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What Fats Are Good For Ketosis?

What To Know About The Ketogenic Diet

What To Know About The Ketogenic Diet

The ketogenic diet, described as “Atkins on steroids” for its focus on foods high in fat and protein and low in carbohydrates, is growing in popularity but some nutritionists warn it may not live up to the hype. The diet’s proponents say that it is the best way to lose weight without feeling hungry and that it increases energy levels. Celebrities including Kim Kardashian and Adriana Lima and athletes from LeBron James to Tim Tebow have all reportedly followed some form of low carb diets. “Absolutely this diet works,” New York-based registered dietitian nutritionist Maya Feller told ABC News. “It is going to give people weight loss.” The ketogenic, keto for short, diet was developed in the 1920s after it was noticed that after fasting, epileptics would experience a marked reduction in their seizures. The diet is designed to get your body into a state called ketosis where your body is so low on carbohydrates it starts burning fat for fuel. Ketosis is also what the body does when fasting. Keto dieters drastically cut carbohydrates to about 10 percent of their daily diet, which in some cases can be just 20 grams of carbohydrates per day. That amount of carbohydrates is equivalent to one slice of white bread per day, according to Feller. Nutritionists also stress that followers of a keto diet should get their fat intake from healthy fats like olive oils and nuts. Samantha Kafedzic, 31, has lost 17 pounds since starting on a keto diet four weeks ago. Kafedzic, who admits she now eats “very different” meals from her daughter, said she feels better overall in addition to the weight loss. “I have more energy with this one running around,” Kafedzic said, pointing to her daughter. “My workouts are so much better. I definitely have more stamina.” The key t Continue reading >>

How To Use Healthy Fats For The Ketogenic Diet

How To Use Healthy Fats For The Ketogenic Diet

1 Swap out red meat for fatty fish. Red meat has more cholesterol and saturated fat, so limit your consumption, advises the American Heart Association. Fatty fish, such as salmon or mackerel, on the other hand, contain omega-3 fats that may reduce your risk of heart disease. 2 Snack on unsalted nuts and seeds. Walnuts, almonds, hazelnuts, pistachios, cashews, pecans, Brazil nuts and macadamias are all good choices, along with pumpkin, sesame and sunflower seeds. Nuts provide mainly healthy monounsaturated fats, while seeds give you polyunsaturated fats. 3 Add olive oil to your salads and vegetables. Skip the mayo and sugar-packed salad dressings and go with olive oil mixed with balsamic vinegar instead. You could also use avocado oil, canola oil or a nut oil. 4 Make your own guacamole to dip vegetable sticks in. It's important to eat vegetables on the ketogenic diet, as grains are more or less out and you need to get fiber from somewhere. Vegetables on their own can be boring though, so make low-carb guacamole using avocados, lemon juice and chillies. 5 Reach for the peanut butter when you're craving something sweet. Natural peanut butter contains the same healthy fats as regular nuts and can be a great craving buster, while being low in carbohydrates. For something a little different, try almond or cashew butters, too. Mike Samuels started writing for his own fitness website and local publications in 2008. He graduated from Peter Symonds College in the UK with A Levels in law, business and sports science, and is a fully qualified personal trainer, sports massage therapist and corrective exercise specialist with accreditations from Premier Global International. Continue reading >>

Can Eating Mostly Fat Help You Lose Weight?

Can Eating Mostly Fat Help You Lose Weight?

