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What Does Ketoacidosis Do

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What is DIABETIC KETOACIDOSIS? What does DIABETIC KETOACIDOSIS mean? DIABETIC KETOACIDOSIS meaning - DIABETIC KETOACIDOSIS definition - DIABETIC KETOACIDOSIS explanation. Source: Wikipedia.org article, adapted under https://creativecommons.org/licenses/... license. SUBSCRIBE to our Google Earth flights channel - https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC6Uu... Diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) is a potentially life-threatening complication of diabetes mellitus. Signs and symptoms may include vomiting, abdominal pain, deep gasping breathing, increased urination, weakness, confusion, and occasionally loss of consciousness. A person's breath may develop a specific smell. Onset of symptoms is usually rapid. In some cases people may not realize they previously had diabetes. DKA happens most often in those with type 1 diabetes, but can also occur in those with other types of diabetes under certain circumstances. Triggers may include infection, not taking insulin correctly, stroke, and certain medications such as steroids. DKA results from a shortage of insulin; in response the body switches to burning fatty acids which produces acidic ketone bodies. DKA is typically diagnosed when testing finds high b

How Does Diabetic Ketoacidosis Develop?

Diabetic ketoacidosis, DKA, is a serious, life-threatening condition that can cause a diabetic coma and possibly death. It develops when the body does not get enough sugar in order to produce energy because of a lack of insulin. This causes the body to start using stored fat for energy. According to WebMD, when the body cannot convert the sugar into energy, it stays inside of the bloodstream (WebMD, 2017). This causes the kidneys to filter some of the sugar from the blood into the urine. This causes ketones to be released from the breakdown of fat, making the blood’s pH level to become acidic. DKA is a condition that should not be taken lightly. It can cause several different problems inside of the body. It is very important that you take care of your body in order to prevent the development of DKA. How does DKA start? WebMD said, “Ketoacidosis can be caused by not getting enough insulin, having a severe infection or other illness, becoming severely dehydrated, or some combination of these things” (WebMD, 2017). There are things that you can control. Frequent communication with your doctor will assist you in determining how much insulin you should take and when. If you keep t Continue reading >>

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  1. Santosh Anand

    Insulin plays a key role in helping sugar (glucose) enter your cells, thus providing them energy. When your cells don't get the glucose they need for energy, your body begins to burn fat for energy, which produces ketones. Ketones are acidic and so when they build up in the blood, they make the blood more acidic, leading to the condition called diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA).
    Now, in type-1 diabetes, there is no insulin production whereas in type-2, there is impairment of insulin production. Thus why Type-2 diabetic people hardly get DKA.
    Note: Diabetic ketoacidosis is a serious condition that might lead to diabetic coma or even death.

  2. Lucas Verhelst

    In order for the cells in your body to access the glucose in your bloodstream so they can use it as energy they need insulin. Insulin acts like a key, opennin the cell door to allow the entry of glucose. Type 1 diabetics produce no insulin and need to inject it, thus the amount of insulin they have is strictly limited. Once they run out of insulin the glucose remains in the blood stream. If this occurs over a long period of time their blood glucose levels will rise due to the release of glucose from the liver. High blood sugar levels causes ketoacidosis which leads to coma and death.

  3. Keith Phillips

    Although type 2 diabetics suffer from insulin resistance, the condition rarely has an absolute negative effect on the bodies ability to convert glucose to usable energy. Type 1 diabetics have little or no ability to produce insulin. With the exception of neural cells, the rest of the body which without insulin is experiencing starvation, will consume its own tissues. (this is how people have endured periods of famine). This process however produces by products that eventually overwhelm the body's ability to process toxins.

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What is KETOACIDOSIS? What does KETOACIDOSIS mean? KETOACIDOSIS meaning - KETOACIDOSIS definition - KETOACIDOSIS explanation. Source: Wikipedia.org article, adapted under https://creativecommons.org/licenses/... license. SUBSCRIBE to our Google Earth flights channel - https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC6Uu... Ketoacidosis is a metabolic state associated with high concentrations of ketone bodies, formed by the breakdown of fatty acids and the deamination of amino acids. The two common ketones produced in humans are acetoacetic acid and ß-hydroxybutyrate. Ketoacidosis is a pathological metabolic state marked by extreme and uncontrolled ketosis. In ketoacidosis, the body fails to adequately regulate ketone production causing such a severe accumulation of keto acids that the pH of the blood is substantially decreased. In extreme cases ketoacidosis can be fatal. Ketoacidosis is most common in untreated type 1 diabetes mellitus, when the liver breaks down fat and proteins in response to a perceived need for respiratory substrate. Prolonged alcoholism may lead to alcoholic ketoacidosis. Ketoacidosis can be smelled on a person's breath. This is due to acetone, a direct by-product of the sp

What Is The Treatments For Ketoacidosis?

