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What Does Ketoacidosis Do To Your Body?

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DKA diabetic ketoacidosis nursing management pathophysiology & treatment. DKA is a complication of diabetes mellitus and mainly affects type 1 diabetics. DKA management includes controlling hyperglycemia, ketosis, and acdidosis. Signs & Symptoms include polyuria, polydipsia, hyperglycemia greater than 300 mg/dL, Kussmaul breathing, acetone breath, and ketones in the urine. Typically DKA treatment includes: intravenous fluids, insulin therapy (IV regular insulin), and electrolyte replacement. This video details what the nurse needs to know for the NCLEX exam about diabetic ketoacidosis. I also touch on DKA vs HHS (diabetic ketoacidosis and hyperosmolar hyperglycemic nonketotic syndrome (please see the other video for more details). Quiz on DKA: http://www.registerednursern.com/diab... Lecture Notes for this video: http://www.registerednursern.com/diab... Diabetes NCLEX Review Videos: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list... Subscribe: http://www.youtube.com/subscription_c... Nursing School Supplies: http://www.registerednursern.com/the-... Nursing Job Search: http://www.registerednursern.com/nurs... Visit our website RegisteredNurseRN.com for free quizzes, nursing care plans, salary information, job search, and much more: http://www.registerednursern.com Check out other Videos: https://www.youtube.com/user/Register... Popular Playlists: "NCLEX Study Strategies": https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list... "Fluid & Electrolytes Made So Easy": https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list... "Nursing Skills Videos": https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list... "Nursing School Study Tips": https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list... "Nursing School Tips & Questions": https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list... "Teaching Tutorials": https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list... "Types of Nursing Specialties": https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list... "Healthcare Salary Information": https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list... "New Nurse Tips": https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list... "Nursing Career Help": https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list... "EKG Teaching Tutorials": https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list... "Personality Types": https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list... "Dosage & Calculations for Nurses": https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list... "Diabetes Health Managment": https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list...

Diabetic Ketoacidosis (dka)

Tweet Diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) is a dangerous complication faced by people with diabetes which happens when the body starts running out of insulin. DKA is most commonly associated with type 1 diabetes, however, people with type 2 diabetes that produce very little of their own insulin may also be affected. Ketoacidosis is a serious short term complication which can result in coma or even death if it is not treated quickly. Read about Diabetes and Ketones What is diabetic ketoacidosis? DKA occurs when the body has insufficient insulin to allow enough glucose to enter cells, and so the body switches to burning fatty acids and producing acidic ketone bodies. A high level of ketone bodies in the blood can cause particularly severe illness. Symptoms of DKA Diabetic ketoacidosis may itself be the symptom of undiagnosed type 1 diabetes. Typical symptoms of diabetic ketoacidosis include: Vomiting Dehydration An unusual smell on the breath –sometimes compared to the smell of pear drops Deep laboured breathing (called kussmaul breathing) or hyperventilation Rapid heartbeat Confusion and disorientation Symptoms of diabetic ketoacidosis usually evolve over a 24 hour period if blood glucose Continue reading >>

