quite a bit, mostly out of concern about upcoming dinners maybe being higher carb than I wanted, so thinking if I filled up ahead of time, I wouldn't be tempted to eat much of the higher carb meal. Well, I think it was a mistake in trying to snack on the macadamia nuts, because even though they have a good KR, they seemed to be quite addicting to me, and I found myself snacking unnecessarily on many days, and then craving the snacking. That is totally unlike me. Throughout being in ketosis, I've had no problems going long periods of time without eating, and not feeling hungry or any cravings. I just get an empty feeling in my stomach at times, but wouldn't really call it hunger, at least not in the sense of the hunger I used to feel when eating a glucose-centric diet.
    So I'm sure I was eating more overall than I normally eat, and I was also getting a much more continuous stream of food, due to too much snacking, compared to normal. But as best I could calculate, my KR was just as high, if not higher than normal, and I stayed in ketosis during my trip, albeit a bit lower than normal - in the 1's, rather than 2's or 3's. Previously I would often though have days where I ate a lot, with much more calories than "normal", so even the excess due to snacking didn't put me outside the range I was accustomed to in the past. Only the reduced time between meals was different. My BG numbers started creeping up at the same time. Previously my fasting numbers were mostly in the 60's and 70's, but during my trips I saw them go up to the 80's and sometimes 90's. At first I thought about what JDM said regarding Dr. Bernstein considering 83 to be a perfect number, and that perhaps being in ketosis for so long was drawing me to that "magic" number. But I stopped seeing any numbers in the 70's, and would see some in the 90's, and PP numbers were also higher. Previously I would rarely go over 100, but started seeing numbers in the 110's and up to about 120. Overall a 20 ~ 30 point increase on average over what I was doing. In the past I could see my BG go up on occasion, but this was different in that it was consistently higher and didn't come back down.
    Well, some say that too much snacking might not be good for some diabetics, though others say they do better with a method of more frequent meals/snacks. For me, I always had good success with intermittent fasting and limiting my number of meals, so I think the snacking may have had some effect. But I suspect the biggest effect was due to my not getting any exercise whatsoever during my trips. I've exercised religiously for the past year since first starting down the road to good control of my diabetes. I've had brief periods in the past where I couldn't exercise for a day or two, but never for a week or two weeks at a time like just happened. The longer I stay at this, the more I see that for me exercise is important. And I think I've just come to the conclusion that it's not only just important, but actually super important and an absolute necessity to control my diabetes (and weight) the way I should. I know for some people exercise doesn't have any effect, or a negligible effect. But for me, the effect is profound, especially when comparing absolutely no exercise to my normal exercise.
    For me, when I first started out, I began my exercise regime at my doctor's urging, and I was under the impression that the standard "calories in - calories out" effect was true. I knew I needed to lose weight, so I tried as much as possible to exercise (via mostly walking) after each and every meal, and to burn off those excess calories and fat. Well, I later learned that not all calories are the same, and it depends a whole lot on what those calories are composed of, and how the body uses those macronutrients and thus the calories. So my reasoning for exercising (to burn off the calories and thus lose weight) was very misguided, but the results were excellent. The reason being, in my mind, is that I was burning off the carbs. Every time I'd eat, I'd exercise enough to in my mind burn off the calories I just ate, or at least most of them. But what I was really doing was burning off the carbs, and thus no carbs were going to fat storage, but rather I had a deficit, and so I was burning fat to make up for it, and it had a dramatic effect on my BG as well, due to the carbs getting burned off.
    Ok, so back to my original question - what happens to the excess carbs? Even when maintaining a ketogenic diet, you still can easily consume more carbs than are necessary for the body. Based on what happens to me, beyond the glycogen aspect, it seems that some of the carbs may go towards elevating BG, but not much. (I'm not talking about going on carb binges which would noticeably spike BG, but rather excess carbs while still eating a good ketogenic diet with a good KR). What does happen though is that they go to fat storage. If I exercise after each meal, the carbs are burned off and not stored. But if I fail to exercise, the carbs can go to storage. Some of the carbs may go towards some minor BG creeping up, but I think ketosis likely puts an upper limit on that and it won't get too out of hand unless due to some other factor (such as illness, etc.)
    So while some people don't notice any changes due to exercising or not, or some even see a negative effect in exercising, for me it's absolutely critical that I continue my exercise after each meal if possible. As a result, I've drawn up a new plan to get back on track, which also addresses the snacking problem. From now on, I will try to only ever eat when I'm "hungry", meaning when I get that empty feeling and believe my body wants some food. And if that time comes when I'm busy and cannot get away to exercise, then I'll hold off and wait until I can, then eat and exercise. Well, there's obviously going to be sometimes when I cannot do that, due to social situations or whatever. But the plan is to do it as much as possible, and hopefully at least 90% or so of the time I can do my exercise regiment after eating, and thus burn off any excess carbs I have, and keep my weight down at it's ideal point and my BG at what I consider to be an ideal level for me. And when I go on travel in the future, I'll look to stay in hotels which have a gym, so that I can continue the exercise regiment I've established here at home, and even if the weather is bad, or environment issues may prevent me from exercising outdoors, I can still do so. I guess if nothing else, and there's no gym, I can just pace back and forth in my hotel room.
    Well, interested in hearing what others have to say about excess carbs when in ketosis, and how they affect you and your body.

