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What Does Alcohol Do To Ketosis

7 Things You Need To Know About Alcohol And The Keto Diet

7 Things You Need To Know About Alcohol And The Keto Diet

Clay Rattenbury started the keto diet in 2014 because he wanted to lose weight. And it worked. He took 70 lbs (32 kg) off his 6’1′ (185 cm) frame in six months. During that time he drank alcohol every day — straight vodka, or vodka mixed with diet coke, often until he blacked out. Still, the weight came off. He actually liked the fact that the ketogenic diet lowered his alcohol tolerance: he’d get drunk faster. About six months into his keto journey, however, Rattenbury knew alcohol was causing too much havoc in his life, harming his health and hurting people he loved. He had to stop drinking. “I realized the way I ate and the way I consumed alcohol were very similar. Once I started I couldn’t stop. It was hard for me to do anything in moderation,” says Rattenbury, 28, who is in the US Navy. He has been sober now for 2.5 years and on the keto diet for three years (except for 8 weeks in Navy boot camp). He feels wonderful, both because of his diet and his sobriety. He is a lean, muscular 185 lbs (84 kg) and feels fit, strong and clear-headed. He enjoys working out regularly. The cravings for both his trigger foods and for alcohol are gone. He sees the two as being very closely related. And he will not risk, ever, bringing up those cravings again. “A few potato chips from time-to-time might not kick me out of ketosis, but it could very well awaken the cravings in me… so that saves me from taking the first bite. And I stay away from alcohol entirely. It is not worth taking a single sip, knowing where my mind goes when I drink.” Alcohol consumption and the keto diet is a hot topic. Many people who want to shed pounds come to ketogenic eating and are delighted that, unlike almost all diets, alcohol is not strictly forbidden when going low carb/high fat. W Continue reading >>

Alcohol And Ketosis | Alcohol And Ketosis Diet And Weight Loss

Alcohol And Ketosis | Alcohol And Ketosis Diet And Weight Loss

There’s something called a ketogenic diet that a lot more people are relying on as a way to lose weight, particularly recently. So what is the ketogenic diet, what is ketosis, and what is the relationship between alcohol and the ketosis diet and weight loss? Below are some of the things to know about the ketogenic diet and alcohol and ketosis. Before looking at the specifics of alcohol and ketosis, what is ketosis in general? Ketosis is a term that refers to a metabolic process that your body regularly goes through. When you don’t have the glucose you need to fuel your body with energy, you’ll instead go into a mode where you’re burning stored fats. When this happens, ketones, which are a build-up of acids, are in the body. The belief with the ketogenic diet is that you can encourage your body to go into that state of ketosis or fat-burning by following a certain diet, which is low-carb. You’re basically forcing your body to eliminate fat because that’s what it’s using for energy instead of carbs. The state of ketosis frequently occurs in people with diabetes, and while it’s a normal process, some extremes are possible. If you have extreme ketosis, you’re more likely to have type 1 diabetes, as an example. If your ketone levels rise too much, it can cause your acid level in your blood to similarly rise, which can cause a condition called ketoacidosis. This can be deadly. Your body typically primarily uses glucose as energy, such as from sugary or starchy foods, but if there’s not enough of this glucose your body will then go to breaking down your stores of fat. The ketogenic diet is also called a low-carb diet, or a keto diet. It’s based on a concept of eating primarily fats, and a reduced amount of carbohydrates. While it’s relatively popular, t Continue reading >>

Atkins Diet & Red Wine

Atkins Diet & Red Wine

The Atkins Diet is a controversial diet plan shrouded in myth and controversy. It works by changing the way your body powers itself, something that can only be accomplished through a dramatic alteration in eating habits. Though alcohol is not recommended while on the Atkins Diet, moderate amounts of red wine can be consumed during certain periods. Video of the Day The Atkins Diet works by forcing your body to burn fat for energy instead of sugar. This is the primary goal of the initial Induction phase of the Atkins Diet, which imposes the greatest restrictions on foods and carbohydrate intake. Ketosis is the name for this condition because a consequence of fat metabolism is the production of chemicals called ketones, or ketone bodies. In a state of ketosis, ketones are used by the brain instead of sugar as the main source of energy. Induction is so named because the goal of this phase is to induce a state of ketosis. Alcohol and Induction Just as the body will naturally burn carbohydrates for energy before fat, it will also metabolize alcohol first. Thus, drinking alcoholic beverages can interfere with the onset of ketosis. For this reason, all alcohol is forbidden during the first two weeks of Induction. One glass of wine is allowed occasionally after the first two weeks. Once you’ve entered ketosis, consuming alcohol will not necessarily reverse the process or prevent weight loss. After the first two weeks, you can enjoy red wine in moderation on the Atkins Diet, but you must count the energy in it towards your daily intake. A 3.5-ounce glass of red wine contains alcohol equivalent to about 4.3 grams of carbohydrates. Alcohol has little to no effect on the glycemic index. This means it does not cause a spike in blood sugar. If you must drink alcohol while on the Atk Continue reading >>

Keto Diet Alcohol Guide: Is Booze Okay If It’s Low Carb?

Keto Diet Alcohol Guide: Is Booze Okay If It’s Low Carb?

