diabetestalk.net

What Does It Mean If Ketones Are Found In Urine?

Ketones Urine Test

Ketones Urine Test

Urine ketones are usually measured as a "spot test." This is available in a test kit that you can buy at a drug store. The kit contains dipsticks coated with chemicals that react with ketone bodies. A dipstick is dipped in the urine sample. A color change indicates the presence of ketones. This article describes the ketone urine test that involves sending collected urine to a lab. A clean-catch urine sample is needed. The clean-catch method is used to prevent germs from the penis or vagina from getting into a urine sample. To collect your urine, the health care provider may give you a special clean-catch kit that contains a cleansing solution and sterile wipes. Follow instructions exactly so that the results are accurate. Continue reading >>

Reasons For Ketones In Urine

Reasons For Ketones In Urine

What are ketones? Everybody has ketones. The body produces ketones when there is not enough insulin that will convert sugar into energy. Ketones are chemicals produced by the liver from fatty acids. The liver then sends ketones into the bloodstream, so the tissues and muscles can utilize them as fuel. People without diabetes don't have an issue with this process. However, people with diabetes can have too much buildup of ketones in the blood, which can be life-threatening. If you have type 1 diabetes, you might need a ketone test. In type 1 diabetes, a person's immune system attacks the pancreas, which produces insulin. Without enough insulin, the levels of blood sugar rise. Individuals who have type 2 diabetes can also experience high ketone levels, but not as common as with those who have type 1 diabetes. Signs to Test for Ketones Your doctor will probably ask for a ketone test when you have the following conditions: A blood sugar of more than 250 mg/dl for two consecutive days Excessive thirst Vomiting You have an illness You have an injury You are pregnant Tests for Ketones Ketones are tested through a urine analysis. You can purchase a ketone test kit at your local drugstore and test your urine at home. A ketone test can also be done in your doctor's clinic. To test for ketones in your urine, you have to pee in a sterile container to get a urine sample. After collecting the urine sample, do the following steps: Dip the test strip into the urine sample. You can also hold the strip under your urine stream. Gently shake off excess urine from the test strip. You will notice that the test strip will change in color. the directions will tell you how long that takes. Follow the instructions and check the strip color against the provided chart in your test kit. The corresp Continue reading >>

Ketones In Urine

Ketones In Urine

What is a Ketones in Urine Test? The test measures ketone levels in your urine. Normally, your body burns glucose (sugar) for energy. If your cells don't get enough glucose, your body burns fat for energy instead. This produces a substance called ketones, which can show up in your blood and urine. High ketone levels in urine may indicate diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA), a complication of diabetes that can lead to a coma or even death. A ketones in urine test can prompt you to get treatment before a medical emergency occurs. Other names: ketones urine test, ketone test, urine ketones, ketone bodies What is it used for? The test is often used to help monitor people at a higher risk of developing ketones. These include people with type 1 or type 2 diabetes. If you have diabetes, ketones in urine can mean that you are not getting enough insulin. If you don't have diabetes, you may still be at risk for developing ketones if you: Participate in strenuous exercise Are on a very low-carbohydrate diet Are pregnant Why do I need a ketones in urine test? Your health care provider may order a ketones in urine test if you have diabetes or other risk factors for developing ketones. You may also need this test if you have symptoms of ketoacidosis. These include: People with type 1 diabetes are at a higher risk for ketoacidosis. What happens during a ketones in urine test? A ketones in urine test can be done in the home as well as in a lab. If in a lab, you will be given instructions to provide a "clean catch" sample. The clean catch method generally includes the following steps: Wash your hands. Clean your genital area with a cleansing pad. Men should wipe the tip of their penis. Women should open their labia and clean from front to back. Start to urinate into the toilet. Move the collect Continue reading >>

Clinical Significance Of Positive Urine Ketone Result

Clinical Significance Of Positive Urine Ketone Result

Ketone bodies are usually absent in urine. The presence of ketones in the urine probably indicates that the body is using fats rather than carbohydrates for energy. High levels of ketones may be present in the urine of individuals with uncontrolled diabetes because the body's ability to metabolize carbohydrates is defective. Detecting the presence of ketones in the urine is a valuable aid to managing and monitoring individuals with diabetes mellitus. Ketonuria is an indication that the insulin dose needs to be increased. Electrolyte imbalance and dehydration occur when ketones accumulate in the blood. If these conditions are not corrected by adjusting the dose of insulin, the patient may develop ketoacidosis and ultimately diabetic coma. Low levels of ketones may be detected during conditions of physiological stress such as fasting, rapid weight loss, frequent strenuous exercise or prolonged vomiting. The presence of ketones in these situations is due to either inadequate intake of carbohydrates or increased loss of carbohydrates. Continue reading >>

What Do High Levels Of Ketones In Urine Mean When A Person Is Dehydrated?