Every January, fat's in the crosshairs of health columnists, fitness magazines, and desperate Americans. This year, PopSci looks at the macronutrient beyond its most negative associations. What’s fat good for? How do we get it to go where we want it to? Where does it wander when it’s lost? This, my friends, is Fat Month. The ketogenic diet didn’t start as a weight-loss method. It was a treatment for epileptic kids—one of the few that worked, especially for those who had already tried traditional medications. But odds are the only people you’ll hear talking about it today are those looking to drop a few pounds without giving up butter. Keto, as it’s known among dieters, is based around getting most of your calories from fat, some from protein, and almost none from carbohydrates. It’s like a more extreme form of Atkins, except keto actually came first. It became an epilepsy treatment back in the 1920s, whereas the weight-loss paper that inspired Dr. Atkins to establish his low-carb diet wasn’t published until 1958. The idea of eating fat in order to lose fat is obviously appealing. Oils and fats are filling and soothing, so prospective dieters feel they might not have to sacrifice as much. And everyone knows that carbs are the devil anyway, right? If it started as a medically-prescribed diet, surely it must be healthy. But like your opinion on most fad diets, your thoughts on keto are probably based on vague notions sourced from the nightly news. Food trends tend to skyrocket to fame and fall from grace before science ever has a chance to weigh in. But you should want to see solid research before you commit to a whole new way of eating. In honor of PopSci’s Fat Month, let’s do a quick refresher on what keto really is—and whether it works. What is the Continue reading >>

The Importance Of Fats In A Ketogenic Diet

The Importance Of Fats In A Ketogenic Diet

There are 3 main types of fats that we see in everyday life. There’s been quite a lot of misconceptions and misinformation that has built up over the years about fats. All of these 3 fats are important to our healthy, and should always be incorporated into your diet. The way that we identify what type of fat we are eating is by the amount that is dominant in the mixture. For example, we call Olive Oil (~75% monounsaturated) a monounsaturated fat and we call butter (~60% saturated) a saturated fat. All real foods will contain a mixture of: Saturated Fats – These fats are necessary and keep your immune system healthy, your bone density normal, and your testosterone levels in check. For years they were dumped into the danger category along with trans fats, but studies have proven them to be necessary time and time again. They have also been found that they have no association with risk of heart disease. Foods that have them include meat, eggs, and butter – food that we have been eating for thousands of years. These fats will improve HDL/LDL cholesterol levels. Polyunsaturated Fats – These are usually seen in the form of vegetable oils and have been hailed as wonderful, but in fact, are normally highly processed. All of those “heart healthy” margarine spreads we see – avoid them. Studies have shown that the rising rates of heart disease are linked with liquid vegetable oils and trans fats – not saturated fats. Don’t get this confused, as fatty fish is also high in polyunsaturated fats, and these are great for you. Takeaway note is that processed polyunsaturated fats are bad (will worsen HDL/LDL cholestertol levels) and natural polyunsaturated fats are good (will improve HDL/LDL cholesterol levels). Monounsaturated Fats – These are pretty well known and a Continue reading >>

Ketogenic Diet Food List: Everything You Need To Know

Ketogenic Diet Food List: Everything You Need To Know

Not sure what to eat on a ketogenic diet? Here’s a quick food list for you to reference. Below you’ll find a brief overview of what you can eat. Scroll further down to see more details on each section. Being on a diet isn’t the easiest thing in the world, especially when you don’t know what you should eat. We’ve put together this ketogenic diet food list to help people out there make decisions on what they are eating and shopping for. Below you can find a quick visual guide to what to eat on a ketogenic diet. Let’s go over some of the commonly identifiable items that people use on keto: All of the food above sticks to the strict 5% carbohydrate allowance that we use on keto. In general, you can eat from the following food groups: Fats & Oils. Try to get your fat from natural sources like meat and nuts. Supplement with saturated and monounsaturated fats like coconut oil, butter, and olive oil. Protein. Try to stick with organic, pasture-raised and grass-fed meat where possible. Most meats don’t have added sugar in them, so they can be consumed in moderate quantity. Remember that too much protein on a ketogenic diet is not a good thing. Vegetables. Fresh or frozen doesn’t matter. Stick with above ground vegetables, leaning toward leafy/green items. Dairy. Most dairy is fine, but make sure to buy full-fat dairy items. Harder cheeses typically have fewer carbs. Nuts and Seeds. In moderation, nuts and seeds can be used to create some fantastic textures. Try to use fattier nuts like macadamias and almonds. Beverages. Stay simple and stick to mostly water. You can flavor it if needed with stevia-based flavorings or lemon/lime juice. If you scroll down, you can see in-depth breakdowns of each section along with some ideas on what types of food to eat! If you’r Continue reading >>

