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What Fruit Is Keto Friendly?

What Fruit Can I Eat On The Ketogenic Diet?

What Fruit Can I Eat On The Ketogenic Diet?

What Fruit Can I Eat On The Ketogenic Diet? As a mom is learning about the ketogenic diet they often wonder what fruit can I eat on the ketogenic diet? Eating fruit is definitely better than tanking up on sugar and carb laden treats but when a person is trying to lose weight on a ketogenic diet and put their body into a state of nutritional ketosis then they need to watch their carbs and fruit can often have higher amounts of carbs and natural sugars than are desired. It depends on how strict you’re wanting to go with the ketogenic diet but I will start off with the fruits with the lowest amount of carbs and go from there. On a strict ketogenic diet (less than 20 grams of carbs a day!) only berries are allowed. They have the least amounts of carbs. So that would include: Raspberries Strawberries Blackberries Cranberries Mulberries Blueberries are the highest carb berry so be mindful when eating them if you’re on a strict keto diet If you’re on more of a moderate low carb diet you can have: Plums Clementines Cherries Kiwis Cantaloupe Peaches Watermelon Now of course it all depends on how strict you are going on the Ketogenic diet but you must count your carbs. Generally people are able to get into ketosis by eating between 20-50 grams of carbs a day. Some may be able to have as much as 100 grams but rarely over that. You’ll need to purchase ketone strips to test your urine to see if you are producing ketones and in ketosis where you are burning fat. The Ketogenic diet is not for the faint of heart but you can of course still see excellent results from cutting carbs, and increasing protein, healthy fats and veggies. All of us moms have different health goals and are willing to make different changes to our diets. My philosophy is you do what you can and you make s Continue reading >>

Hometown Keto Friendly Fruit

Hometown Keto Friendly Fruit

Reduce your risk of cancer by eating fruit According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, by eating fruit you can help reduce your risk of developing cancer. Due to their sweetness, fruit tends to have more carbohydrates compared to vegetables. By choosing keto friendly fruit with fewer carbohydrates per serving we are able to maximize the health benefits of eating fruit, but stay in line with our Hometown Keto diet. Here are a few keto friendly fruits we suggest you try to keep your daily carb intake low. 1. Watermelon: At the top of the list is watermelon. As the name suggests, watermelon is over 91% water by weight. According to the USDA, for 100g of watermelon you are consuming 7.55g of carbs. Watermelon is high in vitamin A and will keep you feeling full without eating a lot of calories. 2. Strawberries: Berries in general are a popular choice for people watching their carbs. Out of the berries, strawberries have the fewest carbs. Per 100g, strawberries contain 7.68g of carbs. Strawberries are also an excellent source of potassium and vitamin C. 3. Cantaloupe: For the first melon in our list, beat the heat with refreshing cantaloupe. At 8.16g of carbs per 100g of fruit, cantaloupe is another keto friendly fruit for your high fat low carb diet. 4. Avocado: This might come as a surprise to many people, but avocado is a fruit! On a keto diet you might already be incorporating avocado into your diet because of its high fat content, but it also has other health benefits by being a fruit. Per 100g of a Californian avocado there are 8.64g of carbs. 5. Honeydew: Coming in at 9.09g of carbs per 100g serving we have another melon – honeydew. Honeydew is a great source of vitamin C and potassium. 6. Peaches: For as juicy and sweet as they are, peaches have a s Continue reading >>

The Truth About Fruit

The Truth About Fruit

Fruit is nature’s candy. Naturally sweet and juicy, it’s a dietary favorite and a pretty big staple in Western culture. Most fruit is also decidedly not keto-friendly. But why? We get that question over and over. After all, isn’t the sugar in fruit “natural?” Doesn’t it have tons of fiber? The answer those questions are yes, and it depends on the fruit, respectively. But those answers do not necessarily make for a keto-friendly food. Remember, sugar itself is completely natural. Regular old table sugar is usually derived from the juice of the sugar cane or sugar beet. It’s essentially juice that’s been clarified and dried into crystals. Perfectly natural. Still not keto. The big disconnect seems to be in the commonly held notion that fructose, what we call “fruit sugar,” is somehow better for you than regular table sugar? But is that so? There does seem to be some scientific evidence that fructose is metabolized differently. It is not readily used by most cells in the rest of the body and so it is primarily processed by the liver instead. There also seems to be no blood glucose or insulin response from fructose. All of this would seem to add up to fruit being friendly. Not so fast. The problems with fruit are two-fold. First, as any diabetic who tests regularly will tell you, they do see an increase in blood glucose after eating fruit. Increases in insulin response follow increases in blood glucose, both of which we try to keep low on keto. Second, there is scientific evidence that increased fructose consumption not only leads to weight gain, occurring primarily in visceral belly fat, but has other, very serious adverse health consequences. Let’s take them one at a time. Blood glucose increases after consuming fruit It does seem to be true that fru Continue reading >>

