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What Fats Are Good For Keto?

Keto Diet Food List, Including The Best Vs. Worst Keto Foods

Keto Diet Food List, Including The Best Vs. Worst Keto Foods

Unlike many fad diets that come and go with very limited rates of long-term success, the ketogenic diet or keto diet has been practiced for more than nine decades (since the 1920s) and is based upon a solid understanding of physiology and nutrition science. The keto diet works for such a high percentage of people because it targets several key, underlying causes of weight gain — including hormonal imbalances, especially insulin resistance coupled with high blood sugar levels, and the cycle of restricting and “binging” on empty calories due to hunger that so many dieters struggle with. Yet that’s not a problem with what’s on the keto diet food list. Rather than relying on counting calories, limiting portion sizes, resorting to extreme exercise or requiring lots of willpower (even in the face of drastically low energy levels), the ketogenic diet takes an entirely different approach to weight loss and health improvements. It works because it changes the very “fuel source” that the body uses to stay energized — namely, from burning glucose (or sugar) to dietary fat, courtesy of keto recipes and the keto diet food list items, including high-fat, low-carb foods. What Can You Eat On a Ketogenic Diet? Here are some examples of high-fat low-carb foods on the keto diet food list you can expect to eat lots of if you’re following the ketogenic diet: High amounts of healthy fats (up to 80 percent of your total calories!), such as olive oil, coconut oil, grass-fed butter, palm oil, and some nuts and seeds. Fats are a critical part of every ketogenic recipe because fat is what provides energy and prevents hunger, weakness and fatigue. All sorts of non-starchy vegetables. What vegetables can you eat on a ketogenic diet without worrying about increasing your carb intak Continue reading >>

The Top 10 Ways To Eat More Fat

The Top 10 Ways To Eat More Fat

Flavorful, full-fat ingredients topped with creamy, satisfying sauces… Low-carb and keto eating can be decadent! Fat is an amazing flavor enhancer – it makes everything taste better. And if you eat enough fat, it’s filling, too. Get ready for a new, luscious take on deliciousness! Remember that a low-carb diet needs to be higher in fat, to make it satisfying. Don’t fear fat (natural fat is good for you). Don’t stay hungry. Add enough fat to feel satisfied after eating. This can sometimes be a challenge for people who are not used to eating natural fat. Here are the top 10 tips on how to eat more fat – plus tips on HOW much fat you should aim for. 1. Start with whole, full-fat ingredients Say goodbye to low-fat and fat-free products. Say good riddance to Egg Beaters, artificial creamers, and reduced-fat peanut butter. Banish any item labeled ‘light’ or ‘lite’ from your pantry and refrigerator. Forget nonfat and low-fat dairy. (If your grocery store doesn’t carry plain, full-fat yogurt, buy the plain low-fat version and add back the fat by stirring in heavy cream, sour cream, or crème fraiche.) Rethink your grocery list and stock your refrigerator and pantry with real whole food, including fat-rich options like avocados and eggs. Try to add natural fat rather than avoid it. Fatty cuts of meat can be more flavorful, tender and inexpensive than leaner cuts. Salmon and sardines contain plenty of healthy fats and are a terrific addition, too. Invite these delicious items back onto your plate. 2. Cook with fat No more limp steamed vegetables or dry chicken breasts. Cook your vegetables, meat, fish, and eggs in tasty natural fats like butter. Or the other ones listed under point 3, below. Use as much as you need. 3. Use different fats for different flavor Continue reading >>

What Are Ketogenic Fat Bombs, How To Make Them In 3 Easy Steps (plus 12 Ketogenic Fat Bomb Recipes)

What Are Ketogenic Fat Bombs, How To Make Them In 3 Easy Steps (plus 12 Ketogenic Fat Bomb Recipes)

