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What Happens To The Excess Glucose In The Body?

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EXCESS Salt in Body Symptoms:4 SIGNS YOUR BODY SENDS WHEN YOU EAT TOO MUCH SALT;salt eating signs Thanks For Watching This Video: EXCESS Salt in Body Symptoms:4 SIGNS YOUR BODY SENDS WHEN YOU EAT TOO MUCH SALT;salt eating signs : https://youtu.be/A9dt-cmtdww Don't forget to Subscribe for updates: https://goo.gl/WqO5fo When your doctor diagnoses you with hypertension it is a clear sign that you are eating too much salt. Still, eating too much sodium has many other negative effects on the health besides increasing the blood pressure. Eating a meal that is rich in salt can make you feel weird or uncomfortable. These 4 symptoms are usually felt after eating too much salt. FREQUENT URINATION The need to urinate often usually comes after drinking plenty of water. Did you know that the same happens when you eat too much salt? Consuming lots of salt makes the kidneys work overtime in order to remove it from the body which results in frequent urination. PERSISTENT HEADACHES The BMJ recently published a study that included adults who ate 3,500 mg of sodium every day and adults who took only 1,500 mg. Those who got the larger amount suffered more frequently from headaches then those who took

What Happens To Excess Glucose In The Body? | Yahoo Answers

What happens to excess glucose in the body? Are you sure you want to delete this answer? Best Answer: Insulin acts as a traffic director, causing glucose to be transported into the bodys cells, directing the body to store excess energy as glycogen for short-term storage in the liver and muscles and/or as triglycerides in adipose (fat) cells. I think this question violates the Community Guidelines Chat or rant, adult content, spam, insulting other members, show more I think this question violates the Terms of Service Harm to minors, violence or threats, harassment or privacy invasion, impersonation or misrepresentation, fraud or phishing, show more If you believe your intellectual property has been infringed and would like to file a complaint, please see our Copyright/IP Policy I think this answer violates the Community Guidelines Chat or rant, adult content, spam, insulting other members, show more I think this answer violates the Terms of Service Harm to minors, violence or threats, harassment or privacy invasion, impersonation or misrepresentation, fraud or phishing, show more If you believe your intellectual property has been infringed and would like to file a complaint, please Continue reading >>

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  1. Aaron1963

    Ketosis: What Happens to Excess Glucose?