Is Fruit Possible On Low Carb?

Is Fruit Possible On Low Carb?

After a certain period of time, these low carb fruits will fit perfectly into your low carb diet. There are plenty of ways to add fruit after the Atkins Induction Phase. How to add fruit to your low carb diet during Atkins Phases 48 Atkins low carb fruit list with 10 net carbs or less Low carb fruits are fiber-rich, and keep meals bright and colorful. Be sure to measure or weigh each serving very carefully. Fruit is eaten sparingly on low carb diets due to the high sugar content. The lowest carb fruit works best as an ‘accessory’ on your plate. Eating Fruit on Atkins Phases Atkins Induction Phase On the Atkins low carb diet, fruits are forbidden for the first two weeks. Avocado however, is an Induction-friendly low carb fruit. OWL and Maintenance Phases The Atkins diet moves from Induction to Ongoing Weight Loss after the first two weeks. Now, a small amount of low carb fruit is allowed. In OWL and Maintenance Atkins phases, try low carb fruits: Rhubarb: Net carbs per ½ cup: 1.7 Raspberries: Net carbs per ½ cup: 3.4 Strawberries: Net carbs per medium strawberry: 3.4 Guava: Net carbs per ½ cup: 5.3 Adding Fruit to Your Low Carb Meals Add low carb berries and raw almonds to full-fat Greek yogurt. Or simply top the berries with whipped heavy cream, flavored or plain. Use thinly sliced strawberries or starfruit to garnish a fresh spinach and feta salad or Atkins approved low carb cheesecake. Sprinkle spicy roasted chicken with mango-pineapple confetti salsa. Low Carb Fruit List The lowest carb fruit (1 to 5 net carbs) are some of the highest in nutritional value, antioxidants and phytonutrients per serving. Low carb fruit (6 to 10 net carbs) has enough fiber per serving to counteract most of the sugary carbs. After the first two weeks (Atkins Induction phase), these Continue reading >>

Lowest Carb Fruits List

Lowest Carb Fruits List

Eating fruit on Atkins is tricky. What if you stall? Learn how to eat the lowest carb fruit during Atkins phases, try out a fat bomb and print the fruit list. 20 lowest carb fruit with 1 to 5 net carbs 23 low carb fruit with 5 to 10 net carbs Blackberry fat bomb recipe Printable list of low carb fruit for Atkins And what if the fruit is high fiber and coupled with healthy, low carb ingredients that burn stored fat? Common Issues Many low carbers find it challenging to eat ‘just a quarter cup’ of tempting fruit – low carb or not. Eating sweets in general may cause more sugary cravings, making it difficult to stick to low carb. Your Solution Test the waters after Induction. Add the highest fiber, lowest carb fruit. Limit your servings to a few per week and track your progress. Eating Fruit During Atkins Induction When following Atkins, you will not consume fruit for the first two weeks on Induction. However, avocado is allowed. Hello Avocado Avocados are sometimes thought of as a vegetable, but they are actually Induction-friendly low carb fruit. There are 6 grams of carbs and 4.2 grams of fiber in ½ of an avocado. Net carbs per ½ avocado: 1.7 Eating Fruit After Induction The Atkins diet moves from Induction to Ongoing Weight Loss (OWL) after the first two weeks. At this time, the lowest carb fruit are allowed in moderation. What is “moderation” ??? Try not to exceed 10-12 net carbs total per hour to prevent blood sugar spikes and inflammation. Fruit for OWL & Maintenance Phases During the early OWL and Maintenance Atkins phases, concentrate on low carb fruit recipes using raspberries, rhubarb, strawberries and guava. These particular low carb fruit are higher in fiber and are considered safe for new low carbers. Rhubarb Net carbs per ½ cup: 1.7 Rhubarb is a Continue reading >>

