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What Does Alcohol Do To Ketosis

The Ketogains Guide To Alcohol

The Ketogains Guide To Alcohol

The Ketogains Guide To Alcohol: What to drink; When to drink, How to drink, And how it affects ketosis. You can drink alcohol in moderation on a Ketogenic Diet as long as you don't have a medical condition that would prohibit you from doing so. Alcoholic drinks DO have calories, and they come from alcohol (at 7 kcals per gram) and from carbs (at 4 kcals per gram). Your body does not have the ability to store the calories from alcohol itself, but it will store the energy from the food ingested along with it. Your body WILL metabolize alcohol before any other source of energy. So while you are metabolizing calories from alcohol, you are NOT metabolizing those from fat. To stay on track with your dietary goals, find out the caloric content of your drink, divide it by 9, then deduct this from your allowed fat grams of the day. Anecdotally, ketosis may lower your alcohol tolerance (1) so you could get drunk faster, there are some theories about the whys (2) but nothing conclusive. Alcohol also dehydrates you, so drink a glass of water along with each alcoholic beverage you consume. Not all alcohol is the same: alcohol is the product of sugar fermented by yeast. Depending on the type of sugar used, you get different kinds of alcoholic beverages with different alcohol and carb content. Straight Liquors are basically zero carb, so mix any of them with water, club soda, or diet sodas to keep them carb free. Pro-Tip: if you use Tonic, make sure it is a sugar free version so it does not contain sugar and carbs! Other liquors such as Amaretto, Jägermeister, Grand Marnier, Curacao, Sweet Vermouth, Limoncello, etc. (basically anything with a hint of sweet) usually contain sugars, so you better avoid them entirely. Although wine is made from grapes and logic dictates it should be hig Continue reading >>

Drinking Alcohol On The Ketogenic Diet

Drinking Alcohol On The Ketogenic Diet

On a ketogenic diet, you train your body to begin using fats for energy rather than carbohydrates. This is also known as a state of ketosis which is indicated by the production of a by-product called ketones. What happens to ketone levels when you introduce alcohol into the mix? Interestingly enough, our bodies treat alcohol like any carbohydrate, in that it is sent to the front of the line to be used as energy. While your body burns calories from the alcohol you consumed, ketosis will be "paused." You won't get kicked out and have to reinitiate it, but ketone production will momentarily cease while your body burns the alcohol. Effects of Drinking and Caution One of the best features of ketogenic dieting is that you can easily drink alcohol in moderation without setting your diet goals back. There are a few things you should remember when drinking alcohol while in ketosis: Ketogenic dieters experience notoriously bad hangovers. Stay hydrated by drinking plenty of water in between drinks. While drinking liquor won't ruin your diet, all things in moderation. Excess carbohydrates and calories will still slow down your weight loss, so make sure you keep drinking to a minimum when possible. Don't forget to consider mixers when calculating your carb counts. Use diet sodas and artificially sweetened juices instead of their full-carbohydrate counterparts. Don't let alcohol affect your willpower! The intoxicating effects may tempt you to stray from your diet, but don't eat those french fries! Try to have some low carb snacks lined up that you can resort to when you get hungry. Below are a few of the most popular types of alcohol, along with their calorie and carbohydrate counts. Have fun and be safe! Calories and Carbohydrates in Liquor (1 oz.) Alcohol Name Calories (kcal) Carbo Continue reading >>