We couldn’t just tell you what ketogenic fat bombs are without also telling you how to make fat bombs! So, this article is a bit longer and will cover what are ketogenic fat bombs and 3 easy steps for making keto fat bombs. If you follow our 3 easy steps for making fat bombs, you’ll be able to make an almost endless selection of keto fat bombs to satisfy your desires. However, if you prefer to follow a fat bomb recipe instead, then at the end of this article you’ll find links to 12 delicious keto fat bomb recipes you can go make right now. If you’d like this entire article (including the list of recipes) emailed to you as a PDF so you can read it at a later time, then just click the green button below: To help you navigate this article on ketogenic fat bombs, below is a helpful table of contents you can click to take you to the section you want to start reading. Table of Contents – Ketogenic Fat Bombs Click to jump to a specific section: What Are Ketogenic Fat Bombs? Ketogenic fat bombs are small snacks or treats that are high in fat and low in carbs (so, literally a fat bomb) that you can eat as a quick breakfast, as a quick mid-afternoon snack, as a pre- or after- workout snack, or as extra fuel during your day. Here are a few facts about ketogenic fat bombs to help you understand them better: 1. Ketogenic fat bombs are often small It’s tough to eat too much of these as they are so high in fat, so they take the shape of small balls or mini muffins. Our favorite way of making them is in muffin pan with liner. That way you don’t get your hands dirty when you make the mixture and they’re super easy (and not messy) to take with you to eat on your way to work or to the gym. 2. Fat bombs can be savory or sweet The majority of the fat bomb recipes tend to be Continue reading >>

Keto Diet: The Do's And Don't's Of This High-fat, Low-carb Nutrition Plan

Keto Diet: The Do's And Don't's Of This High-fat, Low-carb Nutrition Plan

I'm often asked about popular diets, so this week and next I'm covering two popular diets - the Keto Diet this week, and Whole30 next week - including the pros, cons and my take for each. I am not advocating or recommending that we all follow these programs. While these diets - or components of these diets - may be beneficial to some, my recommendation for the majority of the population is to keep it simple, streamlined, wholesome - less about hard rules with lists of do's and don't's, and more about the key fundamentals: limit added sugars and white carbs. Emphasize lean proteins. Tons of vegetables, some fruits (mostly berries), and more of an emphasis on plant based fats when possible. Find what works for your individual lifestyle, taste preferences, budget and schedule. If you do choose to try one or some of these popular diets, use it as an opportunity to help break and replace not-so-good habits, and to educate yourself and learn more about how you may respond to certain foods and ingredients so that you can make lasting behavioral changes that can stick around long after you're "off" of a particular diet plan. *** "I'm going keto." I'm hearing this more and more often. And odds are you've heard someone talk about "going keto," you've considered it yourself, or at the very least, you've seen "keto-friendly" products and recipes in stores, magazines, and social media. Keto is a high-fat, low-carbohydrate diet, with limited protein allowed as well. As with many of these diets, healthful food selections within each of those food categories is what determines whether the diet is healthful. The keto diet's origins "Keto" is short for "ketogenic" and is a type of diet that has been used for 100-plus years for children with uncontrolled seizures. Approximately half of th Continue reading >>

Ketogenic Diet Food List: Everything You Need To Know

Ketogenic Diet Food List: Everything You Need To Know

Not sure what to eat on a ketogenic diet? Here’s a quick food list for you to reference. Below you’ll find a brief overview of what you can eat. Scroll further down to see more details on each section. Being on a diet isn’t the easiest thing in the world, especially when you don’t know what you should eat. We’ve put together this ketogenic diet food list to help people out there make decisions on what they are eating and shopping for. Below you can find a quick visual guide to what to eat on a ketogenic diet. Let’s go over some of the commonly identifiable items that people use on keto: All of the food above sticks to the strict 5% carbohydrate allowance that we use on keto. In general, you can eat from the following food groups: Fats & Oils. Try to get your fat from natural sources like meat and nuts. Supplement with saturated and monounsaturated fats like coconut oil, butter, and olive oil. Protein. Try to stick with organic, pasture-raised and grass-fed meat where possible. Most meats don’t have added sugar in them, so they can be consumed in moderate quantity. Remember that too much protein on a ketogenic diet is not a good thing. Vegetables. Fresh or frozen doesn’t matter. Stick with above ground vegetables, leaning toward leafy/green items. Dairy. Most dairy is fine, but make sure to buy full-fat dairy items. Harder cheeses typically have fewer carbs. Nuts and Seeds. In moderation, nuts and seeds can be used to create some fantastic textures. Try to use fattier nuts like macadamias and almonds. Beverages. Stay simple and stick to mostly water. You can flavor it if needed with stevia-based flavorings or lemon/lime juice. If you scroll down, you can see in-depth breakdowns of each section along with some ideas on what types of food to eat! If you’r Continue reading >>

