diabetestalk.net

What Does Ketoacidosis Smell Like

Why Does My Breath Smell Like Acetone?

Why Does My Breath Smell Like Acetone?

People often associate strong smelling breath with the food someone has eaten or poor dental hygiene. But it may reveal much more than that. If a person's breath smells like acetone or nail polish remover, it could indicate health conditions, including diabetes. The way a person's breath smells can be an indicator of their overall health. This article explores why a person's breath might smell like acetone and what this might mean about their health. Contents of this article: How diabetes can affect breath Diabetes can affect the way a person's breath smells and can cause bad breath, or halitosis. In a 2009 study, researchers found that analyzing a person's breath helped to identify prediabetes when diabetes is in its early stages. There are two conditions associated with diabetes that can cause bad breath: gum disease and a high ketone level. The proper name for gum diseases in periodontal disease, and its forms include: Diabetes can be associated with an increased risk of gum disease, which may cause a person's breath to smell bad. However, gum disease does not cause a person's breath to smell like acetone. If a person has diabetes and their breath smells like acetone, this is usually caused by high levels of ketones in the blood. Diabetes and acetone breath When diabetes is not managed well, the body does not make enough insulin to break down glucose in the blood. This means that the body's cells do not receive enough glucose to use as energy. When the body cannot get its energy from sugar, it switches to burning fat for fuel instead. The process of breaking down fat to use as energy releases by-products called ketones. Ketone bodies include acetone. Acetone is the same substance that is used in nail varnish remover and is distinguished by its fruity smell. When a pe Continue reading >>

How Diet Can Cause (or Help Fix) Bad Breath

How Diet Can Cause (or Help Fix) Bad Breath

Bad breath isn’t a life-threatening problem, but it’s socially embarrassing and it can make life pretty rough, especially if your job has some kind of social component. And even though it sometimes comes from poor oral hygiene, even people with totally solid brush/floss/mouthwash/tongue scraper routines can get breath problems, because not all bad breath is caused by germs in your mouth. Here’s a look at the relationship between diet and breath, including the infamous “keto breath,” but also including other factors like the bacterial population of your mouth and how different foods you eat can affect odor-causing bacteria. Diet and Breath The obvious connection between diet and breath is smelly foods, like garlic, coffee, and fish. Obviously, these foods do have an effect, but it’s temporary: you can brush your teeth and get rid of it. A harder problem is bad breath that persists even if you aren’t eating anything particularly smelly – clearly there’s something else going on here. This study goes over some of the causes of bad breath. In 90% of cases, the problem has something to do with the bacterial population of the mouth. The human mouth naturally plays host to a lot of different bacteria, just like the gut. Just like healthy gut flora, healthy mouth bacteria don’t cause problems, but if something goes wrong, various species of mouth bacteria can produce several different compounds that make your breath smell bad. The study also goes over some other related problems. For example, the inflammation involved in gingivitis and other inflammatory diseases can make the problem worse. Another problem is saliva. Saliva basically “washes” the mouth at regular intervals If you’re not making enough saliva for some reason, bacterial populations in the Continue reading >>

Q&a: What Is Causing Sweet-smelling Urine?

Q&a: What Is Causing Sweet-smelling Urine?

Q: Why does my urine smell like maple syrup? A: If you notice a very distinct sweet smell as you urinate, this could mean one of two things: maple syrup urine disease or diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA). Maple syrup urine disease is a metabolic disorder that causes certain amino acids to build up in the body. This disease is typically diagnosed in infancy and can be harmful. It must be closely monitored by a metabolic specialist. DKA is a potentially life-threatening complication of diabetes. It occurs when your body’s blood sugar spikes from a safe level of 70 to 100 milligrams to a dangerous level of over 250 milligrams, and remains there, untreated. DKA is a result of an insulin shortage, which prevents the body from processing sugar properly. In response, the body instead burns fatty acids that produce acidic ketone bodies. A warning sign of DKA is a person’s breath may develop a specific, sweet, fruity smell. Other symptoms may include vomiting, abdominal pain, shortness of breath, increased urination, generalized weakness, and confusion. Onset of symptoms is usually rapid. DKA happens most often in patients with type 1 diabetes, but can also occur in those with type 2 diabetes under certain circumstances. Triggers may include: Infection Not taking insulin correctly Stroke Certain medications that increase blood sugar, such as steroids It is typically diagnosed when testing finds high blood sugar, low blood pH, and the presence of ketoacids in either the blood or urine. DKA is treated primarily with intravenous fluids and insulin. Blood sugar and potassium levels are regularly monitored during treatment. Usually, potassium supplementation is needed to prevent the development of low blood potassium. Antibiotics may be required in those with an underlying infection. A Continue reading >>