Low Carb Fruit

Low Carb Fruit

Use these low carb fruit suggestions to add flavor to muffins and smoothies, or add to heavy cream for a great dessert or side to a meal. Caution, though. Some people are sensitive the even the sugar in fruit, and in that respect, fruit is just like candy when it comes to what happens to sugar and insulin levels in the blood. Fruit with Less Than 5 Net Carbs These serving sizes of fruit have only 5 grams of net carbs (carb minus the fiber). 1/2 cup of raw strawberries (3.3 net carbs) 1/2 cup of raw raspberries (4.2 net carbs) 1/2 of a medium peach (4.3 net carbs) 5 whole sweet cherries (5.1 net carbs) 1/2 of a kiwi fruit (4.3 net carbs) 1 medium apricot (3.2 net carbs) 1/2 medium Haas avocado (3.7 net carbs) Fruit with less than 10 Net Carbs These serving sizes of fruit have less than 10 grams of net carbs (carb minus the fiber). 1 cup of raw strawberries (6.6 net carbs) 1 cup of raw raspberries (8.4 net carbs) 1/2 cup of raw blueberries (8.6 net carbs) 1/2 cup of raw boysenberries (8.0 net carbs) 1/2 cup of blackberries (5.9 net carbs) 1/2 cup raw grapes (7.1 net carbs) 1/2 cup raw pineapple (8.7 net carbs) 1 raw plum (8.6 net carbs) 1 medium tangerine (9.4 net carbs) 1 raw lime (7.1 net carbs) 1/2 medium apple (9.0 net carbs) 1/2 Valencia orange (5.2 net carbs) 1/2 cup raw honeydew melon (7.8 net carbs) 1/2 cup raw cantaloupe (5.7 net carbs) All of my books are available in electronic PDF, and now in paperback on Amazon! Done with Low Carb Fruit, back to Low Carb Recipes Continue reading >>

What Are The Best Keto Snacks

What Are The Best Keto Snacks

Being on the keto diet, it can be hard to find low carb snacks. While before you might have reached for a bag of chips or a pastry to keep hunger at bay until meal time, the diet requires a massive reduction in carbohydrate intake. This means sugary foods and high-carb treats are out of the question. But the restrictions of the ketogenic diet don’t mean that you can’t eat anything throughout the day. And to prove that we’ve put together a list of the best keto-friendly snacks. Also, we have added a big list of keto-friendly snacks and treats that you can start getting into so stay tuned for that.​ Our 10 Favorite Keto-Friendly Snacks The diet replaces carbohydrates with a high fat intake. But this doesn’t mean that you can just munch on whatever fatty food you want if there are no carbs. Not all carb free snacks are good to eat while on ketosis, and many on the market are advertised as keto-friendly but which have too high of a protein content. Taking in too much protein can mess up the metabolic state that you’ve worked so hard to achieve. When the body is deprived of carbohydrates, it switches to other sources for energy, sending your body into the metabolic state of ketosis. The body burns fat in that state to stay fueled. But when there’s too much protein in your diet, then it will use the protein as an energy source, which will not lead to weight loss. To keep going strong on the keto diet, you need not only low carbs, but little or no sugar, high fat intake, and a moderate amount of protein intake (around 20 percent of your daily diet). This list of low carb snack ideas can help you keep up your diet and eat in a delicious and healthy way. 1. Keto Kookies Snacking on a diet doesn’t have to be bland or boring. And it doesn’t mean you have to go ou Continue reading >>

