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What Fats Are Good For Ketosis?

The Top 10 Ways To Eat More Fat

The Top 10 Ways To Eat More Fat

Flavorful, full-fat ingredients topped with creamy, satisfying sauces… Low-carb and keto eating can be decadent! Fat is an amazing flavor enhancer – it makes everything taste better. And if you eat enough fat, it’s filling, too. Get ready for a new, luscious take on deliciousness! Remember that a low-carb diet needs to be higher in fat, to make it satisfying. Don’t fear fat (natural fat is good for you). Don’t stay hungry. Add enough fat to feel satisfied after eating. This can sometimes be a challenge for people who are not used to eating natural fat. Here are the top 10 tips on how to eat more fat – plus tips on HOW much fat you should aim for. 1. Start with whole, full-fat ingredients Say goodbye to low-fat and fat-free products. Say good riddance to Egg Beaters, artificial creamers, and reduced-fat peanut butter. Banish any item labeled ‘light’ or ‘lite’ from your pantry and refrigerator. Forget nonfat and low-fat dairy. (If your grocery store doesn’t carry plain, full-fat yogurt, buy the plain low-fat version and add back the fat by stirring in heavy cream, sour cream, or crème fraiche.) Rethink your grocery list and stock your refrigerator and pantry with real whole food, including fat-rich options like avocados and eggs. Try to add natural fat rather than avoid it. Fatty cuts of meat can be more flavorful, tender and inexpensive than leaner cuts. Salmon and sardines contain plenty of healthy fats and are a terrific addition, too. Invite these delicious items back onto your plate. 2. Cook with fat No more limp steamed vegetables or dry chicken breasts. Cook your vegetables, meat, fish, and eggs in tasty natural fats like butter. Or the other ones listed under point 3, below. Use as much as you need. 3. Use different fats for different flavor Continue reading >>

Is It Necessary To Include High Fat Intake In A Ketosis Diet, Or Is It Just A Convenience, Because Isn’t The Idea To Burn One’s Body Fat To Make Up For The Lesser Caloric Intake?

Is It Necessary To Include High Fat Intake In A Ketosis Diet, Or Is It Just A Convenience, Because Isn’t The Idea To Burn One’s Body Fat To Make Up For The Lesser Caloric Intake?

Hi, It is actually necessary to include more healthy fat in your diet if you want to follow keto diet. It is one of the major differences between low-carb diet and ketogenic diet. (low-carb diet does not emphasize on eating more fat while ketogenic diet does) Ketogenic diet is a diet that is high in fat, adequate in protein and low in carbohydrates. Generally, the macronutrient ratio varies within the following ranges: 60-75% of calories from fat (or even more), 15-30% of calories from protein, and 5-10% of calories from carbs. In other words, the fat-protein-carbs ratio should be around 7:2:1. You can include more healthy fat by eating more: Coconut oil Olive oil Avocado Organic butter Nuts (Almonds, Walnuts, Cashews…) Seeds (Flaxseeds, Chia seeds…) Cheese If you want to learn more about Keto diet, you can read my blog post where I listed all useful resources of ketogenic diet. Here’s the link: I would suggest that you watch all those videos to better understand how human body works when following a keto diet, and get a well-rated cookbook to get started. Continue reading >>

Eating Fat To Lose Weight? The Ketogenic Diet Is High-fat And Low-carb

Eating Fat To Lose Weight? The Ketogenic Diet Is High-fat And Low-carb

But he didn’t start dropping the pounds until a friend who had lost a lot of weight suggested he try a ketogenic diet. Gross switched to the high-fat, ultra-low-carb diet and lost 70 pounds in seven months. And he’s kept at it for five years. Though online searches about ketogenic diets started spiking last year, the diet was created in the 1920s as a way to treat epilepsy. When you’re on a keto diet and you’re in what’s called ketosis, a metabolic process forces the body to burn stored fat because there’s not enough glucose for energy. Fans of the keto diet say they have more energy and better focus. The diet, however, is restrictive and can be difficult to maintain. A group of local nutrition experts say the diet is safe, but they were split over whether they would recommend it for everyone. Burning fat How does the diet work? Our bodies break down carbohydrates when we eat. Those carbs are turned into glucose that fuels our cells, giving us energy. Eating keto A difficult start Continue reading >>