What Do High Levels Of Ketones In Urine Mean When A Person Is Dehydrated?

Diabetes can induce the onset of dehydration. The buildup of glucose in the blood osmotically pulls the fluid from the cells into the blood. Eventually you are feeling the dry mouth, and excessive thirst of diabetic onset. I drank 12 four ounce apple juice without slaking my thirst. I checked my blood glucose and it was 343. I was diabetic. I was 48 years old and I had type 2 diabetes. A friend of mine drank 24 bottles of root beer before he found he was diabetic at 13 years of age. He had type 1 previously called juvenile diabetes. Ketones are a byproduct of metabolism that does not have sufficient glucose available to power the cells of the body. These ketones are developed when protein is “burned” in the cells instead of glucose. They are acidotic, and can cause ketoacidosis which if sufficiently built up can kill. Why is your body burning protein instead of glucose. Usually it is seen in early onset diabetes where the body cannot get the glucose out of the blood, as there is not enough insulin to make the transfer of glucose from blood to cell. Type 1 diabetes where there is a total loss of insulin is the usual culprit. Ketosis is nothing to play with, and should be managed possibly in a hospital setting. Continue reading >>

Getting To Know Ketones

Getting To Know Ketones

People with diabetes, particularly those with Type 1 diabetes, have been at least vaguely aware of the word ketones for a long time. With the recent resurgence of popular interest in low-carbohydrate diets, however, just about everyone seems to be talking about ketones these days. But does anyone really know what ketones are? Are they a danger to your health (as in diabetic ketoacidosis), or a sign that you have lowered your carbohydrate intake enough to cause weight loss (as some people who follow low-carbohydrate diets believe)? What are ketones? Ketones are end-products of fat metabolism in the body. That is, they are formed when fat is burned for energy by the muscles. Chemically, they are acids known as ketone bodies, and there are three types: beta-hydroxybutyric acid, aceto-acetic acid, and acetone. But you don’t have to be a chemist to understand what role they play in the body. To get to know ketones, it’s helpful to understand how your body burns fuel. A simple analogy is that of an automobile. For a car engine to run, the engine must burn fuel (gasoline), and when the fuel is burned, exhaust (carbon monoxide) is created. The carbon monoxide is the end-product of gasoline combustion. Your body also has an engine that must burn fuel to operate. The engine is muscle, and the fuel is fat, carbohydrate (glucose), and, in certain conditions, protein. When fat is burned, the “exhaust” is ketones, and when glucose is burned, the “exhaust” is lactic acid. Fat is more desirable as a fuel than glucose because there are more calories in a gram of fat (9 calories per gram) than there are in a gram of glucose (4 calories per gram), so you get more energy per gram of fat burned. In a sense, you could call fat a high-test fuel. But there is one catch to burning f Continue reading >>

Ketones: Clearing Up The Confusion

Ketones: Clearing Up The Confusion

Ketones, ketosis, ketoacidosis, DKA…these are words that you’ve probably heard at one point or another, and you might be wondering what they mean and if you need to worry about them at all, especially if you have diabetes. This week, we’ll explore the mysterious world of ketones, including if and how they may affect you. Ketones — what are they? Ketones are a type of acid that the body can form if there’s not enough carbohydrate to be burned for energy (yes, you do need carbs for fuel). Without enough carb, the body turns to another energy source: fat. Ketones are made in the liver from fat breakdown. This is called ketogenesis. People who don’t have diabetes can form ketones. This might occur if a person does extreme exercise, has an eating disorder, is fasting (not eating), or is following a low-carbohydrate diet. This is called ketosis and it’s a normal response to starvation. In a person who has diabetes, ketones form for the same reason (not enough carb for energy), but this often occurs because there isn’t enough insulin available to help move carb (in the form of glucose) from the bloodstream to the cells to be used for energy. Again, the body scrambles to find an alternate fuel source in the form of fat. You might be thinking that it’s a good thing to burn fat for fuel. However, for someone who has diabetes, ketosis can quickly become dangerous if it occurs due to a continued lack of insulin (the presence of ketones along with “normal” blood sugar levels is not necessarily a cause for concern). In the absence of insulin (which can occur if someone doesn’t take their insulin or perhaps uses an insulin pump and the pump has a malfunction, for example), fat cells continue to release fat into the circulation; the liver then continues to churn Continue reading >>