    This is something I've always wondered about. When one is in ketosis, what exactly happens to excess glucose beyond what's needed by the few cells that require glucose? Well, I imagine some (or perhaps all of the initial excess) goes to replenishing glycogen stores that may have been previously depleted. But there's definitely a limit to how much can go towards that. After your glycogen has been topped off, does the glucose just go into the blood stream, or is it used by cells first, rather than utilizing ketones? Or does it just go to fat storage?
    A bit of a background as to why I'm asking this question now. I've been in ketosis for at least the past 8 months or so. I've had a few slipups along the way, but nothing major I'd say. My weight dropped rapidly, and I ended up being noticeably underweight. As a result I added more protein in my diet (due to my previous protein intake being way below recommended levels) and my weight's been quite stable for maybe 6 months or so, after regaining enough to put my right smack in the middle of my ideal weight range. Then in the past month I've been traveling a lot. On my first trip I suspect I ate too many carbs and gained about 5 kg (11 lbs). I was fairly confident that some or maybe even almost all of that was due to replenishing my glycogen stores. I came back from my trip, but my weight didn't go down. Then I went on a few more trips, and gained another 5kg, so 10kg total (22 lbs). 5kg, I could live with, but 10kg is just way too much, and most of it was added to my thighs and waist. Some of my tighter fitting pants are now almost too tight, so I'm most definitely not imagining it, nor is the scale lying.
    During my most recent trips, I felt like I ate pretty good, along the same lines as what I was eating when my weight was stable. There were a few questionable meals where I tried to select the lowest carb option, but imagine there could have been more carbs than I suspected. That's common when I go on travel, and I try to supplement by consuming more fats than normal. In this case I ended up having lots of coffee with fresh cream. I also ended up buying macadamia nuts and snacking on them quite a bit, mostly out of concern about upcoming dinners maybe being higher carb than I wanted, so thinking if I filled up ahead of time, I wouldn't be tempted to eat much of the higher carb meal. Well, I think it was a mistake in trying to snack on the macadamia nuts, because even though they have a good KR, they seemed to be quite addicting to me, and I found myself snacking unnecessarily on many days, and then craving the snacking. That is totally unlike me. Throughout being in ketosis, I've had no problems going long periods of time without eating, and not feeling hungry or any cravings. I just get an empty feeling in my stomach at times, but wouldn't really call it hunger, at least not in the sense of the hunger I used to feel when eating a glucose-centric diet.
    So I'm sure I was eating more overall than I normally eat, and I was also getting a much more continuous stream of food, due to too much snacking, compared to normal. But as best I could calculate, my KR was just as high, if not higher than normal, and I stayed in ketosis during my trip, albeit a bit lower than normal - in the 1's, rather than 2's or 3's. Previously I would often though have days where I ate a lot, with much more calories than "normal", so even the excess due to snacking didn't put me outside the range I was accustomed to in the past. Only the reduced time between meals was different. My BG numbers started creeping up at the same time. Previously my fasting numbers were mostly in the 60's and 70's, but during my trips I saw them go up to the 80's and sometimes 90's. At first I thought about what JDM said regarding Dr. Bernstein considering 83 to be a perfect number, and that perhaps being in ketosis for so long was drawing me to that "magic" number. But I stopped seeing any numbers in the 70's, and would see some in the 90's, and PP numbers were also higher. Previously I would rarely go over 100, but started seeing numbers in the 110's and up to about 120. Overall a 20 ~ 30 point increase on average over what I was doing. In the past I could see my BG go up on occasion, but this was different in that it was consistently higher and didn't come back down.
    Well, some say that too much snacking might not be good for some diabetics, though others say they do better with a method of more frequent meals/snacks. For me, I always had good success with intermittent fasting and limiting my number of meals, so I think the snacking may have had some effect. But I suspect the biggest effect was due to my not getting any exercise whatsoever during my trips. I've exercised religiously for the past year since first starting down the road to good control of my diabetes. I've had brief periods in the past where I couldn't exercise for a day or two, but never for a week or two weeks at a time like just happened. The longer I stay at this, the more I see that for me exercise is important. And I think I've just come to the conclusion that it's not only just important, but actually super important and an absolute necessity to control my diabetes (and weight) the way I should. I know for some people exercise doesn't have any effect, or a negligible effect. But for me, the effect is profound, especially when comparing absolutely no exercise to my normal exercise.
    For me, when I first started out, I began my exercise regime at my doctor's urging, and I was under the impression that the standard "calories in - calories out" effect was true. I knew I needed to lose weight, so I tried as much as possible to exercise (via mostly walking) after each and every meal, and to burn off those excess calories and fat. Well, I later learned that not all calories are the same, and it depends a whole lot on what those calories are composed of, and how the body uses those macronutrients and thus the calories. So my reasoning for exercising (to burn off the calories and thus lose weight) was very misguided, but the results were excellent. The reason being, in my mind, is that I was burning off the carbs. Every time I'd eat, I'd exercise enough to in my mind burn off the calories I just ate, or at least most of them. But what I was really doing was burning off the carbs, and thus no carbs were going to fat storage, but rather I had a deficit, and so I was burning fat to make up for it, and it had a dramatic effect on my BG as well, due to the carbs getting burned off.
    Ok, so back to my original question - what happens to the excess carbs? Even when maintaining a ketogenic diet, you still can easily consume more carbs than are necessary for the body. Based on what happens to me, beyond the glycogen aspect, it seems that some of the carbs may go towards elevating BG, but not much. (I'm not talking about going on carb binges which would noticeably spike BG, but rather excess carbs while still eating a good ketogenic diet with a good KR). What does happen though is that they go to fat storage. If I exercise after each meal, the carbs are burned off and not stored. But if I fail to exercise, the carbs can go to storage. Some of the carbs may go towards some minor BG creeping up, but I think ketosis likely puts an upper limit on that and it won't get too out of hand unless due to some other factor (such as illness, etc.)
    So while some people don't notice any changes due to exercising or not, or some even see a negative effect in exercising, for me it's absolutely critical that I continue my exercise after each meal if possible. As a result, I've drawn up a new plan to get back on track, which also addresses the snacking problem. From now on, I will try to only ever eat when I'm "hungry", meaning when I get that empty feeling and believe my body wants some food. And if that time comes when I'm busy and cannot get away to exercise, then I'll hold off and wait until I can, then eat and exercise. Well, there's obviously going to be sometimes when I cannot do that, due to social situations or whatever. But the plan is to do it as much as possible, and hopefully at least 90% or so of the time I can do my exercise regiment after eating, and thus burn off any excess carbs I have, and keep my weight down at it's ideal point and my BG at what I consider to be an ideal level for me. And when I go on travel in the future, I'll look to stay in hotels which have a gym, so that I can continue the exercise regiment I've established here at home, and even if the weather is bad, or environment issues may prevent me from exercising outdoors, I can still do so. I guess if nothing else, and there's no gym, I can just pace back and forth in my hotel room.
    Well, interested in hearing what others have to say about excess carbs when in ketosis, and how they affect you and your body.

