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What Does Ketoacidosis Smell Like

What Is Acetone?

What Is Acetone?

You can find it in paint thinners, nail polish, and the manufacturing of plastics. But it’s also found naturally (and safely) in the human body, especially in those following a ketogenic diet. What we’re talking about here is acetone, a ketone body produced in the ketosis process, which has many benefits in the body. But what is acetone, exactly? What role does it play in ketosis? Those are questions we’ll be diving into below so you can better understand how this molecule fits into your ketogenic diet and why it’s important. What is Acetone? Acetone is a type of ketone. When someone is eating a high-fat and low-carb diet (namely, the ketogenic diet) or goes through prolonged fasting and there isn’t enough glucose in the body for fuel, the liver starts breaking down fatty acids for energy for the body and the brain. This is the process known as ketosis, the primary function and goal of the ketogenic diet. When ketosis happens, water-soluble molecules called ketone bodies, or just simply “ketones,” are released. These three ketones are: Acetoacetate Beta-hydroxybutyrate Acetone Acetoacetate is created first, followed by beta-hydroxybutyrate and acetone. Acetone is created spontaneously from the breakdown of acetoacetate and is the simplest and most volatile ketone. It diffuses into the lungs and exits the body from exhaled breath. Acetone Benefits on the Ketogenic Diet One way that those on a keto diet ensure they maintain their ketosis, and receive the benefits of ketosis, is by measuring the amount of acetone on the breath. Typically, the higher amount of acetone present, the further they are into ketosis. Weight Loss Benefits There are many reasons someone might choose to follow a keto diet and put their body in ketosis. Benefits of being in ketosis incl Continue reading >>

Drunk Versus Diabetes: How Can You Tell?

Drunk Versus Diabetes: How Can You Tell?

Dispatch calls your EMS unit to the side of a roadway, where police officers have detained a driver on suspicion of driving under the influence of alcohol intoxication. You find the female driver handcuffed in the back seat of a police cruiser. She is screaming profanities and hitting her head against the side window. An officer tells you that she was weaving in and out of traffic at highway speed, and it took several minutes to pull her over. She was noncooperative and it took several officers to subdue her. She sustained a laceration to her head, which the officers want you to evaluate. The woman continues to swear at you as you open the car door. You note that she is diaphoretic and breathing heavily. You can smell what appears to be the sour, boozy smell of alcohol, even though you are not close to her. You can see that the small laceration near the hairline on her right forehead has already stopped bleeding. Her speech is slurred and she appears to be in no mood to be evaluated. The police officers are ready to take her down to the station to be processed for driving under the influence. Sound familiar? It should — this is a scene that is played out often in EMS systems. While it may seem initially that these incidents are not medical in nature, they really deserve close attention by the EMS personnel. In this article we will focus on the challenges of evaluating a patient who is intoxicated versus a patient who is experiencing an acute diabetic emergency. There have been numerous instances where EMS providers have exposed themselves to serious liability secondary to medical negligence. Let's take a closer look. Diabetes Diabetes is a serious disease that affects nearly 29 million people in the United States [1]. Advances in diabetic care have resulted in an impr Continue reading >>

