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What Fats Are Good For Ketosis?

The 5 Best Keto Foods (high-fat & Low-carb)

The 5 Best Keto Foods (high-fat & Low-carb)

Like any diet, the ketogenic diet is not about a specific food; it’s about your entire body of work. Now, if you know anything about going keto (and the typical keto foods), you know it’s a very-low-carbohydrate, high-fat, moderate-protein diet. Given the constraints, I’ll give you three guesses as to what types of foods are BEST. If you guessed fat, fat, and more fat, then you’d be right on point. And while protein-rich foods are also a staple, it’s not a high-protein diet. In fact, too much protein can keep you from getting into or staying in ketosis. While there’s really no such thing as a “ketogenic” food, here are the top 5 you’re most likely to find if you decide to go keto! The Top 5 Keto Foods Coconut Oil One of the best keto foods is coconut oil (along with shredded coconut, coconut milk, coconut flour, and other coconut-based foods). See, about 70% of the fat found in coconut oil is a very special type called medium chain triglycerides (MCTs for short). MCTs are pretty awesome. They’re easily absorbed, metabolized, burned for energy, and the body has a hard time storing them as fat. But that’s not all—MCTs are readily converted into ketone bodies. Perhaps that’s why they’ve been shown to suppress appetite, boost metabolism, lower body weight, reduce belly fat, improve insulin sensitivity, and improve markers of metabolic health.1–6 Winning! Avocados With right around 80% of calories from fat, avocados are another one of the near-perfect keto foods. Plus, they’re incredibly versatile and downright tasty! Avocados are also nutrient-dense, containing 6 grams of fiber and upwards of 20 essential nutrients. They’re a great source of potassium, which is an important mineral to consume on the ketogenic diet. In fact, active people sh Continue reading >>

Goodbye Carbs, Hello High Fats: The Atkins Diet Is Back, And This Time It's Called Keto

Goodbye Carbs, Hello High Fats: The Atkins Diet Is Back, And This Time It's Called Keto

Carbs, the saint or the sinner? It's the part of our food that gives us fast energy when we most need it – but cutting out the carbs has long been seen as a quick way to lose that blubber around your belly. The keto diet is the latest low-carb craze to hit the active scene. In truth, it's been around for a while – decades, in fact, and has been used in the treatment of children with epilepsy – but the term is now finding a mainstream health following. On the plus side, it offers fast weight loss, and on the minus side ... well, according to Australian nutritionist Susie Burrell, writing for news.com earlier this week, there really isn't much on the minus side. "There is no evidence to show that keto diets are damaging to the body," she wrote. The keto (short for ketogenic) diet works when your body produces ketones from broken down fats in the liver for energy, rather than relying on insulin to convert carbohydrates. The body enters a state of ketosis – in layman's terms, just think of it as using fat rather than sugar for energy. Chief Executive of X-Pert Health, Dr Trudi Deacon describes these ketones as "a natural fuel for the body." "Ketones are an excellent source of energy, especially for the brain," explains Dr Deacon. "The only time they are harmful is when they are produced in abundance by people with Type 1 diabetes, where you have insufficient insulin and high blood glucose levels – known as diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA)." If you think you’ve heard of all this before, perhaps under the name ‘the Atkins diet’, then you’d be right – to an extent. Hannah Sutter, founder of the Natural Low Carb Kitchen has been following the keto diet since 2000 and insists that whether it’s the Dukan diet, the real food revolution or the Atkins diet, they all Continue reading >>