  2. Nicoletti

    Originally Posted by Aaron1963
    This is something I've always wondered about. When one is in ketosis, what exactly happens to excess glucose beyond what's needed by the few cells that require glucose?
    Ok, so back to my original question - what happens to the excess carbs? Even when maintaining a ketogenic diet, you still can easily consume more carbs than are necessary for the body. If one is in ketosis, I wouldn't imagine there would be much in the way of excess glucose, or excess carbs. Seems to me from reading Ann's posts about her diet, there's not much in the way of excess carbs either, or she'd not be in ketosis.

  3. Ken S

    This is an interesting question Aaron, my guess would be similar to Nicole's, you use what little you eat which is very little and get the rest of your energy from ketones. If there is an excess then it goes to replace the ketones for energy, no more nutritional ketosis in other words. This is probably why it's so important to so severely limit glucose sources.

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In this video I discuss the what are carbohydrates and the types of carbohydrates. The pros and cons to each type, and the best carbs to eat. Transcript Types of carbs So, what are the different types of carbohydrates? The answer to this question depends on who you ask. Some common classifications would be healthy and unhealthy, good and bad, slow and fast. In this video I am going to classify them as simple, complex and fibrous. Before we get into those classifications, we need to look at molecules. I know, fun stuff, but it will help you understand better. A monosaccharide is a single molecule, such as fructose, which is found in fruit. A disaccharide consists of 2 monosaccharide molecules, such as sucrose or table sugar. And a polysaccharide consists of many monosaccharide molecules, such as in whole grain pasta. Now that we have that out of the way, lets look at simple carbohydrates. Simple carbohydrates are made up of mono and disaccharides, 1 or 2 molecules. Some foods include, fruits, milk, and foods with high amounts of added sugars. Typically simple carbohydrates are easily absorbed into the bloodstream because of their simple molecular structure. However, when you obtain

Carbohydrates (test #2)

Why are the complex carbohydrates referred to as "complex"? The ability for something to dissolve in water In relation to fiber, what is considered to be the soluble part? The meat (or pulp) of a fruit or vegetable (Example: the middle of an apple or pear) In relation to fiber, what is considered to be the insoluble part? The peel or skin of a fruit or vegetable (Example: kiwi fruit or potato) Complex carbohydrates are also known as ... Which carbohydrates are not digestible? Why? (2) 1. Fiber (we do not have an enzyme to digest it) 2. Monosaccharides (it's already in its smallest form) What are some sources of carbohydrates? (3) 1. Anything made from flour (bread, pasta, etc.) 2. Starchy vegetables and fruits (corn, potatoes, pears, bananas, etc.) 3. A lot of added sugars (pop, candy, etc.) Which monosaccharide does pop have a lot of? If you have high added sugar intake you probably ... (4) 1. Missing fiber (due to eating foods that do not have a lot of fiber containing carbohydrates) 2. Over consuming calories (increased caloric density due to a lot of empty calories - causing weight gain) 3. Putting stresses on the body's blood sugar regulation (diabetes, etc.) 4. Excess simple Continue reading >>

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  1. Aaron1963

    Ketosis: What Happens to Excess Glucose?