Why The Ketogenic Diet May Help Fight Diabetes, Cancer

Why The Ketogenic Diet May Help Fight Diabetes, Cancer

A diet extremely high in fat may not seem like the best way to lose fat. But there’s a growing body of research showing that the high-fat, low-carbohydrate ketogenic diet is not only good for weight loss, but also may help in preventing disease. The ketogenic diet, or keto, relies on using your fat as fuel, instead of glucose from carbohydrates or protein. Simply put, the daily ketogenic diet consists of 75 percent fat, 20 percent of protein, and a teeny allotment of carbohydrates, about 5 percent. This balance of macronutrients is intended to put your body in a state of ketosis, which suppresses the release of insulin and blood glucose levels. The benefits of ketosis to your health are improvements in biomarkers like blood glucose, reduction of blood pressure and decreased appetite due to fullness linked to consumption of fats. You might think this sounds a lot like the Atkins diet — it’s not. The main difference lies in the protein content of the diet. Atkins tends to be very high in protein, while ketogenic is moderate. Getty Images stock It's not the easiest plan to follow, but the theory of ketosis as a possible prevention against disease is gaining attention from cancer specialists. Tumor immunologist Dr. Patrick Hwu, one of the leading cancer specialists in the U.S., has followed the keto diet for four years, although he prefers to call it the fat-burning metabolism diet, or fat-burning diet. More research is needed to prove its benefits, but Hwu, the head of cancer medicine at MD Anderson in Houston, believes in it after seeing improvements in his own health. Why keto works The body’s first and preferred fuel of choice is glucose — stored as glycogen. Anytime you eat a carbohydrate, be it lentils or licorice, the body turns it into glucose, or sugar. B Continue reading >>

Good Fats Vs Bad Fats On The Ketogenic Diet

Good Fats Vs Bad Fats On The Ketogenic Diet

Since they make up around 70% of macros on the ketogenic diet, fats are obviously important. However, the type of fat is really important too, and there can be some confusion about what’s best to consume. Here’s a breakdown of what fats you should include and which you should avoid when going keto. GOOD FATS ON KETO The fats that get the green light when it comes to the keto diet—and good health in general—can be broken down into four categories: saturated fats, monounsaturated fats (MUFAs), polyunsaturated fats (PUFAs), and naturally-occurring trans fats. The truth is that all fats contain a mixture of these types, but the one that’s dominant is how we categorize them. Now, we’ll break down each fat type when eating a ketogenic diet more thoroughly so you can recognize them in your own food choices. Healthy Keto Saturated Fats For years and years, saturated fats were seen as harmful for heart health and we were recommended to reduce them as much as possible. However, recent studies have debunked this, showing no significant link between saturated fats, which humans have been eating for thousands of years, and the risk of heart disease. In fact, there are many benefits of including healthy saturated fats in the diet. Plus, one type of saturated fat includes medium-chain triglycerides (MCTs), which are mostly found in coconut oil (and in small amounts in butter and palm oil) and can be digested by the body very easily. When eaten, they’re passed directly to the liver to be used immediately for energy. MCTs are great for fat loss and athletic performance. Health benefits of saturated fats on keto can include: Improved HDL and LDL cholesterol levels Maintenance of bone density Boosting of immune system health Support in creation of important hormones like cor Continue reading >>