What Carbohydrates Not To Eat On Keto

What Carbohydrates Not To Eat On Keto

Starting a ketogenic diet can be difficult for some. It’s basically the complete opposite of what most people are used to eating. So many mistakes to make, habits to change and things to learn. One of the most important things you need to know is what not to eat on keto. This mysterious metabolic state called ketosis is a shift that happens within our biology. It’s an adaptive response that changes the use of glucose as the body’s main fuel source into using ketones for fuel. It occurs over after fasting for several days or restricting one’s carbohydrate intake to a bare minimum. Usually, the guideline is less than 30-50 grams of NET carbs. Adaptation can take up to 2-3 weeks. This changes the liver’s digestive enzymes into preferring fat for energy production. The macronutrient ratios on keto are approximately 70-80% fat 15-25% protein <5% carbohydrates. What is Ketosis in Macros The foods eaten on a ketogenic diet are primarily fatty meat, eggs, nuts, cruciferous vegetables, butter, oils and fat upon fat – bacon strips upon bacon strips. You can’t just eat anything on keto if it fits your macros (or mouth). During adaptation, you have to be even more meticulous because the body will gladly default back to a sugar burning metabolism whenever it can. However, there’s a big difference between burning glucose and fatty acids. The difference is in quality. Nutrition is a powerful tool that causes specific adaptation to occur in the body according to exactly what we digest. If you want to get into ketosis, then you need to know what foods not to eat on keto. The biggest devil in this is sugar. Glucose is the direct opposite of ketones and the two can’t co-exist. If there’s excess glucose in the bloodstream, then the body will definitely not be in a state Continue reading >>

Ketogenic Diet Foods To Avoid: 108 Foods That’ll Slow Your Fat Loss

Ketogenic Diet Foods To Avoid: 108 Foods That’ll Slow Your Fat Loss

There are 108 ketogenic diet foods to avoid that will slow down (or shut down) your body’s fat burning capability. Remember that carbs must be kept very low to remain in ketosis. Most people need to stay within 20-30 grams of net carbs per day, and protein shouldn’t make up more than 20-25% of total calories. Too many carb or protein-centric foods can very quickly bring you out of ketosis and slow down your body’s fat burning capabilities. This is why the foods below should be avoided on a ketogenic diet. Not to worry, though. We’ve made it easy for you with this cheat sheet covering the biggest keto foods to avoid and why. We chunked it down by macronutrient: Want a quick and easy meal plan that doesn’t include any of these keto-unfriendly foods? We’ve created one for you. Click here to get the FREE downloadable meal plan now. Carbs to Avoid on a Ketogenic Diet Grains All grains—and foods made from grains (yup, even whole grains)—should be avoided. Grains contain too many carbs and will interfere with ketosis, slowing weight loss. That includes*: Beans and Legumes Beans provide nutrition for those on a regular diet, but they’re not fit for the ketogenic diet due to their high starch (carb) content. Avoid legumes including*: Fruit is healthy, right? Sure, but that doesn’t mean they’re keto-compliant. Fruit is high in sugar and carbs, so is usually a no-go on the keto diet. That includes tropical fruits, fruit juices, dried fruits, and fruit smoothies (for the most part). If you do have fruit, choose lower-sugar options like blueberries, blackberries, and raspberries, and eat them sparingly. Starchy Vegetables Avoid any vegetables that grow beneath the ground and focus on more on the leafy greens. The high starch content of some vegetables (like tho Continue reading >>

Eat This, Not That: The Best Alternatives For A Keto Thanksgiving

Eat This, Not That: The Best Alternatives For A Keto Thanksgiving

The holiday season is typically a very indulgent time of year. And it all starts with Thanksgiving. Strict diets go out the window on a whim, and it seems everyone has an excuse to put healthy eating on hold until January. And we get it. If you follow the keto diet, this time of year can be especially tough. Turkey slathered in a thick, creamy gravy is delicious. Classic saccharin sweet cranberry sauce reminds many of us of our childhoods. And who can really say no to pumpkin and pecan pie? But there are so many creative, delicious keto-friendly alternatives to the classic dishes that don’t rely on processed foods, refined sugars and carb-loaded ingredients. Believe it or not, there is even a way to make a keto stuffing with flavors that hark back to your childhood, and satisfy the craving without compromising your health or everything you work for on a daily basis with your diet. Here’s our list of Keto-Friendly Thanksgiving recipes, along with a few holiday hacks to keep your macros in check. Keto-Friendly Thanksgiving Swaps 1. Eat Umami Gravy, Not Traditional Gravy Traditional gravy relies on refined flour to get its flavor and thickness, bringing the carb count to 5 grams for just one tablespoon. This is definitely an easy way to kick yourself out of ketosis. Instead, try this keto-friendly umami gravy from Nom Nom Paleo, which relies on mushrooms, fish sauce and bone broth for the ultimate umami flavor and a serious reduction for thickness. You can pour it over organic oven-braised turkey or a cauliflower mash. 2. Eat Sugar Free Cranberry Blueberry Sauce, Not Super Sweet Cranberry Sauce Traditional cranberry sauce, whether homemade or store bought, is full of sugar. And while most fruits should be avoided on the keto diet, there are a few exceptions, such as be Continue reading >>