22 Foods To Eat On A Ketogenic Diet

22 Foods To Eat On A Ketogenic Diet

A ketogenic diet is a low-carb, moderate-protein and high-fat nutrition plan. This article addresses some of the best foods to eat on a ketogenic diet. Following a ketogenic diet has been effectively shown to improve cardiovascular health, regulate the endocrine system, stabilize blood glucose levels, support weight loss, improve insulin sensitivity in people with type-2 diabetes and even treat neurological dysfunction (8, 9). Additionally, a ketogenic diet can improve your energy, cognitive acceleration and overall daily performance. Most people feel their best when in a state of mild-ketosis. One of the big challenges, is that most people have been raised on higher carb comfort foods. So rather than focusing on what foods you will miss, shift your energy to all the great foods you can enjoy. Here are 22 foods to eat on a ketogenic diet that you will LOVE! 1. Lemons & Limes: Most citrus fruits are packed with sugar. Lemons and limes however offer you the pleasure of a low-glycemic fruit to enjoy regularly and are rich in anti-inflammatory nutrients like citric acid, vitamin C and bioflavonoids. (1) Citric acid helps stabilize blood sugar levels and combat the inflammatory effects of sugar while also serving as an alkalizing agents for the body. Lemons and limes are some of the best foods you can use daily to help detoxify the gastrointestinal tract because of their natural antiseptic properties. Add a fresh squeeze of lemon or lime to your water throughout the day and use in many food preparations such as meat marinades and dressings. 2. Herbs: Herbs pact some of the most powerful antioxidants. Bitter herbs like ginger, turmeric, and parsley stimulate digestive function by improving gut health. They support enzyme and bile secretion from the liver as well as the gallbl Continue reading >>

30 Ways To Eat More Fat

30 Ways To Eat More Fat

Are you eating enough fat? If you are on a ketogenic diet, like Keto or Atkins Induction, you must eat fat to get thin. Fat is wonderful. Fat adds joy to food. You can indulge in fantastically rich and scrumptious meals while losing weight. Easy, right? But we’ve been brainwashed by decades of misguided anti-fat propaganda. Habits are hard to reverse. So you might unconsciously eat less fat than you need. How much fat is enough? On ketogenic diets, about 70-80% of all calories should come from fat. That’s huge compared to how much fat people get on “standard” diets, let alone on low-fat diets. Here’s a list of ways to get more fat, so that your ketosis is firing on all cylinders. Download printable list >> 1. Choose fatty cuts of red meat General public shuns fatty cuts of meat because of the low-fat BS. Good news for us – lower demand means cheaper prices. Supermarkets often trim fat from meat. Find a butcher – either locally or online – and ask them for untrimmed cuts. Choose pasture-raised grass-fed red meat over grain-fed, for better taste and nutrient quality. Examples of fatty meat cuts are pork belly, pork ribs, lamb neck, untrimmed lamb chops, beef short ribs, rib eye steak and sirloin steak. 2. Opt for poultry legs and wings, plus duck breasts Chicken drumsticks and wings have more fat than breast meat. Roast, slow-cook or fry them for a perfect high-fat meal. Duck breasts have a nice layer of fat under the skin. Many recipes call for scoring the skin to drain some of the fat. Skip this step to retain all the fatty goodness. Duck legs are fantastic when slow-cooked. Obviously, forget the standard diet advice of discarding poultry skin. On Keto, skin is the best part! RECIPE: Pan-fried duck breast with low-carb veggies 3. Eat oily fish for a hit Continue reading >>

Is It Ever A Good Idea To Eat A High-fat Diet?

Is It Ever A Good Idea To Eat A High-fat Diet?

The dieting world keeps fluctuating between its lead villains. Now that we officially hate sugar, can every meal be loaded with butter, bacon and avocado instead? When the low-fat-everything craze peaked in the late '90s, Australians did not magically become leaner and healthier. Instead, twenty years on, we have an unprecedented level of obesity on our hands. By now we have figured out that the other side of a ‘low fat’ food label should say ‘probably high sugar, will make you fat anyway’. As the case against sugar is mounting, that leaves dietary fats in an interesting situation. No longer the enemy, fatty foods are enjoying a comeback of sorts. The trend is especially prominent within circles adopting the #keto lifestyle. On social media it stands for a parade of athletic bodies, hard-boiled eggs, odd-looking smoothies and a truckload of avocados served in every way imaginable. Keto is short for ‘ketogenic diet’, a scientific approach to going (very) low carb. “The idea of a ketogenic diet is that you restrict carbohydrates to such a low level that your body is mostly using its fat, or the fat that you eat, as its energy store,” explains research scientist and nutrition expert Dr Tim Crowe. This process is called ketosis. “When it's doing that, it produces these things called ketones in your bloodstream. Everybody has ketones in their blood, but on a ketogenic diet the levels are much higher.” The ketogenic diet is actually a medical treatment for children with hard-to-treat epilepsy; when the brain starts using ketones instead of glucose as an energy source, this can also reduce the frequency of epileptic seizures. But lately ketosis is starting to become popular outside its narrow medical application. “Over the last five or ten years there's b Continue reading >>

Can Eating Fat Help You Lose Weight? Let’s Look At The Ketogenic Diet.