Ketosis Symptoms

Ketosis Symptoms

Ketosis symptoms are a result of the way the body gets rid of the excess ketone bodies which build up in the blood stream when a person eats a low carb, ketogenic diet. In short, the body has three ways of dealing with excess ketone bodies: First, the muscles liver and brain can burn them for energy in the cells. Second, the body can breathe ketones out through the lungs. And third, the body can flush ketones out through the kidneys and urine. Legionella Testing Lab - High Quality Lab Results CDC ELITE & NYSDOH ELAP Certified - Fast Results North America Lab Locations legionellatesting.com The ketosis symptoms associated with the benign dietary ketosis caused by eating a low carb, ketogenic diet are not dangerous. They may differ for each individual, with the most common symptoms being: Ketosis breath, which has a fruity odor, and the person in deep ketosis may feel a sort of slight burning in the nose and a slight smell of ammonia. Dry mouth, which is alleviated by drinking more regular tap or bottled water. (Reverse osmosis water will make this worse.) In the first week of beginning a ketogenic diet, most people experience frequent urination followed by fatigue, as insulin levels come down, and the kidneys release extraneous water stores. Minerals such as sodium, magnesium and potassium are also lost with excreted urine, and it is the mineral loss that causes the fatigue. This can be offset by eating more salt, drinking more fluids, and increasing the intake of magnesium and potassium containing foods. (Dairy foods and avocados are high in potassium, and you can drink broth for more sodium.) A slight headache at first which goes away in a few days. This is usually a sign of not getting enough salt. Ketone bodies become detectable in the urine. Ketone bodies are molecu Continue reading >>

Diabetic Ketoacidosis

Diabetic Ketoacidosis

Print Overview Diabetic ketoacidosis is a serious complication of diabetes that occurs when your body produces high levels of blood acids called ketones. The condition develops when your body can't produce enough insulin. Insulin normally plays a key role in helping sugar (glucose) — a major source of energy for your muscles and other tissues — enter your cells. Without enough insulin, your body begins to break down fat as fuel. This process produces a buildup of acids in the bloodstream called ketones, eventually leading to diabetic ketoacidosis if untreated. If you have diabetes or you're at risk of diabetes, learn the warning signs of diabetic ketoacidosis — and know when to seek emergency care. Symptoms Diabetic ketoacidosis signs and symptoms often develop quickly, sometimes within 24 hours. For some, these signs and symptoms may be the first indication of having diabetes. You may notice: Excessive thirst Frequent urination Nausea and vomiting Abdominal pain Weakness or fatigue Shortness of breath Fruity-scented breath Confusion More-specific signs of diabetic ketoacidosis — which can be detected through home blood and urine testing kits — include: High blood sugar level (hyperglycemia) High ketone levels in your urine When to see a doctor If you feel ill or stressed or you've had a recent illness or injury, check your blood sugar level often. You might also try an over-the-counter urine ketones testing kit. Contact your doctor immediately if: You're vomiting and unable to tolerate food or liquid Your blood sugar level is higher than your target range and doesn't respond to home treatment Your urine ketone level is moderate or high Seek emergency care if: Your blood sugar level is consistently higher than 300 milligrams per deciliter (mg/dL), or 16.7 mill Continue reading >>

Diabetic Ketoacidosis

Diabetic Ketoacidosis

Diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) is a serious problem that can occur in people with diabetes if their body starts to run out of insulin. This causes harmful substances called ketones to build up in the body, which can be life-threatening if not spotted and treated quickly. DKA mainly affects people with type 1 diabetes, but can sometimes occur in people with type 2 diabetes. If you have diabetes, it's important to be aware of the risk and know what to do if DKA occurs. Symptoms of diabetic ketoacidosis Signs of DKA include: needing to pee more than usual being sick breath that smells fruity (like pear drop sweets or nail varnish) deep or fast breathing feeling very tired or sleepy passing out DKA can also cause high blood sugar (hyperglycaemia) and a high level of ketones in your blood or urine, which you can check for using home-testing kits. Symptoms usually develop over 24 hours, but can come on faster. Check your blood sugar and ketone levels Check your blood sugar level if you have symptoms of DKA. If your blood sugar is 11mmol/L or over and you have a blood or urine ketone testing kit, check your ketone level. If you do a blood ketone test: lower than 0.6mmol/L is a normal reading 0.6 to 1.5mmol/L means you're at a slightly increased risk of DKA and should test again in a couple of hours 1.6 to 2.9mmol/L means you're at an increased risk of DKA and should contact your diabetes team or GP as soon as possible 3mmol/L or over means you have a very high risk of DKA and should get medical help immediately If you do a urine ketone test, a result of more than 2+ means there's a high chance you have DKA. When to get medical help Go to your nearest accident and emergency (A&E) department straight away if you think you have DKA, especially if you have a high level of ketones in Continue reading >>

