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What Happens If You Don't Eat Enough Fat On Keto

What Happens To The Extra Fat You Eat If You Do Keto Diet Wrong?

What Happens To The Extra Fat You Eat If You Do Keto Diet Wrong?

Your body should either burn it or start excreting it. On the keto diet your body will be prompted to convert fat into ketone bodies to supply the body in its energy needs, any excess of which will get automatically excreted via urine and via lungs in the normal course of events, carrying with them the calories they contain. This helps explain how it can be that a ketogenic diet can in fact promote greater fat or weight loss for a given caloric content and energy demand in a person as comparted to a non-ketogenic (carb based) diet with the same caloric content. Given you’ve only recently learnt about keto diets, I would strongly advise you to continue to learn as much as you can. In particular I’d suggest you read Phinney and Volek’s books “The art and science of low carbohydrate living” and “The art and science of low carbohydrate performance.” Be particularly attentive of the difficulties and side effects you may run into in the beginning stages of a ketogenic diet so you’re prepared for them should they occur. Most of these can be mitigated or eliminated but may be hard to deal with if you’re not expecting them etc. Note that a keto diet is a “high fat, moderate proteien, low carb” diet. (Don’t overdo the proteien.) You mention finding knowing what to eat hard: Unfortunately knowing what to eat is somewhat of a challenge particularly in the beginning on a ketogenic diet, since as you’ll soon find carbs and sugars are present in very many foods, and it can be be quite challenging therefore to come up with meals that complies with the carb limits required to promote enable and promote ketosis. The process is however worth it and you will in time learn what you can eat and what to avoid. Best of luck. Continue reading >>

9 Signs You Need To Eat More Fat

9 Signs You Need To Eat More Fat

By now, we all basically agree that fat is an essential nutrient. Certain fats, like linoleic acid and alpha linolenic acid, are physiologically essential because our bodies cannot produce them. Other fats, like those found in extra virgin olive oil and grass-fed butter, are culinarily essential because they make food taste really good (they’re not so bad in the nutrition department, either). And others are conditionally essential, meaning they become extremely helpful and even critical in certain situations. But how much is enough? How do we know when to increase our intake of specific fats? There are a few indicators that you might need more fat. If any of the following issues are giving you trouble or sound familiar, consider increasing your intake of fat. It may very well help solve your problem. You have dry skin. Dry skin can mean a lot of things – allergic reactions, imbalanced gut microbiota, topical exposure to abrasive chemicals – but it often means that you simply need more fat in your diet. How so? Sebum is the body’s natural moisturizer, and we produce it in-house using the fatty acids that are available. Some of the fats come from our own body stores, of course, while others have to come from the diet, especially if we’re not actively losing body fat or we don’t have much to spare. Increasing fat intake, then, is a painless, simple way to potentially improve your skin’s moisture levels. You’re low-carb and feeling “off.” Fat is still a bad word in many circles. How many people have seen this happen? A person reduces carb intake to lose weight without realizing that they need to increase their consumption of fat to make up for some of the missing energy. They begin losing weight, but the exhaustion, lack of energy, malaise, and headaches Continue reading >>

Ten Reasons You Are Not Losing Fat On A Low-carb Diet

Ten Reasons You Are Not Losing Fat On A Low-carb Diet

“” —Passmore & Swindells, two British dietitians writing in the British Journal of Nutrition in 1963 Whether you agree with the above quote or think it’s hilarious nonsense, there’s no doubt that reduced carb diets are useful for losing body fat. A lot of people find that cutting carbs in favor of a higher protein, higher fat diet is the simplest way to get lean fast. However, people often make mistakes when going low-carb, especially if they are training hard in an effort to accelerate the fat loss process. With these 10 simple tips, you can make going low-carb a lot easier and get better fat loss results. Mistake #1: Not Restricting Carbohydrates Enough Low-carb, high-protein diets are effective for fat loss. This is a scientific fact. But, low-carb is a vague term. Simply cutting the average American man’s carb intake of 310 grams a day in half could be considered low-carb, but if you are overweight and your goal is fat loss, you most likely need to go a lot lower than 155 grams. A review in the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition suggests the 50 to 150 g/day range is too high for losing body fat in overweight, sedentary populations. A useful definition of a low-carb fat loss diet is less than 50 grams of carbs a day, which will lead to the production of ketones. When the body is producing ketones it is no longer relying on glucose (sugar from carbs) for its fuel source, which is a state that provides significant metabolic benefits and easier fat loss. Fix It: For best results, get those 50 grams of carbs from vegetables and select fruits, such as berries, or other low-carb fruit. Eliminate all grains—whole and processed. Mistake #2: You are Lean, Active & Restricting Carbs Too Much The AJCN definition of a low-carb diet as less than 50 grams a day w Continue reading >>