Why Does A Patient's Breath Smell Like Acetone?

Why Does A Patient's Breath Smell Like Acetone?

Perhaps the most common reason of bad breath is poor oral health, infections of gums (called gingivitis), or even a more severe problem call periodontitis. But if a patient's breath smells like acetone, then the reason may not involve the oral cavity. It could actually mean that the patient is blowing out acetone with their breath. Yes, the same thing that is contained in nail polish removers and paint thinners could also be created by the body. The reason behind the acetone-like, fruity odor could be ketosis or ketoacidosis. The first condition, which is ketosis, could be a normal thing, but ketoacidosis may be harmful if not taken care of within time. Most of us are dependent on glucose, which we get from the dietary carbohydrates. Glucose is further broken into smaller parts in a process called glycolysis, and the energy is released. While fat serves more as an energy reserve, when there is a deficit of glucose, our body breaks the fat stored in fatty tissues to ketone bodies, and they can be used by almost any bodily cell to fulfill energy needs through a process called ketosis (break down of ketone bodies). Acetone is one of the byproducts of ketosis, and it may also be the primary source of energy if a person is fasting, doing strenuous exercise, or taking a diet that is rich in fats and low in carbs (ketogenic diet). Ketone bodies and its byproducts are acidic in nature, thus making our blood dangerously acidic. Therefore if ketosis is normal, ketoacidosis is a reason to worry. It usually happens in uncontrolled diabetes, especially either due to a missed dose of insulin in type 1 diabetes or when a person does not know about diabetes at all. In case of diabetes, the smell of acetone in our breath could really be strong. In fact, there are anecdotal reports when Continue reading >>

Ketoacidosis

Ketoacidosis

Ketones in the urine, as detected by urine testing stix or a blood ketone testing meter[1], may indicate the beginning of diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA), a dangerous and often quickly fatal condition caused by low insulin levels combined with certain other systemic stresses. DKA can be fixed if caught quickly. Diabetics of all species therefore need to be checked for ketones with urine testing stix, available at any pharmacy, whenever insulin level may be too low, and any of the following signs or triggers are present: Ketone Monitoring Needed: Little or no insulin in last 12 hours High blood sugar over 16 mmol/L or 300 mg/dL (though with low insulin, lower as well...) Dehydration (skin doesn't jump back after pulling a bit gums are tacky or dry)[2] Not eating for over 12 hours due to Inappetance or Fasting Vomiting Lethargy Infection or illness High stress levels Breath smells like acetone (nail-polish remover) or fruit. Note that the triggers and signs are somewhat interchangeable because ketoacidosis is, once begun, a set of vicious circles which will make itself worse. So dehydration, hyperglycemia, fasting, and presence of ketones are not only signs, they're also sometimes triggers. In a diabetic, any urinary ketones above trace, or any increase in urinary ketone level, or trace urinary ketones plus some of the symptoms above, are cause to call an emergency vet immediately, at any hour of the day. Possible False Urine Ketone Test Results Drugs and Supplements Valproic Acid (brand names) Depakene, Depakote, Divalproex Sodium[3] Positive. Common use: Treatment of epilepsy. Cefixime/Suprax[4] Positive with nitroprusside-based urine testing. Common use: Antibiotic. Levadopa Metabolites[5] Positive with high concentrations[6]. Tricyclic Ring Compounds[7][8] Positive. Commo Continue reading >>

Do Ketone Levels Matter? And Does Keto-smell Go Away?

