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What Does Ketosis Do To A Cow

250 Yearbook Of Agriculture 1956

250 Yearbook Of Agriculture 1956

To obtain best results in treatment, an adequate concentration of the drug must be maintained in the udder for a period of time. Best results are usually obtained when the drugs are administered once or twice daily over a period of 2 to 4 days, depending upon the causative agent and the nature of the case. Most staphylococcal infections must be treated longer than streptococcal infections. Clinical cases must be treated longer than cases not showing symptoms to produce a cure. Many of the antibiotics are available in various vehicles, such as ointments and water-in-oil emulsions, that are designed for infusion into the udder. The vehicles aid in maintaining an adequate therapeutic level of the anti- biotic in the udder for about 24 to 48 hours after i injection. Because anti- biotics can persist for several days in the udder, the milk from the treated cows should not be marketed during the period of treatment or for at least 72 hours after the last treatment. The antibiotics interfere with the growth of the bacteria necessary for the pro- duction of cheese. The drugs are administered by in- fusion into the infected quarter through the teat canal. First, though, the teat must be washed thoroughly and the teat orifice cleansed with a pledget of cotton wetted with alcohol. Because drugs do not cure all infec- tions caused by some of the bacteria and yeasts, the danger exists of intro- ducing these resistant micro-organisms into the udders while treating for another type of organism and of allow- ing a more severe form of mastitis to develop. Faulty technique in prepar- ing the teat for injection and contam- ination of the instruments, drug, or vehicle may be to blame. In treating acute mastitis, it is desir- able to have the drugs administered intravenously or intramuscula Continue reading >>

Ketosis In Dairy Cows

Ketosis In Dairy Cows

Ketosis is a metabolic disease which usually occurs in cows in early lactation. At this time the cow's appetite is depressed after calving and energy intake cannot meet the increasing demand of the rising milk yield. This period of 'negative energy balance' is normal in all newly calved cows but it is the level at which this happens that is important. To meet energy requirements, the cow loses weight by mobilizing back fat which is then transported (as NEFAs) to the liver and broken down to release energy. During periods of high energy demand the liver cannot fully utilize the fat and metabolites known as ketones, such as acetone and beta-hydroxybutyrate, are produced. If too much weight is lost, these ketones overflow into the blood resulting in a further depression of appetite and subsequently reduced milk yield. Typically, cows will lose 0.5 in body condition score from calving to service but many lose more than that. Fat cows already have lower dry matter intakes post calving and so their body condition score drops even more, taking them to the point of ketosis. Cows that have been dry for a long period of time or cows that have some sort of metabolic disease during calving, or dystocia, are also more susceptible to ketosis. Ketosis is a worsening problem in UK dairy cattle, with approximately 30% having 'hidden ketosis'. It is commonly characterized by anorexia, depression and reduced productivity, lower milk yields and poorer fertility. Even when at sub clinical level, cows are at higher risk of suffering a wide range of metabolic and reproductive diseases which can further reduce income and add extra cost. The direct costs of ketosis include the input by the vet and herdsperson, drugs, discarded milk and reduced yield. Longer term problems are extended calving in Continue reading >>

Why Ketone Level Testing Isn't Always Indicative Of Ketosis In Cattle

Why Ketone Level Testing Isn't Always Indicative Of Ketosis In Cattle

In the last few decades, advancements in dairy milking, cow genetics and herd management have cows producing greater amounts and higher quality milk than in any other time in the history of dairy farming. The huge improvements in milk production have also brought with it a new set of challenges. In many modern dairy farms the best cows -- those that produce the most and highest quality milk -- are at the greatest risk for metabolic disorders. A major metabolic interruption and one of the most common calving diseases is ketosis. Ketosis in cows is a pathological condition which decreases milk quantity and quality, damages fertility and shortens lifespan, all of which severely affect farm revenue. Ketosis is especially prominent in post-partum cows, as it is a time of sharp increase in milk production, demanding very high energy requirements. When these energy requirements aren't met, ketosis in cattle occurs. As in most metabolic diseases, clinical signs are rare and not specific; hence, diagnosis is available through measuring excessive ketones in the blood and urine. However, although direct parameter testing is usually accurate, they are not sufficient in truly monitoring and diagnosing ketosis in dairy cows. In this post we'll explain why such direct testing is insufficient, and what alternative methods should be considered instead. Getting a Rise Out of Constantly Fluctuating Ketone Levels A common method for detecting ketosis in cows is through measuring the beta-hydroxybutyrate (BHBA levels) in the blood. This is the most predominant ketone in the cow's blood and known to be the "gold standard" for diagnosis of ketosis. These tests are usually conducted at a specific time after calving, mostly during a veterinarian's visit to the farm. The challenge with these tes Continue reading >>