Management of diabetic ketoacidos Time: 0–60 mins 1. Commence 0.9% sodium chloride If systolic BP > 90 mmHg, give 1 L over 60 mins If systolic BP < 90 mmHg, give 500 mL over 10–15 mins, then re-assess. If BP remains < 90 mmHg, seek senior review 2. Commence insulin treatment 50 U human soluble insulin in 50 mL 0.9% sodium chloride infused intravenously at 0.1 U/kg body weight/hr Continue with SC basal insulin analogue if usually taken by patient 3. Perform further investigations: see text 4. Establish monitoring schedule Hourly capillary blood glucose and ketone testing Venous bicarbonate and potassium after 1 and 2 hrs, then every 2 hrs Plasma electrolytes every 4 hrs Clinical monitoring of O2 saturation, pulse, BP, respiratory rate and urine output every hour 5. Treat any precipitating cause Time: 60 mins to 12 hrs • IV infusion of 0.9% sodium chloride with potassium chloride added as indicated below 1 L over 2 hrs 1 L over 2 hrs 1 L over 4 hrs 1 L over 4 hrs 1 L over 6 hrs • Add 10% glucose 125 mL/hr IV when glucose < 14 mmol/L • Be more cautious with fluid replacement in elderly, young people, pregnant patients and those with renal or heart failure. If plasma sodium i Continue reading >>

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  1. Santosh Anand

    Insulin plays a key role in helping sugar (glucose) enter your cells, thus providing them energy. When your cells don't get the glucose they need for energy, your body begins to burn fat for energy, which produces ketones. Ketones are acidic and so when they build up in the blood, they make the blood more acidic, leading to the condition called diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA).
    Now, in type-1 diabetes, there is no insulin production whereas in type-2, there is impairment of insulin production. Thus why Type-2 diabetic people hardly get DKA.
    Note: Diabetic ketoacidosis is a serious condition that might lead to diabetic coma or even death.

  2. Lucas Verhelst

    In order for the cells in your body to access the glucose in your bloodstream so they can use it as energy they need insulin. Insulin acts like a key, opennin the cell door to allow the entry of glucose. Type 1 diabetics produce no insulin and need to inject it, thus the amount of insulin they have is strictly limited. Once they run out of insulin the glucose remains in the blood stream. If this occurs over a long period of time their blood glucose levels will rise due to the release of glucose from the liver. High blood sugar levels causes ketoacidosis which leads to coma and death.

  3. Keith Phillips

    Although type 2 diabetics suffer from insulin resistance, the condition rarely has an absolute negative effect on the bodies ability to convert glucose to usable energy. Type 1 diabetics have little or no ability to produce insulin. With the exception of neural cells, the rest of the body which without insulin is experiencing starvation, will consume its own tissues. (this is how people have endured periods of famine). This process however produces by products that eventually overwhelm the body's ability to process toxins.

  4. -> Continue reading
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Signs and symptoms of diabetic ketoacidosis - symptoms of diabetic coma What is Diabetic Ketoacidosis? Diabetic ketoacidosis is a potentially fatal condition Happens when blood sugar levels are too high for an extended period of time When high blood sugar does not get treated, ketones gather in the blood and urine Signs and Symptoms of Diabeticketoacidosis Excessive urination, Extreme thirst and dry mouth Extreme fatigue or weakness and decreased appetite Fruity odor of breath or metallic taste in mouth Nausea and Vomiting and Abdominal pain Breathlessness or difficulty in taking breath Disorientation and confusion leading to Loss of consciousness and coma diabetic ketoacidosis anion gap diabetic ketoacidosis lab values diabetic ketoacidosis pathophysiology pathophysiology of diabetic ketoacidosis

What Are Symptoms Of Diabetic Ketoacidosis?

Diabetic ketoacidosis is a serious complication typically faced by people with type-1 diabetes, which occurs when body starts running out of insulin. This condition can leave the patient in coma or even death if not treated immediately. Diabetic ketoacidosis occurs when body is lacking lacking insulin to allow sufficient glucose to enter cells. Therefore the body absorbs energy by burning fatty acids and in turn produce acidic ketone bodies. Blood containing high levels of ketone bodies can cause serious illness. Diabetic ketoacidosis is itself a symptom of undiagnosed type-1 diabetes. Other symptoms of diabetic ketoacidosis include: 1. Dehydration 2. Vomiting 3. Nausea 4. Blurred vision 5. Fatigue & sleepiness 6. Frequent urination 7. Rapid heartbeat 8. Unusual smell on the breath (similar to that of pear drops) 9. Confusion and disorientation 10. Hyperventilation or deep laboured breathing 11. Coma The symptoms of diabetic ketoacidosis usually develop over a 24-hour period if blood glucose levels are and remain very high (hyperglycemia). Continue reading >>

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Popular Questions

  1. Santosh Anand

    Insulin plays a key role in helping sugar (glucose) enter your cells, thus providing them energy. When your cells don't get the glucose they need for energy, your body begins to burn fat for energy, which produces ketones. Ketones are acidic and so when they build up in the blood, they make the blood more acidic, leading to the condition called diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA).
    Now, in type-1 diabetes, there is no insulin production whereas in type-2, there is impairment of insulin production. Thus why Type-2 diabetic people hardly get DKA.
    Note: Diabetic ketoacidosis is a serious condition that might lead to diabetic coma or even death.

  2. Lucas Verhelst

    In order for the cells in your body to access the glucose in your bloodstream so they can use it as energy they need insulin. Insulin acts like a key, opennin the cell door to allow the entry of glucose. Type 1 diabetics produce no insulin and need to inject it, thus the amount of insulin they have is strictly limited. Once they run out of insulin the glucose remains in the blood stream. If this occurs over a long period of time their blood glucose levels will rise due to the release of glucose from the liver. High blood sugar levels causes ketoacidosis which leads to coma and death.

  3. Keith Phillips

    Although type 2 diabetics suffer from insulin resistance, the condition rarely has an absolute negative effect on the bodies ability to convert glucose to usable energy. Type 1 diabetics have little or no ability to produce insulin. With the exception of neural cells, the rest of the body which without insulin is experiencing starvation, will consume its own tissues. (this is how people have endured periods of famine). This process however produces by products that eventually overwhelm the body's ability to process toxins.

  4. -> Continue reading
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