Ketogenic Dieting 101: How To Use Fat As Fuel

Ketogenic Dieting 101: How To Use Fat As Fuel

Eating fat to burn fat sounds contradictory, if not nuts, right? The world is full of people who are fat because of high-fat diets, so why would a fit person want to follow suit? I'm not talking about stuffing your face full of peanut butter cups. I'm talking about following a ketogenic diet—or, put simply, a high-fat, moderate-protein, carbohydrate-restricted diet designed to make the body burn fat for fuel. Bodybuilders, fitness enthusiasts, and researchers alike have found that such diets are an effective fat-loss tool. In fact, studies have shown that ketogenic diets induce numerous favorable metabolic and physiological changes, including weight loss, less oxidative stress, improved body composition, reduced inflammation, and increased insulin sensitivity.[1-4] That being said, what does the science surrounding ketogenic diets have to say about individuals looking to run faster or farther, jump higher, or improve other aspects of sports performance? Shouldn't athletes be swilling Gatorade before, during, and after their events instead of adopting a high-fat, restricted-carbohydrate diet? Not necessarily. Ketogenic diets have become increasingly popular among athletes ranging from Olympic competitors to endurance runners, with good reason. Let's take a closer look at the science. What Exactly Is A Ketogenic Diet, Anyway? Ketogenic diets are very high-fat, moderate-protein, carbohydrate-restricted diets.[5] The exact breakdown of the diet varies between individuals, but a general profile may reflect 70-75 percent fat, 15-20 percent protein, and only 5-10 percent carbohydrate. So, you're probably thinking, all I need to do then is watch out for the carbs, right? Not exactly. Ketogenic diets are not the same as high-protein, carbohydrate-restricted diets. I often hear Continue reading >>

Healthiest High Fat Foods

Healthiest High Fat Foods

Let’s be honest: eating lots of fat is one of the best things about your low carb diet. This isn’t a gimmick. It’s hard science. Find the foods, grab some recipes and add more healthy fats to your plan. 14 high fat low carb foods and health benefits Easy high fat keto recipes and food combinations Real-Life HFLC meal plan Fat is Your New Skinny If you want to bust a plateau or lose more fat than ever before, stop depriving yourself. Start eating these healthy high fat low carb foods. Saturated fat is traditionally forbidden in most diets, but it actually helps a low carb diet. Healthy fat increases your HDL (good) cholesterol, which helps remove plaque from your artery walls. In turn, decreasing your risk of heart disease. Eating more fat keeps you fuller, longer: the key to reducing your daily calories without feeling deprived. Increasing your fat intake accelerates your fat burning. How to Increase the Fat Don’t be afraid to eat healthy, high fats! With the absence of carbs, fat is your body’s primary fuel source. But pushing fat levels even higher while cutting carbs makes a big difference in the amount of fat you’ll burn. We are all unique. Low carb dieters require varying levels of fat, protein and carbs to meet different weight loss goals. During ketosis, the fat levels are very high. See how you respond to various foods. Simply adjust the recipe ingredients to adjust the percentage of fat. 14 High Fat Foods Perfect for Ketosis Coconut oil is a healthy source of saturated fat. Coconut oil is an immediate source of energy and isn’t stored as fat. Adding this quality fat to your diet helps you burn more fat in ketosis. It’s high lauric acid content boosts your metabolism, and helps support healthy thyroid functioning. Coconut oil helps skin heal fast Continue reading >>

What Are Good Fats On A Low Carb Diet?

What Are Good Fats On A Low Carb Diet?

Not all fats are created equal. Eating the right (healthy) fats is very important, especially on a ketogenic/low carb diet where fat makes up ~70% of your daily caloric intake. All the important facts and supporting studies are included further down in this article but here’s what you need to know about good and bad fats in a nutshell: Good Fats Saturated Fats = Good Found in red meat, butter, ghee, lard, cream, eggs, coconut oil (MCTs) or palm oil Monounsaturated Fats = Good Found in extra virgin olive oil, avocados, avocado oil and macadamia nut oil Natural Trans Fats = Good Found in meat from grass-fed animals and dairy products Bad Fats Processed Polyunsaturated Fats = Bad Avoid vegetable and seed oils including: Canola, Soybean, Corn, Sesame, Grapeseed, Peanut, Sunflower Processed Trans Fats = Bad Avoid processed foods, fast foods, margarine and commercially baked goods. IMPORTANT: Most of your daily fat intake should consist of saturated and monounsaturated fats. Fat is identified by the amount that’s dominant in the mixture. Extra Virgin Olive Oil is about 73% monounsaturated fat so it is considered monounsaturated. Butter is about 65% saturated and thus a saturated fat. Below is a breakdown of each type of fat so you can start eating the right fats immediately. Saturated Fatty Acids (SFAs) Saturated Fats Don’t Increase Chances of Heart Disease Saturated fats are great! Although the government has condemned saturated fats to fat hell, there have been many studies with extremely conclusive results (21 studies with a total of 347,747 subjects) showing that there is no significant evidence of saturated fat increasing risk of heart disease in any way.2 Saturated Fats Increase Concentrations of Larger LDL Cholesterol is extremely important to us. It is used to m Continue reading >>