Keto Diet Alcohol Rules: What To Drink, What To Avoid

Keto Diet Alcohol Rules: What To Drink, What To Avoid

Boy, doesn’t that bottle of wine above look like it’s ominously laying in a casket? Alcohol is infamously known as the fourth macronutrient. If you enjoy a drink or two but aren’t sure if that fits into the keto diet alcohol guidelines, let’s shed some light on the keto diet alcohol rules so you can make an informed decision about what’s best for your goals. Let’s not sugar coat this: When you drink alcohol, your body is getting the signal that there is a toxic substance present. It will then send all it’s resources to the liver to process the toxin as quickly as possible, taking resources from other processes, one of which, is fat oxidation (re: ketone production). This means drinking alcohol slows ketone production. It’s true that partying looks a little different when you’re keto. Some people consider it (or rationalize it) that it’s their cheat meal. There are some legitimate concerns when it comes to consuming alcohol on a ketogenic diet. Here are some of the biggest things to keep in mind before reaching for your next drink. Keto Diet Alcohol Rules: What to Avoid and Why Let’s first acknowledge that not all alcoholic drinks are created equal. Of course, alcohol (ethanol) the molecule itself, is always the same. Yeast acts on a sugar compound to make both carbon dioxide and the alcohol. But the type of sugar compound used and the type of drink mixture is what determines how your body uses the alcohol. For example, let’s look at beer. It’s made from barley, hops, yeast, and water. Barley is the main ingredient broken down to the sugar maltose, which is what the yeast acts on. Beer is a dangerous drink for those going keto because the process leaves it rich in carbohydrates, which can stop or slow ketosis. In the same vein, some other drinks Continue reading >>

Ketogenic Diet And Alcohol Effects On Ketosis Is It Keto Friendly?

Ketogenic Diet And Alcohol Effects On Ketosis Is It Keto Friendly?

Ok, first thing is first, before we get into the Ketogenic diet and alcohol’s effect on ketosis; that is most western cultures drink far too much. Now I know most people (those on a keto diet included) don’t want to hear that, and I’m not trying to be a party-pooper, but I’m here to tell you the truth as I know it, not to tell you what you want to hear. Anyway, there’s a little room for debate depending on how you read the evidence on whether there’s room in a Ketogenic Diet for alcohol and whether alcohol will throw you out of ketosis, it may or may not, but there are certainly side effects to be aware of, some very dangerous. Ketogenic Diet and Alcohol Effects on Ketosis I’ve read quite a few articles and forums about keto and alcohol and almost all of them dance around it looking for some loophole in the figures to squeeze in some amount of alcohol. Many try to satisfy the vast majority who think giving away alcohol on a keto diet will be a deal breaker. They all try hard I have to say. Let’s be real, if you’re dying to fit alcohol into your ketogenic diet and it’s a must have for you, I doubt the small amount that could possibly fit in will satisfy you. Here are a few things to consider if you’re to drink alcohol while trying to maintain a keto diet: You will undoubtedly get drunk much quicker on a ketogenic diet than if you weren’t. Hangovers will be worse, as you know a keto diet flushes your body of water retention and the chances that you’ll be staying hydrated while drinking is slim, alcohol is notorious for dehydrating you. Even if alcohol itself doesn’t kick you out of ketosis, when tipsy self-control goes out the window, you’re likely to eat whatever is in front of you. If you are determined to include alcohol in your ketogenic Continue reading >>

Alcohol

Alcohol

Another very common question asked by those new to a Zero Carb diet is: Can I Drink Alcohol on a Zero Carb Diet? There have been many posts about this subject in the Facebook group Zeroing in on Health. I have selected some of the best comments from these discussions and posted them here for easy reference. While occasional or even moderate consumption of dry, non-sweet alcohol might be okay for some people. Those who are new to a Zero Carb diet are strongly encouraged to abstain from it during their initial 30-Day trial. Once you have a clear baseline of how you feel on just meat and water, then you can easily test out other things like dairy or alcohol and get a much better idea of how your body is personally affected by them. … Dr. Paul Mabry: I’m a retired MD with years of low carb ketogenic blogging experience. I’m day 6 on this new and from all my research intuitively beautiful way of eating. There have been some questions about alcohol so I wanted to post this short answer on the basic science of alcohol in layman’s terms which apply equally to low carb and zero carb: Moderate alcohol can be accommodated on the diet. Alcohol is metabolized exclusively in the liver and does not stimulate the release of Insulin which is the big enemy of people like me who suffer from the metabolic syndrome. Things to know if you’re going to drink alcohol is that many forms contain carbs that can torpedo any weight loss. The worst offenders are beers, even lite ones, sweet wines though all wines contain carbs the dry ones contain the least and some drinks like hard cider and lemonade are as bad as drinking Coke. You will have to count carbs if you consume these. Drinks like Rum, Scotch, Whiskey and Vodka have zero carbs if you drink them with water. However, Scotch and Whi Continue reading >>

Does Alcohol Stop Ketosis?

Does Alcohol Stop Ketosis?