Low-carb Diets Can Cause Bad Breath

Low-carb Diets Can Cause Bad Breath

Low-carb diets may be good for your waistline, but you might not be able to say the same for your breath. Low-carb lifestyle junkies are more likely to suffer from a seldom discussed side effect of such diets -- halitosis, aka bad breath. And since more than 25 million people say they have tried the Atkins diet (not to mention other low-carb eating plans), according to the National Marketing Institute, bad breath may be an epidemic! Bad breath in the low/no-carb sect is often caused by certain chemicals that are released in the breath as the body burns fat. They are called ketones, and entering into a fat-burning state of ketosis is the hallmark of the Atkins diet. So the good news is that if your breath stinks, you're probably doing a good job of sticking to that low-carb diet. "Carbohydrates aren't readily available, so you start to use other fats and proteins as your source of energy, and as a result you are going to get a breath problem," explains Kenneth Burrell, DDS, the senior director of the council on scientific affairs of the American Dental Association. Pass the Bread? This is not an oral hygiene problem, Burrell says, so "all the brushing, flossing, and scraping of the tongue that you can do is not possibly enough to overcome this." The bottom line is that you must "reconsider the diet and modify it so this doesn't happen," he says. Sure, "there may be some ways to mask it by using mouthwashes, but you can't overcome the fundamental problem other than by changing the diet -- or at least introducing some carbohydrates." "It's a difficult problem to solve because if one uses any sucking candy or lozenge, one has to be careful that it has no sugar in it" as sugar is a big no-no on many low-carb eating plans, says S. Lawrence Simon, DDS, a New York City periodon Continue reading >>

Symptoms And Detection Of Ketoacidosis

Symptoms And Detection Of Ketoacidosis

Symptoms These symptoms are due to the ketone poisoning and should never be ignored. As soon as a person begins to vomit or has difficulty breathing, immediate treatment in an emergency room is required to prevent coma and possible death. Early Signs, Symptoms: Late Signs, Symptoms: very tired and sleepy weakness great thirst frequent urination dry skin and tongue leg cramps fruity odor to the breath* upset stomach* nausea* vomiting* shortness of breath sunken eyeballs very high blood sugars rapid pulse rapid breathing low blood pressure unresponsiveness, coma * these are more specific for ketoacidosis than hyperosmolar syndrome Everyone with diabetes needs to know how to recognize and treat ketoacidosis. Ketones travel from the blood into the urine and can be detected in the urine with ketone test strips available at any pharmacy. Ketone strips should always be kept on hand, but stored in a dry area and replaced as soon as they become outdated. Measurement of Ketones in the urine is very important for diabetics with infections or on insulin pump therapy due to the fact it gives more information than glucose tests alone. Check the urine for ketones whenever a blood sugar reading is 300 mg/dl or higher, if a fruity odor is detected in the breath, if abdominal pain is present, if nausea or vomiting is occurring, or if you are breathing rapidly and short of breath. If a moderate or large amount of ketones are detected on the test strip, ketoacidosis is present and immediate treatment is required. Symptoms for hyperglycemic hyperosmolar syndrome are linked to dehydration rather than acidosis, so a fruity odor to the breath and stomach upset are less likely. How To Detect Ketones During any illness, especially when it is severe and any time the stomach becomes upset, ketone Continue reading >>

Do Ketone Levels Matter? And Does Keto-smell Go Away?

Do Ketone Levels Matter? And Does Keto-smell Go Away?