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  1. dietcherry

    THE DANGERS OF DIABETIC KETOACIDOSIS

    This serious complication, the result of acid buildup in the blood, can lead to coma or even death.
    If you have type 1 diabetes, one of the serious complications you may face is a condition known as ketoacidosis. In diabetic ketoacidosis, acids called ketones build up in your blood and could eventually lead to diabetic coma or death.
    But by vigilantly controlling your diabetes and watching for early signs of ketoacidosis, you can help prevent it from happening to you.
    What Is Diabetic Ketoacidosis?
    "When blood sugars get elevated and there is not enough insulin, your fat cells start to break down their storage sites of energy, which are called ketones," says Jay Cohen, MD, medical director of the Endocrine Clinic and clinical assistant professor in the department of family medicine at the University of Tennessee. Ketones are acidic, and that acid builds up in your blood.
    Diabetic ketoacidosis is found more often in younger people than older people, and more often in women than in men. At least 20 percent of people learn they have diabetes after seeking medical care for complaints that turn out to be symptoms of ketoacidosis.
    Common Causes of Diabetic Ketoacidosis
    The three common causes of ketoacidosis are:
    Not enough insulin. This can happen if you don’t inject enough insulin or if your insulin needs increase in response to an illness such as a cold or the flu. Blood glucose can’t be used for energy without enough insulin to help in the process, so the body breaks down fat for energy and high ketone levels result.
    "Elevated blood sugars could be due to an infection or any other physical or emotional stress — good or bad," says Dr. Cohen. Unexpected increases in your blood glucose levels can increase your insulin needs. "You may have a certain amount of insulin that you usually use, but if you have an infection, you may need more insulin to help your body to improve blood sugars," Cohen explains.
    Not enough food intake. If you don’t eat enough, your body has to break down fat for energy, producing high ketone levels. This is particularly common in people who are sick and don't feel like eating.
    Low blood glucose levels. This situation can force your body to break down fat to use as energy, resulting in ketone production.
    Diabetic Ketoacidosis Symptoms
    Symptoms of ketoacidosis usually progress relatively slowly. But since diabetic ketoacidosis can be a life-threatening condition, it is important to seek medical help immediately if you experience any of its symptoms. These include:
    Excessive thirst
    Dry mouth
    Frequent urination
    Elevated blood glucose levels
    Elevated ketones in the urine
    Persistent fatigue
    Skin that is dry or flushed
    Nausea or vomiting
    Pain in your abdomen
    Shortness of breath
    A fruity smell to your breath (the result of elevated ketone levels)
    Inability to concentrate
    Confused state
    Preventing Diabetic Ketoacidosis
    Ask your endocrinologist how you can reduce your risk of developing diabetic ketoacidosis. It is often a good idea to use a home dipstick test to check for ketones in your urine when your blood glucose levels are high (over 240 milligrams per deciliter) and when you have an infection.
    Diabetes education also helps. One study found that hospital stays for ketoacidosis were reduced among a group of people who attended diabetes education classes.
    Managing Diabetic Ketoacidosis
    If think you may have ketoacidosis, it is essential to contact your doctor or get to the emergency room immediately.
    "If we can catch it early, with medicine and IV fluids, we can stop the diabetic ketoacidosis from progressing to severe dehydration," says Cohen. "Diabetic ketoacidosis, if severe and not treated aggressively, has about a 5 percent death rate, so you really want to get a handle on it rapidly."
    Remember that regularly monitoring your blood glucose levels, performing urine ketone tests as recommended, and recognizing symptoms that might indicate your ketone levels are high is the best approach to reducing your risk of diabetic ketoacidosis.
    From Everyday Health

  2. Gem93

    I recently had a friend that got DKA she only had ketones for a day and was bring violently sick she couldn't test for ketones as her strips were left at her uni campus and went home to visit her family for the weekend her mum was just about to leave to go get the strips when she said I don't feel well take me to hospital betime she got to hospital ( which is a 10 min drive from where she lives) her vains had short down and the only vain left was the one to her heart they had to cut her throat open to put in an insulin drip immediately and was put in intensive care her family was told she might not make it and that was from having ketone symptoms for just a few hours / day at the most .. This has woken me up to life alot Snd made me realise what can happen if you don't look after yourself

  3. dietcherry

    OMG Can you get her to join here so we may talk to her?