Nervous Form Of Ketosis In Cows And Its Treatment

Nervous Form Of Ketosis In Cows And Its Treatment

Ketosis is defined as an abnormal rise of the ketone or acetone bodies in the body. The ketone bodies are organic chemical compounds and include acetone, acetoacetic acid, and beta hydroxy butyric acid. Present study reports the primary nervous ketosis in three cows at their peak milk yield. Cows exhibited the bellowing, head pressing and reluctance to take concentrates. Low serum glucose, high levels of blood urea nitrogen with ketonuria was observed. Cows showed fruitful recovery after treatment with 25% glucose solution, dexamethasone and glycerin along with supportive therapy. Keywords: Cows, Dextrose, Ketosis, Nervous Signs. Ketosis is defined as an abnormal rise of the ketone or acetone bodies in the body. The ketone bodies are organic chemical compounds and include acetone, acetoacetic acid, and beta hydroxy butyric acid. Present study reports the primary nervous ketosis in three cows at their peak milk yield. Cows exhibited the bellowing, head pressing and reluctance to take concentrates. Low serum glucose, high levels of blood urea nitrogen with ketonuria was observed. Cows showed fruitful recovery after treatment with 25% glucose solution, dexamethasone and glycerin along with supportive therapy. Keywords: Cows, Dextrose, Ketosis, Nervous Signs. Continue reading >>

What Is Ketosis Diet And What Does It Contain?

What Is Ketosis Diet And What Does It Contain?

A keto diet is well known for being a low carb diet, where the body produces ketones in the liver to be used as energy. It’s referred to as many different names – ketogenic diet, low carb diet, low carb high fat (LCHF), etc. When you eat something high in carbs, your body will produce glucose and insulin. Glucose is the easiest molecule for your body to convert and use as energy, so it will be chosen over any other energy source. Insulin is produced to process the glucose in your bloodsteam, by taking it around the body. Since the glucose is being used as a primary energy, your fats are not needed, and are therefore stored. Typically on a normal, higher carbohydrate diet, the body will use glucose as the main form of energy. By lowering the intake of carbs, the body is induced into a state known as ketosis. Ketosis is a natural process the body initiates to help us survive when food intake is low. During this state, we produce ketones, which are produced from the breakdown of fats in the liver. The end goal of a properly maintained keto diet is to force your body into this metabolic state. We don’t do this through starvation of calories, but through starvation of carbohydrates. Our bodies are extremely adaptive to what you put into it – when you overload it with fats and take away carbohydrates, it will begin to burn ketones as the main energy source. Cholesterol. A keto diet has shown to improve triglyceride levels and cholesterol levels most associated with arterial buildup. Weight Loss. As your body is burning fat as the main source of energy, you will essentially be using your fat stores as an energy source while in a fasting state. Blood Sugar. Many studies show the decrease of LDL cholesterol over time and have shown to eliminate ailments such as type 2 di Continue reading >>

New Tools Help Us Spot Ketotic Cows

New Tools Help Us Spot Ketotic Cows

The author is a dairy practitioner and owner/partner in Countryside Veterinary Clinic, Lowville, N.Y. When a cow's intake of energy does not meet her energy needs for maintenance and milk production, she begins to burn fat as an energy source. One common form of ketosis (Type I) occurs when a cow is in negative energy balance. She is not consuming enough energy to meet her metabolic needs. This generally occurs in early lactation when the cow's feed intake is unable to keep up with climbing milk production. When a cow's intake of energy does not meet her energy needs, she begins to burn fat as an energy source. The liver is the necessary organ to convert fat into usable energy (sugar). Think of the liver as a factory with an output limit. It can only convert so much fat into sugar. Once this pathway is overwhelmed, the liver produces ketones. Ketones can be used as an energy source, but they are much less efficient, and they cause the cow to feel sick. This becomes a downward spiral . . . the cow does not feel well, eats less, burns more fat, and makes more ketones. She now has clinical ketosis. Two other forms of ketosis can occur as a result of either "fat cow syndrome" or the consumption of forages high in butyric acid. "Fat cow" (or Type II) ketosis occurs when dry matter intake declines before freshening. This most commonly occurs in overconditioned cows but can also occur when dry matter intake is restricted to cows prior to freshening. This often is the result of overcrowding or improperly balanced prefresh rations. Cows with Type II ketosis are very difficult to manage and don't respond well to treatment. Butyric acid-induced ketosis is caused by the direct consumption of ketones in the diet. This causes poor dry matter intake and the obvious downward spiral as Continue reading >>

Can A Cow Typically Lactate For Years After A Single Pregnancy?