  2. Nicoletti

    Originally Posted by Aaron1963
    This is something I've always wondered about. When one is in ketosis, what exactly happens to excess glucose beyond what's needed by the few cells that require glucose?
    Ok, so back to my original question - what happens to the excess carbs? Even when maintaining a ketogenic diet, you still can easily consume more carbs than are necessary for the body. If one is in ketosis, I wouldn't imagine there would be much in the way of excess glucose, or excess carbs. Seems to me from reading Ann's posts about her diet, there's not much in the way of excess carbs either, or she'd not be in ketosis.

  3. Ken S

    This is an interesting question Aaron, my guess would be similar to Nicole's, you use what little you eat which is very little and get the rest of your energy from ketones. If there is an excess then it goes to replace the ketones for energy, no more nutritional ketosis in other words. This is probably why it's so important to so severely limit glucose sources.

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Tips to Detox Your Body of Excess Sugar Most of us love sweets, especially cookies and chocolates. It is very common to share these treats during family events or with friends. However, we dont often think that this type of treat can be harmful to our health and we dont control it. When it comes to sugary foods or bakery products, its important to know that these foods are easily absorbed by your body and brought to your bloodstream much faster than normal sugars. This is where the release of insulin originates. When you eat foods with a high amount of refined sugar, you are giving your body practically zero nutrients. Its often said that these foods have empty calories because they do not provide you with the necessary energy for properly carrying out functions. When you want to take care of yourself and are conscious that a balanced diet is the best thing you can do in order to have good health, you should begin to eat good amounts of vegetables and whole grains that give you both nutrients and carbohydrates. Unlike refined sugar, these carbohydrates are released little by little in the blood and are used as fuel to provide the necessary energy so that all the functions of your body are carried out properly. For that reason and many others, you have to try to eliminate those amounts of refined sugars in your body which arent giving you any nutritional value. In order to do this, you should carry out a good detoxification, which is why we recommend that you take note of the following tips. Tips for Detoxifying Your Body Watermelon The first thing you should do to begin to take care of yourself and avoid eating sugary products is: remove all temptations. That means that in your house or any place that you go there should not be any type of sweet. In this way, you will not feel any desire to eat them. The power of willpower! You should replace sugar with healthy products like walnuts and other nuts that besides being very tasty, they can be a huge help in not having an appetite between your main meals. Detoxify the body Drinking detoxifying smoothies allows effective toxin elimination. Fruits like watermelon, bananas, and strawberries can be a huge help to replace the desire to eat sweets. Vanilla, cinnamon, or almond extract is great for adding a little bit of sweetness to beverages. These simple steps are great for getting away from sweets. We also recommend that our readers look at the following detoxifying smoothies and juices. In order to seem them, click here. Remember You should keep in mind that all the products that you eat everyday contain sugar, in lesser or greater amounts, which is why you have to know how to choose products that have lesser quantities and prevent consuming those that have greater quantities at all costs like sugary cereals, cookies, caramels, and chocolates, for example. It will probably be a little difficult to stay away from these delicious cravings at first but if you really want to improve your health or prevent future problems, you should have a little bit of willpower and try to stay away from excess sweets forever.