  4. -> Continue reading
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What is DIABETIC KETOACIDOSIS? What does DIABETIC KETOACIDOSIS mean? DIABETIC KETOACIDOSIS meaning - DIABETIC KETOACIDOSIS definition - DIABETIC KETOACIDOSIS explanation. Source: Wikipedia.org article, adapted under https://creativecommons.org/licenses/... license. SUBSCRIBE to our Google Earth flights channel - https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC6Uu... Diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) is a potentially life-threatening complication of diabetes mellitus. Signs and symptoms may include vomiting, abdominal pain, deep gasping breathing, increased urination, weakness, confusion, and occasionally loss of consciousness. A person's breath may develop a specific smell. Onset of symptoms is usually rapid. In some cases people may not realize they previously had diabetes. DKA happens most often in those with type 1 diabetes, but can also occur in those with other types of diabetes under certain circumstances. Triggers may include infection, not taking insulin correctly, stroke, and certain medications such as steroids. DKA results from a shortage of insulin; in response the body switches to burning fatty acids which produces acidic ketone bodies. DKA is typically diagnosed when testing finds high blood sugar, low blood pH, and ketoacids in either the blood or urine. The primary treatment of DKA is with intravenous fluids and insulin. Depending on the severity, insulin may be given intravenously or by injection under the skin. Usually potassium is also needed to prevent the development of low blood potassium. Throughout treatment blood sugar and potassium levels should be regularly checked. Antibiotics may be required in those with an underlying infection. In those with severely low blood pH, sodium bicarbonate may be given; however, its use is of unclear benefit and typically not recommended. Rates of DKA vary around the world. About 4% of people with type 1 diabetes in United Kingdom develop DKA a year, while in Malaysia the condition affects about 25% a year. DKA was first described in 1886 and, until the introduction of insulin therapy in the 1920s, it was almost universally fatal. The risk of death with adequate and timely treatment is currently around 1–4%. Up to 1% of children with DKA develop a complication known as cerebral edema. The symptoms of an episode of diabetic ketoacidosis usually evolve over a period of about 24 hours. Predominant symptoms are nausea and vomiting, pronounced thirst, excessive urine production and abdominal pain that may be severe. Those who measure their glucose levels themselves may notice hyperglycemia (high blood sugar levels). In severe DKA, breathing becomes labored and of a deep, gasping character (a state referred to as "Kussmaul respiration"). The abdomen may be tender to the point that an acute abdomen may be suspected, such as acute pancreatitis, appendicitis or gastrointestinal perforation. Coffee ground vomiting (vomiting of altered blood) occurs in a minority of people; this tends to originate from erosion of the esophagus. In severe DKA, there may be confusion, lethargy, stupor or even coma (a marked decrease in the level of consciousness). On physical examination there is usually clinical evidence of dehydration, such as a dry mouth and decreased skin turgor. If the dehydration is profound enough to cause a decrease in the circulating blood volume, tachycardia (a fast heart rate) and low blood pressure may be observed. Often, a "ketotic" odor is present, which is often described as "fruity", often compared to the smell of pear drops whose scent is a ketone. If Kussmaul respiration is present, this is reflected in an increased respiratory rate.....

Diabetic Ketoacidosis

Diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) happens when your blood sugar is high and your insulin level is low. This imbalance in the body causes a build-up of ketones. Ketones are toxic. If DKA isn’t treated, it can lead to diabetic coma and even death. DKA mainly affects people who have type 1 diabetes. But it can also happen with other types of diabetes, including type 2 diabetes and gestational diabetes (during pregnancy). DKA is a very serious condition. If you have diabetes and think you may have DKA, contact your doctor or get to a hospital right away. The first symptoms to appear are usually: frequent urination. The next stage of DKA symptoms include: vomiting (usually more than once) confusion or trouble concentrating a fruity odor on the breath. The main cause of DKA is not enough insulin. A lack of insulin means sugar can’t get into your cells. Your cells need sugar for energy. This causes your body’s glucose levels to rise. To get energy, the body starts to burn fat. This process causes ketones to build up. Ketones can poison the body. High blood glucose levels can also cause you to urinate often. This leads to a lack of fluids in the body (dehydration). DKA can be caused by mis Continue reading >>