Can Eating Fat Help You Lose Weight? Let’s Look At The Ketogenic Diet.

Fat makes your meals more palatable and helps you feel full, so it’s no wonder the high-fat ketogenic diet is increasing in popularity. The diet has been trending for the past three years, as “keto” blogs and cookbooks continue to pop up and build an impressive fan base. This diet has been used under close supervision by physicians and dietitians since the 1920s for treating epilepsy and has shown promise in managing brain cancer. But is it useful and healthy as a strategy for weight loss? First, the basics: On the ketogenic diet, at least 70 percent of your daily calories come from fat. Five to 10 percent of your calories come from carbohydrates (20 to 50 grams a day). The rest, up to 25 percent of your daily energy, comes from protein. By contrast, the healthy diet recommended by the Institute of Medicine is 45 to 65 percent carbs, 20 to 35 percent fat and 10 to 35 percent protein. The ketogenic diet’s low-carb target can be met only by avoiding grains, dairy products, fruit, and legumes such as chickpeas and lentils. Starchy vegetables such as sweet potatoes and squash are out, and even amounts of lower-carb vegetables are limited. So what’s left to eat? Typically, eggs cooked in butter for breakfast; for lunch and dinner, meat, chicken or fish with salad or green vegetables and plenty of oily dressing. Sorry folks, no alcohol on this diet. Even red wine is out. The ketogenic diet gets its name from a process called ketosis. Ketosis happens when your body doesn’t have enough energy from glucose (carbohydrates), so it adapts by using stored fat for energy. The result? Weight loss. Does the ketogenic diet lead to faster or more sustainable weight loss than other diets? The research to date suggests that initial weight loss on the keto diet is impressive but Continue reading >>

What Are Good Fats On A Low Carb Diet?

What Are Good Fats On A Low Carb Diet?

Not all fats are created equal. Eating the right (healthy) fats is very important, especially on a ketogenic/low carb diet where fat makes up ~70% of your daily caloric intake. All the important facts and supporting studies are included further down in this article but here’s what you need to know about good and bad fats in a nutshell: Good Fats Saturated Fats = Good Found in red meat, butter, ghee, lard, cream, eggs, coconut oil (MCTs) or palm oil Monounsaturated Fats = Good Found in extra virgin olive oil, avocados, avocado oil and macadamia nut oil Natural Trans Fats = Good Found in meat from grass-fed animals and dairy products Bad Fats Processed Polyunsaturated Fats = Bad Avoid vegetable and seed oils including: Canola, Soybean, Corn, Sesame, Grapeseed, Peanut, Sunflower Processed Trans Fats = Bad Avoid processed foods, fast foods, margarine and commercially baked goods. IMPORTANT: Most of your daily fat intake should consist of saturated and monounsaturated fats. Fat is identified by the amount that’s dominant in the mixture. Extra Virgin Olive Oil is about 73% monounsaturated fat so it is considered monounsaturated. Butter is about 65% saturated and thus a saturated fat. Below is a breakdown of each type of fat so you can start eating the right fats immediately. Saturated Fatty Acids (SFAs) Saturated Fats Don’t Increase Chances of Heart Disease Saturated fats are great! Although the government has condemned saturated fats to fat hell, there have been many studies with extremely conclusive results (21 studies with a total of 347,747 subjects) showing that there is no significant evidence of saturated fat increasing risk of heart disease in any way.2 Saturated Fats Increase Concentrations of Larger LDL Cholesterol is extremely important to us. It is used to m Continue reading >>