So I thought I might be in ketosis. I don't eat a whole lot in the way of carbs, just potatoes, fruit, and a square or two of 85% dark chocolate, a few times a week. On potato or fruit days probably around 80g carbs, other days around 40g, I think. I'm estimating on the higher side because I don't really count them. I don't have a particular macro goal and weight loss isn't something I'm trying to do, but if it happens that is okay, too. I don't have keto-breath, but my armpit smell has been, ah, different lately (sharper, almost chemicallish which sounds kinda like the breath description, sorry if it's TMI) so I thought ketosis might be the cause. I got some ketostix and gave myself a test and came up on the trace level. (Also, last night was a potato night so perhaps that could affect it. I plan to continue testing for a few days, do a little N=1 experimentation.) Is this significant? Do you burn more fat/is it desirable when your ketone levels are higher or is it more of an on/off sort of thing? Also, if I am in ketosis and that's the cause of my yuck-smell, does that go away if you keep yourself in ketosis? Does it persist if you bounce around in and out of keto? I'm trying to decide, if I am in ketosis, if I want to stay here or not. I love my calendula deodorant, but to be honest Tom's of MAINE doesn't understand what summer in the South is like and I don't like the smell, assuming it is because of ketosis. If I am in ketosis and I like it, I can always go again in the winter when Tom's of Maine might have a chance. Continue reading >>

Diabetes 15, Diabetic Ketoacidosis (dka) – Why Do Diabetics Breath Smell Like Acetone

Diabetes 15, Diabetic Ketoacidosis (dka) – Why Do Diabetics Breath Smell Like Acetone

Why Do Diabetics Breath Smell like Acetone You can support the work of campbellteaching, at no cost to you, if you use the following link as your bookmark to access Amazon. Thank you. If you use this link in the United States If in the UK you use this link If you want to get my books, one on physiology and one on pathophysiology, check out my website campbellteaching.co.uk funds from the sale of books helps finance the distribution of resources to students in the poorest countries. In addition to occurring in previously undiagnosed patients, ketosis may occur if insulin therapy is discontinued. This is another good reason why insulin therapy should never be stopped in type 1 DM. If no insulin is available, most tissues will switch to fat metabolism because they are unable to metabolize carbohydrates. It is this metabolism of fats by the mitochondria, mainly in the liver, which generates the ketone bodies. Increased levels of acetone are formed in ketosis and accumulate in the blood. Acetone is a volatile substance and part of it is expelled in the expired air of the lungs. This makes the breath smell of acetone; an odor generally described as being as "pear drops". Like most odors, once you have experienced it the first time you will recognize it again right away. Video credits to Dr. John Campbell YouTube channel Diabetes Related Tweets Around The World Continue reading >>

Ketone Smell

Ketone Smell

Home The last few 100s I've finished, my wife has informed me I have a keytone smell that permeates throughout my body as well as my breath. She has also noticed this to a lesser degree when I've been building mileage. Could this be the result of fat metabolism? It usually subsides after 24-36 hours. Anyone else experience this or are their spouses keeping quiet? I've never really had this problem until the last fews years. Harry Strohm I am not an expert but it is my understanding that a keytone smell would be associated with protien conversion not fat converson. Paul Comet Are you on a diet? Sounds like ketosis. When I fasted on water and vitamin pills for 8 days, I had that smell big-time. I recall reading that the smell comes from muscle tissue being destroyed. But I'm no expert on physiology. Scott Weber When Al Howie brought up diabetes and ketones, here's what he was referring to: When too little insulin is present, your body cannot use glucose for energy. It is then forced to break down fat for energy. Your body produces ketones (acids) and releases them into the blood and urine. When people with Type I diabetes do not take enough insulin, especially in times of stress or illness, ketones are produced. Large amounts of ketones can lead to diabetic ketoacidosis, a medical emergency. Karl King Ketosis is a result of profoundly low carbohydrate availability and is normally associated with prolonged starvation. The take home message is: eat something, preferably some carbos. I try to run with an intake of 30 to 50 calories per mile and have never experienced a ketone aroma when I run, though I've noted it in others after a long run. Dr Martin W. Fryer, (PhD School of Physiology & Pharmacology University of New South Wales) Without trying to be too technical I think Continue reading >>