What Happens To Excess Glucose In The Body? | Yahoo Answers

What happens to excess glucose in the body? Are you sure you want to delete this answer? Best Answer: Insulin acts as a traffic director, causing glucose to be transported into the bodys cells, directing the body to store excess energy as glycogen for short-term storage in the liver and muscles and/or as triglycerides in adipose (fat) cells. I think this question violates the Community Guidelines Chat or rant, adult content, spam, insulting other members, show more I think this question violates the Terms of Service Harm to minors, violence or threats, harassment or privacy invasion, impersonation or misrepresentation, fraud or phishing, show more If you believe your intellectual property has been infringed and would like to file a complaint, please see our Copyright/IP Policy I think this answer violates the Community Guidelines Chat or rant, adult content, spam, insulting other members, show more I think this answer violates the Terms of Service Harm to minors, violence or threats, harassment or privacy invasion, impersonation or misrepresentation, fraud or phishing, show more If you believe your intellectual property has been infringed and would like to file a complaint, please Continue reading >>

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  1. Aaron1963

    Ketosis: What Happens to Excess Glucose?

    This is something I've always wondered about. When one is in ketosis, what exactly happens to excess glucose beyond what's needed by the few cells that require glucose? Well, I imagine some (or perhaps all of the initial excess) goes to replenishing glycogen stores that may have been previously depleted. But there's definitely a limit to how much can go towards that. After your glycogen has been topped off, does the glucose just go into the blood stream, or is it used by cells first, rather than utilizing ketones? Or does it just go to fat storage?
    A bit of a background as to why I'm asking this question now. I've been in ketosis for at least the past 8 months or so. I've had a few slipups along the way, but nothing major I'd say. My weight dropped rapidly, and I ended up being noticeably underweight. As a result I added more protein in my diet (due to my previous protein intake being way below recommended levels) and my weight's been quite stable for maybe 6 months or so, after regaining enough to put my right smack in the middle of my ideal weight range. Then in the past month I've been traveling a lot. On my first trip I suspect I ate too many carbs and gained about 5 kg (11 lbs). I was fairly confident that some or maybe even almost all of that was due to replenishing my glycogen stores. I came back from my trip, but my weight didn't go down. Then I went on a few more trips, and gained another 5kg, so 10kg total (22 lbs). 5kg, I could live with, but 10kg is just way too much, and most of it was added to my thighs and waist. Some of my tighter fitting pants are now almost too tight, so I'm most definitely not imagining it, nor is the scale lying.
    During my most recent trips, I felt like I ate pretty good, along the same lines as what I was eating when my weight was stable. There were a few questionable meals where I tried to select the lowest carb option, but imagine there could have been more carbs than I suspected. That's common when I go on travel, and I try to supplement by consuming more fats than normal. In this case I ended up having lots of coffee with fresh cream. I also ended up buying macadamia nuts and snacking on them quite a bit, mostly out of concern about upcoming dinners maybe being higher carb than I wanted, so thinking if I filled up ahead of time, I wouldn't be tempted to eat much of the higher carb meal. Well, I think it was a mistake in trying to snack on the macadamia nuts, because even though they have a good KR, they seemed to be quite addicting to me, and I found myself snacking unnecessarily on many days, and then craving the snacking. That is totally unlike me. Throughout being in ketosis, I've had no problems going long periods of time without eating, and not feeling hungry or any cravings. I just get an empty feeling in my stomach at times, but wouldn't really call it hunger, at least not in the sense of the hunger I used to feel when eating a glucose-centric diet.
    So I'm sure I was eating more overall than I normally eat, and I was also getting a much more continuous stream of food, due to too much snacking, compared to normal. But as best I could calculate, my KR was just as high, if not higher than normal, and I stayed in ketosis during my trip, albeit a bit lower than normal - in the 1's, rather than 2's or 3's. Previously I would often though have days where I ate a lot, with much more calories than "normal", so even the excess due to snacking didn't put me outside the range I was accustomed to in the past. Only the reduced time between meals was different. My BG numbers started creeping up at the same time. Previously my fasting numbers were mostly in the 60's and 70's, but during my trips I saw them go up to the 80's and sometimes 90's. At first I thought about what JDM said regarding Dr. Bernstein considering 83 to be a perfect number, and that perhaps being in ketosis for so long was drawing me to that "magic" number. But I stopped seeing any numbers in the 70's, and would see some in the 90's, and PP numbers were also higher. Previously I would rarely go over 100, but started seeing numbers in the 110's and up to about 120. Overall a 20 ~ 30 point increase on average over what I was doing. In the past I could see my BG go up on occasion, but this was different in that it was consistently higher and didn't come back down.