Does alcohol stop ketosis? What happens if you eat more fat than your body needs? And will a slightly higher carb intake kick you out of ketosis? Get the answers in this week’s Q&A with Dr. Andreas Eenfeldt: Alcohol stopping ketosis? We are trying to get into ketosis and measuring blood ketones which seem to be sitting around 1.0 mmol/L. We have adjusted and readjusted our protein and carb amounts to be within the limits you suggest. Last night I had three vodkas – being no-carb alcohol, can this still affect ketosis levels or would we be doing something else wrong? Thank you, Meg Alcohol should not have any major effect on ketosis, as long as it’s no-carb alcohol like vodka (without sweet ingredients in a drink of course). If anything, pure alcohol tends to somewhat increase ketosis. For best results choose low-carb alcoholic drinks like wine or other low-carb drinks, see the guide below. Also note that many people get more sensitive to alcohol on a ketogenic diet. Be careful and never drink and drive, this is especially true on keto. Best, Andreas Eenfeldt If I eat more fat than my body needs for fuel, what happens to the excess? I understand that if one eats more carbs (glucose) and/or protein than one’s body can immediately use, the excess can be stored as fat. What happens to dietary fat if one eats more of it than can be used? Is it, too, stored, or does the body excrete it? Kathleen It’s mostly stored, though there may be a slight increase in calories burned on low carb. Don’t eat when you’re not hungry, and this should not really be an issue on a low-carb diet, as fat is very satiating. Best, Andreas Eenfeldt Will going moderate low carb >50 carbs turn brain back to using carbs for fuel instead of ketones? I think I need to up carbs for energy. I e Continue reading >>

Pruvit Ketogenic Diet Plan: Foods To Eat & Avoid While Drinking Keto Os

Pruvit Ketogenic Diet Plan: Foods To Eat & Avoid While Drinking Keto Os

088.8KSHARES Share to FacebookFacebookFacebookShare to PinterestPinterestPinterestShare to PrintPrintPrintShare to MoreAddthisMore Keto OS and Keto Max from Pruvit provide exogenous ketones. Maximize your ketone levels with a ketogenic diet approved food list. What is Ketosis? Explore the health benefits of ketosis for accelerated fat loss, disease prevention, better brain function, appetite control, performance, and more. Ketosis can often be a misunderstood subject. Some think it is part of a starvation diet or a alarming sign that something has gone wrong in your metabolism. But this is simply not the truth! You see, ketones – contrary to popular belief and myth – are a much needed and essential healing energy source in our cells that come from the normal metabolism of fat. Have you ever heard someone say that fats are “evil”? This has become the standard way of thinking in today’s society, which has led to our primary energy source coming from carbohydrates – sugar AKA glucose. Most people eat a diet high in carbohydrates or glucose. When sugar is your body’s primary energy source, that sugar needs to be processed first in the cell soup before it can be passed into the energy factory of the cell- the mitochondrion. Energy sources from fat don’t require this processing; it goes directly into the mitochondria for energetic uses. That is, it is more complicated to create energy out of sugar than out of fat. The process of ketosis refers to the body’s ability to use fats as its primary source of energy, over glucose. “Carbohydrates are not required to obtain energy. Fat supplies more energy than a comparable amount of carbohydrate, and low-carbohydrate diets tend to make your system of producing energy more efficient. Furthermore, many organs prefer Continue reading >>

Ketosis & Alcohol, What Are The Impacts?

Ketosis & Alcohol, What Are The Impacts?