Ketones In Urine

Ketones In Urine

I know this is an old post, but people may still be checking for answers. I work in a laboratory where we do urinalysis constantly all day every day. In a pregnant woman, you can see ketones in the urine in two, but separate, circumstances. First is ketones in combination with any urine glucose (sugar) level. This may be a sign of gestational diabetes and you should start asking your doctor questions about it. Second is ketones by themselves. I'm 12 weeks pregnant and had ketones in my urine and was instructed by my doctor to go to the ER and get IV fluids. This was directly related to my eating habits, which at that point were near null because of the morning sickness. Because I was eating so little, and barely able to keep water down, my body was using my fat stores to supply nutrients to the baby. This breakdown of fat in such large amounts causes ketones as a waste product, which is then excreted through your urine. Ketones occur in the absence of carbs, when your body starts to use fat for calories. You will see ketones when you are eating very low calorie, very low carb, or have impaired insulin function. Ketones are concentrated in a state of dehydration. Excess glucose in urine indicates eating too many carbs (if you're diabetic) and/or impaired insulin function. Both are hallmarked by sweet smelling urine. Make sure you eat small meals during the day and add a night time snack, with a protein, to prevent ketosis while sleeping. If you think you have diabetes see a physician. I am 38 weeks pregnant and my urin showed high ketones this week. My blood sugar was in "acceptable" level; however, my doctor said that the presence of ketones in my urine means I need to drink alot more water because my body is converting carbs to sugar faster than I can exp Continue reading >>

Diabetes With Ketone Bodies In Dogs

Diabetes With Ketone Bodies In Dogs

Diabetes Mellitus with Ketoacidosis in Dogs Diabetes is a medical condition in which the body cannot absorb sufficient glucose, thus causing a rise the blood sugar levels. The term “ketoacidosis,” meanwhile, refers to a condition in which levels of acid abnormally increased in the blood due to presence of “ketone bodies”. In diabetes with ketoacidosis, ketoacidosis immediately follows diabetes. It should be considered a dire emergency, one in which immediate treatment is required to save the life of the animal. This condition typically affects older dogs as well as females. In addition, miniature poodles and dachshunds are predisposed to diabetes with ketoacidosis. Symptoms and Types Weakness Lethargy Depression Lack of appetite (anorexia) Muscle wasting Rough hair coat Dehydration Dandruff Sweet breath odor Causes Although the ketoacidosis is ultimately brought on by the dog's insulin dependency due to diabetes mellitus, underlying factors include stress, surgery, and infections of the skin, respiratory, and urinary tract systems. Concurrent diseases such as heart failure, kidney failure, asthma, cancer may also lead to this type of condition. Diagnosis You will need to give a thorough history of your dog’s health, including the onset and nature of the symptoms, to your veterinarian. He or she will then perform a complete physical examination, as well as a biochemistry profile and complete blood count (CBC). The most consistent finding in patients with diabetes is higher than normal levels of glucose in the blood. If infection is present, white blood cell count will also high. Other findings may include: high liver enzymes, high blood cholesterol levels, accumulation in the blood of nitrogenous waste products (urea) that are usually excreted in the urine (azo Continue reading >>