Can A Cow Typically Lactate For Years After A Single Pregnancy?

Can, yes, but should, not really. As other commentators have said, the annual calf crop is a good part of the productive value of the cow, and a cow not yielding a replacement annually besides her milk production is generally less well thought of than one that does. However, practically speaking, there are many cows that lactate longer than the usual cycle of: Calve (0 Days In Milk, DIM) 2 months VWP (50–60 DIM) This is lactic anhemia/recovery/ voluntary waiting period before insemination. This also is when the cow’s metabolism shifts from stagnant to a high-functioning diabetic, where she converts almost all her energy intake into milk sugars, and sweats off late-pregnancy and pre-calving fat buildup. There’s some risk of ketosis and other metabolic issues if she tries to do too much too early, she’s typically not fertile right away after calving, and lactation tends to peak around maybe 90 days. So if you forego the metabolic drain of carrying a calf until later, you have more energy available to support a higher level of production for a longer term, since production tends to decline at a steady rate-over-time regardless of peak production- a cow peaking at 90 pounds a day declines at the same general rate as a cow peaking at 70, but you have 20 extra pounds every day on the 90 pound cow versus the 70, all year long, until they both go dry. So, theoretically, you breed the cow at 60 days and she milks another 305, goes dry (stop milking), vacations for two months, and has another calf. In a perfect world and according to charts and graphs. HOWEVER Firstly, it’s an imperfect world. Some cows won’t show a heat. Some cows will have issues after calving and take longer to become fertile, some will be too busy milking to show signs of heat, some cows had some Continue reading >>

Fresh Cow Ketosis Tests Pay Back Big

Fresh Cow Ketosis Tests Pay Back Big

A drop of blood is all that’s needed Editor’s note: This is the first of a six-part series on transition cow management that will run in 2015. When it comes to fresh cow health, an ounce of prevention can result in pounds more milk, fewer displaced abomasums (DAs) and less culling. All of it adds up to potentially thousands of dollars saved each year. And it all can be had with the use of a simple, easy-to-use blood test of cows in your fresh pen. Most dairy farmers, unless they routinely test for subclinical ketosis, are blissfully unaware of how prevalent the disease is in their herds. But work in New York and Wisconsin herds done by veterinarian researchers Jessica McArt, Cornell University, and Gary Oetzel, University of Wisconsin, suggest subclinical ketosis is challenging fresh cows through early transition. The study, done during the summer of 2010, involved 1,800 cows in four herds—two each in New York and Wisconsin. Nearly 45% of cows were subclincally ketotic during the first two weeks after calving. The good news is subclinical cows that were treated responded well, averaging 1.5 lb. more milk per day, had fewer DAs and were culled less frequently. For every 100 fresh cows tested twice between three and nine days in milk, the net economic return was roughly $1,200. What makes all this possible are easy-to-use test strips requiring just a drop of blood from the tail vein. A very small amount of blood is added to the end of the test strip and then read by a meter. The Cornell and Wisconsin vet-erinarians have found the Precision Xtra ketone meter from Abbott gives excellent results with no additional calibration needed from the human system. The meter measures whole blood beta-hydroxybutyrate (BHBA). A reading of 1.2 mmol/L or more indicates subclinical k Continue reading >>

Fresh Cow Milk Fat To Protein Ratio (fat:protein) Can Be Used To Identify Cows Experiencing Ketosis

Fresh Cow Milk Fat To Protein Ratio (fat:protein) Can Be Used To Identify Cows Experiencing Ketosis

Extension > Agriculture > Dairy Extension > Transition cows > Fresh cow milk fat to protein ratio (fat:protein) can be used to identify cows experiencing ketosis Zach Sawall, Research Assistant - Dairy Cattle Nutrition Noah Litherland, Assistant Professor - Dairy Cattle Nutrition Subclinical ketosis affects 26 to 55% of dairy cows and is conservatively estimated to cost dairy producers $78 per case. Ketosis is also correlated with increased risk for other transition cow disorders that decrease dairy farm profitability. Various studies have evaluated the effects of serum concentration of beta-hydroxy butyrate (BHBA) > 1400 µmol/L and found that there is an increased risk for displaced abomasum, metritis, severity of mastitis, and increased days to conception. Milk production is also affected by ketosis and results in a milk yield decrease of 3.0 pounds per cow per day in early lactation and annual milk yield reduction of 866 pounds for mature cows. When cows lose body weight and body condition score rapidly after calving they are at a greater risk for ketosis and fatty liver. Blood non-sterified fatty acids (NEFA) represent body fat mobilized from the cow's back, thighs, ribs, and abdomen. Think of NEFA as dollars that are withdrawn from a savings account and now can be spent on the things you want to accomplish. Blood NEFA are an important source of energy for the cow and may have some additional roles in altering metabolism, which affect milk production and immune function. The majority of NEFA in the blood is metabolized in the liver to provide energy and ketones, or is stored in the liver as fat. We know that high producing cows have higher or stronger hormonal signals that allow them to be elite cows. Some of those hormonal signals regulate the rate and extent of b Continue reading >>

How Long Does It Take The Average Fit Person To Enter Into A State Of Ketosis?