    Well, some say that too much snacking might not be good for some diabetics, though others say they do better with a method of more frequent meals/snacks. For me, I always had good success with intermittent fasting and limiting my number of meals, so I think the snacking may have had some effect. But I suspect the biggest effect was due to my not getting any exercise whatsoever during my trips. I've exercised religiously for the past year since first starting down the road to good control of my diabetes. I've had brief periods in the past where I couldn't exercise for a day or two, but never for a week or two weeks at a time like just happened. The longer I stay at this, the more I see that for me exercise is important. And I think I've just come to the conclusion that it's not only just important, but actually super important and an absolute necessity to control my diabetes (and weight) the way I should. I know for some people exercise doesn't have any effect, or a negligible effect. But for me, the effect is profound, especially when comparing absolutely no exercise to my normal exercise.
    For me, when I first started out, I began my exercise regime at my doctor's urging, and I was under the impression that the standard "calories in - calories out" effect was true. I knew I needed to lose weight, so I tried as much as possible to exercise (via mostly walking) after each and every meal, and to burn off those excess calories and fat. Well, I later learned that not all calories are the same, and it depends a whole lot on what those calories are composed of, and how the body uses those macronutrients and thus the calories. So my reasoning for exercising (to burn off the calories and thus lose weight) was very misguided, but the results were excellent. The reason being, in my mind, is that I was burning off the carbs. Every time I'd eat, I'd exercise enough to in my mind burn off the calories I just ate, or at least most of them. But what I was really doing was burning off the carbs, and thus no carbs were going to fat storage, but rather I had a deficit, and so I was burning fat to make up for it, and it had a dramatic effect on my BG as well, due to the carbs getting burned off.
    Ok, so back to my original question - what happens to the excess carbs? Even when maintaining a ketogenic diet, you still can easily consume more carbs than are necessary for the body. Based on what happens to me, beyond the glycogen aspect, it seems that some of the carbs may go towards elevating BG, but not much. (I'm not talking about going on carb binges which would noticeably spike BG, but rather excess carbs while still eating a good ketogenic diet with a good KR). What does happen though is that they go to fat storage. If I exercise after each meal, the carbs are burned off and not stored. But if I fail to exercise, the carbs can go to storage. Some of the carbs may go towards some minor BG creeping up, but I think ketosis likely puts an upper limit on that and it won't get too out of hand unless due to some other factor (such as illness, etc.)
    So while some people don't notice any changes due to exercising or not, or some even see a negative effect in exercising, for me it's absolutely critical that I continue my exercise after each meal if possible. As a result, I've drawn up a new plan to get back on track, which also addresses the snacking problem. From now on, I will try to only ever eat when I'm "hungry", meaning when I get that empty feeling and believe my body wants some food. And if that time comes when I'm busy and cannot get away to exercise, then I'll hold off and wait until I can, then eat and exercise. Well, there's obviously going to be sometimes when I cannot do that, due to social situations or whatever. But the plan is to do it as much as possible, and hopefully at least 90% or so of the time I can do my exercise regiment after eating, and thus burn off any excess carbs I have, and keep my weight down at it's ideal point and my BG at what I consider to be an ideal level for me. And when I go on travel in the future, I'll look to stay in hotels which have a gym, so that I can continue the exercise regiment I've established here at home, and even if the weather is bad, or environment issues may prevent me from exercising outdoors, I can still do so. I guess if nothing else, and there's no gym, I can just pace back and forth in my hotel room.
    Well, interested in hearing what others have to say about excess carbs when in ketosis, and how they affect you and your body.