30 Ways To Eat More Fat

30 Ways To Eat More Fat

Are you eating enough fat? If you are on a ketogenic diet, like Keto or Atkins Induction, you must eat fat to get thin. Fat is wonderful. Fat adds joy to food. You can indulge in fantastically rich and scrumptious meals while losing weight. Easy, right? But we’ve been brainwashed by decades of misguided anti-fat propaganda. Habits are hard to reverse. So you might unconsciously eat less fat than you need. How much fat is enough? On ketogenic diets, about 70-80% of all calories should come from fat. That’s huge compared to how much fat people get on “standard” diets, let alone on low-fat diets. Here’s a list of ways to get more fat, so that your ketosis is firing on all cylinders. Download printable list >> 1. Choose fatty cuts of red meat General public shuns fatty cuts of meat because of the low-fat BS. Good news for us – lower demand means cheaper prices. Supermarkets often trim fat from meat. Find a butcher – either locally or online – and ask them for untrimmed cuts. Choose pasture-raised grass-fed red meat over grain-fed, for better taste and nutrient quality. Examples of fatty meat cuts are pork belly, pork ribs, lamb neck, untrimmed lamb chops, beef short ribs, rib eye steak and sirloin steak. 2. Opt for poultry legs and wings, plus duck breasts Chicken drumsticks and wings have more fat than breast meat. Roast, slow-cook or fry them for a perfect high-fat meal. Duck breasts have a nice layer of fat under the skin. Many recipes call for scoring the skin to drain some of the fat. Skip this step to retain all the fatty goodness. Duck legs are fantastic when slow-cooked. Obviously, forget the standard diet advice of discarding poultry skin. On Keto, skin is the best part! RECIPE: Pan-fried duck breast with low-carb veggies 3. Eat oily fish for a hit Continue reading >>

I Was Doing Keto Wrong

I Was Doing Keto Wrong

What I want to share with you in this post is very important if you are trying to follow a very low carb, high fat diet. Ketogenic diets are becoming very popular due to the fantastic weight loss and health improvement results people are experiencing. They really do work very well, but only if you do it properly. If you don’t you can damage your metabolism, adrenals, thyroid and upset your hormones. It happened to me so I am speaking from first-hand experience. You need to know what you are doing and you need to KEEP doing it. What was my mistake? I wasn’t eating enough fat or enough calories (and I wasn’t properly keto-adapted). Everything changed for me when I was privileged enough to spend time with US expert Keto Coach, Stephanie Person, when she visited South Africa in May. I explained to Stephanie that I had been trying to follow a ketogenic diet but had started to get disillusioned. I wasn’t losing anymore weight, my blood sugar was higher than I wanted it to be and my waist wasn’t getting any slimmer. I informed her that even on a 1200 calorie /day LCHF diet, plus 5 to 6 days of exercise each week, the weight wasn’t budging. What she said next opened my eyes to the severity of my situation. “You are starving yourself Nicky and your body is so stressed out that your adrenals are pumping too much cortisol and that is why you can’t lose weight“. It was amazing to me that intellectually I knew this stuff and have even written articles on these issues, but couldn’t recognise the problem in myself. I told Stephanie that I had been experimenting lately with upping my carbs and that I had experienced some benefits but I confessed that of late I was finding my old sugar and carb cravings returning and that it was becoming increasingly more difficult t Continue reading >>