Ketogenic Dieting 101: How To Use Fat As Fuel

Ketogenic Dieting 101: How To Use Fat As Fuel

Eating fat to burn fat sounds contradictory, if not nuts, right? The world is full of people who are fat because of high-fat diets, so why would a fit person want to follow suit? I'm not talking about stuffing your face full of peanut butter cups. I'm talking about following a ketogenic diet—or, put simply, a high-fat, moderate-protein, carbohydrate-restricted diet designed to make the body burn fat for fuel. Bodybuilders, fitness enthusiasts, and researchers alike have found that such diets are an effective fat-loss tool. In fact, studies have shown that ketogenic diets induce numerous favorable metabolic and physiological changes, including weight loss, less oxidative stress, improved body composition, reduced inflammation, and increased insulin sensitivity.[1-4] That being said, what does the science surrounding ketogenic diets have to say about individuals looking to run faster or farther, jump higher, or improve other aspects of sports performance? Shouldn't athletes be swilling Gatorade before, during, and after their events instead of adopting a high-fat, restricted-carbohydrate diet? Not necessarily. Ketogenic diets have become increasingly popular among athletes ranging from Olympic competitors to endurance runners, with good reason. Let's take a closer look at the science. What Exactly Is A Ketogenic Diet, Anyway? Ketogenic diets are very high-fat, moderate-protein, carbohydrate-restricted diets.[5] The exact breakdown of the diet varies between individuals, but a general profile may reflect 70-75 percent fat, 15-20 percent protein, and only 5-10 percent carbohydrate. So, you're probably thinking, all I need to do then is watch out for the carbs, right? Not exactly. Ketogenic diets are not the same as high-protein, carbohydrate-restricted diets. I often hear Continue reading >>

22 Foods To Eat On A Ketogenic Diet

22 Foods To Eat On A Ketogenic Diet

A ketogenic diet is a low-carb, moderate-protein and high-fat nutrition plan. This article addresses some of the best foods to eat on a ketogenic diet. Following a ketogenic diet has been effectively shown to improve cardiovascular health, regulate the endocrine system, stabilize blood glucose levels, support weight loss, improve insulin sensitivity in people with type-2 diabetes and even treat neurological dysfunction (8, 9). Additionally, a ketogenic diet can improve your energy, cognitive acceleration and overall daily performance. Most people feel their best when in a state of mild-ketosis. One of the big challenges, is that most people have been raised on higher carb comfort foods. So rather than focusing on what foods you will miss, shift your energy to all the great foods you can enjoy. Here are 22 foods to eat on a ketogenic diet that you will LOVE! 1. Lemons & Limes: Most citrus fruits are packed with sugar. Lemons and limes however offer you the pleasure of a low-glycemic fruit to enjoy regularly and are rich in anti-inflammatory nutrients like citric acid, vitamin C and bioflavonoids. (1) Citric acid helps stabilize blood sugar levels and combat the inflammatory effects of sugar while also serving as an alkalizing agents for the body. Lemons and limes are some of the best foods you can use daily to help detoxify the gastrointestinal tract because of their natural antiseptic properties. Add a fresh squeeze of lemon or lime to your water throughout the day and use in many food preparations such as meat marinades and dressings. 2. Herbs: Herbs pact some of the most powerful antioxidants. Bitter herbs like ginger, turmeric, and parsley stimulate digestive function by improving gut health. They support enzyme and bile secretion from the liver as well as the gallbl Continue reading >>