    This is something I've always wondered about. When one is in ketosis, what exactly happens to excess glucose beyond what's needed by the few cells that require glucose? Well, I imagine some (or perhaps all of the initial excess) goes to replenishing glycogen stores that may have been previously depleted. But there's definitely a limit to how much can go towards that. After your glycogen has been topped off, does the glucose just go into the blood stream, or is it used by cells first, rather than utilizing ketones? Or does it just go to fat storage?
    A bit of a background as to why I'm asking this question now. I've been in ketosis for at least the past 8 months or so. I've had a few slipups along the way, but nothing major I'd say. My weight dropped rapidly, and I ended up being noticeably underweight. As a result I added more protein in my diet (due to my previous protein intake being way below recommended levels) and my weight's been quite stable for maybe 6 months or so, after regaining enough to put my right smack in the middle of my ideal weight range. Then in the past month I've been traveling a lot. On my first trip I suspect I ate too many carbs and gained about 5 kg (11 lbs). I was fairly confident that some or maybe even almost all of that was due to replenishing my glycogen stores. I came back from my trip, but my weight didn't go down. Then I went on a few more trips, and gained another 5kg, so 10kg total (22 lbs). 5kg, I could live with, but 10kg is just way too much, and most of it was added to my thighs and waist. Some of my tighter fitting pants are now almost too tight, so I'm most definitely not imagining it, nor is the scale lying.
    During my most recent trips, I felt like I ate pretty good, along the same lines as what I was eating when my weight was stable. There were a few questionable meals where I tried to select the lowest carb option, but imagine there could have been more carbs than I suspected. That's common when I go on travel, and I try to supplement by consuming more fats than normal. In this case I ended up having lots of coffee with fresh cream. I also ended up buying macadamia nuts and snacking on them quite a bit, mostly out of concern about upcoming dinners maybe being higher carb than I wanted, so thinking if I filled up ahead of time, I wouldn't be tempted to eat much of the higher carb meal. Well, I think it was a mistake in trying to snack on the macadamia nuts, because even though they have a good KR, they seemed to be quite addicting to me, and I found myself snacking unnecessarily on many days, and then craving the snacking. That is totally unlike me. Throughout being in ketosis, I've had no problems going long periods of time without eating, and not feeling hungry or any cravings. I just get an empty feeling in my stomach at times, but wouldn't really call it hunger, at least not in the sense of the hunger I used to feel when eating a glucose-centric diet.
    So I'm sure I was eating more overall than I normally eat, and I was also getting a much more continuous stream of food, due to too much snacking, compared to normal. But as best I could calculate, my KR was just as high, if not higher than normal, and I stayed in ketosis during my trip, albeit a bit lower than normal - in the 1's, rather than 2's or 3's. Previously I would often though have days where I ate a lot, with much more calories than "normal", so even the excess due to snacking didn't put me outside the range I was accustomed to in the past. Only the reduced time between meals was different. My BG numbers started creeping up at the same time. Previously my fasting numbers were mostly in the 60's and 70's, but during my trips I saw them go up to the 80's and sometimes 90's. At first I thought about what JDM said regarding Dr. Bernstein considering 83 to be a perfect number, and that perhaps being in ketosis for so long was drawing me to that "magic" number. But I stopped seeing any numbers in the 70's, and would see some in the 90's, and PP numbers were also higher. Previously I would rarely go over 100, but started seeing numbers in the 110's and up to about 120. Overall a 20 ~ 30 point increase on average over what I was doing. In the past I could see my BG go up on occasion, but this was different in that it was consistently higher and didn't come back down.
    Well, some say that too much snacking might not be good for some diabetics, though others say they do better with a method of more frequent meals/snacks. For me, I always had good success with intermittent fasting and limiting my number of meals, so I think the snacking may have had some effect. But I suspect the biggest effect was due to my not getting any exercise whatsoever during my trips. I've exercised religiously for the past year since first starting down the road to good control of my diabetes. I've had brief periods in the past where I couldn't exercise for a day or two, but never for a week or two weeks at a time like just happened. The longer I stay at this, the more I see that for me exercise is important. And I think I've just come to the conclusion that it's not only just important, but actually super important and an absolute necessity to control my diabetes (and weight) the way I should. I know for some people exercise doesn't have any effect, or a negligible effect. But for me, the effect is profound, especially when comparing absolutely no exercise to my normal exercise.
    For me, when I first started out, I began my exercise regime at my doctor's urging, and I was under the impression that the standard "calories in - calories out" effect was true. I knew I needed to lose weight, so I tried as much as possible to exercise (via mostly walking) after each and every meal, and to burn off those excess calories and fat. Well, I later learned that not all calories are the same, and it depends a whole lot on what those calories are composed of, and how the body uses those macronutrients and thus the calories. So my reasoning for exercising (to burn off the calories and thus lose weight) was very misguided, but the results were excellent. The reason being, in my mind, is that I was burning off the carbs. Every time I'd eat, I'd exercise enough to in my mind burn off the calories I just ate, or at least most of them. But what I was really doing was burning off the carbs, and thus no carbs were going to fat storage, but rather I had a deficit, and so I was burning fat to make up for it, and it had a dramatic effect on my BG as well, due to the carbs getting burned off.
    Ok, so back to my original question - what happens to the excess carbs? Even when maintaining a ketogenic diet, you still can easily consume more carbs than are necessary for the body. Based on what happens to me, beyond the glycogen aspect, it seems that some of the carbs may go towards elevating BG, but not much. (I'm not talking about going on carb binges which would noticeably spike BG, but rather excess carbs while still eating a good ketogenic diet with a good KR). What does happen though is that they go to fat storage. If I exercise after each meal, the carbs are burned off and not stored. But if I fail to exercise, the carbs can go to storage. Some of the carbs may go towards some minor BG creeping up, but I think ketosis likely puts an upper limit on that and it won't get too out of hand unless due to some other factor (such as illness, etc.)
    So while some people don't notice any changes due to exercising or not, or some even see a negative effect in exercising, for me it's absolutely critical that I continue my exercise after each meal if possible. As a result, I've drawn up a new plan to get back on track, which also addresses the snacking problem. From now on, I will try to only ever eat when I'm "hungry", meaning when I get that empty feeling and believe my body wants some food. And if that time comes when I'm busy and cannot get away to exercise, then I'll hold off and wait until I can, then eat and exercise. Well, there's obviously going to be sometimes when I cannot do that, due to social situations or whatever. But the plan is to do it as much as possible, and hopefully at least 90% or so of the time I can do my exercise regiment after eating, and thus burn off any excess carbs I have, and keep my weight down at it's ideal point and my BG at what I consider to be an ideal level for me. And when I go on travel in the future, I'll look to stay in hotels which have a gym, so that I can continue the exercise regiment I've established here at home, and even if the weather is bad, or environment issues may prevent me from exercising outdoors, I can still do so. I guess if nothing else, and there's no gym, I can just pace back and forth in my hotel room.
    Well, interested in hearing what others have to say about excess carbs when in ketosis, and how they affect you and your body.