Ketosis, Ketones, And How It All Works

Ketosis, Ketones, And How It All Works

Ketosis is a process that the body does on an everyday basis, regardless of the number of carbs you eat. Your body adapts to what is put in it, processing different types of nutrients into the fuels that it needs. Proteins, fats, and carbs can all be processed for use. Eating a low carb, high fat diet just ramps up this process, which is a normal and safe chemical reaction. When you eat carbohydrate based foods or excess amounts of protein, your body will break this down into sugar – known as glucose. Why? Glucose is needed in the creation of ATP (an energy molecule), which is a fuel that is needed for the daily activities and maintenance inside our bodies. If you’ve ever used our keto calculator to determine your caloric needs, you will see that your body uses up quite a lot of calories. It’s true, our bodies use up much of the nutrients we intake just to maintain itself on a daily basis. If you eat enough food, there will likely be an excess of glucose that your body doesn’t need. There are two main things that happen to excess glucose if your body doesn’t need it: Glycogenesis. Excess glucose will be converted to glycogen and stored in your liver and muscles. Estimates show that only about half of your daily energy can be stored as glycogen. Lipogenesis. If there’s already enough glycogen in your muscles and liver, any extra glucose will be converted into fats and stored. So, what happens to you once your body has no more glucose or glycogen? Ketosis happens. When your body has no access to food, like when you are sleeping or when you are on a ketogenic diet, the body will burn fat and create molecules called ketones. We can thank our body’s ability to switch metabolic pathways for that. These ketones are created when the body breaks down fats, creating Continue reading >>

The Keto Lifestyle Rocks!

The Keto Lifestyle Rocks!

What the heck is ‘keto’? Ketosis (keto) is where you train your body to work slightly differently. Normally, your body uses carbs for its fuel because we eat a ton of carbs (pasta, bread, wheat, etc.). But when you go into ketosis and maintain a low carb, high fat lifestyle, your body transitions into burning fat instead of carbs in order to get its energy. So what do you eat while in ketosis? The goal with keto is: low carb, high fat/protein. The exact values you want to hit are different for each person (depending on gender, weight, height, activity level), but to give you an idea, here are my goals: Carbs: 20-25g per day (or less) Fat: 100g Protein: 80g The first and most obvious thing is to cut out carbs, grains, and sugar. This means no bread, pasta, rice, tortillas, and anything with sugar. Next, you need to load up on fat. STOP buying anything that says “low fat” on it. Not only are these foods horrible for you anyway, but you won’t be getting the fat you need if you buy them. Remember, when you’re on keto, your body actually uses fat as fuel. If you don’t have enough fat, you don’t have enough fuel, and your body will start using muscle instead. That’s bad! How do you lose weight by eating low carb? I couldn’t survive on a calorie controlled diet I should say that I never spent any large amount of time on just a calorie controlled diet, but I did try it a little bit. IT SUCKED! I found it so incredibly easy to go over my daily calorie limit. Then when I “ran out”, I’d get super moody and cranky because I was hungry and wanted more food. A lot of people report that a ‘normal’ calorie controlled diet causes them to do well for a week (or a few days), then totally binge eat the next few days. This is because they’re unsatisfied and h Continue reading >>

How Much Fat On A Ketogenic Diet?

How Much Fat On A Ketogenic Diet?

