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What Happens In Respiratory Acidosis?

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Respiratory acidosis #sign and symptoms of Respiratory acidosis Respiratory acidosis ABGs Analyse https://youtu.be/L5MWy1iHacI Plz share n subscribe my chanel is a condition that occurs when the lungs cant remove enough of the Suctioning https://youtu.be/hMJGkxvXTW0 carbon dioxide (CO2) produced by the body. Excess CO2 causes the pH of blood and other bodily fluids to decrease, making them too acidic. Normally, the body is able to balance the ions that control acidity. This balance is measured on a pH scale from 0 to 14. Acidosis occurs when the pH of the blood falls below 7.35 (normal blood pH is between 7.35 and 7.45).Rinku Chaudhary NSG officer AMU ALIGARH https://www.facebook.com/rinkutch/ Respiratory acidosis is typically caused by an underlying disease or condition. This is also called respiratory failure or ventilatory failure. Suctioning https://youtu.be/hMJGkxvXTW0 Normally, the lungs take in oxygen and exhale CO2. Oxygen passes from the lungs into the blood. CO2 passes from the blood into the lungs. However, sometimes the lungs cant remove enough CO2. This may be due to a decrease in respiratory rate or decrease in air movement due to an underlying condition such as: asthma COPD pneumonia sleep apnea TYPES Forms of respiratory acidosis There are two forms of respiratory acidosis: acute and chronic. Acute respiratory acidosis occurs quickly. Its a medical emergency. Left untreated, symptoms will get progressively worse. It can become life-threatening. Chronic respiratory acidosis develops over time. It doesnt cause symptoms. Instead, the body adapts to the increased acidity. For example, the kidneys produce more bicarbonate to help maintain balance. Chronic respiratory acidosis may not cause symptoms. Developing another illness may cause chronic respiratory acidosis to worsen and become acute respiratory acidosis. SYMPTOMS Symptoms of respiratory acidosis Initial signs of acute respiratory acidosis include: headache anxiety blurred vision restlessness confusion Without treatment, other symptoms may occur. These include: https://www.healthline.com/health/res... sleepiness or fatigue lethargy delirium or confusion shortness of breath coma The chronic form of respiratory acidosis doesnt typically cause any noticeable symptoms. Signs are subtle and nonspecific and may include: memory loss sleep disturbances personality changes CAUSES Common causes of respiratory acidosis The lungs and the kidneys are the major organs that help regulate your bloods pH. The lungs remove acid by exhaling CO2, and the kidneys excrete acids through the urine. The kidneys also regulate your bloods concentration of bicarbonate (a base). Respiratory acidosis is usually caused by a lung disease or condition that affects normal breathing or impairs the lungs ability to remove CO2. Some common causes of the chronic form are: asthma chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) acute pulmonary edema severe obesity (which can interfere with expansion of the lungs) neuromuscular disorders (such as multiple sclerosis or muscular dystrophy) scoliosis Some common causes of the acute form are: lung disorders (COPD, emphysema, asthma, pneumonia) conditions that affect the rate of breathing muscle weakness that affects breathing or taking a deep breath obstructed airways (due to choking or other causes) sedative overdose cardiac arrest DIAGNOSIS How is respiratory acidosis diagnosed? The goal of diagnostic tests for respiratory acidosis is to look for any pH imbalance, to determine the severity of the imbalance, and to determine the condition causing the imbalance. Several tools can help doctors diagnose respiratory acidosis. Blood gas measurement Blood gas is a series of tests used to measure oxygen and CO2 in the blood. A healthcare provider will take a sample of blood from your artery. High levels of CO2 can indicate acidosis.

