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What Does Hhs Stand For In Diabetes?

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====================== DISCLAIMER: THE AUTHOR DISCLAIMS ANY LIABILITY, LOSS, INJURY, OR DAMAGE INCURRED AS A CONSEQUENCE DIRECTLY OR INDIRECTLY OF THE USE AND APPLICATION OF ANY OF THE CONTENT AND MATERIAL CONTAINED IN THIS VIDEO. ALTHOUGH THE INFORMATION IN THIS VIDEO HAS BEEN CAREFULLY REVIEWED FOR CORRECTNESS, THE AUTHOR CANNOT ACCEPT ANY RESPONSIBILITY FOR ANY ERRORS OR OMISSIONS THAT MAY BE MADE. THE AUTHOR MAKES NO WARRANTY. EXPRESS OR IMPLIED. AS TO THE COMPLETENESS, CURRENCY OR ACCURACY OF THE CONTENTS OF THIS VIDEO. THE INFORMATION CONTAINED IN THIS VIDEO SHOULD NOT BE CONSTRUED AS SPECIFIC INSTRUCTIONS FOR INDIVIDUAL PATIENTS, MANUFACTURER'S PRODUCT INFORMATION AND PACKAGE INSERTS SHOULD BE REVIEWED FOR CURRENT INFORMATION. INCLUDING CONTRAINDICATIONS. DOSAGES. AND PRECAUTIONS.

Differentiating Diabetes Complications: Whats Your Call?

Differentiating diabetes complications: Whats your call? Author: Cynthia Ticker, RN, BSN, CDE, CPT Carlos Suarez, age 74, arrives at the emergency department by ambulance after collapsing at home. Emergency personnel report that he is confused and cant tell them what caused his collapse. His vital signs are temperature 102.4 F, respirations 22 breaths/minute, pulse 110 beats/minute, and blood pressure 90/60 mm Hg. He has dry mucous membranes, poor skin turgor, and bilateral wheezing in both lungs. A fingerstick blood glucose level reads high on the meter, indicating a value above 600 mg/dl. Mr. Suarezs wife states that she called 911 after finding her husband lying in the bedroom unresponsive. She says he has a history of hypertension, for which hes taking chlorothiazide (a thiazide diuretic), and hyperlipidemia, which he controls with atorvastatin. Two days ago, he finished a 5-day course of antibiotics prescribed for bronchitis. She also says her husband has been drinking fluidsand urinatingmore frequently than usual. STAT laboratory tests show a plasma glucose level of 1,050 mg/dl, plasma osmolarity above 320 mOsm/kg, serum sodium level below 120 mEq/L, serum potassium level of Continue reading >>

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  1. fhinix

    I have been following a ketogenic diet for the last 6 weeks. I even bought a ketone meter and my ketones measure 3.0 mmol on a fairly regular basis so I know that I am producing adequate ketones, but I am totally exhausted. I am on the verge of giving up. My macros are 83% fat, 3% carbs, and 14% protein. I am eating only moderate levels of protein, and my carbs are around 15 grams or below. I am having no fruit and no nuts. My carbs are only salad vegetables like kale, lettuce, spinach, or chives. Protein is mostly meat, eggs, and some cheese. Fat is coming from coconut oil, and ghee. I also am taking a teaspoon of salt twice a day to make sure that my sodium levels are adequate. I am not eating enough protein to disrupt ketosis as my ketone meter clearly indicates. My energy levels are extremely low, and I do not have increased mental clarity. Please help. I have been super strict and it does not appear to be working. I track my food daily in an online food log and I am very specific.
    Am I just one of those people that does not function well on a ketogenic diet? Any suggestions?

  2. FrenchFry

    What are you trying to achieve with this diet ?

  3. fhinix

    Stable energy and mental clarity. Still suffering with brain fog after 6 weeks.

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What is DIABETIC KETOACIDOSIS? What does DIABETIC KETOACIDOSIS mean? DIABETIC KETOACIDOSIS meaning - DIABETIC KETOACIDOSIS definition - DIABETIC KETOACIDOSIS explanation. Source: Wikipedia.org article, adapted under https://creativecommons.org/licenses/... license. SUBSCRIBE to our Google Earth flights channel - https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC6Uu... Diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) is a potentially life-threatening complication of diabetes mellitus. Signs and symptoms may include vomiting, abdominal pain, deep gasping breathing, increased urination, weakness, confusion, and occasionally loss of consciousness. A person's breath may develop a specific smell. Onset of symptoms is usually rapid. In some cases people may not realize they previously had diabetes. DKA happens most often in those with type 1 diabetes, but can also occur in those with other types of diabetes under certain circumstances. Triggers may include infection, not taking insulin correctly, stroke, and certain medications such as steroids. DKA results from a shortage of insulin; in response the body switches to burning fatty acids which produces acidic ketone bodies. DKA is typically diagnosed when testing finds high blood sugar, low blood pH, and ketoacids in either the blood or urine. The primary treatment of DKA is with intravenous fluids and insulin. Depending on the severity, insulin may be given intravenously or by injection under the skin. Usually potassium is also needed to prevent the development of low blood potassium. Throughout treatment blood sugar and potassium levels should be regularly checked. Antibiotics may be required in those with an underlying infection. In those with severely low blood pH, sodium bicarbonate may be given; however, its use is of unclear benefit and typically not recommended. Rates of DKA vary around the world. About 4% of people with type 1 diabetes in United Kingdom develop DKA a year, while in Malaysia the condition affects about 25% a year. DKA was first described in 1886 and, until the introduction of insulin therapy in the 1920s, it was almost universally fatal. The risk of death with adequate and timely treatment is currently around 1–4%. Up to 1% of children with DKA develop a complication known as cerebral edema. The symptoms of an episode of diabetic ketoacidosis usually evolve over a period of about 24 hours. Predominant symptoms are nausea and vomiting, pronounced thirst, excessive urine production and abdominal pain that may be severe. Those who measure their glucose levels themselves may notice hyperglycemia (high blood sugar levels). In severe DKA, breathing becomes labored and of a deep, gasping character (a state referred to as "Kussmaul respiration"). The abdomen may be tender to the point that an acute abdomen may be suspected, such as acute pancreatitis, appendicitis or gastrointestinal perforation. Coffee ground vomiting (vomiting of altered blood) occurs in a minority of people; this tends to originate from erosion of the esophagus. In severe DKA, there may be confusion, lethargy, stupor or even coma (a marked decrease in the level of consciousness). On physical examination there is usually clinical evidence of dehydration, such as a dry mouth and decreased skin turgor. If the dehydration is profound enough to cause a decrease in the circulating blood volume, tachycardia (a fast heart rate) and low blood pressure may be observed. Often, a "ketotic" odor is present, which is often described as "fruity", often compared to the smell of pear drops whose scent is a ketone. If Kussmaul respiration is present, this is reflected in an increased respiratory rate.....