Do calories matter? How much fat can I eat to lose weight on a ketogenic diet? These are just some of the many questions I focused on when writing this post. What's the Ideal Fat Intake on a Ketogenic Diet? As most of you know, ketogenic diets are high in fat, adequate in protein and low in carbohydrates. The aim of the ketogenic eating is to get your body into a state known as ketosis. Generally, the macronutrient ratio varies within the following ranges: • 60-75% of calories from fat (or even more), • 15-30% of calories from protein, and • 5-10% of calories from carbs. However, percentages are relative and don't say anything about the amount of calories you are eating. Percentages will give you an idea of the macronutrient composition of a diet. To determine the amount of calories, you have to look at absolute numbers - macronutrients in grams. So it's totally different to consume 4,000 kcal and 2,000 kcal on a ketogenic diet. Can I Eat less than 60% of Calories from Fat? Yes, you can. Since you only regulate your energy intake via fat when following a ketogenic diet (protein and carbs remain more or less constant), you may end up eating less than 60% of calories from fat, especially if you are trying to lose weight. This is perfectly fine. In his bestselling books and also in this video, Dr. Stephen Phinney explains the different phases of the ketogenic diet. Depending on your goal, your fat intake will vary in each phase and you will lose different amount of body fat. Weight loss slows down and it's completely natural - you will lose more weight at the beginning (water weight + accelerated fat loss) so don't get discouraged if your weight loss slows down as you get close to your target weight. Why You Need to Use a Keto Calculator Not everyone follows the keto Continue reading >>

The Keto Method

The Keto Method

Disclaimer Please consult a qualified, ketogenic-friendly medical professional before following the advice from this website. The Keto Method is completely non-profit. There is no financial gain and I am not associated with any external websites or persons mentioned on this page. I do not receive or ask for any money to run and maintain this server. The Keto Method is a lifestyle which follows the ketogenic diet to improve your physical and mental health, reducing your body fat and breaking the high carb diet trap that plagues us with a whole range of metabolic related health issues. The ketogenic diet (pronounced key-toe-jenik) is one which consists of restricting carbohydrates and increasing fat consumption for weight loss and improved overall health. The goal here is to reduce our glycogen levels and increase our ketone levels. Glycogen is a type of sugar that the body can use as a source of energy. It is a fast and easy fuel source created by the intake of carbohydrates. Is glycogen the best fuel for the body? What happens if you don’t eat carbohydrates and never ‘refuel’ your glycogen stores? The answer to these questions lie in the alternative body fuel: fat. The term ‘ketogenic’ comes from the principal of burning fat (instead of glycogen) for fuel. Burning fat for fuel means your body is in ‘ketosis’, which can be verified by ketone bodies present in your breath, blood and urine. The idea that eating fat to lose weight or to improve our health may sound absurd, but there is lots of evidence to suggest that this is true. Fats, especially saturated fats (found in butter, coconut oil, meat, eggs and dairy), have many benefits to our health, including: Improving our cholesterol levels. Keep us fuller for longer. Improving our dental health. Easier fat Continue reading >>

How Much Fat Should You Eat On A Ketogenic Diet?

How Much Fat Should You Eat On A Ketogenic Diet?

Thankfully, the days of low-fat diet fads are mostly behind us, and people are better understanding the importance of eating healthy fats for health. But still, many of those eating keto will underestimate just how much fat they need to eat to see success on this way of eating. So, how much fat can you eat on a ketogenic diet? This article will cover why fat intake matters on the ketogenic diet and how it makes it successful, as well as how to find out how much fat you need. Then, we’ll touch on how you can make sure your fat intake stays high (while still getting enough calories) and the best types of fat to eat. The Importance of Fat on the Keto Diet Dietary fat is the cornerstone of the ketogenic diet. It’s the high fat intake and low carb intake that makes the diet “work” and keeps your body in ketosis — using those ketones for fuel and burning through fat. Having a very low carb intake allows you to deplete your body of carbohydrates and stored carbohydrates (glycogen) and conditioning it to begin turning to fat instead, leading to the creation of ketones for energy. Getting and keeping the body in this state of ketosis has many benefits that include weight loss and better health. High Fat and Enough Calories Matters Those new to keto or who have taken a break from it often struggle with eating enough fat at first. Since you’re greatly reducing your carb intake, you have to really increase your fat intake to replace the calories you were eating before from carbs. This can take some adjustment. If you’re not used to eating high fat, it might seem like a lot at the beginning. Fat is satiating, which is one of the advantages of keto because you can naturally avoid overeating due to its satisfying nature. That being said, it’s important to also eat enou Continue reading >>

How To Cut Fat On A Ketogenic Or Low Carb Diet (and Why You Might Want To)