  2. Nicoletti

    Originally Posted by Aaron1963
    This is something I've always wondered about. When one is in ketosis, what exactly happens to excess glucose beyond what's needed by the few cells that require glucose?
    Ok, so back to my original question - what happens to the excess carbs? Even when maintaining a ketogenic diet, you still can easily consume more carbs than are necessary for the body. If one is in ketosis, I wouldn't imagine there would be much in the way of excess glucose, or excess carbs. Seems to me from reading Ann's posts about her diet, there's not much in the way of excess carbs either, or she'd not be in ketosis.

  3. Ken S

    This is an interesting question Aaron, my guess would be similar to Nicole's, you use what little you eat which is very little and get the rest of your energy from ketones. If there is an excess then it goes to replace the ketones for energy, no more nutritional ketosis in other words. This is probably why it's so important to so severely limit glucose sources.

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Watch this video to get an answer to your question! Ask a question in the comments and see your question answered. Intro by MacLobuzz www.maclobuzz.com https://www.youtube.com/maclobuzz Original video : https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=18uzY... zero-project presents "The ISS HD Earth Viewing Experiment" by "Zero project" 17 okt. 2014 Song title: "Silence" Album title: "e-world: The ultimate edition" Release date: February 1st 2015 Download page: http://www.zero-project.gr/music/albu... Official website: http://www.zero-project.gr/ -------------------------------------- Volatile Reaction Kevin MacLeod (incompetech.com) Licensed under Creative Commons: By Attribution 3.0 License http://creativecommons.org/licenses/b...