When To Worry About Ketones

When To Worry About Ketones

“Your blood sugar is over 250. We’ll have to test for ketones, just to make sure you’re not spilling any.” The nurse stuck a label featuring my name and date of birth onto a plastic cup. “The bathroom is down the hall and to the right,” she said. By now, I was familiar with the drill, having experienced it a handful of times in the past: Provide urine sample to endocrinologist and keep my fingers crossed that it’s negative. Fortunately, it was—no ketones spilled. Though we often toss the word ketones around when we talk about diabetes, there tends to be confusion about what ketones are and when they’re dangerous. What are ketones? Ketone bodies are produced by the liver and are byproducts of fat metabolism. They occur when muscles in the body (which normally uses glucose as fuel) begin to use fat instead. This can happen when a person restricts carbohydrates (i.e., following a ketogenic diet—see below), eats too little, or feels ill. Simply put, ketones are markers of fat burning in the body. People with diabetes need to be concerned about ketones, though, because they can be a sign of a life-threatening condition. The presence of ketones makes the blood acidic and can result in an illness known as diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA), which occurs when blood sugar levels are very high. DKA can be caused by not getting enough insulin, and it may occur prior to a diagnosis of type one diabetes. DKA symptoms of concern include a dry mouth, blood sugar levels greater than 240 mg/dL, strong thirst, and frequent urination. Without treatment, these symptoms can worsen into confusion, extreme fatigue, flushed skin, fruity-smelling breath, nausea, vomiting, stomach pain, and difficulty breathing. The most serious effects include swelling in the brain, loss of conscio Continue reading >>

Urine Test

Urine Test

Test Overview A urine test checks different components of urine, a waste product made by the kidneys. A regular urine test may be done to help find the cause of symptoms. The test can give information about your health and problems you may have. The kidneys take out waste material, minerals, fluids, and other substances from the blood to be passed in the urine. Urine has hundreds of different body wastes. What you eat and drink, how much you exercise, and how well your kidneys work can affect what is in your urine. More than 100 different tests can be done on urine. A regular urinalysis often includes the following tests: Color. Many things affect urine color, including fluid balance, diet, medicines, and diseases. How dark or light the color is tells you how much water is in it. Vitamin B supplements can turn urine bright yellow. Some medicines, blackberries, beets, rhubarb, or blood in the urine can turn urine red-brown. Clarity. Urine is normally clear. Bacteria, blood, sperm, crystals, or mucus can make urine look cloudy. Odor. Urine does not smell very strong, but it has a slightly "nutty" odor. Some diseases cause a change in the odor of urine. For example, an infection with E. coli bacteria can cause a bad odor, while diabetes or starvation can cause a sweet, fruity odor. Specific gravity. This checks the amount of substances in the urine. It also shows how well the kidneys balance the amount of water in urine. The higher the specific gravity, the more solid material is in the urine. When you drink a lot of fluid, your kidneys make urine with a high amount of water in it, which has a low specific gravity. When you do not drink fluids, your kidneys make urine with a small amount of water in it, which has a high specific gravity. pH. The pH is a measure of how acid Continue reading >>

Urine Test Types: Ph, Ketones, Proteins, And Cells

Urine Test Types: Ph, Ketones, Proteins, And Cells

Urine as a Diagnostic Tool A long time ago, disgusting as it may be, people used to actually taste and drink urine in order to try and diagnose a patient's disease! I'm not even kidding you. Thankfully, modern-day doctors do not have to resort to such disgusting and even dangerous methods. One of the reasons the doctor barbers of yesteryear used to drink their patient's urine was to see if it had a sweet taste, often indicative of diabetes mellitus. Finding the sweet-tasting glucose in the urine was covered in detail in another lesson, so we'll focus on other important measurements here instead. Interpreting Urine pH One value that can be measured in the urine is known as urine pH. pH is a measure of the acidity or alkalinity of a substance. If the pH is low, then it is acidic. If the pH is high, then it is basic, or alkaline. To remember which is which, I'll give you a little trick that has worked for me. If you grew up watching cartoons, you probably saw some comical ones where cartoonish robbers poured acid on the roof of a bank vault and waited while the acid ate its way downward into the vault, so the robbers could get down there to steal all the cash. If you can recall that acid likes to eat its way downward into things, then you'll remember that acidic substances go down the pH scale. That is to say, their pH numbers are lower than basic substances. Normal urine pH is roughly 4.6-8, with an average of 6. Urine pH can increase, meaning it will become more basic, or alkaline, due to: A urinary tract infection Kidney failure The administration of certain drugs such as sodium bicarbonate Vegetarian diets On the flip side, causes for a decreased, or acidic, urine pH, include: Metabolic or respiratory acidosis Diabetic ketoacidosis, a complication of diabetes mellitus Continue reading >>