Do Ketone Levels Matter? And Does Keto-smell Go Away?

So I thought I might be in ketosis. I don't eat a whole lot in the way of carbs, just potatoes, fruit, and a square or two of 85% dark chocolate, a few times a week. On potato or fruit days probably around 80g carbs, other days around 40g, I think. I'm estimating on the higher side because I don't really count them. I don't have a particular macro goal and weight loss isn't something I'm trying to do, but if it happens that is okay, too. I don't have keto-breath, but my armpit smell has been, ah, different lately (sharper, almost chemicallish which sounds kinda like the breath description, sorry if it's TMI) so I thought ketosis might be the cause. I got some ketostix and gave myself a test and came up on the trace level. (Also, last night was a potato night so perhaps that could affect it. I plan to continue testing for a few days, do a little N=1 experimentation.) Is this significant? Do you burn more fat/is it desirable when your ketone levels are higher or is it more of an on/off sort of thing? Also, if I am in ketosis and that's the cause of my yuck-smell, does that go away if you keep yourself in ketosis? Does it persist if you bounce around in and out of keto? I'm trying to decide, if I am in ketosis, if I want to stay here or not. I love my calendula deodorant, but to be honest Tom's of MAINE doesn't understand what summer in the South is like and I don't like the smell, assuming it is because of ketosis. If I am in ketosis and I like it, I can always go again in the winter when Tom's of Maine might have a chance. Continue reading >>

Ketoacidosis In Cats – Causes, Symptoms & Treatment

Ketoacidosis In Cats – Causes, Symptoms & Treatment

Ketoacidosis in cats at a glance Ketoacidosis is a serious complication of diabetes in which ketones and blood sugar levels build up in the body due to insufficient levels of insulin which is required to move glucose into the cells for energy. As a result, the body uses fat as an alternate energy source which produces ketones causing the blood to become too acidic. Common causes include uncontrolled diabetes, missed or insufficient insulin, surgery, infection, stress and obesity. Symptoms of ketoacidosis include increased urination and thirst, dehydration, nausea, diarrhea, confusion, rapid breathing which may later change to laboured breathing. What is diabetic ketoacidosis? Diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) is a life-threatening complication of diabetes characterised by metabolic acidosis (increased acids in the blood), hyperglycemia (high blood glucose) and ketonuria (ketones in the urine). It is caused by a lack of or insufficient amounts of insulin which is required to move glucose from the bloodstream and into the cells to be used for energy. When this occurs, the body begins to search for alternate sources of energy and begins to break down fat. When fat is broken down (metabolised) into fatty acids, waste products known as ketones (acetoacetate, beta-hydroxybutyrate, acetone) are released from the liver and accumulate in the bloodstream (known as ketonemia). This causes the blood to become too acidic (metabolic acidosis). As well as metabolic acidosis, ketones also cause central nervous depression.The body will try to get rid of the ketones by excreting them out of the body via the urine, increased urine output leads to dehydration, making the problem worse. Meanwhile, the unused glucose remains in the bloodstream, resulting in hyperglycemia (high blood sugar).Insulin Continue reading >>

What Does Bad Breath Have To Do With Diabetes?

What Does Bad Breath Have To Do With Diabetes?

Your breath has an interesting ability to provide clues to your overall health. A sweet, fruity odor can be a sign of ketoacidosis, an acute complication of diabetes. An odor of ammonia is associated with kidney disease. Similarly, a very foul, fruity odor may be a sign of anorexia nervosa. Other diseases, such as asthma, cystic fibrosis, lung cancer, and liver disease, also can cause distinct odors on the breath. Bad breath, also called halitosis, can be so telling that doctors may even be able to use it to identify diabetes. Recently, researchers have found that infrared breath analyzers can be effective in identifying prediabetes or early-stage diabetes. Diabetes-related halitosis has two main causes: periodontal disease and high levels of ketones in the blood. Periodontal diseases Periodontal diseases, also called gum diseases, include gingivitis, mild periodontitis, and advanced periodontitis. In these inflammatory diseases, bacteria attack the tissues and bone that support your teeth. Inflammation can affect metabolism and increase your blood sugar, which worsens diabetes. While diabetes can lead to periodontal diseases, these diseases can also create further problems for people with diabetes. According to a report in IOSR Journal of Dental and Medical Sciences, an estimated one in three people with diabetes will also experience periodontal diseases. Heart disease and stroke, which can be complications of diabetes, are also linked to periodontal disease. Diabetes can damage blood vessels, which can reduce blood flow throughout your body, including your gums. If your gums and teeth aren’t receiving a proper supply of blood, they may become weak and more prone to infection. Diabetes may also raise glucose levels in your mouth, promoting bacteria growth, infection, Continue reading >>

