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What Does Dka Feel Like

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The Causes Of High Blood Sugar

Glucose, or sugar, is the body's main fuel source. That means your body — including your brain — needs glucose to work properly. But even though we need glucose for energy, too much glucose in the blood can be unhealthy. What Is Hyperglycemia? Hyperglycemia (say: hi-per-gly-SEE-me-uh) is the medical word for high blood sugar levels. The hormone insulin is supposed to control the level of glucose in the blood. But someone with diabetes doesn't make enough insulin — or the insulin doesn't work properly — so too much sugar can get into the blood and make the person sick. If you have high blood sugar levels, you may need treatment to lower your blood sugar. Your parents and your diabetes health care team will tell you what your blood sugar levels should be and what to do if they get too high. Managing diabetes is like a three-way balancing act because you have to watch: the medicines you take (insulin or pills) the food that you eat the amount of exercise you get All three need to be balanced. If any one of these is off, blood sugar levels can be, too. Your parents and doctor can help you with this balancing act. In general, higher than normal blood glucose levels can be caused Continue reading >>

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  1. elbruce

    Stages of DKA/Any Personal Experiences?

    After 19.5 years of Type 1 diabetes I should probably know everything about DKA but thankfully up to this point I have avoided any hint of DKA so out of sight, out of mind! I of course know the basics, the danger signs, symptoms etc. but the basic info does not tell you a lot about the progression, stages, etc. so in my mind my takeaways were "don't stay high too long, take your insulin, if you are high stay hydrated,"....good to go right?
    So yesterday around 4 AM my blood sugar started to rocket up after being normal for most of the night. Took a bolus to bring it down and when I woke around 6 my CGM said 250 but tested my blood sugar, it was 190. A little annoyed as my bolus should have brought this down but good enough to continue with my plan so I went for a 30 min run. After exercise it came down to about 150, I was happy so I did not think too much of it.
    Got it the car, ate two pieces of toast, and on my drive to work (45 minutes) my blood sugar started to rocket up! Gave myself a large bolus to bring it down and by the time I got to work it still was climbing higher and higher (over 400). Changed my infusion site (it was leaking so I probably was getting very little insulin), gave myself a bolus with a needle, drank a lot of water and just tried to focus on work. Started to come down very slowly but it was coming down and around 1230 I was down to about 150 around the same time I started feeling physically ill (lots of nausea, threw up once, lethargic) and that is when it hit me, could it be DKA? Since my blood sugar was not too bad I did not feel I was in immediate danger but I read that DKA can change your blood chemistry so I was a little worried about any cascading effects. My body felt awful, I just threw up, my stomach was upset, I didn't feel like eating. I forced myself to eat my modest lunch and closely monitored but still didn't feel good for most of the day and I left work about an hour early.
    I rode it out and I was fine but the experience just got me thinking. Has anyone ever experienced DKA? How fast did it come on? Any noticeable stages? Just curious about any personal experiences. Read that DKA can happen fast but when you are possibly experiencing it, it still surprised me at the speed of it. Don't know if I was actually experiencing DKA but it certainly seems plausible! Thoughts?

  2. Nicoletti

    Sorry, no personal experience here, but vomiting can be an early sign. And yes, DKA will change your blood chemistry to the point of metabolic acidosis. Too much acidosis is not compatible with life -- very serious stuff!
    Do you have urine keto strips? You can check ketones with them if your blood sugar is high.

  3. coravh

    I've been on the verge twice in my 50 years of D. The first time was when I was about 16 or so and I'd had the flu. One of those horrible ones making the rounds that was killing some of the elderly that caught it. I was vomiting for 3 days and on day 3 it started getting worse, rather than better (keep in mind that this was in the 70s, so horrible insulins and no home testing) so my Mom took me to the hospital. They said my blood chemistry was just starting to go "off". The second time was when I had peritonitis (so got really sick, really fast) and went to hospital in the morning. Again, this was in the days before lantus. I took my morning shot of N, and went to the ER. By midnight they had given me no insulin, hadn't tested my blood sugar in 6 hours (the nurse was refusing to) and so I called home to get my insulin. The next morning a young resident cheerfully told me that I had "been on the verge of DKA, but we saved you!!!!". I informed her that they were the ones that had pushed me there.
    As far as for myself, I know coming close I have always been pretty ill before I got close to the edge. So if you are taking a reasonable amount of insulin and still feel ok, I suspect that DKA is the last thing you need to worry about. Especially if you can keep fluids down along with your bg.
    I really doubt if you were experiencing DKA. Don't forget, the K stands for Keto (acidosis). So you have to have rampaging ketones that acidify your blood. It's not a single day process, especially with insulin on board.
    Cora