How Long Does It Take The Average Fit Person To Enter Into A State Of Ketosis?

It entirely depends on body’s metabolism, how quick you kick off the carbs from your daily routine and how strict you are to yourself to meet the body requirrments ( protein + healthy fats) and Woohoo you will feel the changes! Do not forget our very own Keto Flu.. If you are determined… nothing will stop you Continue reading >>

Ketosis Can Expose Cows To Many More Conditions - How To Check For It

Ketosis Can Expose Cows To Many More Conditions - How To Check For It

When a cow calves she must increase the intake of food at this time or at the very least the energy density should increase. Anything that may affect her appetite or reduce feed intake must be avoided. It is important to ensure food being eaten has adequate energy in it. A cow naturally will dip into negative energy after calving (for up to 6-8 weeks) which is where food intake can’t match output. We must minimise this period of negative energy as it can potentially have a negative long-term impact on the immune function and even production of the cow. When a cow dips into this negative energy she ‘milks off her back’. All this means is that she will break down fat reserves to fill this energy gap. This is okay for a short period but if it occurs long term or quickly it results in a condition called ketosis or more commonly subclinical ketosis which can be a build-up of the by-products of this fat breakdown called ketones. If this condition persists for a prolonged period it can reduce appetite and depress immunity. This is very much like a gateway condition; simply put it predisposes the cow to so many more conditions. Its reduction in appetite can also strongly link it with displaced abomasam. This is where the abomasum or true stomach will flip out of position mainly due to decreased feed intakes. Ketosis is one of the reasons we see an increase in all sorts of infections in cows from mastitis to metritis post calving. It is really important to remember also that ketosis will inhibit the cow producing an egg or ovulating; this can delay heats dramatically and really affects overall herd and cow fertility. Although this subclinical ketosis is not an obvious condition, it still causes so many issues we need to monitor it. The first thing we need to do is assess a Continue reading >>

Ketosis

Ketosis

Not to be confused with Ketoacidosis. Ketosis is a metabolic state in which some of the body's energy supply comes from ketone bodies in the blood, in contrast to a state of glycolysis in which blood glucose provides energy. Ketosis is a result of metabolizing fat to provide energy. Ketosis is a nutritional process characterised by serum concentrations of ketone bodies over 0.5 mM, with low and stable levels of insulin and blood glucose.[1][2] It is almost always generalized with hyperketonemia, that is, an elevated level of ketone bodies in the blood throughout the body. Ketone bodies are formed by ketogenesis when liver glycogen stores are depleted (or from metabolising medium-chain triglycerides[3]). The main ketone bodies used for energy are acetoacetate and β-hydroxybutyrate,[4] and the levels of ketone bodies are regulated mainly by insulin and glucagon.[5] Most cells in the body can use both glucose and ketone bodies for fuel, and during ketosis, free fatty acids and glucose synthesis (gluconeogenesis) fuel the remainder. Longer-term ketosis may result from fasting or staying on a low-carbohydrate diet (ketogenic diet), and deliberately induced ketosis serves as a medical intervention for various conditions, such as intractable epilepsy, and the various types of diabetes.[6] In glycolysis, higher levels of insulin promote storage of body fat and block release of fat from adipose tissues, while in ketosis, fat reserves are readily released and consumed.[5][7] For this reason, ketosis is sometimes referred to as the body's "fat burning" mode.[8] Ketosis and ketoacidosis are similar, but ketoacidosis is an acute life-threatening state requiring prompt medical intervention while ketosis can be physiological. However, there are situations (such as treatment-resistant Continue reading >>