Absorbing And Storing Energy: How The Body Controls Glucose

Absorbing and Storing Energy: How the Body Controls Glucose Editors note: Physicians have a special place among the thinkers who have elaborated the argument for intelligent design. Perhaps thats because, more than evolutionary biologists, they are familiar with the challenges of maintaining a functioning complex system, the human body. With that in mind, Evolution News is delighted to offer this series, The Designed Body. For the complete series, see here . Dr. Glicksman practices palliative medicine for a hospice organization. Just like a car needs the energy, in the form of gasoline, to run properly, the body needs the energy in glucose to survive. When we havent eaten for a while, our blood glucose level drops and our stomach is empty, causing the hunger center in our brain to tell us to eat or drink something with calories. As I have explained in my last couple of articles, the complex molecules that are in what we eat and drink enter the gastrointestinal system, where digestive enzymes break them down into simpler molecules so the body can absorb them. Carbohydrates are broken down into simple sugars, like glucose, which are then absorbed into the blood. Tissues, such as the Continue reading >>

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  1. Aaron1963

    Ketosis: What Happens to Excess Glucose?

    This is something I've always wondered about. When one is in ketosis, what exactly happens to excess glucose beyond what's needed by the few cells that require glucose? Well, I imagine some (or perhaps all of the initial excess) goes to replenishing glycogen stores that may have been previously depleted. But there's definitely a limit to how much can go towards that. After your glycogen has been topped off, does the glucose just go into the blood stream, or is it used by cells first, rather than utilizing ketones? Or does it just go to fat storage?
    A bit of a background as to why I'm asking this question now. I've been in ketosis for at least the past 8 months or so. I've had a few slipups along the way, but nothing major I'd say. My weight dropped rapidly, and I ended up being noticeably underweight. As a result I added more protein in my diet (due to my previous protein intake being way below recommended levels) and my weight's been quite stable for maybe 6 months or so, after regaining enough to put my right smack in the middle of my ideal weight range. Then in the past month I've been traveling a lot. On my first trip I suspect I ate too many carbs and gained about 5 kg (11 lbs). I was fairly confident that some or maybe even almost all of that was due to replenishing my glycogen stores. I came back from my trip, but my weight didn't go down. Then I went on a few more trips, and gained another 5kg, so 10kg total (22 lbs). 5kg, I could live with, but 10kg is just way too much, and most of it was added to my thighs and waist. Some of my tighter fitting pants are now almost too tight, so I'm most definitely not imagining it, nor is the scale lying.
    During my most recent trips, I felt like I ate pretty good, along the same lines as what I was eating when my weight was stable. There were a few questionable meals where I tried to select the lowest carb option, but imagine there could have been more carbs than I suspected. That's common when I go on travel, and I try to supplement by consuming more fats than normal. In this case I ended up having lots of coffee with fresh cream. I also ended up buying macadamia nuts and snacking on them quite a bit, mostly out of concern about upcoming dinners maybe being higher carb than I wanted, so thinking if I filled up ahead of time, I wouldn't be tempted to eat much of the higher carb meal. Well, I think it was a mistake in trying to snack on the macadamia nuts, because even though they have a good KR, they seemed to be quite addicting to me, and I found myself snacking unnecessarily on many days, and then craving the snacking. That is totally unlike me. Throughout being in ketosis, I've had no problems going long periods of time without eating, and not feeling hungry or any cravings. I just get an empty feeling in my stomach at times, but wouldn't really call it hunger, at least not in the sense of the hunger I used to feel when eating a glucose-centric diet.
    So I'm sure I was eating more overall than I normally eat, and I was also getting a much more continuous stream of food, due to too much snacking, compared to normal. But as best I could calculate, my KR was just as high, if not higher than normal, and I stayed in ketosis during my trip, albeit a bit lower than normal - in the 1's, rather than 2's or 3's. Previously I would often though have days where I ate a lot, with much more calories than "normal", so even the excess due to snacking didn't put me outside the range I was accustomed to in the past. Only the reduced time between meals was different. My BG numbers started creeping up at the same time. Previously my fasting numbers were mostly in the 60's and 70's, but during my trips I saw them go up to the 80's and sometimes 90's. At first I thought about what JDM said regarding Dr. Bernstein considering 83 to be a perfect number, and that perhaps being in ketosis for so long was drawing me to that "magic" number. But I stopped seeing any numbers in the 70's, and would see some in the 90's, and PP numbers were also higher. Previously I would rarely go over 100, but started seeing numbers in the 110's and up to about 120. Overall a 20 ~ 30 point increase on average over what I was doing. In the past I could see my BG go up on occasion, but this was different in that it was consistently higher and didn't come back down.