How To Cut Fat On A Ketogenic Or Low Carb Diet (and Why You Might Want To)

Reduce fat intake? On a low carb or ketogenic diet? Amy, have you done lost yo' mind? You know people use the abbreviation “LCHF,” right? And that means low carb high fat, right? I’ve heard from many, many people who are struggling to lose body fat on a low carb or ketogenic diet. And while there are many possible reasons for this, the simplest, most obvious, and most common one is, they’re eating too darn much fat. What is this madness you speak of? This is possible. It is, as they say, “a thing.” Remember: when you reduce your carbohydrate intake to the point that your body must switch over to running primarily on fat for fuel, you go from being a “sugar burner” to being a “fat burner.” But what this means is that you’re burning fat. It doesn’t mean that the fat you’re burning will automatically and unfailingly come from your love handles and thunder thighs adipose tissue (your stored body fat). It could be coming from your fatty coffee, avocado smoothie, fat bombs, or a heavier-than-you-realize hand with nuts, cheese, and ranch dressing. Bottom line: the more fat you eat, the less of a need your body has to tap into its stored fat to use for fuel. If you’re already lean and happy with your weight, this is no problem. You might need a bunch of fat just to maintain your weight. (I hate you. Lucky you.) But if you’re struggling with fat loss on low carb despite doing “all the right things” and being on-point with your diet, there’s a chance you’re simply overdoing the dietary fat. It’s true. If your carbs are very low, then insulin will be pretty low, which is what allows you to get into “fat burning mode.” But just because insulin is low doesn’t mean you’ll magically drop body fat regardless of how many calories you take Continue reading >>

The Top 10 Ways To Eat More Fat

The Top 10 Ways To Eat More Fat

Flavorful, full-fat ingredients topped with creamy, satisfying sauces… Low-carb and keto eating can be decadent! Fat is an amazing flavor enhancer – it makes everything taste better. And if you eat enough fat, it’s filling, too. Get ready for a new, luscious take on deliciousness! Remember that a low-carb diet needs to be higher in fat, to make it satisfying. Don’t fear fat (natural fat is good for you). Don’t stay hungry. Add enough fat to feel satisfied after eating. This can sometimes be a challenge for people who are not used to eating natural fat. Here are the top 10 tips on how to eat more fat – plus tips on HOW much fat you should aim for. 1. Start with whole, full-fat ingredients Say goodbye to low-fat and fat-free products. Say good riddance to Egg Beaters, artificial creamers, and reduced-fat peanut butter. Banish any item labeled ‘light’ or ‘lite’ from your pantry and refrigerator. Forget nonfat and low-fat dairy. (If your grocery store doesn’t carry plain, full-fat yogurt, buy the plain low-fat version and add back the fat by stirring in heavy cream, sour cream, or crème fraiche.) Rethink your grocery list and stock your refrigerator and pantry with real whole food, including fat-rich options like avocados and eggs. Try to add natural fat rather than avoid it. Fatty cuts of meat can be more flavorful, tender and inexpensive than leaner cuts. Salmon and sardines contain plenty of healthy fats and are a terrific addition, too. Invite these delicious items back onto your plate. 2. Cook with fat No more limp steamed vegetables or dry chicken breasts. Cook your vegetables, meat, fish, and eggs in tasty natural fats like butter. Or the other ones listed under point 3, below. Use as much as you need. 3. Use different fats for different flavor Continue reading >>

Minimum Fat Intake With Ketogenic Diet?

Minimum Fat Intake With Ketogenic Diet?