Low-carb Fruits And Berries – The Best And The Worst

Low-carb Fruits And Berries – The Best And The Worst

What are the best and the worst fruits and berries to eat on a low-carb diet? Here’s the short version: most berries are OK low-carb foods in moderate amounts, but fruits are candy from nature (and full of sugar). For more details, check out this guide, with the lower-carb options to the left. Berries The numbers above are the percentages of digestible carbohydrates i.e. net carbs (fiber is not counted). So 100 grams of berries (3½ ounces or about three handfuls) – will contain that number of grams of carbs. Raspberries, blackberries and strawberries can be eaten in small amounts on a strict low-carb diet, and you can have pretty much all you want if you’re on a more moderate low-carb diet. Blueberries contain a bit more carbs, so don’t overdo them – on a strict low-carb diet eat them only occasionally, in small amounts. Fruits So how about fruit? As you can see, all fruits contain quite a few carbs (mostly in the form of sugar). That’s why fruits are sweet! Fruit is candy from nature. For easy comparison all numbers are still grams of digestible carbs per 100 grams (3½ ounces) of the fruits. A medium-sized apple (150 grams) may contain about 18 grams of carbs. How much fruit can you have? This means that on a keto low-carb diet (<20 grams per day) you're probably better off having some berries instead. Or perhaps a small fruit like a plum or a couple of cherries, once in a while. You can eat plenty of vegetables instead. You can easily get any nutrient in fruit from vegetables – without all the sugar. So there’s no need for fruit. Even on a more moderate low-carb diet (20-50 grams per day) you’ll have to be careful with fruit – probably no more than about one a day. On a liberal low-carb diet (50-100 grams per day) you may be able to squeeze in tw Continue reading >>

The 'eat This Not That' Guide To The Keto Diet

The 'eat This Not That' Guide To The Keto Diet

The ketogenic diet can be dizzyingly complicated. You want to load up on fats and protein, and keep your carb intake low—but all fats and proteins aren’t alike, and there are some veggies higher in carbohydrates than others. Oh, and fruit is pretty much banned. But don’t worry: We’ve put together the best and worst of each category so you can go keto with confidence. Fats Eat this: Play Video Play Loaded: 0% Progress: 0% Remaining Time -0:00 This is a modal window. Foreground --- White Black Red Green Blue Yellow Magenta Cyan --- Opaque Semi-Opaque Background --- White Black Red Green Blue Yellow Magenta Cyan --- Opaque Semi-Transparent Transparent Window --- White Black Red Green Blue Yellow Magenta Cyan --- Opaque Semi-Transparent Transparent Font Size 50% 75% 100% 125% 150% 175% 200% 300% 400% Text Edge Style None Raised Depressed Uniform Dropshadow Font Family Default Monospace Serif Proportional Serif Monospace Sans-Serif Proportional Sans-Serif Casual Script Small Caps Defaults Done Saturated fats including coconut oil, ghee, grass-fed butter, duck fat, tallow, and lard—all essential for a healthy immune system, dense bones, and proper testosterone levels. Monounsaturated fats like olive, avocado, macadamia, and almond oils, which boost heart health and provide vitamin E—important for vision and a strong immune system. Polyunsaturated omega-3s such as wild-caught salmon, sardines, and sustainably harvested seafood—to prevent heart disease and stroke and reduce blood pressure. Medium-chain triglycerides, fatty acids that are easily absorbed and used for energy. Linked to weight loss, MCTs increase satiety and rev-up metabolism. Not that: Refined fats and oils like sunflower, canola, soybean, grapeseed, and corn oils, which have been processed at high Continue reading >>