Respiratory Acidosis: Types, Causes, Symptoms, Treatment

What is Respiratory Acidosis? Respiratory Acidosis which is also known by the names of Respiratory Failure or Ventilatory Failure is a pathological condition of the respiratory system in which the lungs of the body are not able to remove enough carbon dioxide from the body thus making the blood and other fluids in the body more acidic in nature. This is because the body must balance the ions that control pH. In majority of the cases, Respiratory Acidosis is caused due to an underlying condition. Under normal circumstances, the lungs take in oxygen and release carbon dioxide. The oxygen is taken from the lungs to different parts of the body while the carbon dioxide is released from the lungs to the air. Sometimes what happens is that the lungs lose their capacity to remove enough carbon dioxide from the body and some amount of carbon dioxide still remains within the body, which increases the acidic content in the blood and other fluids in the body causing Respiratory Acidosis. Some of the underlying conditions like asthma, COPD, pneumonia and sleep apnea are the primary causes for development of Respiratory Acidosis. What are the Types of Respiratory Acidosis? Respiratory Acidosis i Continue reading >>

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  1. Justwantnormal

    Alcoholic 'Breath of Death'?

    Hi all, it's been a while since I've posted. Not much has changed here, unless you call finding new places to hide vodka 'change'. I have a question though. Last night my AH had a horrible smell to him. I smelt it on his breath early in the evening, but then it seemed to start seeping out of his pores as the night went on. It's not the smell of alcohol, it's much, MUCH worse. I've smelt it on him before, but could never figure out a way to describe the smell. When I woke up at 3am, the smell was so strong I thought I might be sick. It suddenly dawned on me that I know the smell - it smells like the old folks home I used to visit my Grandmother in. So I googled 'alcoholic smells like an old folks home' and came up with Fetor Hepaticus (also referred to as the 'Breath of Death'). Has anyone else experienced this? It's such an awful, awful smell and my whole house stinks of it. Is this a 'GET HIM TO THE HOSPITAL NOW' sort of situation? …not that he'd listen.

  2. thequest

    I notice that alcohol can increase or change the smell of colognes, soaps and deodorants. Alcohol can also change hormones if hard core long term alkie. Alkies frequently have hang over breath. I think once they have sweet or alcohol breath their bodies are over loaded with alcohol. Alcohol can dehydrate the body which could affect smells as well. It could affect the smell of what he has eaten. I'll have to follow and check on this because I too notice a lot of smells as well with the excessive drinker.
    Good Luck

  3. CodeJob

    Yuck. I doubt it would make a difference to point it out.
    Mine used to get up and puke his brains out every morning and then pretend everyone gets up and yaks! Gross!! Total denial...

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Respiratory acidosis and alkalosis made easy for nurses. This NCLEX review is part of a acid base balance for nurses series. In this video I discuss respiratory acidosis causes, signs & symptoms, nursing interventions, and "How to Solve ABGs Problems using the TIC TAC TOE method" for patients in respiratory acidosis. Quiz: Respiratory Acidosis vs Respiratory Alkalosis: http://www.registerednursern.com/resp... Review Notes on Respiratory Acidosis: http://www.registerednursern.com/resp... Solving ABGs with TIC TAC TOE Method: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=URCS4... Respiratory Alkalosis Video: https://youtu.be/Kw89JJZU3GA Metabolic Acidosis Video: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hitB3... Subscribe: http://www.youtube.com/subscription_c... Nursing School Supplies: http://www.registerednursern.com/the-... Nursing Job Search: http://www.registerednursern.com/nurs... Visit our website RegisteredNurseRN.com for free quizzes, nursing care plans, salary information, job search, and much more: http://www.registerednursern.com Check out other Videos: https://www.youtube.com/user/Register... Popular Playlists: "NCLEX Study Strategies": https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list... "Fluid & Electrolytes Made So Easy": https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list... "Nursing Skills Videos": https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list... "Nursing School Study Tips": https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list... "Nursing School Tips & Questions": https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list... "Teaching Tutorials": https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list... "Types of Nursing Specialties": https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list... "Healthcare Salary Information": https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list... "New Nurse Tips": https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list... "Nursing Career Help": https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list... "EKG Teaching Tutorials": https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list... "Personality Types": https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list... "Dosage & Calculations for Nurses": https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list... "Diabetes Health Managment": https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list...