My Favorite Healthy Keto Fats

My Favorite Healthy Keto Fats

Want to look in my pantry? During the last few weeks we had a look at how too many calories and too much protein can look like. If you ever wondered what foods are good and bad for a Ketogenic or low carb diet this new series is for you! Today we will start to have a look at making substitutions that will change those health-damaging, fat-accumulating, sickness-causing foods into delicious Healing Foods that are right for a person who can not handle carbs. (PS you can refer to the Carb Intolerance Q&A page for that). Today we will start with having a look at the very base of the keto diet: Fat! IMPORTANT: Not all keto fats are created equal: The bad, the good and …the UGLY! Knowing what fats to use is of vital importance! Using the wrong kind of oil or fat can do more harm than good. Oxidized and damaged fats use can lead to arteriosclerosis, rheumatoid arthritis, cancer, damage to the digestive system and more problems! Why are some fats bad for you: Chemically processed (bleached, deodorized, hydrogenated etc) contain loads of harmful substances. Using the wrong oil with high heat can make it rancid and very toxic. Some oils are full of Omega 6, which in excessive amounts disrupt the 3’s and 6’s balance and cause inflammation in the body. Are made with GMO seeds! NEVER use these oils, because of the reasons listed above: Canola oil Peanut oil Corn Oil Soybean Oil Sunflower Oil Cottonseed Oil Rice Bran Oil Of course avoid ALL TRANS FATS like the plague! (that includes Margarine and “buttery spreads”. You can read the nasty process to make margarine HERE) The delicate flowers! There are few seed oils with a very low smoke point (the temperature where they start becoming toxic) which are great if used cold. Those oils should be bought “expeller pressed”, wh Continue reading >>

Keto Diet Food List: 221 Foods To Boost Energy (+ Printable Cheat Sheet)

Keto Diet Food List: 221 Foods To Boost Energy (+ Printable Cheat Sheet)

In some studies, only 38% of people can stick to a keto diet. (1) In other words, if you’re not prepared, a keto diet can be HARD. However, if you want to boost your energy and burn fat, there is no better way. Bottom line… If you want to transform your body, you need to be prepared. So in the keto diet food list below, I’ll show you 221 foods that will help you burn fat and boost your energy. Most of these foods are common and easy-to-find so that you can create thousands of different meals that you’ll love. I’ll also show you some of the best benefits of a keto diet and how to make sure that you reach your goals. If you want to find out more in general about keto, check out our comprehensive article on the ketogenic diet here. If you want more recipes, check out all of our keto recipes here. KETO DIET FOOD LIST “CHEAT SHEET” (PRINTABLE) To make things easy for you at the grocery store and in the kitchen, we also put together a printable “cheat sheet” of foods you can eat on a keto diet. To get our cheat sheet, just click the button below: Remember, there are a TON of foods you can eat on a keto diet. And that’s great, because you want to keep your meals interesting. But you also need to keep things as simple as possible, because if your meals and recipes get too overwhelming or take too long, then you won’t stick with it. So use this list to find a few dishes that you really love, and then try to stick to those dishes as much as possible. THE ‘SHORT’ LIST OF KETO FOODS… If you’re looking for a short list of keto diet foods, then here it is. (Remember, all 221 foods are listed below.) Basically, you can eat most meats, most vegetables, most seafood, and healthy fats. More specifically, you can eat these foods… Non-Starchy Vegetables Berr Continue reading >>

The Ketogenic Diet - Eat Fat To Lose Fat

The Ketogenic Diet - Eat Fat To Lose Fat

Fad diets are as American as apple pie. Starting with the Cigarette Diet in 1925, the US has seen the number of prescribed diets grow into the hundreds with more coming out each year. Some of them are legitimate and based on sound research. Others, like the Baby Food Diet, Cotton Ball Diet, and Tapeworm Diet, are less so. Say what you will about fad diets, but there’s no shortage of creativity. One diet that's become very popular in recent years and has been tossed in with fad diets is the Ketogenic or Keto Diet. The diet has actually been around since the early 1900s when it was successfully used to treat epilepsy and brain cancer. But you'd more likely recognize it from online pictures of people drinking butter coffee or eating bowls of bacon. Eating keto means eating fat. Lots of fat - at least 70% of your calories. For the rest, 25% should come from protein and 5% or less from carbs. How Does It Work? In most of the world, carbs are the body’s primary source of energy. To simplify some complex physiology, carbs are broken down into glucose. Glucose is then used to fuel your brain and muscles. Due to the global abundance of cheap carbs - primarily rice, wheat, and corn - this is how most of the world runs. However, there are a few cultures that don't have access to carbs and must use something else for fuel - fat. When your body has no carbs, it naturally will turn to fat for energy. This causes your body to ramp up production of something called ketones and these ketones replace glucose as your body's fuel. When this happens, your body goes into ketosis. This is the goal of the keto diet. That or eating as much Kerrygold butter as possible. What Do I Eat? To get to ketosis, you need to eat a lot of fat. That doesn't mean you've got a green light to pound bacon a Continue reading >>