Keto Diet: The Do's And Don't's Of This High-fat, Low-carb Nutrition Plan

Keto Diet: The Do's And Don't's Of This High-fat, Low-carb Nutrition Plan

I'm often asked about popular diets, so this week and next I'm covering two popular diets - the Keto Diet this week, and Whole30 next week - including the pros, cons and my take for each. I am not advocating or recommending that we all follow these programs. While these diets - or components of these diets - may be beneficial to some, my recommendation for the majority of the population is to keep it simple, streamlined, wholesome - less about hard rules with lists of do's and don't's, and more about the key fundamentals: limit added sugars and white carbs. Emphasize lean proteins. Tons of vegetables, some fruits (mostly berries), and more of an emphasis on plant based fats when possible. Find what works for your individual lifestyle, taste preferences, budget and schedule. If you do choose to try one or some of these popular diets, use it as an opportunity to help break and replace not-so-good habits, and to educate yourself and learn more about how you may respond to certain foods and ingredients so that you can make lasting behavioral changes that can stick around long after you're "off" of a particular diet plan. *** "I'm going keto." I'm hearing this more and more often. And odds are you've heard someone talk about "going keto," you've considered it yourself, or at the very least, you've seen "keto-friendly" products and recipes in stores, magazines, and social media. Keto is a high-fat, low-carbohydrate diet, with limited protein allowed as well. As with many of these diets, healthful food selections within each of those food categories is what determines whether the diet is healthful. The keto diet's origins "Keto" is short for "ketogenic" and is a type of diet that has been used for 100-plus years for children with uncontrolled seizures. Approximately half of th Continue reading >>

The Ultimate List Of Foods To Eat On A Ketogenic Diet

The Ultimate List Of Foods To Eat On A Ketogenic Diet

This is a list of ketogenic diet foods. It includes meats, vegetables, dairy, nuts, seeds, beverages, fats and oils that are allowed on the ketogenic diet. Trying a new diet can be frustrating, difficult, and can even cause irritability. It can be extremely frustrating trying to figure out what to buy at the grocery store or how to prepare it in your home. It can also be very difficult trying to find proper foods when dining at restaurants or friends and family members. Yet, a proper diet can be a very positive change in your daily health. Over time, a diet filled with appropriate nutrition from all food groups should become part of your daily lifestyle. A ketogenic diet is a great source for those who need to produce more ketones. During this diet, keep in mind that you’ll want to be in taking more fatty foods. Because ketosis works through changing your metabolism through using fat as an energy source, you’ll want to be storing more fat than you might have previously. While this can be a daunting thought to overcome, having an appropriate food list should help you establish the ultimate ketogenic diet. There are many options for those looking for a ketogenic healthy diet. Fats and Oils It may sound silly to say that you need to eat fat to lose weight or be healthier. However, the fatty foods that you should be choosing will be filled with healthy nutrients. Fats can be very important to our diet. However, eating the wrong fats can also be very detrimental. Fats should be the majority of your daily intake on a ketogenic diet, so be sure to know that you are eating the right kind of fatty foods. Saturated fats like the contents of potato chips, processed pretzels, cookies, crackers, and other snacks do not fit into the fat category of a ketogenic diet. You need to b Continue reading >>

8 Things To Avoid On A Keto Diet

8 Things To Avoid On A Keto Diet

There are many guides telling you what to eat and drink on a keto diet. It can however sometimes be good to also know what to not eat or drink on a keto diet. Since that food that are good for a keto diet are foods that are very high in fat and low on carbohydrates the opposite should therefor in general be avoided. That means food that is low in fat and high in carbohydrates. But there are also some things that can be hard to know if they are good for you or not. Diet soda Diet soda might seem like something that is good to drink at a low carb diet since they do not contain any sugar or carbs. However there is a danger with these and that is the artificial sweeteners that are used as replacement for the sugar. Everyone’s bodies react differently to these sugar substitutes. Some people can drink diet soda without any problem when on a keto diet and others can not have a single glass of it without interrupting their diet and their ketosis. Low-carb sweets There are many different low carb sweets out there that claim they are good for a low carb diet. However most of these often contain processed food and also in many cases a relative high amount of carbohydrates. It does not seem like a lot when it says 4 net grams of carbs but if you eat 2 or 3 of these candy in one day it quickly becomes quite many carbohydrates. avoid sweets on keto diet Processed or packaged foods Try to avoid processed or packaged food. They often come with added artificial additions. Did you e.g. know that crashed bugs are used as red food coloring or that there sometimes is duck feathers in your bread. Get natural food and try to avoid processed and packaged food. No matter if you are on a low carb diet or not, this kind of things is not good for you. Different Fluids Fluids with a high carbohyd Continue reading >>

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