Diabetic Ketoacidosis And Hyperglycaemic Hyperosmolar State

The hallmark of diabetes is a raised plasma glucose resulting from an absolute or relative lack of insulin action. Untreated, this can lead to two distinct yet overlapping life-threatening emergencies. Near-complete lack of insulin will result in diabetic ketoacidosis, which is therefore more characteristic of type 1 diabetes, whereas partial insulin deficiency will suppress hepatic ketogenesis but not hepatic glucose output, resulting in hyperglycaemia and dehydration, and culminating in the hyperglycaemic hyperosmolar state. Hyperglycaemia is characteristic of diabetic ketoacidosis, particularly in the previously undiagnosed, but it is the acidosis and the associated electrolyte disorders that make this a life-threatening condition. Hyperglycaemia is the dominant feature of the hyperglycaemic hyperosmolar state, causing severe polyuria and fluid loss and leading to cellular dehydration. Progression from uncontrolled diabetes to a metabolic emergency may result from unrecognised diabetes, sometimes aggravated by glucose containing drinks, or metabolic stress due to infection or intercurrent illness and associated with increased levels of counter-regulatory hormones. Since diabetic Continue reading >>

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  1. FrankUnderWood

    Hi,
    I have started out for the third and final time on Keto on Monday.
    My weight has dropped 3 pounds in 4 days, but the Keto sticks are not changing colour (only started yesterday using them).
    How long does it take the average person to get into Ketsosis, I know there are a lot of variables to consider but I was wondering what people’s experience is?
    Before when I did this, the sticks were changing colour after 3 days.
    Thanks

    F

  2. VLC.MD

    Focus on the process and the results will happen. Test your urine 2/week

  3. Jacob4Jesus

    FrankUnderWood:
    How long does it take the average person to get into Ketsosis, I know there are a lot of variables to consider but I was wondering what people’s experience is?
    The average person (someone who is insulin sensitive) could be in ketosis when they get up every morning.
    I started casually and it took about 2 days for me to get the first symptoms of carb withdrawal.

    –Jacob

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DKA (Diabetic Ketoacidosis) Vs HHNS (Hyperosmolar Hyperglycemic Nonketotic Syndrome) Tables From Step Up to Medicine (3rd Edition, Agabegi) Here is the link for the Quick Hits =) http://imgur.com/TnJPBmu

Diabetic Hyperglycemic Hyperosmolar Syndrome

HHS is a condition of: Extremely high blood sugar (glucose) level Extreme lack of water (dehydration) Decreased alertness or consciousness (in many cases) Buildup of ketones in the body (ketoacidosis) may also occur. But it is unusual and is often mild compared with diabetic ketoacidosis. HHS is more often seen in people with type 2 diabetes who don't have their diabetes under control. It may also occur in those who have not been diagnosed with diabetes. The condition may be brought on by: Infection Other illness, such as heart attack or stroke Medicines that decrease the effect of insulin in the body Medicines or conditions that increase fluid loss Normally, the kidneys try to make up for a high glucose level in the blood by allowing the extra glucose to leave the body in the urine. But this also causes the body to lose water. If you do not drink enough water, or you drink fluids that contain sugar and keep eating foods with carbohydrates, the kidneys may become overwhelmed. When this occurs, they are no longer able to get rid of the extra glucose. As a result, the glucose level in your blood can become very high. The loss of water also makes the blood more concentrated than norma Continue reading >>

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  1. DrewChan

    Im just doing usual pork chops beans and gemsquash - with some protein shake to top it off

  2. DJ...

    So my first cup of coffee in months is a cup of butter coffee, no sugar.
    It is delicious...

  3. SlinkyMike

    Originally Posted by DJ...
    So my first cup of coffee in months is a cup of butter coffee, no sugar.
    It is delicious... If the milk is stretched correctly then lactose is broken down to glucose during that process. There is also the issue of texture and how the tongue is coated by the milk...
    Bottom line though: This is why a properly prepared sugar free flat white should have a sweetness to it.

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