The Best Animal Fats And Plant Fats To Eat

The Best Animal Fats And Plant Fats To Eat

I like to make sure I am eating a combination of both animal fats and plant based fats during the day so that I am getting a wide variety of nutrients and fatty profiles into my diet. There are both similarities and differences between animal fats and plant fats, and there are also some types of fats that I won’t touch with a barge pole if I can help it! ‘Fat’ is a generic term used for any kind of lipid, which in an ester between fatty acids and glycerol. Both plant fats and animal fats are triglycerides, which means they are molecules that are composed of one glycerol and 3 fatty acid chains. The primary difference between plant fats and animal fats are their ratios of saturated, monounsaturated and polyunsaturated fatty acid chains. Animal fat has been vilified in the past (and still somewhat nowadays), due to the higher saturated fat content found in it. For the last 50 years or so, people thought that saturated fat was the cause of heart disease, obesity, and other diseases. But more and more people are starting to wake up to the fact that saturated fat is actually incredibly good for you and it is, in fact, sugar that is the primary cause of these things. In truth, for pretty much the entire of human history, up until the latter half of the 20th century, fatty meats and organs from animals were prized as the most nutritious and delicious part of the animal. Great Plant Fats Coconut Oil Coconut Oil is a wonderful fat that I pretty much use every day. Both for cooking, infatty teas/coffees and on my skin! It is full of medium chain fatty acids – caprylic acid, lauric acid, and capric acid. These are unlike the long chain fatty acids found in other plant-based fats because they are immediately processed by the liver (and therefore not stored as fat), anti-mic Continue reading >>

Healthiest High Fat Foods

Healthiest High Fat Foods

Let’s be honest: eating lots of fat is one of the best things about your low carb diet. This isn’t a gimmick. It’s hard science. Find the foods, grab some recipes and add more healthy fats to your plan. 14 high fat low carb foods and health benefits Easy high fat keto recipes and food combinations Real-Life HFLC meal plan Fat is Your New Skinny If you want to bust a plateau or lose more fat than ever before, stop depriving yourself. Start eating these healthy high fat low carb foods. Saturated fat is traditionally forbidden in most diets, but it actually helps a low carb diet. Healthy fat increases your HDL (good) cholesterol, which helps remove plaque from your artery walls. In turn, decreasing your risk of heart disease. Eating more fat keeps you fuller, longer: the key to reducing your daily calories without feeling deprived. Increasing your fat intake accelerates your fat burning. How to Increase the Fat Don’t be afraid to eat healthy, high fats! With the absence of carbs, fat is your body’s primary fuel source. But pushing fat levels even higher while cutting carbs makes a big difference in the amount of fat you’ll burn. We are all unique. Low carb dieters require varying levels of fat, protein and carbs to meet different weight loss goals. During ketosis, the fat levels are very high. See how you respond to various foods. Simply adjust the recipe ingredients to adjust the percentage of fat. 14 High Fat Foods Perfect for Ketosis Coconut oil is a healthy source of saturated fat. Coconut oil is an immediate source of energy and isn’t stored as fat. Adding this quality fat to your diet helps you burn more fat in ketosis. It’s high lauric acid content boosts your metabolism, and helps support healthy thyroid functioning. Coconut oil helps skin heal fast Continue reading >>

Get Thin By Eating More Fat. Is The Keto Diet Too Good To Be True?

Get Thin By Eating More Fat. Is The Keto Diet Too Good To Be True?

The ketogenic diet is an invitation to eat eggs, cheese, bacon and butter while attempting to lose weight. It allows you to pack the fat onto your plate with the promise of inches disappearing from your hips, waist and thighs. It encourages you to ignore calories. Yes, you read that right. According to Body Building magazine, you’ll eat 70 to 75 percent of your calories as fats on the Keto diet, 15 to 20 percent as protein, and the remaining 5 to 10 percent as carbohydrates. The Keto Diet Blog recommends: Eating all the fats you like, including butter, duck fat and lard. Protein can include beef, pork, lamb, eggs, fish and chicken. You’ll eat only 30 grams of net carbs (that’s carbohydrate grams minus fiber grams), which could include green leafy vegetables like kale and bok choy, cauliflower, mushrooms, avocados, peppers and asparagus. Berries like raspberries, blueberries and blackberries are fine. Breads, cookies, cake, rice, potatoes, pasta, and anything containing sugar or corn syrup are strictly off limits. This Chicken with Rosemary Butter Sauce from Taste of Home has Keto just right. How the Keto Diet Works According to a study in Frontiers in Psychology, after three or four days on the diet, your body recognizes that it can’t make enough energy from carbohydrates in food, so it starts using the fat stored in your cells. The process is called ketosis: Your liver is making ketone bodies, which are then used to make energy. When your body begins using fats instead of sugars for energy, your brain registers an “aha” moment. You now have a more efficient fat-burning metabolism. The Science Behind Keto The ketogenic diet dates back to 1920, when it was first used to help reduce epileptic seizures in children. It’s still used for that purpose, according Continue reading >>

Can Eating Mostly Fat Help You Lose Weight?