When on a ketogenic diet or other low carb diets there are many people asking if it is possible to combine ketosis and Alcohol. The simple answer is yes, you can stay in ketosis even though you drink alcohol but you need to be careful what kind of alcohol you drink. You can also not drink alcohol on a regular basis since it will impact your weight loss even though it does not take you out of ketosis. The main reason that alcohol will impact your ketosis is that the body is not able to store the alcohol that you consume. Instead it will start to metabolize the calories in the alcohol first before the body uses any other energy sources. This means that you will not use fat as your main energy source until the alcohol in the body has been used up. Still does not impact ketosis, but your weight loss results. Also when drinking alcohol on ketosis there are some kinds of alcohol that are better than others. Your first choice should be vodka, whiskey or other types of strong alcohol. They contain no or very little carbohydrates. If you do not like to drink strong alcohol then some dry wine is also quite okay. It contains some more carbohydrates but still okay now and then. Beer and other kinds of alcohol you should stay away from if you want to focus on your diet. To help you to know how many calories there are in different types of alcohol you can use this keto alcohol cheat sheet from dietketo.com Red Wines Based on 5oz or 1.5dL. Merlot: 3.7g carbohydrates and 120 calories Pinot Noir: 3.4g carbohydrates and 121 calories Cabernet: 3.8g carbohydrates and 120 calories White Wines Based on 5oz or 1.5dL. Chardonnay: 3.7g carbohydrates and 118 calories Riesling: 5.5g carbohydrates and 118 calories Sparkling whites: 1.5g carbohydrates and 96 calories Beer Based on 12oz or 3.5dL. Mi Continue reading >>

Alcohol On A Keto Diet: What Is Safe To Drink While In Ketosis?

Alcohol On A Keto Diet: What Is Safe To Drink While In Ketosis?

Can you drink alcohol on a keto diet? Yes. It’s okay if you like to go out on the town and party it up. A lot of us do. It’s a part of our lives that we don’t want to stop. But you’re on a keto diet and you know that alcohol isn’t necessarily part of your diet. Don’t hesitate to go out and have a good time just because you’re on a keto diet. You can go out. You can drink. You just have to be smart about your choices when you’re drinking. Note: If you’re just learning about the keto diet then check out our free Guide to the Ketogenic Diet. Alcohol on Keto Diet It may seem like a daunting task, but if you start watching everything you’re drinking, you won’t have to worry about your body getting out of ketosis. Your body will still be able to stay the fat burner it was meant to be. If you don’t keep a close eye on your drinking habits, then you will slip back into your old ways and your body will once again be just a sugar burner and you may slowly see the weight creeping back onto your body. Aren’t sure if your body is in ketosis? Here are 7 Signs You’re in Ketosis. The Breakdown When you drink alcohol, your body is going to start breaking it down immediately because your body sees it as toxic. Go figure. As soon as your body recognizes that alcohol has entered your system, it begins to metabolize it and break it down. When drinking alcohol in excess, you will probably find that your weight loss will start to slow down. It could even stall completely. This is something that you definitely don’t want to happen, especially when you’re starting to see a lot of results. I’m assuming that you are already in ketosis, so your body will start to feel the drinks quicker. Your body is used to burning fats first now, so when you add alcohol, your bo Continue reading >>

Ketogenic Diet And Alcohol

Ketogenic Diet And Alcohol

When it involves ketogenic dieting and consuming alcohol, there are lots of confusing and different opinions around, and it can drive you to make all sorts of mistakes. One of those difficult areas is how alcohol can fit in with a keto lifestyle. Hopefully, after you read this, you’ll have better knowledge after reading and then able to make sensible decisions on your ketogenic diet journey. Since just because you don’t consume carbs does not mean the end of a social life. You may be asking yourself can I drink alcohol on keto? The quick answer is of course. One way of thinking about it is to think of it as a once in a while treat the same as you would as eating a cheat meal. As long as you have no medical requirements that would otherwise forbid it, then it’s absolutely okay to consume alcohol in moderation while on a low-carb or keto diet. However, you must be conscious of all the carbohydrates you are drinking which is essentially empty calories. Alcohol slows Ketosis Consuming alcohol won’t kick you out of ketosis initially, but it will severely hamper any potential results. If unsure whether you are in ketosis see our post on how to tell if you’re in ketosis. Your body has no way of storing the energy in alcohol, so before your body can use other energy sources, you burn the calories in alcohol first. Alcohol is not stored as glycogen, so you are quickly back into lipolysis after the alcohol is processed. So, while you consume alcohol, everything in your body is on pause, and it’s not processing fats for energy. Weight loss is merely delayed not stopped. Most people when beginning a ketogenic diet will have to track their macronutrients to be sure to maintain ketosis. The main macros to track that provide us energy during the day are protein 4 calories Continue reading >>

Alcohol On A Low Carb, Keto Diet!

Alcohol On A Low Carb, Keto Diet!