Comprehensive Food List For The Keto Diet

Comprehensive Food List For The Keto Diet

In this post you’ll get a full Keto Food list to better help you manage your ketosis plan. Approved Keto Fats The very basis of the keto diet is to encourage your body to use fat as its primary fuel source instead of carbohydrates. This means that quality sources of fats including oils, nuts and seeds should make up most of your caloric intake. Although we’re typically told to avoid eating too much fat, it’s actually a vital nutrient that’s needed by your body to keep every cell in your body healthy. Including more of the right types of fats in your diet is also a great way to promote an efficient metabolism that delivers an even source of energy throughout the day without sudden hunger pangs or cravings. It also increases satiety and makes you feel full for longer while boosting the amount of stored fat that your body burns throughout the day for effective weight loss and healthy weight management. When it comes to including fats in your keto diet, it’s vital that they’re from the right sources. Natural sources of saturated fats, monounsaturated fats and polyunsaturated fats will help your body to enter and stay in ketosis (fat burning mode). To ensure you’re getting enough of these, focus your diet on meats and nuts and use healthy oils and butters to cook with. Try to make sure that you’re getting a good balance of omega 3 to omega 6 fatty acids by including fatty fish as well. Processed fats, i.e. chemically altered trans fats are very damaging to your body and should always be avoided. Keto Approved Meats and Protein In addition to fats, meat is a staple of the ketogenic diet. They’re low in carbohydrates, higher in fats and contain quality protein which aids to maintain lean muscle mass on a low-carb diet. Most fresh meats are also rich in B vita Continue reading >>

Ketogenic Diet: Is The Ultimate Low-carb Diet Good For You?

Ketogenic Diet: Is The Ultimate Low-carb Diet Good For You?

Recently, many of my patients have been asking about a ketogenic diet. Is it safe? Would you recommend it? Despite the recent hype, a ketogenic diet is not something new. In medicine, we have been using it for almost 100 years to treat drug-resistant epilepsy, especially in children. In the 1970s, Dr. Atkins popularized his very-low-carbohydrate diet for weight loss that began with a very strict two-week ketogenic phase. Over the years, other fad diets incorporated a similar approach for weight loss. What is a ketogenic diet? In essence, it is a diet that causes the body to release ketones into the bloodstream. Most cells prefer to use blood sugar, which comes from carbohydrates, as the body’s main source of energy. In the absence of circulating blood sugar from food, we start breaking down stored fat into molecules called ketone bodies (the process is called ketosis). Once you reach ketosis, most cells will use ketone bodies to generate energy until we start eating carbohydrates again. The shift, from using circulating glucose to breaking down stored fat as a source of energy, usually happens over two to four days of eating fewer than 20 to 50 grams of carbohydrates per day. Keep in mind that this is a highly individualized process, and some people need a more restricted diet to start producing enough ketones. Because it lacks carbohydrates, a ketogenic diet is rich in proteins and fats. It typically includes plenty of meats, eggs, processed meats, sausages, cheeses, fish, nuts, butter, oils, seeds, and fibrous vegetables. Because it is so restrictive, it is really hard to follow over the long run. Carbohydrates normally account for at least 50% of the typical American diet. One of the main criticisms of this diet is that many people tend to eat too much protein and Continue reading >>