Why Does My Sweat Smell Sweet?

Why Does My Sweat Smell Sweet?

The human body gives off a surprising variety of odors, which people spend a great deal of money and effort trying to mask or neutralize. A strange body or breath odor-different from the typical locker-room type of body odor with which most of us are familiar-could indicate a health problem. If you notice that your sweat has begun to smell sweet, you should bring it to your doctor's attention. Smells and Medicine In the past, doctors followed their noses toward the source of many diseases. Unusual body odors can range from fish to rotten eggs to maple syrup or apples. Today, doctors still recognize that some diseases, like yeast infections, carry distinctive odors. For example, an uncommon metabolic disorder called maple syrup urine disease can cause a sweet body odor. The most common cause for sweet body odor is ketoacidosis, a complication of Type I diabetes. Ketoacidosis With undiagnosed or inadequately controlled Type I diabetes, the body has trouble producing enough insulin to break down sugars for energy. Instead, the body burns fats. This leads to a buildup of acids called ketones in the blood and urine. The ketones can cause a distinctive fruity odor on your breath and body. It may be the first symptom that sends you to a doctor. Left untreated, ketoacidosis can lead to diabetic coma and even death. Symptoms of Ketoacidosis Aside from the fruity body odor, symptoms of ketoacidosis include sustained thirst, loss of appetite, breathing problems, headache, fatigue, stupor or loss of consciousness, flushed face, dry skin and mouth, nausea and vomiting, muscle stiffness or pain, and if it goes on too long, you could slip into a diabetic coma and even die. That fruity body odor should be your first clue to see a doctor. Tests and Diagnosis If your doctor suspects keto Continue reading >>

Breath Acetone Is A Reliable Indicator Of Ketosis In Adults Consuming Ketogenic Meals1,2,3

Breath Acetone Is A Reliable Indicator Of Ketosis In Adults Consuming Ketogenic Meals1,2,3

Abstract Background: Ketogenic diets are used therapeutically to treat intractable seizures. Clinically, it appears that the maintenance of ketosis is crucial to the efficacy of the diet in ameliorating seizures. To understand how ketosis and seizure protection are related, a reliable, noninvasive measure of ketosis that can be performed frequently with minimal discomfort is needed. Objective: The objective was to determine which index, breath acetone or urinary acetoacetate, is more strongly related to the plasma ketones acetoacetate and β-hydroxybutyrate. Design: After fasting overnight for 12 h, 12 healthy adults consumed 4 ketogenic meals over 12 h. Blood, breath, and urine samples were collected hourly. Blood was analyzed for plasma acetoacetate and β-hydroxybutyrate, breath for acetone, and urine for acetoacetate. Results: By the end of the 12-h dietary treatment, plasma acetoacetate, plasma β-hydroxybutyrate, and breath acetone had increased 3.5-fold, whereas urinary acetoacetate increased 13-fold when measured enzymatically and 25-fold when measured with urinary ketone dipsticks. Plasma acetoacetate was best predicted by breath acetone (R2 = 0.70, P < 0.0001). Plasma β-hydroxybutyrate was equally predicted by breath acetone and urinary acetoacetate (R2 = 0.54, P = 0.0040). Conclusions: Breath acetone is as good a predictor of ketosis as is urinary acetoacetate. Breath acetone analysis is noninvasive and can be performed frequently with minimal discomfort to patients. As an indicator of ketosis in epilepsy patients consuming a ketogenic diet, breath acetone may be useful for understanding the mechanism of the diet, elucidating the importance of ketosis in seizure protection, and ultimately, enhancing the efficacy of the diet by improving patient monitoring. I Continue reading >>

Drunk Versus Diabetes: How Can You Tell?