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DKA diabetic ketoacidosis nursing management pathophysiology & treatment. DKA is a complication of diabetes mellitus and mainly affects type 1 diabetics. DKA management includes controlling hyperglycemia, ketosis, and acdidosis. Signs & Symptoms include polyuria, polydipsia, hyperglycemia greater than 300 mg/dL, Kussmaul breathing, acetone breath, and ketones in the urine. Typically DKA treatment includes: intravenous fluids, insulin therapy (IV regular insulin), and electrolyte replacement. This video details what the nurse needs to know for the NCLEX exam about diabetic ketoacidosis. I also touch on DKA vs HHS (diabetic ketoacidosis and hyperosmolar hyperglycemic nonketotic syndrome (please see the other video for more details). Quiz on DKA: http://www.registerednursern.com/diab... Lecture Notes for this video: http://www.registerednursern.com/diab... Diabetes NCLEX Review Videos: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list... Subscribe: http://www.youtube.com/subscription_c... Nursing School Supplies: http://www.registerednursern.com/the-... Nursing Job Search: http://www.registerednursern.com/nurs... Visit our website RegisteredNurseRN.com for free quizzes, nursing care plans, salary

Diabetic Ketoacidosis (dka)

Topic Overview What is diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA)? Diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) is a life-threatening condition that develops when cells in the body are unable to get the sugar (glucose) they need for energy because there is not enough insulin. When the sugar cannot get into the cells, it stays in the blood. The kidneys filter some of the sugar from the blood and remove it from the body through urine. Because the cells cannot receive sugar for energy, the body begins to break down fat and muscle for energy. When this happens, ketones, or fatty acids, are produced and enter the bloodstream, causing the chemical imbalance (metabolic acidosis) called diabetic ketoacidosis. What causes DKA? Ketoacidosis can be caused by not getting enough insulin, having a severe infection or other illness, becoming severely dehydrated, or some combination of these things. It can occur in people who have little or no insulin in their bodies (mostly people with type 1 diabetes but it can happen with type 2 diabetes, especially children) when their blood sugar levels are high. What are the symptoms? Your blood sugar may be quite high before you notice symptoms, which include: Flushed, hot, dry skin. Blur Continue reading >>

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  1. v_prediabetic

    my mom was an insulin dependent type 2 (maybe LADA?). at the end of her life she was on hospice care and did not receive insulin. just a little food and water and morphine until she wouldn't open her mouth anymore. then she just had a glazed look with her eyes open. she wasn't getting any food, so maybe she wasn't in DKA. are there any special considerations for insulin dependent diabetics during the hospice/palliative care stage? is there anything different that needs to be done to ease their suffering?

  2. Rphil2

    I have had a parent (my mom), a type 1, in hospice. She was not there long. Basically what you experienced is very similar to what my mom experienced in 1986. mom did come from ICU to hospice and he stay in ICU was definitely like what you experienced.

    rick

  3. Holger

    A person with fully developed T1 Diabetes has lost most of its beta cell mass due to an autoimmune process that killed the cells. LADA is Type 1 Diabetes with the exception that the autoimmune process has a less aggressive progression. Usually LADA patients can preserve residual beta cells for a longer period of time. Only a full panel of very specific lab tests can identify the exact type of diabetes. Even T2 patients can loose much of their beta cells due to exhaustion. If a person has less insulin than needed then exogenous insulin is the only choice. Metformin can help to moderate the glucose output of the liver to lower levels. But it can not replace the functionality of insulin. The body needs insulin to have access to carbohydrate based energy sources. Without insulin the body will convert body fat and muscles to energy. This process is very exhausting and creates many unwanted side products like ketones. These will accumulate in the blood creating a very dangerous condition called DKA. Usually these patients and their rooms have a strong acetonic smell due to the ketones. A patient in the hospice should receive at least the basal insulin to prevent DKA. Otherwise it would be a form of neglect. I very much hope your mother did not have to suffer from the decision of the hospice.

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Get clarity on DKA (diabetic ketoacidosis) with memorable illustrations from Dr. Seheult. See the DKA series free at http://www.medcram.com. This video is part of the "MedCram Remastered" series: A video we've re-edited & sped up to make learning even more efficient. This is video 1 of 2 on diabetic ketoacidosis (pathophysiology and signs of diabetic ketoacidosis / DKA): 0:08 DKA stats 0:47 DKA - cellular anatomy 1:00 mitochondria 1:48 beta-oxidation 2:30 insulin function 3:08 pyruvate 3:19 diabetes mellitus type 1 3:26 diabetes mellitus type 2 4:48 ketone bodies (acetone, acetoacetate, b-hydroxybutyrate) 6:09 carboxylic acid 6:23 conjugate base (anion gap acidosis) 7:38 beta-oxidation 8:17 DKA review 8:57 diabetic ketoacidosis - hyperkalemia 9:37 diabetic ketoacidosis - dehydration 9:50 osmotic diuresis 10:10 dehydration 10:27 diabetic ketoacidosis - potassium effects 11:04 diabetic ketoacidosis - Cr elevation / renal failure 11:30 anion gap metabolic acidosis 12:09 measuring ketone bodies (serum ketones, b-hydroxybutyrate) Visit https://www.MedCram.com for part 2 of this course (on DKA treatment) and over 100 lectures. This is the home for ALL MedCram.com medical videos (many med