For years, I’ve read countless dieting books that prohibited me from drinking alcohol. Actually, it’s probably the first thing that many “diet gurus” say to cut out of your diet and for (somewhat) good reason. Alcohol gets a bad reputation because it’s basically empty calories. In an ideal world, sure. I’ll give up alcohol to lose weight. But let’s get serious. I’m 23 years old and I very much enjoy a tasty alcoholic beverage (or 5) and a wild night out on the town with my friends. The beauty of a ketogenic, low carb diet is that you can still enjoy yourself from time-to-time with alcohol and still lose weight! However, there are some guidelines as to what alcohols you can enjoy and those you should avoid. Liquor On average, one shot is the equivalent to about 1.5oz and for these spirits have a nutritional value of 0 carbs and roughly 64 calories. Of course, this will vary depending on how much is actually in your beverage (order a double? Double the nutritional stats). Approved spirits on a keto, low carb diet include: Vodka (Three Olives, Absolut, Grey Goose, etc.) Rum (Captain Morgan, etc) Gin (Tanqueray, Beefeater, etc) Tequila Whiskey (Jack Daniel’s, etc.) Scotch Brandy Cognac (Hennessy, etc.) Please note that these are for the original, unflavored versions. For flavored spirits (including flavored vodkas and some dark/coconut rums), always check up on nutritional information before consuming as they often contain carbohydrates. My spirit of choice is generally a nice gin (with soda water& lime) or cognac (with diet cola). I’ve been known to drink a fair share of Hennessy. Chasers & Mixers For mixing or chasing, you have many no sugar, no calorie options Diet sodas (Coke Zero, Diet Coke, Diet Ginger Ale) Soda water Diet tonic water Seltzer water Continue reading >>

Transcript Of Episode 146: Can You Drink Wine And Stay In Ketosis?

Transcript Of Episode 146: Can You Drink Wine And Stay In Ketosis?

Meredith Dykstra: Welcome to Cellular Healing TV. I’m your host Meredith Dykstra and this is Episode Number 146, and we have Dr. Dan Pompa, our resident cellular healing specialist on the line. Today we have a very special guest, and his name is Todd White. Todd White is a wine expert and we have a lot of fun things to talk about. This is not your average wine that he makes. We’re going to talk a lot about wine today, but before we delve in, let me tell you guys a little bit more about Todd. Todd White has been a serial entrepreneur and creator since he was age 17. Today, after 15 years in the wine business, his life is dedicated to educating and helping people make better choices about food nutrition and how they think about consuming alcohol. He is the founder of Drive Farm Wine, a writer, speaker, and a leading authority on healthy organic natural wines, and the importance of micro-dosing alcohol for health, longevity, and vitality. Todd’s passion is unlocking the best way to enjoy alcohol, how to enjoy the benefits of modern consumption while avoiding the negative outcomes. Todd has been a featured guest on many of the nation’s leading health influential podcasts, including David Asbury, Bullet Proof Radio; Mark Sisson, Primal Blue Print; Abel James, Fat Burning Man; Rob Wolf’s, Paleo Solution; and Jimmy Moore, Living Low-carb Show. Todd is a self-described biohacker who practices daily meditation, Wim Hof breathing, cold thermogenesis, a ketogenic diet, intermittent fasting, and he is a fitness enthusiast. He’s also a frequent speaker on ketogenic lifestyle, and is completing a cookbook on the ketogenic diet and lifestyle to be released this fall called, Keto Well. He was most recently the featured ketogenic speaker at the 2016 Bulletproof annual confer Continue reading >>