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  1. dietcherry

    THE DANGERS OF DIABETIC KETOACIDOSIS

    This serious complication, the result of acid buildup in the blood, can lead to coma or even death.
    If you have type 1 diabetes, one of the serious complications you may face is a condition known as ketoacidosis. In diabetic ketoacidosis, acids called ketones build up in your blood and could eventually lead to diabetic coma or death.
    But by vigilantly controlling your diabetes and watching for early signs of ketoacidosis, you can help prevent it from happening to you.
    What Is Diabetic Ketoacidosis?
    "When blood sugars get elevated and there is not enough insulin, your fat cells start to break down their storage sites of energy, which are called ketones," says Jay Cohen, MD, medical director of the Endocrine Clinic and clinical assistant professor in the department of family medicine at the University of Tennessee. Ketones are acidic, and that acid builds up in your blood.
    Diabetic ketoacidosis is found more often in younger people than older people, and more often in women than in men. At least 20 percent of people learn they have diabetes after seeking medical care for complaints that turn out to be symptoms of ketoacidosis.
    Common Causes of Diabetic Ketoacidosis
    The three common causes of ketoacidosis are:
    Not enough insulin. This can happen if you don’t inject enough insulin or if your insulin needs increase in response to an illness such as a cold or the flu. Blood glucose can’t be used for energy without enough insulin to help in the process, so the body breaks down fat for energy and high ketone levels result.
    "Elevated blood sugars could be due to an infection or any other physical or emotional stress — good or bad," says Dr. Cohen. Unexpected increases in your blood glucose levels can increase your insulin needs. "You may have a certain amount of insulin that you usually use, but if you have an infection, you may need more insulin to help your body to improve blood sugars," Cohen explains.
    Not enough food intake. If you don’t eat enough, your body has to break down fat for energy, producing high ketone levels. This is particularly common in people who are sick and don't feel like eating.
    Low blood glucose levels. This situation can force your body to break down fat to use as energy, resulting in ketone production.
    Diabetic Ketoacidosis Symptoms
    Symptoms of ketoacidosis usually progress relatively slowly. But since diabetic ketoacidosis can be a life-threatening condition, it is important to seek medical help immediately if you experience any of its symptoms. These include:
    Excessive thirst
    Dry mouth
    Frequent urination
    Elevated blood glucose levels
    Elevated ketones in the urine
    Persistent fatigue
    Skin that is dry or flushed
    Nausea or vomiting
    Pain in your abdomen
    Shortness of breath
    A fruity smell to your breath (the result of elevated ketone levels)
    Inability to concentrate
    Confused state
    Preventing Diabetic Ketoacidosis
    Ask your endocrinologist how you can reduce your risk of developing diabetic ketoacidosis. It is often a good idea to use a home dipstick test to check for ketones in your urine when your blood glucose levels are high (over 240 milligrams per deciliter) and when you have an infection.
    Diabetes education also helps. One study found that hospital stays for ketoacidosis were reduced among a group of people who attended diabetes education classes.
    Managing Diabetic Ketoacidosis
    If think you may have ketoacidosis, it is essential to contact your doctor or get to the emergency room immediately.
    "If we can catch it early, with medicine and IV fluids, we can stop the diabetic ketoacidosis from progressing to severe dehydration," says Cohen. "Diabetic ketoacidosis, if severe and not treated aggressively, has about a 5 percent death rate, so you really want to get a handle on it rapidly."
    Remember that regularly monitoring your blood glucose levels, performing urine ketone tests as recommended, and recognizing symptoms that might indicate your ketone levels are high is the best approach to reducing your risk of diabetic ketoacidosis.
    From Everyday Health

  2. Gem93

    I recently had a friend that got DKA she only had ketones for a day and was bring violently sick she couldn't test for ketones as her strips were left at her uni campus and went home to visit her family for the weekend her mum was just about to leave to go get the strips when she said I don't feel well take me to hospital betime she got to hospital ( which is a 10 min drive from where she lives) her vains had short down and the only vain left was the one to her heart they had to cut her throat open to put in an insulin drip immediately and was put in intensive care her family was told she might not make it and that was from having ketone symptoms for just a few hours / day at the most .. This has woken me up to life alot Snd made me realise what can happen if you don't look after yourself

  3. dietcherry

    OMG Can you get her to join here so we may talk to her?