Comparisons Of Available On-farm Tests For Monitoring Ketosis In Dairy Cattle

Comparisons Of Available On-farm Tests For Monitoring Ketosis In Dairy Cattle

A guide to selecting the right ketosis monitoring tool for your needs. During the transition period, cows rapidly mobilize body fat, which increases the risk of developing metabolic diseases including ketosis, fatty liver, and displaced abomasum. Producers should confirm the diagnosis of ketosis before proceeding with treatment. There are now a variety of inexpensive on-farm tests available to confirm the presence of ketones for both routine herd level monitoring and individual diagnosis. Ketosis is characterized by the accumulation of the ketone bodies betahydroxybutrate (BHBA), acetoacetate (AcAc), and acetone. The standard test for the diagnosis of ketosis is serum BHBA concentrations above14.4 mg/dL(1400 µM/L) as measured in a diagnostic lab (Oetzel, 2004). The five available cowside tests measure either AcAC or BHBA in urine, milk, or whole blood. There are currently five available on-farm tests for ketones, summarized by sample type and cost below (adapted from Townsend, Tri-State Dairy Nutrition Proceedings, 2011). Product Sample Type Ketone measured Cost KetoCheck powder milk or urine Acetoacetone ~ $0.28/test KetoStix urine Acetoacetone ~$0.24 KetoTest milk BHBA ~$2.00 PortaBHB milk BHBA ~$1.75/strip Precision Xtra blood BHBA ~1.30/strip ~$15 – $20 for meter Which test should you use? Your selection depends on what your goal is. Are you trying to estimate herd level ketosis or confirm diagnosis of ketosis in an individual animal? The five on-farm tests available vary in the sensitivity and specificity monitoring. Sensitivity is a measurement of the actual positives the test can correctly determine as compared to the standard. Specificity is a measurement of the actual negatives the test can correctly determine. In this case, the standard is the laboratory de Continue reading >>

Ketosis

Ketosis

Ketosis is a metabolic disease that occurs when the cow is in severe state of negative energy balance. In this state, the cow mobilises large quantities of body fat but cannot convert this to energy through the usual pathways. Instead, ketone bodies are produced which in small amounts can be used by the cow for energy. However, when ketone production is high, the cow cannot use all the ketone bodies for energy and ketone levels increase in the blood. When this occurs the cow may suffer from ketosis. Types of Ketosis Type 1 ketosis is a result of a sudden drop in energy intake. This can be due to underfeeding or adverse weather events (e.g. snow storms) that prevent the cows from eating sufficient amounts of dry matter. Type 2 ketosis generally occurs post-calving, when the cow is mobilising excess body fat to meet the demands of milk production. Cows that are too fat at calving (BCS > 5) or cows that have been overfed pre-calving are particularly at risk. Silage ketosis is due to cows ingesting poor quality silage. The silage undergoes a secondary fermentation and when ingested will increase the risk of ketosis. Symptoms Ketosis can be displayed in two ways: Wasting form Lethargy (head down, lack of energy) Decreased dry matter intake Decreased milk production Often a sweet smell on the breath (acetone) Nervous form Excitable, uncoordinated and can become aggressive Strange behaviour such as eating soil, licking fence posts and gates, walking in circles, or standing with heads raised up and pushed into a corner etc. If a cow shows signs of ketosis seek advice from your veterinarian Prevention It is important to prevent ketosis from occurring, rather than treating cases as they appear. Prevention depends on adequate feeding and management of body condition score (BCS). E Continue reading >>

Ketosis In Cattle Symptoms And Treatments

Ketosis In Cattle Symptoms And Treatments

Ketosis is a fairly common disease among adult cattle, although usually it occurs in dairy cattle.Ketosis typically occurs the first six weeks of parturition.It occurs in dairy cattle because of their inability to intake enough nutrients to meet their energy needs.This can lead to hypoglycemia which is a pathologic state produced by a lower than normal level of glucose.That in turn leads to the formation of ketone bodies from the body and fat stores. Although they are only broken down for energy to used by the heart and brain in the times of low glucose levels. Ketosis is not an immediate thing like many other illnesses, it gradually occurs. Some typical symptoms you will notice about your cattle if they have ketosis happen to be a decreased appetite,marked weight loss,decreased milk production,acetone odor of breath,nervousness, and hard, mucus covered feces. For confined cattle, usually decreased appetite is the first sign that they might have ketosis.Also if they are fed in components such as part forage, part grain, they will tend to go for the forage more than they will go for the grain.If you fed your cattle in herds, then usually you will see reduced milk production,lethargy and an somewhat “empty” appearing abdomen.When cattle are physically examined with having ketosis they may appear sightly dehydrated. Treatment for ketosis in cattle is more commonly done by IV administration of 500 ml of 50% dextrose solution. This treatment allows rapid recovery but the effects are often producing results beyond itself therefore relapses of ketosis are pretty common.Another treatment that can be used is the administration of glucocorticoids such as dexamethasone or isoflupredone acetate.You typically administer 5-20mg dose intra muscularly. This treatment often has good Continue reading >>

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