16 Foods To Eat On A Ketogenic Diet

16 Foods To Eat On A Ketogenic Diet

The ketogenic diet has become quite popular recently. Studies have found that this very low-carb, high-fat diet is effective for weight loss, diabetes and epilepsy (1, 2, 3). There's also early evidence to show that it may be beneficial for certain cancers, Alzheimer's disease and other diseases, too. A ketogenic diet typically limits carbs to 20–50 grams per day. While this may seem challenging, many nutritious foods can easily fit into this way of eating. Here are 16 healthy foods to eat on a ketogenic diet. Fish and shellfish are very keto-friendly foods. Salmon and other fish are rich in B vitamins, potassium and selenium, yet virtually carb-free (4). However, the carbs in different types of shellfish vary. For instance, while shrimp and most crabs contain no carbs, other types of shellfish do (5). While these shellfish can still be included on a ketogenic diet, it's important to account for these carbs when you're trying to stay within a narrow range. Here are the carb counts for 3.5-ounce (100-gram) servings of some popular types of shellfish (6, 7, 8, 9, 10): Clams: 5 grams Mussels: 7 grams Octopus: 4 grams Oysters: 4 grams Squid: 3 grams Salmon, sardines, mackerel and other fatty fish are very high in omega-3 fats, which have been found to lower insulin levels and increase insulin sensitivity in overweight and obese people (11). In addition, frequent fish intake has been linked to a decreased risk of disease and improved mental health (12, 13). Aim to consume at least two servings of seafood weekly. Many types of seafood are carb-free or very low in carbs. Fish and shellfish are also good sources of vitamins, minerals and omega-3s. Non-starchy vegetables are low in calories and carbs, but high in many nutrients, including vitamin C and several minerals. Vegeta Continue reading >>

Understanding A High-fat Ketogenic Diet—and Is It Right For You?

Understanding A High-fat Ketogenic Diet—and Is It Right For You?

While food trends come and go, high-fat diets—lauded for their weight-loss potential and brain-function benefits—have proven to have some staying power. Functional medicine M.D. Sara Gottfried contributes frequently to goop on the topic of weight-loss resistance. She’s spent the past two years rigorously studying the ketogenic diet—high-fat, low-carb, moderate-protein. Named for ketones, which Gottfried explains are “the energy source made by the body when there’s not enough carbohydrates to be burned for energy demand,” the goal of the diet is to get the body to burn fat instead of sugar. Gottfried recommends the keto diet (as it’s commonly called) to help with a range of brain and focus issues—she finds ketones to be “very efficient fuel for the brain”; she also says it works well for some patients (not all) who want to lose weight but have trouble kicking sugar cravings. We talked to her about who the keto diet is right for (and whom, or when, it isn’t); the nutritional ins and outs of mastering it; and which keto-friendly meals are healthy for practically everyone, regardless of what diet we do (or don’t) practice. A Q&A with Sara Gottfried, M.D. Q What is ketosis? A In most circles, ketosis refers to nutritional ketosis, an optimized state in which you burn fat instead of sugar. Nutritional ketosis has been used to treat epilepsy since the 1920’s and its popularity for mental acuity and weight loss has surged recently. More technically, ketosis refers to a metabolic state in which most of your body’s energy comes from ketones in the blood, as opposed to glycolysis, in which energy supply comes from blood glucose. Ketones are the energy source made by the body (in the liver) when there’s not enough carbohydrates to be burned for energ Continue reading >>