  4. -> Continue reading
read more
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What is KETOACIDOSIS? What does KETOACIDOSIS mean? KETOACIDOSIS meaning - KETOACIDOSIS definition - KETOACIDOSIS explanation. Source: Wikipedia.org article, adapted under https://creativecommons.org/licenses/... license. SUBSCRIBE to our Google Earth flights channel - https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC6Uu... Ketoacidosis is a metabolic state associated with high concentrations of ketone bodies, formed by the breakdown of fatty acids and the deamination of amino acids. The two common ketones produced in humans are acetoacetic acid and ß-hydroxybutyrate. Ketoacidosis is a pathological metabolic state marked by extreme and uncontrolled ketosis. In ketoacidosis, the body fails to adequately regulate ketone production causing such a severe accumulation of keto acids that the pH of the blood is substantially decreased. In extreme cases ketoacidosis can be fatal. Ketoacidosis is most common in untreated type 1 diabetes mellitus, when the liver breaks down fat and proteins in response to a perceived need for respiratory substrate. Prolonged alcoholism may lead to alcoholic ketoacidosis. Ketoacidosis can be smelled on a person's breath. This is due to acetone, a direct by-product of the spontaneous decomposition of acetoacetic acid. It is often described as smelling like fruit or nail polish remover. Ketosis may also smell, but the odor is usually more subtle due to lower concentrations of acetone. Treatment consists most simply of correcting blood sugar and insulin levels, which will halt ketone production. If the severity of the case warrants more aggressive measures, intravenous sodium bicarbonate infusion can be given to raise blood pH back to an acceptable range. However, serious caution must be exercised with IV sodium bicarbonate to avoid the risk of equally life-threatening hypernatremia. Three common causes of ketoacidosis are alcohol, starvation, and diabetes, resulting in alcoholic ketoacidosis, starvation ketoacidosis, and diabetic ketoacidosis respectively. In diabetic ketoacidosis, a high concentration of ketone bodies is usually accompanied by insulin deficiency, hyperglycemia, and dehydration. Particularly in type 1 diabetics the lack of insulin in the bloodstream prevents glucose absorption, thereby inhibiting the production of oxaloacetate (a crucial molecule for processing Acetyl-CoA, the product of beta-oxidation of fatty acids, in the Krebs cycle) through reduced levels of pyruvate (a byproduct of glycolysis), and can cause unchecked ketone body production (through fatty acid metabolism) potentially leading to dangerous glucose and ketone levels in the blood. Hyperglycemia results in glucose overloading the kidneys and spilling into the urine (transport maximum for glucose is exceeded). Dehydration results following the osmotic movement of water into urine (Osmotic diuresis), exacerbating the acidosis. In alcoholic ketoacidosis, alcohol causes dehydration and blocks the first step of gluconeogenesis by depleting oxaloacetate. The body is unable to synthesize enough glucose to meet its needs, thus creating an energy crisis resulting in fatty acid metabolism, and ketone body formation.

Diabetic Ketoacidosis

Diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) is a potentially life-threatening complication of diabetes mellitus.[1] Signs and symptoms may include vomiting, abdominal pain, deep gasping breathing, increased urination, weakness, confusion, and occasionally loss of consciousness.[1] A person's breath may develop a specific smell.[1] Onset of symptoms is usually rapid.[1] In some cases people may not realize they previously had diabetes.[1] DKA happens most often in those with type 1 diabetes, but can also occur in those with other types of diabetes under certain circumstances.[1] Triggers may include infection, not taking insulin correctly, stroke, and certain medications such as steroids.[1] DKA results from a shortage of insulin; in response the body switches to burning fatty acids which produces acidic ketone bodies.[3] DKA is typically diagnosed when testing finds high blood sugar, low blood pH, and ketoacids in either the blood or urine.[1] The primary treatment of DKA is with intravenous fluids and insulin.[1] Depending on the severity, insulin may be given intravenously or by injection under the skin.[3] Usually potassium is also needed to prevent the development of low blood potassium.[1] Th Continue reading >>