3 Sudden Warning Signs That Could Save Your Life

3 Sudden Warning Signs That Could Save Your Life

Your Video is Loading Diabetes. Ovarian cancer. Stroke. These serious medical conditions can stop a woman in her tracks. The three sudden warning signs associated with diabetes, ovarian cancer and stroke may seem unusual and are often overlooked. Commit them to memory, and you’ll gain a leg up on how to detect potentially major health problems. Sudden Warning Sign #1 Your Breath Smells Like Nail Polish Remover = Possible Symptom of Diabetes Over 80 million Americans suffer from diabetes. Disturbingly, almost one-third of Americans living with diabetes are unaware they have it. The sudden warning sign of one’s breath smelling like nail polish remover occurs when your body is unable to utilize sugar properly, and burns fat for fuel instead. The chemical compounds released during this process are known as ketones. The ketone, acetone – a key ingredient in nail polish remover – produces the telltale diabetes warning sign of fruity-smelling breath. You may also experience a fruity taste in your mouth that persists even after you’ve brushed your teeth. Referred to medically as diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA), this symptom can result in a diabetic coma if left untreated. Additional warning signs of diabetes include: Fatigue Dizziness Frequent thirst and urination Craving sweets If you experience acetone-scented breath or any other warning signs linked to diabetes, schedule an appointment with your physician. You’ll likely be asked to fast for at least 8 hours beforehand so the doctor can check your blood sugar level via a simple blood test. Bear in mind, a healthy fasting blood sugar level is between 70 and 100mg/dl; a reading over 200mg/dl may signal diabetes. While type 1 diabetes is managed with insulin injection therapy, type 2 diabetes treatment often includes lif Continue reading >>

Why Does My Breath Smell Like Acetone?

Why Does My Breath Smell Like Acetone?

People often associate strong smelling breath with the food someone has eaten or poor dental hygiene. But it may reveal much more than that. If a person's breath smells like acetone or nail polish remover, it could indicate health conditions, including diabetes. The way a person's breath smells can be an indicator of their overall health. This article explores why a person's breath might smell like acetone and what this might mean about their health. Contents of this article: How diabetes can affect breath Diabetes can affect the way a person's breath smells and can cause bad breath, or halitosis. In a 2009 study, researchers found that analyzing a person's breath helped to identify prediabetes when diabetes is in its early stages. There are two conditions associated with diabetes that can cause bad breath: gum disease and a high ketone level. The proper name for gum diseases in periodontal disease, and its forms include: Diabetes can be associated with an increased risk of gum disease, which may cause a person's breath to smell bad. However, gum disease does not cause a person's breath to smell like acetone. If a person has diabetes and their breath smells like acetone, this is usually caused by high levels of ketones in the blood. Diabetes and acetone breath When diabetes is not managed well, the body does not make enough insulin to break down glucose in the blood. This means that the body's cells do not receive enough glucose to use as energy. When the body cannot get its energy from sugar, it switches to burning fat for fuel instead. The process of breaking down fat to use as energy releases by-products called ketones. Ketone bodies include acetone. Acetone is the same substance that is used in nail varnish remover and is distinguished by its fruity smell. When a pe Continue reading >>

Ketoacidosis

Ketoacidosis

Ketoacidosis is a metabolic state associated with high concentrations of ketone bodies, formed by the breakdown of fatty acids and the deamination of amino acids. The two common ketones produced in humans are acetoacetic acid and β-hydroxybutyrate. Ketoacidosis is a pathological metabolic state marked by extreme and uncontrolled ketosis. In ketoacidosis, the body fails to adequately regulate ketone production causing such a severe accumulation of keto acids that the pH of the blood is substantially decreased. In extreme cases ketoacidosis can be fatal.[1] Ketoacidosis is most common in untreated type 1 diabetes mellitus, when the liver breaks down fat and proteins in response to a perceived need for respiratory substrate. Prolonged alcoholism may lead to alcoholic ketoacidosis. Ketoacidosis can be smelled on a person's breath. This is due to acetone, a direct by-product of the spontaneous decomposition of acetoacetic acid. It is often described as smelling like fruit or nail polish remover.[2] Ketosis may also give off an odor, but the odor is usually more subtle due to lower concentrations of acetone. Treatment consists most simply of correcting blood sugar and insulin levels, which will halt ketone production. If the severity of the case warrants more aggressive measures, intravenous sodium bicarbonate infusion can be given to raise blood pH back to an acceptable range. However, serious caution must be exercised with IV sodium bicarbonate to avoid the risk of equally life-threatening hypernatremia. Cause[edit] Three common causes of ketoacidosis are alcohol, starvation, and diabetes, resulting in alcoholic ketoacidosis, starvation ketoacidosis, and diabetic ketoacidosis respectively.[3] In diabetic ketoacidosis, a high concentration of ketone bodies is usually accomp Continue reading >>