Why The Ketogenic Diet May Help Fight Diabetes, Cancer

Why The Ketogenic Diet May Help Fight Diabetes, Cancer

A diet extremely high in fat may not seem like the best way to lose fat. But there’s a growing body of research showing that the high-fat, low-carbohydrate ketogenic diet is not only good for weight loss, but also may help in preventing disease. The ketogenic diet, or keto, relies on using your fat as fuel, instead of glucose from carbohydrates or protein. Simply put, the daily ketogenic diet consists of 75 percent fat, 20 percent of protein, and a teeny allotment of carbohydrates, about 5 percent. This balance of macronutrients is intended to put your body in a state of ketosis, which suppresses the release of insulin and blood glucose levels. The benefits of ketosis to your health are improvements in biomarkers like blood glucose, reduction of blood pressure and decreased appetite due to fullness linked to consumption of fats. You might think this sounds a lot like the Atkins diet — it’s not. The main difference lies in the protein content of the diet. Atkins tends to be very high in protein, while ketogenic is moderate. Getty Images stock It's not the easiest plan to follow, but the theory of ketosis as a possible prevention against disease is gaining attention from cancer specialists. Tumor immunologist Dr. Patrick Hwu, one of the leading cancer specialists in the U.S., has followed the keto diet for four years, although he prefers to call it the fat-burning metabolism diet, or fat-burning diet. More research is needed to prove its benefits, but Hwu, the head of cancer medicine at MD Anderson in Houston, believes in it after seeing improvements in his own health. Why keto works The body’s first and preferred fuel of choice is glucose — stored as glycogen. Anytime you eat a carbohydrate, be it lentils or licorice, the body turns it into glucose, or sugar. B Continue reading >>

How To Use Healthy Fats For The Ketogenic Diet

How To Use Healthy Fats For The Ketogenic Diet

1 Swap out red meat for fatty fish. Red meat has more cholesterol and saturated fat, so limit your consumption, advises the American Heart Association. Fatty fish, such as salmon or mackerel, on the other hand, contain omega-3 fats that may reduce your risk of heart disease. 2 Snack on unsalted nuts and seeds. Walnuts, almonds, hazelnuts, pistachios, cashews, pecans, Brazil nuts and macadamias are all good choices, along with pumpkin, sesame and sunflower seeds. Nuts provide mainly healthy monounsaturated fats, while seeds give you polyunsaturated fats. 3 Add olive oil to your salads and vegetables. Skip the mayo and sugar-packed salad dressings and go with olive oil mixed with balsamic vinegar instead. You could also use avocado oil, canola oil or a nut oil. 4 Make your own guacamole to dip vegetable sticks in. It's important to eat vegetables on the ketogenic diet, as grains are more or less out and you need to get fiber from somewhere. Vegetables on their own can be boring though, so make low-carb guacamole using avocados, lemon juice and chillies. 5 Reach for the peanut butter when you're craving something sweet. Natural peanut butter contains the same healthy fats as regular nuts and can be a great craving buster, while being low in carbohydrates. For something a little different, try almond or cashew butters, too. Mike Samuels started writing for his own fitness website and local publications in 2008. He graduated from Peter Symonds College in the UK with A Levels in law, business and sports science, and is a fully qualified personal trainer, sports massage therapist and corrective exercise specialist with accreditations from Premier Global International. Continue reading >>

Why The High Fat, Low Carb 'keto Diet' Fails The Comment Sense Test

Why The High Fat, Low Carb 'keto Diet' Fails The Comment Sense Test

Renae Gilley used to be a size 22. Through diet and exercise she is now a size 10 and doesn't plan to look back. She was pre-diabetic and needed to make changes in her life. Two years later she works out nearly every day and keeps diabetes at bay. Michael Clevenger, CJ Last week I discussed the Keto diet, high in fat and very low in carbs, and why it’s not a good choice. A much better choice is a healthy well-balanced diet loaded with complex carbs (fruits, vegetables and whole grains), protein and modest fat intake. Going hand in hand with a healthy diet is daily exercise. When it comes to comparing diets, like comparing the Keto Diet with a healthy and well-balanced diet, it’s best to examine scientific data. Both diets can help reduce weight, which in turn helps lower blood pressure and serum cholesterol. Does that mean both diets are equally good for you? No. With the Keto Diet, kidney stones and accelerated osteoporosis arising from keto-acidosis can occur, along with a host of side effects, including lack of energy, trouble with the bowels, loss of mental acuity, loss of salt which can disrupt electrolyte balance and lead to muscle cramping, etc. But, there is much more to the story, and evidence continually mounts against using a high fat, low carb diet long term. HEART DISEASE A recent interview in the Nutrition Action Newsletter with Dr. Frank Sacks, an internationally respected researcher from Harvard, provided an update on the impact of dietary saturated fat on heart disease risk. Regarding the totality of evidence to date, according to Sacks: “The evidence that saturated fat causes atherosclerosis and heart disease is compelling. Saturated fat increases LDL… and LDL is a cause of heart disease. It’s not a risk factor. It’s a direct absolute cause Continue reading >>