Respiratory Acidosis Nclex Review Notes

Are you studying respiratory acidosis and need to know a mnemonic on how to remember the causes? This article will give you a clever mnemonic and simplify the signs and symptoms and nursing interventions on how to remember respiratory acidosis for nursing lecture exams and NCLEX. In addition, you will learn how to differentiate respiratory acidosis from respiratory alkalosis. Don’t forget to take the respiratory acidosis and respiratory alkalosis quiz. This article will cover: Sequence of normal breathing Patho of respiratory acidosis Causes of respiratory acidosis Signs and symptoms of respiratory acidosis Nursing interventions for respiratory acidosis Lecture on Respiratory Acidosis Respiratory Acidosis What’s involved:…let’s look at normal breathing: Oxygen enters through the mouth or nose down through the Pharynx into the Larynx (the throat) then into the Trachea and the Bronchus (right and left) which branches into the bronchioles and ends in alveoli sac *The alveolar sacs are where gas exchange takes place (oxygen and carbon dioxide diffuse across the membrane). The oxygen enters into your blood stream and CARBON DIOXIDE CO2 is exhaled through your nose or mouth. The Continue reading >>

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  1. SWEETJAS

    HEY ALL!!
    I AM SOOOOO CONFUSED! I know some people don't think that the strips are accurate (their are many things that can effect the out come, how much water are you drinking, yadda, yadda, yadda) I had to try them !. I bought some last night and according to the color I am in Moderate ketosis. This morning I used one and it is the same. The strips go from Zero, Trace, Low, Moderate, to Large. So does the moderate mean that I AM buring fat as fuel or that I am ALMOST buring fat for fuel? The box and directions don't give and explanation for some odd reason.
    HEEEEELP!! Thanks!

  2. Cherimee

    On the side of the bottle, you should see a like a chart to compare it to.... if you are in moderate ketosis then that's good! The more purple the stick, the more fat you are burning for fuel, which is what you want to do on Atkins. You'll notice that with Atkins, the keto strips are like the scale, you wanna see PURPLE when you test becasue the more ketones in your urine, of course the more fat you burn! Sounds like you are doing good...good luck
    P.S. I'm told that with Atkins even a 'trace' of ketones is good... trying going to www dot lowcarbnexus dot com, that site gives you good info... here's what they say about ketosis:
    Ketosis? - As long as we are on the topic, what about ketosis? Ketosis is the state that your body enters into when you are eating mainly protein and fats, and drastically curtailing your consumption of carbohydrates. As Dr. Atkins says, "There is no lipolysis without ketosis, no ketosis without lipolysis." Lipolysis is, essentially, "fat burning." In other words, this is just what we want! We want to force our bodies to consume stored fat for fuel rather than burn primarily our food. This occurs because protein and fat do not "give up" their stored energy as easily as do carbohydrates. As long as you are eating mainly carbs, especially refined sugars, you will find that your body will burn that as opposed to your fat stores. Testing with LTS, as we have mentioned above, scientifically tests for the process of your body burning it's own fat as fuel. When the sticks turn purple (or a shade thereof), you are burning fat! It is a good feeling! It is especially comforting to see that purple when your scales don't agree that you are losing! Keep in mind that fat loss doesn't always equal weight loss on the scales... immediately. Body weight can be related to water retention, and many other temporary conditions. However, FAT loss is what we want, and you will see measurements change even if your scale does not show it immediately! That WILL follow, of course... just stick with it!
    Some have asked, "Do I have to be in ketosis?" Well, it is perfectly safe to be in what Dr. Atkins calls "Benign Dietary Ketosis" for extended periods. In fact, if you are burning fat, you will be in some amount of ketosis...sometimes just not a measurable amount (with LTS). If you are out of ketosis for extended periods, you won't be burning fat, and therefore, you won't be losing weight! And that's what we are doing the diet to do! Don't confuse ketosis, a safe metabolic state that you enter when you loss weight, with ketoacidosis, a dangerous state that diabetics, in particular, can enter if they get out of proper balance in their insulin / glycogen balance. Many health care professionals and nutritionists are apparently confused by the distinction between these two different states... ketone test strips are used to test both states, but they are quite different!