Good Fats And Bad Fats

Good Fats And Bad Fats

As I explained in this article, a ketogenic diet is a very high fat diet. But, as with anything, there are good and bad choices when it comes to the kinds of fat you should eat. Essentially, the good fats are saturated and monounsaturated. They have the greatest healthy impact on body fat, cholesterol, blood triglycerides, and joint and brain health. The bad fats are trans fats and most vegetable oils. I’ll make it easier. Good fats Avocados Beef and pork fats (lard, tallow, bacon fat, etc.) Butter Cheese (cheddar, colby, feta, mozzarella, swiss, provolone, ricotta, etc…not American or Velveeta) Coconut oil Cream cheese Greek yogurt Heavy whipping cream Sour cream Olive oil Nuts (almonds, macadamia, brazil, hazelnut, pistachios, walnuts, pecans) Bad fats Any other vegetable oils (corn, vegetable, safflower, canola) Margarine Vegetable shortening Any other not on the good fats list Stick with the good list and you’ll never go wrong. Continue reading >>

The 5 Best Keto Foods (high-fat & Low-carb)

The 5 Best Keto Foods (high-fat & Low-carb)

Like any diet, the ketogenic diet is not about a specific food; it’s about your entire body of work. Now, if you know anything about going keto (and the typical keto foods), you know it’s a very-low-carbohydrate, high-fat, moderate-protein diet. Given the constraints, I’ll give you three guesses as to what types of foods are BEST. If you guessed fat, fat, and more fat, then you’d be right on point. And while protein-rich foods are also a staple, it’s not a high-protein diet. In fact, too much protein can keep you from getting into or staying in ketosis. While there’s really no such thing as a “ketogenic” food, here are the top 5 you’re most likely to find if you decide to go keto! The Top 5 Keto Foods Coconut Oil One of the best keto foods is coconut oil (along with shredded coconut, coconut milk, coconut flour, and other coconut-based foods). See, about 70% of the fat found in coconut oil is a very special type called medium chain triglycerides (MCTs for short). MCTs are pretty awesome. They’re easily absorbed, metabolized, burned for energy, and the body has a hard time storing them as fat. But that’s not all—MCTs are readily converted into ketone bodies. Perhaps that’s why they’ve been shown to suppress appetite, boost metabolism, lower body weight, reduce belly fat, improve insulin sensitivity, and improve markers of metabolic health.1–6 Winning! Avocados With right around 80% of calories from fat, avocados are another one of the near-perfect keto foods. Plus, they’re incredibly versatile and downright tasty! Avocados are also nutrient-dense, containing 6 grams of fiber and upwards of 20 essential nutrients. They’re a great source of potassium, which is an important mineral to consume on the ketogenic diet. In fact, active people sh Continue reading >>

The Importance Of Fats In A Ketogenic Diet

The Importance Of Fats In A Ketogenic Diet

There are 3 main types of fats that we see in everyday life. There’s been quite a lot of misconceptions and misinformation that has built up over the years about fats. All of these 3 fats are important to our healthy, and should always be incorporated into your diet. The way that we identify what type of fat we are eating is by the amount that is dominant in the mixture. For example, we call Olive Oil (~75% monounsaturated) a monounsaturated fat and we call butter (~60% saturated) a saturated fat. All real foods will contain a mixture of: Saturated Fats – These fats are necessary and keep your immune system healthy, your bone density normal, and your testosterone levels in check. For years they were dumped into the danger category along with trans fats, but studies have proven them to be necessary time and time again. They have also been found that they have no association with risk of heart disease. Foods that have them include meat, eggs, and butter – food that we have been eating for thousands of years. These fats will improve HDL/LDL cholesterol levels. Polyunsaturated Fats – These are usually seen in the form of vegetable oils and have been hailed as wonderful, but in fact, are normally highly processed. All of those “heart healthy” margarine spreads we see – avoid them. Studies have shown that the rising rates of heart disease are linked with liquid vegetable oils and trans fats – not saturated fats. Don’t get this confused, as fatty fish is also high in polyunsaturated fats, and these are great for you. Takeaway note is that processed polyunsaturated fats are bad (will worsen HDL/LDL cholestertol levels) and natural polyunsaturated fats are good (will improve HDL/LDL cholesterol levels). Monounsaturated Fats – These are pretty well known and a Continue reading >>

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