Diabetic Ketoacidosis (dka)

Topic Overview Diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) is a life-threatening condition that develops when cells in the body are unable to get the sugar (glucose) they need for energy because there is not enough insulin. When the sugar cannot get into the cells, it stays in the blood. The kidneys filter some of the sugar from the blood and remove it from the body through urine. Because the cells cannot receive sugar for energy, the body begins to break down fat and muscle for energy. When this happens, ketones, or fatty acids, are produced and enter the bloodstream, causing the chemical imbalance (metabolic acidosis) called diabetic ketoacidosis. Ketoacidosis can be caused by not getting enough insulin, having a severe infection or other illness, becoming severely dehydrated, or some combination of these things. It can occur in people who have little or no insulin in their bodies (mostly people with type 1 diabetes but it can happen with type 2 diabetes, especially children) when their blood sugar levels are high. Your blood sugar may be quite high before you notice symptoms, which include: Flushed, hot, dry skin. Blurred vision. Feeling thirsty and urinating a lot. Drowsiness or difficulty wak Continue reading >>

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Popular Questions

  1. elbruce

    Stages of DKA/Any Personal Experiences?

    After 19.5 years of Type 1 diabetes I should probably know everything about DKA but thankfully up to this point I have avoided any hint of DKA so out of sight, out of mind! I of course know the basics, the danger signs, symptoms etc. but the basic info does not tell you a lot about the progression, stages, etc. so in my mind my takeaways were "don't stay high too long, take your insulin, if you are high stay hydrated,"....good to go right?
    So yesterday around 4 AM my blood sugar started to rocket up after being normal for most of the night. Took a bolus to bring it down and when I woke around 6 my CGM said 250 but tested my blood sugar, it was 190. A little annoyed as my bolus should have brought this down but good enough to continue with my plan so I went for a 30 min run. After exercise it came down to about 150, I was happy so I did not think too much of it.
    Got it the car, ate two pieces of toast, and on my drive to work (45 minutes) my blood sugar started to rocket up! Gave myself a large bolus to bring it down and by the time I got to work it still was climbing higher and higher (over 400). Changed my infusion site (it was leaking so I probably was getting very little insulin), gave myself a bolus with a needle, drank a lot of water and just tried to focus on work. Started to come down very slowly but it was coming down and around 1230 I was down to about 150 around the same time I started feeling physically ill (lots of nausea, threw up once, lethargic) and that is when it hit me, could it be DKA? Since my blood sugar was not too bad I did not feel I was in immediate danger but I read that DKA can change your blood chemistry so I was a little worried about any cascading effects. My body felt awful, I just threw up, my stomach was upset, I didn't feel like eating. I forced myself to eat my modest lunch and closely monitored but still didn't feel good for most of the day and I left work about an hour early.
    I rode it out and I was fine but the experience just got me thinking. Has anyone ever experienced DKA? How fast did it come on? Any noticeable stages? Just curious about any personal experiences. Read that DKA can happen fast but when you are possibly experiencing it, it still surprised me at the speed of it. Don't know if I was actually experiencing DKA but it certainly seems plausible! Thoughts?

  2. Nicoletti

    Sorry, no personal experience here, but vomiting can be an early sign. And yes, DKA will change your blood chemistry to the point of metabolic acidosis. Too much acidosis is not compatible with life -- very serious stuff!
    Do you have urine keto strips? You can check ketones with them if your blood sugar is high.

  3. coravh

    I've been on the verge twice in my 50 years of D. The first time was when I was about 16 or so and I'd had the flu. One of those horrible ones making the rounds that was killing some of the elderly that caught it. I was vomiting for 3 days and on day 3 it started getting worse, rather than better (keep in mind that this was in the 70s, so horrible insulins and no home testing) so my Mom took me to the hospital. They said my blood chemistry was just starting to go "off". The second time was when I had peritonitis (so got really sick, really fast) and went to hospital in the morning. Again, this was in the days before lantus. I took my morning shot of N, and went to the ER. By midnight they had given me no insulin, hadn't tested my blood sugar in 6 hours (the nurse was refusing to) and so I called home to get my insulin. The next morning a young resident cheerfully told me that I had "been on the verge of DKA, but we saved you!!!!". I informed her that they were the ones that had pushed me there.
    As far as for myself, I know coming close I have always been pretty ill before I got close to the edge. So if you are taking a reasonable amount of insulin and still feel ok, I suspect that DKA is the last thing you need to worry about. Especially if you can keep fluids down along with your bg.
    I really doubt if you were experiencing DKA. Don't forget, the K stands for Keto (acidosis). So you have to have rampaging ketones that acidify your blood. It's not a single day process, especially with insulin on board.
    Cora

  4. -> Continue reading
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