Why Does A Patient's Breath Smell Like Acetone?

Why Does A Patient's Breath Smell Like Acetone?

Perhaps the most common reason of bad breath is poor oral health, infections of gums (called gingivitis), or even a more severe problem call periodontitis. But if a patient's breath smells like acetone, then the reason may not involve the oral cavity. It could actually mean that the patient is blowing out acetone with their breath. Yes, the same thing that is contained in nail polish removers and paint thinners could also be created by the body. The reason behind the acetone-like, fruity odor could be ketosis or ketoacidosis. The first condition, which is ketosis, could be a normal thing, but ketoacidosis may be harmful if not taken care of within time. Most of us are dependent on glucose, which we get from the dietary carbohydrates. Glucose is further broken into smaller parts in a process called glycolysis, and the energy is released. While fat serves more as an energy reserve, when there is a deficit of glucose, our body breaks the fat stored in fatty tissues to ketone bodies, and they can be used by almost any bodily cell to fulfill energy needs through a process called ketosis (break down of ketone bodies). Acetone is one of the byproducts of ketosis, and it may also be the primary source of energy if a person is fasting, doing strenuous exercise, or taking a diet that is rich in fats and low in carbs (ketogenic diet). Ketone bodies and its byproducts are acidic in nature, thus making our blood dangerously acidic. Therefore if ketosis is normal, ketoacidosis is a reason to worry. It usually happens in uncontrolled diabetes, especially either due to a missed dose of insulin in type 1 diabetes or when a person does not know about diabetes at all. In case of diabetes, the smell of acetone in our breath could really be strong. In fact, there are anecdotal reports when Continue reading >>

Ketosis Breath: Causes & Solutions For Bad Breath

Ketosis Breath: Causes & Solutions For Bad Breath

Ultra-low carb diets have grown in popularity over recent years. These so-called “keto diets” aim to facilitate rapid weight loss, through the consumption of minimal carbohydrates. Keto diets have become understandably popular on account of their rapid results, together with the practical benefits of consuming healthy volumes of the right foods, making hunger less of a problem than on more typical calorie-controlled diets. However keto diets are not without their issues, and one of the most common complaints comes in the form of “ketosis breath”. Quite simply many individuals making use of very low carb diets suffer from pungent and unpleasant breath. The question is what can be done to counteract such a problem? The Cause of Ketosis Breath In order to learn how to get rid of keto breath, we first need to understand why breath can smell under such a regime. As it turns out there are two potential reasons(1), both of which can operate independently, or in conjunction. Ketone Release The most typical source of energy used by the body is glucose. This is typically derived from carbohydrates, where the digestive system breaks down complex sugars into simple glucose molecules. On very low carb diets, however, the body is unable to utilize such a fuel. Instead, the liver utilizes the fat present in the body as an energy source, producing “ketones” in the process(2). This is known as “ketosis” – and is the process from where keto diets get their unusual name. These ketone bodies come in three common forms; acetoacetate, beta-hydroxybutyrate and acetone(3). In large quantities they are removed from the body in the urine or through exhalation. Ketones can have quite a characteristic smell; they often make the dieter’s breath smell quite sweet and fruity, quit Continue reading >>

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