Can Eating Mostly Fat Help You Lose Weight?

Every January, fat's in the crosshairs of health columnists, fitness magazines, and desperate Americans. This year, PopSci looks at the macronutrient beyond its most negative associations. What’s fat good for? How do we get it to go where we want it to? Where does it wander when it’s lost? This, my friends, is Fat Month. The ketogenic diet didn’t start as a weight-loss method. It was a treatment for epileptic kids—one of the few that worked, especially for those who had already tried traditional medications. But odds are the only people you’ll hear talking about it today are those looking to drop a few pounds without giving up butter. Keto, as it’s known among dieters, is based around getting most of your calories from fat, some from protein, and almost none from carbohydrates. It’s like a more extreme form of Atkins, except keto actually came first. It became an epilepsy treatment back in the 1920s, whereas the weight-loss paper that inspired Dr. Atkins to establish his low-carb diet wasn’t published until 1958. The idea of eating fat in order to lose fat is obviously appealing. Oils and fats are filling and soothing, so prospective dieters feel they might not have to sacrifice as much. And everyone knows that carbs are the devil anyway, right? If it started as a medically-prescribed diet, surely it must be healthy. But like your opinion on most fad diets, your thoughts on keto are probably based on vague notions sourced from the nightly news. Food trends tend to skyrocket to fame and fall from grace before science ever has a chance to weigh in. But you should want to see solid research before you commit to a whole new way of eating. In honor of PopSci’s Fat Month, let’s do a quick refresher on what keto really is—and whether it works. What is the Continue reading >>

Low Carb Food List

Low Carb Food List

Here’s a low carb food list to help you get started. I have also included buying techniques and tips that will point you toward ketogenic foods that are clean, whole and offer the best nutrition. This includes information on the types of fats that are the healthiest, and where to find grass-fed meat and poultry. Fats and Oils Since the majority of calories on a ketogenic diet will come from dietary fats, choices should be made with digestive tolerance in mind. Most people cannot tolerate eating a large amount of vegetable oil, mayonnaise or even olive oil over time. And this is a good thing, since vegetable oils are high in polyunsaturated Omega-6 fatty acids. The Omega-6 fatty acids (found in nut oils, margarine, soybean oil, sunflower oil, safflower oil, corn oil, and canola oil) trigger inflammation within the body and they will make you sick if they are your only fat source. In addition, cooking with them is not recommended. Most nuts (with the exceptions of macadamias and walnuts) are high in Omega 6 fatty acids as well, so go easy on them). However, there are polyunsaturated fats which are essential and these are the Omega 6 and Omega 3 fats. Your intake of Omega 6 and Omega 3 types should be balanced, and you only need about a teaspoon a day. Eating wild salmon, tuna and shellfish will provide balancing Omega 3 fatty acids and are important part of a low carb food list. A few nuts or some mayonnaise will provide the Omega 6. If you don't like seafood, then consider taking small amounts of a fish oil supplement for Omega 3s. Saturated and monounsaturated fats such as butter, macadamia nuts, coconut oil, avocado and egg yolks are tolerated more easily by most people, and since they are more chemically stable, they are less inflammatory. Fats and oils can be combi Continue reading >>