Healthiest High Fat Foods

Healthiest High Fat Foods

Let’s be honest: eating lots of fat is one of the best things about your low carb diet. This isn’t a gimmick. It’s hard science. Find the foods, grab some recipes and add more healthy fats to your plan. 14 high fat low carb foods and health benefits Easy high fat keto recipes and food combinations Real-Life HFLC meal plan Fat is Your New Skinny If you want to bust a plateau or lose more fat than ever before, stop depriving yourself. Start eating these healthy high fat low carb foods. Saturated fat is traditionally forbidden in most diets, but it actually helps a low carb diet. Healthy fat increases your HDL (good) cholesterol, which helps remove plaque from your artery walls. In turn, decreasing your risk of heart disease. Eating more fat keeps you fuller, longer: the key to reducing your daily calories without feeling deprived. Increasing your fat intake accelerates your fat burning. How to Increase the Fat Don’t be afraid to eat healthy, high fats! With the absence of carbs, fat is your body’s primary fuel source. But pushing fat levels even higher while cutting carbs makes a big difference in the amount of fat you’ll burn. We are all unique. Low carb dieters require varying levels of fat, protein and carbs to meet different weight loss goals. During ketosis, the fat levels are very high. See how you respond to various foods. Simply adjust the recipe ingredients to adjust the percentage of fat. 14 High Fat Foods Perfect for Ketosis Coconut oil is a healthy source of saturated fat. Coconut oil is an immediate source of energy and isn’t stored as fat. Adding this quality fat to your diet helps you burn more fat in ketosis. It’s high lauric acid content boosts your metabolism, and helps support healthy thyroid functioning. Coconut oil helps skin heal fast Continue reading >>

Complete Guide To Fats & Oils On A Low-carb Ketogenic Diet

Complete Guide To Fats & Oils On A Low-carb Ketogenic Diet

The main focus of the ketogenic diet is to get the macronutrient ratio right. Ideally, you should be eating 5-10% calories from carbs (net carbs), 15-30% of calories from protein and 65-75% calories from fat (or even more) in order to benefit from ketone bodies produced by your liver. So, what is the ideal fat intake on the ketogenic diet? The amount of fat varies for all individuals and depends on your goal. In general, you won't need to precisely count fat intake or calories on a ketogenic diet, because eating food naturally low in carbs will keep you sated for longer. Based on studies, proteins and fats have been shown to be the most sating nutrients, while carbohydrates the least sating. Fat provides a steady supply of energy with no insulin spikes. That's why, you won't experience any cravings or energy and mood swings. However, in some cases counting calories and keeping track of your macros make help you break through a weight loss plateau. If you want to find out your ideal fat intake, have a look at KetoDiet Buddy, a free online keto calculator we have developed for our blog. All the recipes on my blog and in KetoDiet and KetoDiet Basic include detailed nutrition data to help you track you food intake. Furthermore, the macronutrient ratio is not the only aspect you should consider. When increasing your fat intake, it's critical to understand which fats are beneficial and which may damage your health. Simply put, the type and quality of fats matter. When deciding which oils and fats you should use, follow these rules: You can download a print-friendly version of this guide here! 1. Use Saturated Fats for Cooking Saturated fats have been cursed and deemed to be really bad for our health. We've been brainwashed for the last 50 years that saturated fat and choleste Continue reading >>

Eating Fat To Lose Weight? The Ketogenic Diet Is High-fat And Low-carb

Eating Fat To Lose Weight? The Ketogenic Diet Is High-fat And Low-carb

But he didn’t start dropping the pounds until a friend who had lost a lot of weight suggested he try a ketogenic diet. Gross switched to the high-fat, ultra-low-carb diet and lost 70 pounds in seven months. And he’s kept at it for five years. Though online searches about ketogenic diets started spiking last year, the diet was created in the 1920s as a way to treat epilepsy. When you’re on a keto diet and you’re in what’s called ketosis, a metabolic process forces the body to burn stored fat because there’s not enough glucose for energy. Fans of the keto diet say they have more energy and better focus. The diet, however, is restrictive and can be difficult to maintain. A group of local nutrition experts say the diet is safe, but they were split over whether they would recommend it for everyone. Burning fat How does the diet work? Our bodies break down carbohydrates when we eat. Those carbs are turned into glucose that fuels our cells, giving us energy. Eating keto A difficult start Continue reading >>

What Are Fat Bombs And Why Should You Be Eating Them?