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Popular Questions

  1. dietcherry

    THE DANGERS OF DIABETIC KETOACIDOSIS

    This serious complication, the result of acid buildup in the blood, can lead to coma or even death.
    If you have type 1 diabetes, one of the serious complications you may face is a condition known as ketoacidosis. In diabetic ketoacidosis, acids called ketones build up in your blood and could eventually lead to diabetic coma or death.
    But by vigilantly controlling your diabetes and watching for early signs of ketoacidosis, you can help prevent it from happening to you.
    What Is Diabetic Ketoacidosis?
    "When blood sugars get elevated and there is not enough insulin, your fat cells start to break down their storage sites of energy, which are called ketones," says Jay Cohen, MD, medical director of the Endocrine Clinic and clinical assistant professor in the department of family medicine at the University of Tennessee. Ketones are acidic, and that acid builds up in your blood.
    Diabetic ketoacidosis is found more often in younger people than older people, and more often in women than in men. At least 20 percent of people learn they have diabetes after seeking medical care for complaints that turn out to be symptoms of ketoacidosis.
    Common Causes of Diabetic Ketoacidosis
    The three common causes of ketoacidosis are:
    Not enough insulin. This can happen if you don’t inject enough insulin or if your insulin needs increase in response to an illness such as a cold or the flu. Blood glucose can’t be used for energy without enough insulin to help in the process, so the body breaks down fat for energy and high ketone levels result.
    "Elevated blood sugars could be due to an infection or any other physical or emotional stress — good or bad," says Dr. Cohen. Unexpected increases in your blood glucose levels can increase your insulin needs. "You may have a certain amount of insulin that you usually use, but if you have an infection, you may need more insulin to help your body to improve blood sugars," Cohen explains.
    Not enough food intake. If you don’t eat enough, your body has to break down fat for energy, producing high ketone levels. This is particularly common in people who are sick and don't feel like eating.
    Low blood glucose levels. This situation can force your body to break down fat to use as energy, resulting in ketone production.
    Diabetic Ketoacidosis Symptoms
    Symptoms of ketoacidosis usually progress relatively slowly. But since diabetic ketoacidosis can be a life-threatening condition, it is important to seek medical help immediately if you experience any of its symptoms. These include:
    Excessive thirst
    Dry mouth
    Frequent urination
    Elevated blood glucose levels
    Elevated ketones in the urine
    Persistent fatigue
    Skin that is dry or flushed
    Nausea or vomiting
    Pain in your abdomen
    Shortness of breath
    A fruity smell to your breath (the result of elevated ketone levels)
    Inability to concentrate
    Confused state
    Preventing Diabetic Ketoacidosis
    Ask your endocrinologist how you can reduce your risk of developing diabetic ketoacidosis. It is often a good idea to use a home dipstick test to check for ketones in your urine when your blood glucose levels are high (over 240 milligrams per deciliter) and when you have an infection.
    Diabetes education also helps. One study found that hospital stays for ketoacidosis were reduced among a group of people who attended diabetes education classes.
    Managing Diabetic Ketoacidosis
    If think you may have ketoacidosis, it is essential to contact your doctor or get to the emergency room immediately.
    "If we can catch it early, with medicine and IV fluids, we can stop the diabetic ketoacidosis from progressing to severe dehydration," says Cohen. "Diabetic ketoacidosis, if severe and not treated aggressively, has about a 5 percent death rate, so you really want to get a handle on it rapidly."
    Remember that regularly monitoring your blood glucose levels, performing urine ketone tests as recommended, and recognizing symptoms that might indicate your ketone levels are high is the best approach to reducing your risk of diabetic ketoacidosis.
    From Everyday Health

  2. Gem93

    I recently had a friend that got DKA she only had ketones for a day and was bring violently sick she couldn't test for ketones as her strips were left at her uni campus and went home to visit her family for the weekend her mum was just about to leave to go get the strips when she said I don't feel well take me to hospital betime she got to hospital ( which is a 10 min drive from where she lives) her vains had short down and the only vain left was the one to her heart they had to cut her throat open to put in an insulin drip immediately and was put in intensive care her family was told she might not make it and that was from having ketone symptoms for just a few hours / day at the most .. This has woken me up to life alot Snd made me realise what can happen if you don't look after yourself

  3. dietcherry

    OMG Can you get her to join here so we may talk to her?

  4. -> Continue reading
read more

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