Ketone Testing: What You Need To Know

Ketone Testing: What You Need To Know

What are ketones? Ketones are produced when the body burns fat for energy or fuel. They are also produced when you lose weight or if there is not enough insulin to help your body use sugar for energy. Without enough insulin, glucose builds up in the blood. Since the body is unable to use glucose for energy, it breaks down fat instead. When this occurs, ketones form in the blood and spill into the urine. These ketones can make you very sick. How can I test for ketones? You can test to see if your body is making any ketones by doing a simple urine test. There are several products available for ketone testing and they can be purchased, without a prescription, at your pharmacy. The test result can be negative, or show small, moderate, or large quantities of ketones. When should I test for ketones? Anytime your blood glucose is over 250 mg/dl for two tests in a row. When you are ill. Often illness, infections, or injuries will cause sudden high blood glucose and this is an especially important time to check for ketones. When you are planning to exercise and the blood glucose is over 250 mg/dl. If you are pregnant, you should test for ketones each morning before breakfast and any time the blood glucose is over 250 mg/dl. If ketones are positive, what does this mean? There are situations when you might have ketones without the blood glucose being too high. Positive ketones are not a problem when blood glucose levels are within range and you are trying to lose weight. It is a problem if blood glucose levels are high and left untreated. Untreated high blood glucose with positive ketones can lead to a life-threatening condition called diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA). What should I do if the ketone test is positive? Call your diabetes educator or physician, as you may need additional Continue reading >>

Emedicinehealth Medical Reference From Healthwise

Emedicinehealth Medical Reference From Healthwise

A A A Urine Test Test Overview A urine test checks different components of urine, a waste product made by the kidneys. A regular urine test may be done to help find the cause of symptoms. The test can give information about your health and problems you may have. The kidneys take out waste material, minerals, fluids, and other substances from the blood to be passed in the urine. Urine has hundreds of different body wastes. What you eat and drink, how much you exercise, and how well your kidneys work can affect what is in your urine. More than 100 different tests can be done on urine. A regular urinalysis often includes the following tests: Color. Many things affect urine color, including fluid balance, diet, medicines, and diseases. How dark or light the color is tells you how much water is in it. Vitamin B supplements can turn urine bright yellow. Some medicines, blackberries, beets, rhubarb, or blood in the urine can turn urine red-brown. Clarity. Urine is normally clear. Bacteria, blood, sperm, crystals, or mucus can make urine look cloudy. Odor. Urine does not smell very strong, but it has a slightly "nutty" odor. Some diseases cause a change in the odor of urine. For example, an infection with E. coli bacteria can cause a bad odor, while diabetes or starvation can cause a sweet, fruity odor. Specific gravity. This checks the amount of substances in the urine. It also shows how well the kidneys balance the amount of water in urine. The higher the specific gravity, the more solid material is in the urine. When you drink a lot of fluid, your kidneys make urine with a high amount of water in it, which has a low specific gravity. When you do not drink fluids, your kidneys make urine with a small amount of water in it, which has a high specific gravity. pH. The pH is Continue reading >>

Urine Tests During Pregnancy

Urine Tests During Pregnancy

Urine tests provide your doctor or midwife with important information about diseases or conditions that could potentially affect you or your growing baby. That's why at each prenatal visit, you'll be asked to give a urine sample as part of your regular exam. This sample is used to help determine if you have diabetes, kidney disease, or a bladder infection by measuring the levels of sugar, protein, bacteria, or other substances in your urine. The test is routine and painless and could prevent a lot of trouble down the road. What does a urine test involve? Urine can be collected any time of day. You will most likely be given a sterile cup to collect a sample before your exam. Before urinating, use a sterile towelette to wipe your genitals from front to back, and then release a small amount of urine into the toilet -- this prevents the sample from being contaminated with bacteria or other secretions that may invalidate the results. Put the container in your urine stream, and collect at least one to two ounces. This sample is then checked with chemically treated testing strips or sticks, and the results are usually available right away. If more analysis is necessary, your urine may be sent to a lab for additional assessment. What can a urine test detect? Sugar Typically, there is very little or no sugar (glucose) in urine during pregnancy. But when blood sugar levels in the body are too high, excess sugar can end up in the urine. This can be seen with gestational diabetes, a form of diabetes that only develops during pregnancy. It occurs when pregnancy hormones disrupt the body's ability to use insulin, a chemical that turns blood sugar into energy. A doctor often orders a blood test for diabetes early in your pregnancy if he or she knows you have other risk factors, like a Continue reading >>

More in ketosis