What Are Fat Bombs And Why Should You Be Eating Them?

Fat bomb. It doesn't have the most positive of connotations, does it? Greasy takeaways, clogged-up arteries... Oh, you hadn't heard? Fat is no longer public enemy number one. In fact, recent research suggests that saturated fats like coconut oil, butter and even cream can increase our levels of good cholesterol and improve "cardiometabolic risk factors, such as ectopic fat storage, blood pressure, blood lipids (triglycerides), insulin and blood sugar". No wonder, then, that the wellness set is attempting to harness its benefits. What are fat bombs? So what, exactly, is a fat bomb? And does your mid-afternoon Twix count? I'm afraid not - boasting a mere 23.7g fat per 100g, it doesn't even come close to the 85% fat content we're aiming for. Yes, 85%. A fat bomb is similar to an energy ball or bar. However, whilst these tend to be based around carb and sugar-heavy ingredients like dates and oats, fat bombs eschew these in favour of high-fat, low-carb additions such as coconut oil, peanut butter and cream. Why should you be eating fat bombs? OK, let's get a few things straight. Trans fats are bad. Nasties formed as byproducts of the chemical processing undergone by these ‘hydrogenated oils' lower good cholesterol, raise bad cholesterol and appear to promote inflammation and weight gain. However, according to scientists, we should still be getting at least 20% of our daily calorie intake from ‘good fats'. We need fats to absorb fat soluble vitamins like vitamin A, vitamin D, vitamin E and vitamin K, and research suggests that monounsaturated fats (the kind found in avocados, peanuts and olives) can lower ‘bad' LDL cholesterol and increase ‘good' HDL cholesterol. Fats take longer to break down in the digestive tract and slow the breakdown of carbohydrates into sugar, Continue reading >>

Keto Diet Food List: 221 Foods To Boost Energy (+ Printable Cheat Sheet)

Keto Diet Food List: 221 Foods To Boost Energy (+ Printable Cheat Sheet)

In some studies, only 38% of people can stick to a keto diet. (1) In other words, if you’re not prepared, a keto diet can be HARD. However, if you want to boost your energy and burn fat, there is no better way. Bottom line… If you want to transform your body, you need to be prepared. So in the keto diet food list below, I’ll show you 221 foods that will help you burn fat and boost your energy. Most of these foods are common and easy-to-find so that you can create thousands of different meals that you’ll love. I’ll also show you some of the best benefits of a keto diet and how to make sure that you reach your goals. If you want to find out more in general about keto, check out our comprehensive article on the ketogenic diet here. If you want more recipes, check out all of our keto recipes here. KETO DIET FOOD LIST “CHEAT SHEET” (PRINTABLE) To make things easy for you at the grocery store and in the kitchen, we also put together a printable “cheat sheet” of foods you can eat on a keto diet. To get our cheat sheet, just click the button below: Remember, there are a TON of foods you can eat on a keto diet. And that’s great, because you want to keep your meals interesting. But you also need to keep things as simple as possible, because if your meals and recipes get too overwhelming or take too long, then you won’t stick with it. So use this list to find a few dishes that you really love, and then try to stick to those dishes as much as possible. THE ‘SHORT’ LIST OF KETO FOODS… If you’re looking for a short list of keto diet foods, then here it is. (Remember, all 221 foods are listed below.) Basically, you can eat most meats, most vegetables, most seafood, and healthy fats. More specifically, you can eat these foods… Non-Starchy Vegetables Berr Continue reading >>