The Ketogenic Diet And Alcohol

The Ketogenic Diet And Alcohol

Having a social life on a ketogenic diet is something that many find hard to do. There are carbs pretty much everywhere you look, and that’s especially the case when you’re in a bar. Cutting out all the beer and wine is a great start, but sticking with hard liquor is usually the best choice. Even though hard liquor is made from natural sugars, grains, potatoes, and fruits – during the fermentation and distillation process that sugar is converted into ethyl alcohol. Drinking liquor can in fact deepen your level of ketosis, but will slow weight loss down. Ingestion of alcohol has effects on liver metabolism, in which more ketones are produced as you drink more. When your liver is taking care of the alcohol you drink, it’s being converted to a triglyceride which can also positively affect the production of ketones. Be aware that many people experience a heightened level of being drunk and at a quicker rate than usual. While that may be a great thing for some, you need to be careful – especially if you’re driving. Do not drink and drive. Be very careful when on a ketogenic diet and consuming alcohol. There are plenty of people that also experience worse hangover while on a ketogenic diet, so make sure you stay hydrated. The typical advice is to drink 1 glass of water per 1 shot (or glass) of alcohol you drink. Below you’ll find short and quick versions of everything you can drink. Scroll down the page to read a more in-depth explanation on each low-carb alcohol and what you should commonly avoid. Here’s a short list on what you can drink when you want to consume low-carb alcohol. Try not to stray away too much from the suggested list, but if you want more options scroll down and you’ll see a much more comprehensive list (including brands and carb counts)! Continue reading >>

Sugar Alcohol Facts

Sugar Alcohol Facts

Sugar alcohol sweeteners (also known as polyols) usually contain less calories than regular sugar, and have virtually no impact on blood sugar and dental health. Sounds great, except for some disclaimers: since they can't be digested in the human digestive system, these sweeteners can cause gut issues such as flatulence, bloating and diarrhea. In addition, most of these sweeteners are excreted in the urine, which increases the amount and frequency of urination. This increased urination will result in a higher loss of body minerals such as calcium, magnesium and potassium and possibly cause muscle cramping. At higher intake amounts, this effect is more pronounced, and in rat studies, has resulted in changes in kidney function and structure. (See this reference: Nutrient Requirements of Laboratory Animals,: Fourth Revised Edition, 1995, page 22). Some people with blood sugar issues may experience blood sugar spikes after eating these sweeteners, but this is an individual response. Since all of these types of sugar substitutes contain some calories and carbs, be sure to count them into your daily totals if you are on a low carb diet plan. Below is an overview of the most common sugar alcohol sweeteners: Erythritol Erythritol has about 3/4 the sweetening power as regular sugar, with only a tenth of the calories. One cup of erythritol contains about 10 grams of carbohydrate, and 40 calories. This sugar alcohol is best used in conjunction with other sugar substitutes such as stevia, sucralose and glycerin. Lauren over at the Healthy Indulgences Blog suggests using erythritol in desserts which are of a moist consistency for best results, since erythritol does not attract moisture as regular sugar and some other sweeteners do. Hence, it has a tendency to dry out the foods to wh Continue reading >>

7 Things You Need To Know About Alcohol And The Keto Diet

7 Things You Need To Know About Alcohol And The Keto Diet

Clay Rattenbury started the keto diet in 2014 because he wanted to lose weight. And it worked. He took 70 lbs (32 kg) off his 6’1′ (185 cm) frame in six months. During that time he drank alcohol every day — straight vodka, or vodka mixed with diet coke, often until he blacked out. Still, the weight came off. He actually liked the fact that the ketogenic diet lowered his alcohol tolerance: he’d get drunk faster. About six months into his keto journey, however, Rattenbury knew alcohol was causing too much havoc in his life, harming his health and hurting people he loved. He had to stop drinking. “I realized the way I ate and the way I consumed alcohol were very similar. Once I started I couldn’t stop. It was hard for me to do anything in moderation,” says Rattenbury, 28, who is in the US Navy. He has been sober now for 2.5 years and on the keto diet for three years (except for 8 weeks in Navy boot camp). He feels wonderful, both because of his diet and his sobriety. He is a lean, muscular 185 lbs (84 kg) and feels fit, strong and clear-headed. He enjoys working out regularly. The cravings for both his trigger foods and for alcohol are gone. He sees the two as being very closely related. And he will not risk, ever, bringing up those cravings again. “A few potato chips from time-to-time might not kick me out of ketosis, but it could very well awaken the cravings in me… so that saves me from taking the first bite. And I stay away from alcohol entirely. It is not worth taking a single sip, knowing where my mind goes when I drink.” Alcohol consumption and the keto diet is a hot topic. Many people who want to shed pounds come to ketogenic eating and are delighted that, unlike almost all diets, alcohol is not strictly forbidden when going low carb/high fat. W Continue reading >>

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