    Well, some say that too much snacking might not be good for some diabetics, though others say they do better with a method of more frequent meals/snacks. For me, I always had good success with intermittent fasting and limiting my number of meals, so I think the snacking may have had some effect. But I suspect the biggest effect was due to my not getting any exercise whatsoever during my trips. I've exercised religiously for the past year since first starting down the road to good control of my diabetes. I've had brief periods in the past where I couldn't exercise for a day or two, but never for a week or two weeks at a time like just happened. The longer I stay at this, the more I see that for me exercise is important. And I think I've just come to the conclusion that it's not only just important, but actually super important and an absolute necessity to control my diabetes (and weight) the way I should. I know for some people exercise doesn't have any effect, or a negligible effect. But for me, the effect is profound, especially when comparing absolutely no exercise to my normal exercise.
    For me, when I first started out, I began my exercise regime at my doctor's urging, and I was under the impression that the standard "calories in - calories out" effect was true. I knew I needed to lose weight, so I tried as much as possible to exercise (via mostly walking) after each and every meal, and to burn off those excess calories and fat. Well, I later learned that not all calories are the same, and it depends a whole lot on what those calories are composed of, and how the body uses those macronutrients and thus the calories. So my reasoning for exercising (to burn off the calories and thus lose weight) was very misguided, but the results were excellent. The reason being, in my mind, is that I was burning off the carbs. Every time I'd eat, I'd exercise enough to in my mind burn off the calories I just ate, or at least most of them. But what I was really doing was burning off the carbs, and thus no carbs were going to fat storage, but rather I had a deficit, and so I was burning fat to make up for it, and it had a dramatic effect on my BG as well, due to the carbs getting burned off.
    Ok, so back to my original question - what happens to the excess carbs? Even when maintaining a ketogenic diet, you still can easily consume more carbs than are necessary for the body. Based on what happens to me, beyond the glycogen aspect, it seems that some of the carbs may go towards elevating BG, but not much. (I'm not talking about going on carb binges which would noticeably spike BG, but rather excess carbs while still eating a good ketogenic diet with a good KR). What does happen though is that they go to fat storage. If I exercise after each meal, the carbs are burned off and not stored. But if I fail to exercise, the carbs can go to storage. Some of the carbs may go towards some minor BG creeping up, but I think ketosis likely puts an upper limit on that and it won't get too out of hand unless due to some other factor (such as illness, etc.)
    So while some people don't notice any changes due to exercising or not, or some even see a negative effect in exercising, for me it's absolutely critical that I continue my exercise after each meal if possible. As a result, I've drawn up a new plan to get back on track, which also addresses the snacking problem. From now on, I will try to only ever eat when I'm "hungry", meaning when I get that empty feeling and believe my body wants some food. And if that time comes when I'm busy and cannot get away to exercise, then I'll hold off and wait until I can, then eat and exercise. Well, there's obviously going to be sometimes when I cannot do that, due to social situations or whatever. But the plan is to do it as much as possible, and hopefully at least 90% or so of the time I can do my exercise regiment after eating, and thus burn off any excess carbs I have, and keep my weight down at it's ideal point and my BG at what I consider to be an ideal level for me. And when I go on travel in the future, I'll look to stay in hotels which have a gym, so that I can continue the exercise regiment I've established here at home, and even if the weather is bad, or environment issues may prevent me from exercising outdoors, I can still do so. I guess if nothing else, and there's no gym, I can just pace back and forth in my hotel room.
    Well, interested in hearing what others have to say about excess carbs when in ketosis, and how they affect you and your body.

  2. Nicoletti

    Originally Posted by Aaron1963
    This is something I've always wondered about. When one is in ketosis, what exactly happens to excess glucose beyond what's needed by the few cells that require glucose?
    Ok, so back to my original question - what happens to the excess carbs? Even when maintaining a ketogenic diet, you still can easily consume more carbs than are necessary for the body. If one is in ketosis, I wouldn't imagine there would be much in the way of excess glucose, or excess carbs. Seems to me from reading Ann's posts about her diet, there's not much in the way of excess carbs either, or she'd not be in ketosis.

  3. Ken S

    This is an interesting question Aaron, my guess would be similar to Nicole's, you use what little you eat which is very little and get the rest of your energy from ketones. If there is an excess then it goes to replace the ketones for energy, no more nutritional ketosis in other words. This is probably why it's so important to so severely limit glucose sources.

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