Comprehensive Food List For The Keto Diet

Comprehensive Food List For The Keto Diet

In this post you’ll get a full Keto Food list to better help you manage your ketosis plan. Approved Keto Fats The very basis of the keto diet is to encourage your body to use fat as its primary fuel source instead of carbohydrates. This means that quality sources of fats including oils, nuts and seeds should make up most of your caloric intake. Although we’re typically told to avoid eating too much fat, it’s actually a vital nutrient that’s needed by your body to keep every cell in your body healthy. Including more of the right types of fats in your diet is also a great way to promote an efficient metabolism that delivers an even source of energy throughout the day without sudden hunger pangs or cravings. It also increases satiety and makes you feel full for longer while boosting the amount of stored fat that your body burns throughout the day for effective weight loss and healthy weight management. When it comes to including fats in your keto diet, it’s vital that they’re from the right sources. Natural sources of saturated fats, monounsaturated fats and polyunsaturated fats will help your body to enter and stay in ketosis (fat burning mode). To ensure you’re getting enough of these, focus your diet on meats and nuts and use healthy oils and butters to cook with. Try to make sure that you’re getting a good balance of omega 3 to omega 6 fatty acids by including fatty fish as well. Processed fats, i.e. chemically altered trans fats are very damaging to your body and should always be avoided. Keto Approved Meats and Protein In addition to fats, meat is a staple of the ketogenic diet. They’re low in carbohydrates, higher in fats and contain quality protein which aids to maintain lean muscle mass on a low-carb diet. Most fresh meats are also rich in B vita Continue reading >>

Can Eating Fat Help You Lose Weight? Let’s Look At The Ketogenic Diet.

Can Eating Fat Help You Lose Weight? Let’s Look At The Ketogenic Diet.

Fat makes your meals more palatable and helps you feel full, so it’s no wonder the high-fat ketogenic diet is increasing in popularity. The diet has been trending for the past three years, as “keto” blogs and cookbooks continue to pop up and build an impressive fan base. This diet has been used under close supervision by physicians and dietitians since the 1920s for treating epilepsy and has shown promise in managing brain cancer. But is it useful and healthy as a strategy for weight loss? First, the basics: On the ketogenic diet, at least 70 percent of your daily calories come from fat. Five to 10 percent of your calories come from carbohydrates (20 to 50 grams a day). The rest, up to 25 percent of your daily energy, comes from protein. By contrast, the healthy diet recommended by the Institute of Medicine is 45 to 65 percent carbs, 20 to 35 percent fat and 10 to 35 percent protein. The ketogenic diet’s low-carb target can be met only by avoiding grains, dairy products, fruit, and legumes such as chickpeas and lentils. Starchy vegetables such as sweet potatoes and squash are out, and even amounts of lower-carb vegetables are limited. So what’s left to eat? Typically, eggs cooked in butter for breakfast; for lunch and dinner, meat, chicken or fish with salad or green vegetables and plenty of oily dressing. Sorry folks, no alcohol on this diet. Even red wine is out. The ketogenic diet gets its name from a process called ketosis. Ketosis happens when your body doesn’t have enough energy from glucose (carbohydrates), so it adapts by using stored fat for energy. The result? Weight loss. Does the ketogenic diet lead to faster or more sustainable weight loss than other diets? The research to date suggests that initial weight loss on the keto diet is impressive but Continue reading >>