  2. Nicoletti

    Originally Posted by Aaron1963
    This is something I've always wondered about. When one is in ketosis, what exactly happens to excess glucose beyond what's needed by the few cells that require glucose?
    Ok, so back to my original question - what happens to the excess carbs? Even when maintaining a ketogenic diet, you still can easily consume more carbs than are necessary for the body. If one is in ketosis, I wouldn't imagine there would be much in the way of excess glucose, or excess carbs. Seems to me from reading Ann's posts about her diet, there's not much in the way of excess carbs either, or she'd not be in ketosis.

  3. Ken S

    This is an interesting question Aaron, my guess would be similar to Nicole's, you use what little you eat which is very little and get the rest of your energy from ketones. If there is an excess then it goes to replace the ketones for energy, no more nutritional ketosis in other words. This is probably why it's so important to so severely limit glucose sources.

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How is Insulin released in response to Higher blood glucose concentration

Excess Glucose In The Blood And Insulin Response

Excess glucose in the bloodstream is a devastating health problem. In the extreme, the condition is called diabetes and it affects approximately 29 million Americans. Of these, 8 million are undiagnosed, which means they don’t know they are diabetic, and the longer it goes undetected the worse it gets and the greater the damage. In addition, it is estimated that at least one-third of the U.S. adult population has pre-diabetes (Metabolic Syndrome), and without intervention or lifestyle change most of these will graduate to full blown diabetes in the future. Glucose lingers in the blood and accumulates when insulin does not do its job of escorting glucose into the cells. This is because glucose cannot gain entrance into cells on its own. This is intelligent by design, because otherwise, it would be impossible to regulate blood glucose concentration. In fact, if glucose could leave the blood and enter cells on its own, it wouldn’t take much to drain the blood of glucose entirely. This would be a major disaster, because the brain is dependent upon glucose as its source of energy, and without an ongoing supply the brain would suffer severe damage. When blood glucose concentration in Continue reading >>

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  1. Aaron1963

    Ketosis: What Happens to Excess Glucose?