  3. SWEETJAS

    Cherimee, BIG THANKS!!!! The info you gave me is sooooo relieving!!! I was so worried! I know that must have takin a while for you to find and type, thank you so much for helping me!

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Hello guys In this video discuss about the basic concept of acidosis and alkalosis and Discuss the topic of respiratory acidosis The cause Sign symptom and treatment Please subscribe my channel for more video And comment which video you want discuss in next videos. Thanks

Respiratory Acidosis

Respiratory Acidosis Definition Respiratory acidosis is a condition in which a build-up of carbon dioxide in the blood produces a shift in the body's pH balance and causes the body's system to become more acidic. This condition is brought about by a problem either involving the lungs and respiratory system or signals from the brain that control breathing. Description Respiratory acidosis is an acid imbalance in the body caused by a problem related to breathing. In the lungs, oxygen from inhaled air is exchanged for carbon dioxide from the blood. This process takes place between the alveoli (tiny air pockets in the lungs) and the blood vessels that connect to them. When this exchange of oxygen for carbon dioxide is impaired, the excess carbon dioxide forms an acid in the blood. The condition can be acute with a sudden onset, or it can develop gradually as lung function deteriorates. Causes and symptoms Respiratory acidosis can be caused by diseases or conditions that affect the lungs themselves, such as emphysema, chronic bronchitis, asthma, or severe pneumonia. Blockage of the airway due to swelling, a foreign object, or vomit can induce respiratory acidosis. Drugs like anesthetics Continue reading >>

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  1. lucullus

    low carb causing my fasting blood sugar to rise?

    A few months ago I had a fasting blood sugar test which showed signs of pre diabetes. I went on a strick diet for 4 weeks and lost 22lbs. I had another checkup and they told me there was no signs of diabetes. HBA1C was 5.4 and fasting blood was 99. I assumed all was well and went back to normal diet. Three weeks later I noticed my fasting level where 110-125 over a few days. I went straight on to a low carb restricted calorie diet, that's about 12 days ago.
    I have been consuming about 1400-1600 calories with around 130g carbs. Nearly All foods being low glycemic index. I thought I would add fasting days to my diet also. So I had one day on 650 calories. I have been doing about 1.5 to 2 hours of walking per day, plus either 1 hr bike or 1 hour gym. Since the fasting day (5 days ago) my fasting blood sugars have risen quite dramatically. My fasting blood sugar is averaging 145 and before bed I have scores as high as 175. I have lost around 12 lbs in the last 12 days. My BMI is currently 26.7 down from 30.2. My waist measurement is less than half my height 191cm versus 94 cm
    It appears that by loosing approx 34 lbs in total. I have managed to go from pre diabetic to full diabetes. I am very concerned can anyone give we a reason why my blood sugars are rising when I am eating such a low calorie low carb diet. It like my pancreas just decided to stop producing insulin. When a few weeks into the start of first part of my diet it was producing normal amounts. 72.3 pmol/l. My wife has said my breath has started to smell a bit worse last few days?

  2. Nan OH

    Hello and welcome
    For many people 130 grams of carbohydrates is not a low carb diet. Your extra fasting may be causing your liver to release stored glucose and that is raising your numbers. For me, if my Blood Glucose Level is 150 or higher I can not do heavy work outs. Well I could not, my health has changed due to other conditions and I can no longer work out at all.
    It is debated whether there is actually a pre-diabetes. When you notice that carbohydrates are giving you problems, they will almost always give you problems. We can control but we can not stop our inability to use our bodies' insulin.
    How often are you testing? I know test strips are expensive but since you are trying to figure this out you may want to test when you get up, one hour and two hours after each meal and then at bed time.
    Has your doctor run any test to rule out the possibility that you could be a Type One diabetic?

  3. AnnC

    You've made a lot of changes to your diet in the past 12 days, without waiting for each change to take effect. If eating the first 'strict diet' brought your HbA1c back into non-diabetic ranges while maintaining normal insulin production, is there any reason why you can't go back to eating that diet?

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