Keto Diet Food List, Including The Best Vs. Worst Keto Foods

Keto Diet Food List, Including The Best Vs. Worst Keto Foods

Unlike many fad diets that come and go with very limited rates of long-term success, the ketogenic diet or keto diet has been practiced for more than nine decades (since the 1920s) and is based upon a solid understanding of physiology and nutrition science. The keto diet works for such a high percentage of people because it targets several key, underlying causes of weight gain — including hormonal imbalances, especially insulin resistance coupled with high blood sugar levels, and the cycle of restricting and “binging” on empty calories due to hunger that so many dieters struggle with. Yet that’s not a problem with what’s on the keto diet food list. Rather than relying on counting calories, limiting portion sizes, resorting to extreme exercise or requiring lots of willpower (even in the face of drastically low energy levels), the ketogenic diet takes an entirely different approach to weight loss and health improvements. It works because it changes the very “fuel source” that the body uses to stay energized — namely, from burning glucose (or sugar) to dietary fat, courtesy of keto recipes and the keto diet food list items, including high-fat, low-carb foods. What Can You Eat On a Ketogenic Diet? Here are some examples of high-fat low-carb foods on the keto diet food list you can expect to eat lots of if you’re following the ketogenic diet: High amounts of healthy fats (up to 80 percent of your total calories!), such as olive oil, coconut oil, grass-fed butter, palm oil, and some nuts and seeds. Fats are a critical part of every ketogenic recipe because fat is what provides energy and prevents hunger, weakness and fatigue. All sorts of non-starchy vegetables. What vegetables can you eat on a ketogenic diet without worrying about increasing your carb intak Continue reading >>

The Best Animal Fats And Plant Fats To Eat

The Best Animal Fats And Plant Fats To Eat

I like to make sure I am eating a combination of both animal fats and plant based fats during the day so that I am getting a wide variety of nutrients and fatty profiles into my diet. There are both similarities and differences between animal fats and plant fats, and there are also some types of fats that I won’t touch with a barge pole if I can help it! ‘Fat’ is a generic term used for any kind of lipid, which in an ester between fatty acids and glycerol. Both plant fats and animal fats are triglycerides, which means they are molecules that are composed of one glycerol and 3 fatty acid chains. The primary difference between plant fats and animal fats are their ratios of saturated, monounsaturated and polyunsaturated fatty acid chains. Animal fat has been vilified in the past (and still somewhat nowadays), due to the higher saturated fat content found in it. For the last 50 years or so, people thought that saturated fat was the cause of heart disease, obesity, and other diseases. But more and more people are starting to wake up to the fact that saturated fat is actually incredibly good for you and it is, in fact, sugar that is the primary cause of these things. In truth, for pretty much the entire of human history, up until the latter half of the 20th century, fatty meats and organs from animals were prized as the most nutritious and delicious part of the animal. Great Plant Fats Coconut Oil Coconut Oil is a wonderful fat that I pretty much use every day. Both for cooking, infatty teas/coffees and on my skin! It is full of medium chain fatty acids – caprylic acid, lauric acid, and capric acid. These are unlike the long chain fatty acids found in other plant-based fats because they are immediately processed by the liver (and therefore not stored as fat), anti-mic Continue reading >>

The Worst Fats To Eat When You’re Keto (or Any Time)

The Worst Fats To Eat When You’re Keto (or Any Time)

The oils you should never eat. Oils that cause inflammation, digestive conditions, and more. Smoke points, omega 6 to 3 ratios and why I choose not to consume vegan spreads. Ever. Many of us, myself included, have been duped by the food and “nutrition” industry to eat oils and fats that are not good for us. I used to think grapeseed oil was a healthy oil for baking. This is wrong. I used to think that canola oil, regardless of the way it was processed, was REALLY bad. I used to think that sesame oil added healthy flavor to dishes, I couldn’t have been farther from the truth. There was a time where vegan spreads were the only fat I consumed. And don’t even get me started on “healthy omega oils”. I spent two solid weeks digging into the research behind common oils – they’re polyunsaturated content, processing methods, omega ratios, and more, and have rated each and every common oil to decode marketing gimmicks and uncover the truth. If you’re struggling with inflammation, unhealthy oils could be the culprit. Signs of inflammation include but are not limited to aches, pains, fatigue, weight imbalances, itchy skin, red skin, autoimmune conditions, multiple food allergies/sensitivities, multiple infections, high blood glucose, digestive issues (gas, diarrhea, bloating, or constipation), acne, eczema, psoriasis, puffy eyes or face, gum disease, brain fog, anxiousness, erectile dysfunction, and more. For video transcript PDF, scroll down. Your Mini Guide & Transcript A 5-10 page PDF with the transcript for this video, resources, and exclusive steps to taking your fat burning to the next level. Download to your device and access anytime. Simply click the button above, enter your details, and the guide will be delivered to your inbox! Get the mini guide & trans Continue reading >>

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