    This is something I've always wondered about. When one is in ketosis, what exactly happens to excess glucose beyond what's needed by the few cells that require glucose? Well, I imagine some (or perhaps all of the initial excess) goes to replenishing glycogen stores that may have been previously depleted. But there's definitely a limit to how much can go towards that. After your glycogen has been topped off, does the glucose just go into the blood stream, or is it used by cells first, rather than utilizing ketones? Or does it just go to fat storage?
    A bit of a background as to why I'm asking this question now. I've been in ketosis for at least the past 8 months or so. I've had a few slipups along the way, but nothing major I'd say. My weight dropped rapidly, and I ended up being noticeably underweight. As a result I added more protein in my diet (due to my previous protein intake being way below recommended levels) and my weight's been quite stable for maybe 6 months or so, after regaining enough to put my right smack in the middle of my ideal weight range. Then in the past month I've been traveling a lot. On my first trip I suspect I ate too many carbs and gained about 5 kg (11 lbs). I was fairly confident that some or maybe even almost all of that was due to replenishing my glycogen stores. I came back from my trip, but my weight didn't go down. Then I went on a few more trips, and gained another 5kg, so 10kg total (22 lbs). 5kg, I could live with, but 10kg is just way too much, and most of it was added to my thighs and waist. Some of my tighter fitting pants are now almost too tight, so I'm most definitely not imagining it, nor is the scale lying.
    During my most recent trips, I felt like I ate pretty good, along the same lines as what I was eating when my weight was stable. There were a few questionable meals where I tried to select the lowest carb option, but imagine there could have been more carbs than I suspected. That's common when I go on travel, and I try to supplement by consuming more fats than normal. In this case I ended up having lots of coffee with fresh cream. I also ended up buying macadamia nuts and snacking on them quite a bit, mostly out of concern about upcoming dinners maybe being higher carb than I wanted, so thinking if I filled up ahead of time, I wouldn't be tempted to eat much of the higher carb meal. Well, I think it was a mistake in trying to snack on the macadamia nuts, because even though they have a good KR, they seemed to be quite addicting to me, and I found myself snacking unnecessarily on many days, and then craving the snacking. That is totally unlike me. Throughout being in ketosis, I've had no problems going long periods of time without eating, and not feeling hungry or any cravings. I just get an empty feeling in my stomach at times, but wouldn't really call it hunger, at least not in the sense of the hunger I used to feel when eating a glucose-centric diet.
    So I'm sure I was eating more overall than I normally eat, and I was also getting a much more continuous stream of food, due to too much snacking, compared to normal. But as best I could calculate, my KR was just as high, if not higher than normal, and I stayed in ketosis during my trip, albeit a bit lower than normal - in the 1's, rather than 2's or 3's. Previously I would often though have days where I ate a lot, with much more calories than "normal", so even the excess due to snacking didn't put me outside the range I was accustomed to in the past. Only the reduced time between meals was different. My BG numbers started creeping up at the same time. Previously my fasting numbers were mostly in the 60's and 70's, but during my trips I saw them go up to the 80's and sometimes 90's. At first I thought about what JDM said regarding Dr. Bernstein considering 83 to be a perfect number, and that perhaps being in ketosis for so long was drawing me to that "magic" number. But I stopped seeing any numbers in the 70's, and would see some in the 90's, and PP numbers were also higher. Previously I would rarely go over 100, but started seeing numbers in the 110's and up to about 120. Overall a 20 ~ 30 point increase on average over what I was doing. In the past I could see my BG go up on occasion, but this was different in that it was consistently higher and didn't come back down.
    Well, some say that too much snacking might not be good for some diabetics, though others say they do better with a method of more frequent meals/snacks. For me, I always had good success with intermittent fasting and limiting my number of meals, so I think the snacking may have had some effect. But I suspect the biggest effect was due to my not getting any exercise whatsoever during my trips. I've exercised religiously for the past year since first starting down the road to good control of my diabetes. I've had brief periods in the past where I couldn't exercise for a day or two, but never for a week or two weeks at a time like just happened. The longer I stay at this, the more I see that for me exercise is important. And I think I've just come to the conclusion that it's not only just important, but actually super important and an absolute necessity to control my diabetes (and weight) the way I should. I know for some people exercise doesn't have any effect, or a negligible effect. But for me, the effect is profound, especially when comparing absolutely no exercise to my normal exercise.
    For me, when I first started out, I began my exercise regime at my doctor's urging, and I was under the impression that the standard "calories in - calories out" effect was true. I knew I needed to lose weight, so I tried as much as possible to exercise (via mostly walking) after each and every meal, and to burn off those excess calories and fat. Well, I later learned that not all calories are the same, and it depends a whole lot on what those calories are composed of, and how the body uses those macronutrients and thus the calories. So my reasoning for exercising (to burn off the calories and thus lose weight) was very misguided, but the results were excellent. The reason being, in my mind, is that I was burning off the carbs. Every time I'd eat, I'd exercise enough to in my mind burn off the calories I just ate, or at least most of them. But what I was really doing was burning off the carbs, and thus no carbs were going to fat storage, but rather I had a deficit, and so I was burning fat to make up for it, and it had a dramatic effect on my BG as well, due to the carbs getting burned off.
    Ok, so back to my original question - what happens to the excess carbs? Even when maintaining a ketogenic diet, you still can easily consume more carbs than are necessary for the body. Based on what happens to me, beyond the glycogen aspect, it seems that some of the carbs may go towards elevating BG, but not much. (I'm not talking about going on carb binges which would noticeably spike BG, but rather excess carbs while still eating a good ketogenic diet with a good KR). What does happen though is that they go to fat storage. If I exercise after each meal, the carbs are burned off and not stored. But if I fail to exercise, the carbs can go to storage. Some of the carbs may go towards some minor BG creeping up, but I think ketosis likely puts an upper limit on that and it won't get too out of hand unless due to some other factor (such as illness, etc.)
    So while some people don't notice any changes due to exercising or not, or some even see a negative effect in exercising, for me it's absolutely critical that I continue my exercise after each meal if possible. As a result, I've drawn up a new plan to get back on track, which also addresses the snacking problem. From now on, I will try to only ever eat when I'm "hungry", meaning when I get that empty feeling and believe my body wants some food. And if that time comes when I'm busy and cannot get away to exercise, then I'll hold off and wait until I can, then eat and exercise. Well, there's obviously going to be sometimes when I cannot do that, due to social situations or whatever. But the plan is to do it as much as possible, and hopefully at least 90% or so of the time I can do my exercise regiment after eating, and thus burn off any excess carbs I have, and keep my weight down at it's ideal point and my BG at what I consider to be an ideal level for me. And when I go on travel in the future, I'll look to stay in hotels which have a gym, so that I can continue the exercise regiment I've established here at home, and even if the weather is bad, or environment issues may prevent me from exercising outdoors, I can still do so. I guess if nothing else, and there's no gym, I can just pace back and forth in my hotel room.
    Well, interested in hearing what others have to say about excess carbs when in ketosis, and how they affect you and your body.

  2. Nicoletti

    Originally Posted by Aaron1963
    This is something I've always wondered about. When one is in ketosis, what exactly happens to excess glucose beyond what's needed by the few cells that require glucose?
    Ok, so back to my original question - what happens to the excess carbs? Even when maintaining a ketogenic diet, you still can easily consume more carbs than are necessary for the body. If one is in ketosis, I wouldn't imagine there would be much in the way of excess glucose, or excess carbs. Seems to me from reading Ann's posts about her diet, there's not much in the way of excess carbs either, or she'd not be in ketosis.

  3. Ken S

    This is an interesting question Aaron, my guess would be similar to Nicole's, you use what little you eat which is very little and get the rest of your energy from ketones. If there is an excess then it goes to replace the ketones for energy, no more nutritional ketosis in other words. This is probably why it's so important to so severely limit glucose sources.

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