Understanding A High-fat Ketogenic Diet—and Is It Right For You?

Understanding A High-fat Ketogenic Diet—and Is It Right For You?

While food trends come and go, high-fat diets—lauded for their weight-loss potential and brain-function benefits—have proven to have some staying power. Functional medicine M.D. Sara Gottfried contributes frequently to goop on the topic of weight-loss resistance. She’s spent the past two years rigorously studying the ketogenic diet—high-fat, low-carb, moderate-protein. Named for ketones, which Gottfried explains are “the energy source made by the body when there’s not enough carbohydrates to be burned for energy demand,” the goal of the diet is to get the body to burn fat instead of sugar. Gottfried recommends the keto diet (as it’s commonly called) to help with a range of brain and focus issues—she finds ketones to be “very efficient fuel for the brain”; she also says it works well for some patients (not all) who want to lose weight but have trouble kicking sugar cravings. We talked to her about who the keto diet is right for (and whom, or when, it isn’t); the nutritional ins and outs of mastering it; and which keto-friendly meals are healthy for practically everyone, regardless of what diet we do (or don’t) practice. A Q&A with Sara Gottfried, M.D. Q What is ketosis? A In most circles, ketosis refers to nutritional ketosis, an optimized state in which you burn fat instead of sugar. Nutritional ketosis has been used to treat epilepsy since the 1920’s and its popularity for mental acuity and weight loss has surged recently. More technically, ketosis refers to a metabolic state in which most of your body’s energy comes from ketones in the blood, as opposed to glycolysis, in which energy supply comes from blood glucose. Ketones are the energy source made by the body (in the liver) when there’s not enough carbohydrates to be burned for energ Continue reading >>

12 Healthy High-fat Foods Perfect For Nutritional Ketosis

12 Healthy High-fat Foods Perfect For Nutritional Ketosis

Jimmy Moore Achieves Nutritional Ketosis with High Fat Foods In my two previous CarbSmart columns, I explained what the difference is between the relatively new concept of nutritional ketosis and the traditional Atkins diet and the 5 low-carb mistakes I feel I was making that nutritional ketosis has helped fix. As many of you know, I’ve been doing my own experiment of this concept for over five months and counting (read my updates for Day 1-30, Day 31-60, Day 61-90, Day 91-120 and Day 121-150) and it’s produced some pretty remarkable weight loss and health improvement results so far as I’ve lost over 50 pounds while enjoying robust energy, mental clarity, stable d blood sugars, complete satiety, zero cravings and counterintuitive results in the gym. It’s been an amazing ride so far and I look forward to continuing this journey in the months to come. But the most popular question I’ve received from people about this by far has been “What the heck are the high-fat foods you’re eating?” It’s a fantastic question as I have consistently been over 2.0 millimolar blood ketone levels for most of this experiment. I have been reluctant to share my exact menus – they are what’s working for me. Some people may not need to eat a ketosis diet foods list exactly like me to experience the results that I have; others of you may need to be even more strict. The best thing for you to do is test to see how you respond to various foods and adjust accordingly. We are all different and require varying levels of fat, protein and carbohydrate for our specific metabolic needs. If you are like me and are metabolic deranged, it may be necessary to cut your carbohydrate intake down to the bare minimum, and reduce protein as well. One of the major keys to my success with nutrit Continue reading >>

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