2 Answers i am trying to lose weight, but i am concerned about the minimum amount of fat i am supposed to eat per day. There's no minimum amount of fat you need to eat. Ketosis gets triggered by lack of carbs and protein, not surplus of fat. You raise ketosis by reducing carbs and protein. The reason this sometimes causes weight loss is that ketosis often suppresses appetite. If this happens to you, you'll eat less almost without effort. The less you eat, the faster you'll lose weight. Of course, if you want your ketogenic diet to contain the same number of calories as your usual diet, you'll have to add fat to make up for the removed carbs and protein. This is the case for children on ketogenic diets to treat epilepsy. It's important for them to get enough calories to grow, so their diets include enormous amounts of fat. But you don't want your diet to contain the same number of calories. You want it to have fewer calories so you'll lose weight. The less you eat, the faster you'll lose. If I am not eating enough fat will weight loss occur? Whether you lose weight depends mainly on the total amount of calories your body extracts from food. If you eat too many calories you will get fatter even if most of the diet consists of fat. If you eat fewer calories than your body burns you'll lose weight. Ketosis figures into this because it often suppresses appetite, which makes people eat less without effort. Ketosis depends on carbs and protein, not fat. The fastest way to lose weight is not eat anything. The amount of fat is zero, but even so you'll lose weight rapidly. You'll also be in high ketosis. Most likely you won't be very hungry even though you're fasting because ketosis usually suppresses appetite. How about trying this calculator that allows you to calculate exactly Continue reading >>

How Too Much Protein Is Bad For Ketosis

How Too Much Protein Is Bad For Ketosis

One of the well-known mantras of the ketogenic diet is very low carb intake and high fat intake. But there’s another nutrient that’s important to monitor when going keto—and a lot of people make the mistake of not considering its importance. That would be protein. Although protein is a critical element in the diet we need for optimal health, it’s important to not eat TOO much protein on the ketogenic diet. Why? Well, there are a couple reasons that we’ll be discussing below. How Too Much Protein is Bad for Ketosis The biggest energy source on the ketogenic diet is fat. In fact, around 75% of your diet should come from healthy fat sources. The key here is that, unlike the traditional idea of low-carb diets where protein is higher, protein intake should bemoderate, not high, on keto. Not following this advice will never allow your body to enter ketosis, which is the main point of going keto and reaping all of the amazing benefits. The reason too much protein is bad for ketosis is because our bodies have a fundamental energy process called gluconeogenesis. For a deeper dive into the topic, see our post on fixing the biggest ketosis mistakes. For now we shoud know the basics. Let’s break it down this mouthful of a term. The word gluconeogenesis has three parts to it, Gluco – coming from the greek root glukos – literally meaning “sweet wine.” Neo – “new” Genesis – “creation” So a great way to think about it is this is how your body creates new sweet wine for your body. Some people tout that “you don’t need carbohydrates to survive,” which is only partially true. To clarify, you don’t need to eat any carbs to survive, but make no mistake, your body needs carbs in the form of glucose and glycogen, and it will get this via survival mechan Continue reading >>

13 Common Keto Mistakes

13 Common Keto Mistakes

Adjusting to the Ketogenic diet and lifestyle is a process, and, like any other process, there are some learning curves and speed bumps. These curves and bumps can lead to frustration and disappointment, but they don’t have to. I’ve put together a list of what I see as the most common keto mistakes (and what you can do about them). You are obsessing over macros On the surface, this might seem a little contradictory to some of the other items on this list, but hear me out for a second. The mistake isn’t tracking your macros. The mistake is OBSESSING over your macros. The biggest psychological benefit to keto is the freedom it provides. You’re no longer shackled to the hangry, sad existence filled with constant food preoccupation. You’re free to live. So don’t shackle yourself by fretting and obsessing about macros. You aren’t eating macros, you’re eating food. Make sure your food is keto-friendly, and you’re going to be doing just fine. You are obsessing over the scale I’ve written about this before, but it’s important enough to repeat. The number on the scale is the least important metric you can use to gauge your success. This is another pet peeve of mine that is similar to the previous mistake. Enjoy the freedom of your life, don’t fret about the number on the scale. The scale is always a snap shot of what happened two weeks ago. Think about it. Aside from water, which can fluctuate many pounds in a short period of time, in order for you to gain or lose weight, it requires time. The scale doesn’t tell you important information. Don’t sweat it. You are eating too much protein Protein is, probably, the most important macro, because it is essential (we cannot manufacture all the requisite amino acids) and it is required to build and rebuild al Continue reading >>

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