Why The Ketogenic Diet May Help Fight Diabetes, Cancer

Why The Ketogenic Diet May Help Fight Diabetes, Cancer

A diet extremely high in fat may not seem like the best way to lose fat. But there’s a growing body of research showing that the high-fat, low-carbohydrate ketogenic diet is not only good for weight loss, but also may help in preventing disease. The ketogenic diet, or keto, relies on using your fat as fuel, instead of glucose from carbohydrates or protein. Simply put, the daily ketogenic diet consists of 75 percent fat, 20 percent of protein, and a teeny allotment of carbohydrates, about 5 percent. This balance of macronutrients is intended to put your body in a state of ketosis, which suppresses the release of insulin and blood glucose levels. The benefits of ketosis to your health are improvements in biomarkers like blood glucose, reduction of blood pressure and decreased appetite due to fullness linked to consumption of fats. You might think this sounds a lot like the Atkins diet — it’s not. The main difference lies in the protein content of the diet. Atkins tends to be very high in protein, while ketogenic is moderate. Getty Images stock It's not the easiest plan to follow, but the theory of ketosis as a possible prevention against disease is gaining attention from cancer specialists. Tumor immunologist Dr. Patrick Hwu, one of the leading cancer specialists in the U.S., has followed the keto diet for four years, although he prefers to call it the fat-burning metabolism diet, or fat-burning diet. More research is needed to prove its benefits, but Hwu, the head of cancer medicine at MD Anderson in Houston, believes in it after seeing improvements in his own health. Why keto works The body’s first and preferred fuel of choice is glucose — stored as glycogen. Anytime you eat a carbohydrate, be it lentils or licorice, the body turns it into glucose, or sugar. B Continue reading >>

3 Reason Why “fat Bombs” Are Part Of The Ketogenic Diet

3 Reason Why “fat Bombs” Are Part Of The Ketogenic Diet

Written by: Lindsay Sibson Intuition: the ability to understand something instinctively, without the need for conscious reasoning. OOOOH, we all have it. You know, that little voice inside of your head that helps you make decisions and often gives you a “gut feeling” about what to do. Except when it doesn’t. This is precisely what happened when I first heard about eating “Fat Bombs.” Just the name alone sounds like it adds a few pounds to your waistline! Eating FAT to burn fat… certainly against my intuition. That is… until I tried it and it FREAKING WORKS! Here is why you need to start using *healthy* fats for fuel, which is made simple when you make “fat bombs.” It’s all part of a ketogenic diet: What Is A Ketogenic Diet? The ketogenic diet is: Low carb and high fat diet Trains your body to get its energy from KETONES and not glucose What Are Ketogenic “Fat Bombs?” Small snacks or treats that are HIGH in fat and LOW in carbs Make a great, quick and healthy breakfast Can be used as pre or post workout fuel Similar to an energy ball or bar – BUT focused on a high healthy fat content Why “Fat Bombs” Are Part Of The Ketogenic Diet Loaded with healthy fats that help lower inflammation in your body Keep your body in a fat burning state (ketosis) Made with stevia, a natural sweetener that won’t screw with your blood sugar levels Are easy to make and can be made to be vegan: lactose free, casein free Place all of the ingredients in a pot and warm over low heat until combined. Gently stir to mix thoroughly. Pour the mixture into silicone molds and place in the freezer for 30 minutes. Once solid, they are ready to eat! Pop one out of the mold and enjoy right away (it will melt if left out too long). To amp up the flavor, you can add your favorite Continue reading >>

The Beginners Guide To Ketosis: Investigating Low-carb, High-fat Eating

The Beginners Guide To Ketosis: Investigating Low-carb, High-fat Eating

The only hard and fast rule of health is that health is personal and what works well for one person may not work for someone else. Aside from that rule, there are “frameworks” that seem to benefit large groups of people. One more level down from that are alternative strategies that benefit smaller groups. Ketosis is likely one of those alternative strategies that works well for certain, smaller groups of people. So, right off the bat I want you to understand that Ketosis might not be for everyone. I’m going to lay out the case for potential benefits of Ketosis. If it sounds interesting and beneficial to you, then consider trying it. (see our free cheat sheet to help you). What is Ketosis Ketosis occurs when liver glycogen gets depleted and the body burns fatty acids for fuel. The primary driver of this state is a very low carbohydrate intake. Often, it also requires a low protein, higher fat intake. You can also achieve a state of ketosis by not eating altogether. The creation of ketones is a byproduct of this metabolic state. Ketones are a source of fuel, just as glucose is a source of fuel. Ketones tend to have some added benefits, though. What role does Ketosis play in human health? Ketosis allows our bodies to function in the absence of carbohydrates, both physically and mentally. Instead of burning carbohydrates, or converting protein to glucose, the body burns ketones. This is pretty much a survival mechanism. It allows your body to function in a state of caloric deprivation. This is why ketosis often gets bad press (as it’s linked to “starvation”). Being a survival mechanism doesn’t make it invalid as a strategy, though. There can still be potential benefits to be had. Let’s cover a few of them… Ketosis and Accelerated Fat Loss Being in ketosis Continue reading >>

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