Drunk Versus Diabetes: How Can You Tell?

Dispatch calls your EMS unit to the side of a roadway, where police officers have detained a driver on suspicion of driving under the influence of alcohol intoxication. You find the female driver handcuffed in the back seat of a police cruiser. She is screaming profanities and hitting her head against the side window. An officer tells you that she was weaving in and out of traffic at highway speed, and it took several minutes to pull her over. She was noncooperative and it took several officers to subdue her. She sustained a laceration to her head, which the officers want you to evaluate. The woman continues to swear at you as you open the car door. You note that she is diaphoretic and breathing heavily. You can smell what appears to be the sour, boozy smell of alcohol, even though you are not close to her. You can see that the small laceration near the hairline on her right forehead has already stopped bleeding. Her speech is slurred and she appears to be in no mood to be evaluated. The police officers are ready to take her down to the station to be processed for driving under the influence. Sound familiar? It should — this is a scene that is played out often in EMS systems. While it may seem initially that these incidents are not medical in nature, they really deserve close attention by the EMS personnel. In this article we will focus on the challenges of evaluating a patient who is intoxicated versus a patient who is experiencing an acute diabetic emergency. There have been numerous instances where EMS providers have exposed themselves to serious liability secondary to medical negligence. Let's take a closer look. Diabetes Diabetes is a serious disease that affects nearly 29 million people in the United States [1]. Advances in diabetic care have resulted in an impr Continue reading >>

What Is Acetone?

What Is Acetone?

You can find it in paint thinners, nail polish, and the manufacturing of plastics. But it’s also found naturally (and safely) in the human body, especially in those following a ketogenic diet. What we’re talking about here is acetone, a ketone body produced in the ketosis process, which has many benefits in the body. But what is acetone, exactly? What role does it play in ketosis? Those are questions we’ll be diving into below so you can better understand how this molecule fits into your ketogenic diet and why it’s important. What is Acetone? Acetone is a type of ketone. When someone is eating a high-fat and low-carb diet (namely, the ketogenic diet) or goes through prolonged fasting and there isn’t enough glucose in the body for fuel, the liver starts breaking down fatty acids for energy for the body and the brain. This is the process known as ketosis, the primary function and goal of the ketogenic diet. When ketosis happens, water-soluble molecules called ketone bodies, or just simply “ketones,” are released. These three ketones are: Acetoacetate Beta-hydroxybutyrate Acetone Acetoacetate is created first, followed by beta-hydroxybutyrate and acetone. Acetone is created spontaneously from the breakdown of acetoacetate and is the simplest and most volatile ketone. It diffuses into the lungs and exits the body from exhaled breath. Acetone Benefits on the Ketogenic Diet One way that those on a keto diet ensure they maintain their ketosis, and receive the benefits of ketosis, is by measuring the amount of acetone on the breath. Typically, the higher amount of acetone present, the further they are into ketosis. Weight Loss Benefits There are many reasons someone might choose to follow a keto diet and put their body in ketosis. Benefits of being in ketosis incl Continue reading >>

The Causes And Solutions For Bad Breath (ketosis Breath)

The Causes And Solutions For Bad Breath (ketosis Breath)

If you’re on a low-carb diet, not all the outcomes are good. One of the side effects you could notice is bad breath. It’s commonly nicknamed ketosis breath, whether it happens when following the ketosis diet, but it can happen with all low carb/high protein diets. In fact, bad breath is becoming an epidemic. This is because so many people now are following these low carb diets. So, you’re definitely not alone. In fact, scientists say that 40% of people on these types of diets report bad breath as one of the worst side effects. I’ve been in your position before with my low carb diets. Your best friend likely has, too. We just get so embarrassed about our bad breath that we tend not to mention it. We just hope that we can mask it with some breath mints. But what is the real cause of bad breath on the ketosis diet? Just why do low carb diets make us stink? And is there anything that we can do to stop the problem? I can share some very positive news. You can stop ketosis breath becoming an issue. You don’t need to become part of the growing epidemic. I’m going to share everything that you can do to stop ketosis breath becoming a problem. So, Why Do We Get Bad Breath? Let’s start with how low carb diets work. When we stop feeding ourselves as many carbs, our bodies have to get the energy in other ways. They do this through the burning of fat, which means the release of ketones in the body. It’s a chemical process since the body can’t create the carbohydrates that it would need to help It’s this process that is causing the bad breath. The great news is that you’re sticking to your diet and you will see a smaller waistline. It will be successful, and you will be able to lose weight. Of course, the downside is that you have to deal with the breath. The mos Continue reading >>

Ketosis Breath: Causes & Solutions For Bad Breath

Ketosis Breath: Causes & Solutions For Bad Breath

Ultra-low carb diets have grown in popularity over recent years. These so-called “keto diets” aim to facilitate rapid weight loss, through the consumption of minimal carbohydrates. Keto diets have become understandably popular on account of their rapid results, together with the practical benefits of consuming healthy volumes of the right foods, making hunger less of a problem than on more typical calorie-controlled diets. However keto diets are not without their issues, and one of the most common complaints comes in the form of “ketosis breath”. Quite simply many individuals making use of very low carb diets suffer from pungent and unpleasant breath. The question is what can be done to counteract such a problem? The Cause of Ketosis Breath In order to learn how to get rid of keto breath, we first need to understand why breath can smell under such a regime. As it turns out there are two potential reasons(1), both of which can operate independently, or in conjunction. Ketone Release The most typical source of energy used by the body is glucose. This is typically derived from carbohydrates, where the digestive system breaks down complex sugars into simple glucose molecules. On very low carb diets, however, the body is unable to utilize such a fuel. Instead, the liver utilizes the fat present in the body as an energy source, producing “ketones” in the process(2). This is known as “ketosis” – and is the process from where keto diets get their unusual name. These ketone bodies come in three common forms; acetoacetate, beta-hydroxybutyrate and acetone(3). In large quantities they are removed from the body in the urine or through exhalation. Ketones can have quite a characteristic smell; they often make the dieter’s breath smell quite sweet and fruity, quit Continue reading >>

Ketoacidosis

Ketoacidosis

Ketoacidosis is a metabolic state associated with high concentrations of ketone bodies, formed by the breakdown of fatty acids and the deamination of amino acids. The two common ketones produced in humans are acetoacetic acid and β-hydroxybutyrate. Ketoacidosis is a pathological metabolic state marked by extreme and uncontrolled ketosis. In ketoacidosis, the body fails to adequately regulate ketone production causing such a severe accumulation of keto acids that the pH of the blood is substantially decreased. In extreme cases ketoacidosis can be fatal.[1] Ketoacidosis is most common in untreated type 1 diabetes mellitus, when the liver breaks down fat and proteins in response to a perceived need for respiratory substrate. Prolonged alcoholism may lead to alcoholic ketoacidosis. Ketoacidosis can be smelled on a person's breath. This is due to acetone, a direct by-product of the spontaneous decomposition of acetoacetic acid. It is often described as smelling like fruit or nail polish remover.[2] Ketosis may also give off an odor, but the odor is usually more subtle due to lower concentrations of acetone. Treatment consists most simply of correcting blood sugar and insulin levels, which will halt ketone production. If the severity of the case warrants more aggressive measures, intravenous sodium bicarbonate infusion can be given to raise blood pH back to an acceptable range. However, serious caution must be exercised with IV sodium bicarbonate to avoid the risk of equally life-threatening hypernatremia. Cause[edit] Three common causes of ketoacidosis are alcohol, starvation, and diabetes, resulting in alcoholic ketoacidosis, starvation ketoacidosis, and diabetic ketoacidosis respectively.[3] In diabetic ketoacidosis, a high concentration of ketone bodies is usually accomp Continue reading >>

More in ketosis