If you’re a boozy babe, you’re likely to ask the million dollar question: “Can I drink alcohol on the keto diet?” This keto diet alcohol guide will point you in the right direction. First, to answer your question: yes, you most certainly can have alcohol on the keto diet. That’s right, not all booze has carbohydrates in it! Most spirits have 0 carbs. Take a shot or four two of vodka, tequila, or gin and you’re still sitting well below your daily carb limit. A glass of white wine, like pinot or sauvignon blanc, only has about 3 net carbohydrates per serving. For the most part, you’re SOL with beer due to the gluten and high carb count. You’ll see in the table below that you can technically make some light beers fit your macros (IIFYM-style), but I’m going to go ahead and give beer a big thumbs down as a keto-approved beverage. In fact, I have a whole comprehensive list of alcoholic beverages sorted by carb count at the bottom of this post if you want to jump to the nitty gritty details of alcohol nutrition data. (CLICK HERE TO SKIP STRAIGHT TO THE KETO ALCOHOL LIST) But before you run off and get white girl wasted with celebratory low carb drinks, there’s a few things you should know about drinking alcohol while you’re in ketosis. I will admit right here and now that alcohol is by far my biggest vice. While my days of telling strangers I love them, sobbing uncontrollably over nothing, and woo-ing too loudly at concerts are over, I do still enjoy a good cocktail (Exhibit A: Vodka Mojito Recipe and Exhibit B: Kamikaze Shot Recipe, two of the keto diet alcohol drink recipes you’ll find on this site). This is a judgement-free zone. The upcoming lecture is just as much for myself as it is for you. The Obligatory Buzz-Kill Alcohol is not a nutrient. Boo Continue reading >>

Drinking Booze While In Ketosis: Is It Dangerous?

Drinking Booze While In Ketosis: Is It Dangerous?

Hey all. I was bumping around the paleo inter-webs and came across this little nugget on ketosis: DO NOT DRINK ALCOHOL IF YOU ARE KETOTIC! Alcohol is a powerful inhibitor of gluconeogenesis. In fact, it forces part of the gluconeogenic metabolic process into reverse. This means that if all the glucose in the blood is being derived from gluconeogenesis then the consumption of alcohol will inevitably cause the blood glucose level to fall. Worse still, the alcohol also stops ketone body production, thus leaving the brain entirely without fuel. 1 Worst Carb After Age 50 If you're over 50 and you eat this carb, you will never lose belly fat. HealthPlus50 A person who is ketotic is 100% reliant on gluconeogenesis to maintain adequate levels of glucose in the blood. If, under these circumstances alcohol is taken, the person will become disorientated and might lose consciousness, not just from the alcohol, but from low blood sugar. Needless to say, this could be very dangerous, and even fatal. Alcohol does not have these effects if the glycogen stores in the liver are normal. Under these circumstances the blood glucose level in the blood is maintained by the breakdown of liver glycogen, a process that is not influenced by alcohol. If a person becomes confused under these circumstances it is due simply to the pharmacological effects of the alcohol! - Link Although I'm philosophically ketosis-agnostic, I do best on a lowish carb diet and most likely find myself in ketosis from time-to-time. I'm wondering what you think of this warning. Is the science sound? Should ketotic boozers eat a sweet potato before hitting the firewater this xmas? Continue reading >>

Alcohol On A Ketogenic Diet?

Alcohol On A Ketogenic Diet?

I live in south florida where the night life never ends. I want to go out and drink and have a good time. but, im on this ketogenic diet and trying to stay in ketosis. Are there any beers or alcohols that cater to the low carb or ketogenic lifestyle? The last time i went drinking it took me three days to get back into ketosis. I presume you're wanting to use keto to loose fat? I presume you're wanting to use keto to loose fat? Yes! I did a ketogenic diet 7 years ago in which i reduced my bodyfat from 38% to 12% and maintained this for 5 years by following a heart healthy diet. But, these last two years i ended up gaining a lot of bodyfat due to personal issues (back injury, relationship and work stress etc, which lead to eating lots of pizza and not working out). So i am in my 2nd week of being in ketosis (mild to moderate) and lost 7lbs of bodyfat while gaining 1lb of lean body mass. But, i would still like to go out one night a week to drink alcohol and meet ladies. Alcohol has 7 calories/gram, does not affect insulin levels but is empty calories. Alcohol oxidises into acetaldehyde then ketone bodies so it may be excreted as ketones. I'm an expert at gaining body fat too. But keto diets are the best for losing fat out of everything I've tried. Last edited by GregT; 11-20-2005 at 08:23 AM. If its one night a week, a couple of drinks on the day of your carb up will work. Why even touch low carb beers? The time I did keto and was successful we were taking a load of vodka shots every night we went out. Vodka doesn't have ANY carbs....take it straight or maybe with diet coke or something if diet soda doesn't kick you out of ketosis. Alcohol and keto don't really mix too well IMO. beware some people report feelings of increased drunkeness. There have also been issues of Al Continue reading >>

Alcohol Vs The Ketogenic Diet – Can I Drink It?

Alcohol Vs The Ketogenic Diet – Can I Drink It?

You’re at the bar, you want a drink, but you’re not sure about the alcohol because you are following a ketogenic diet. (To learn about the ketogenic diet click here). It is hard to be the only person at a social event who isn’t drinking. So, what would be my best choices? In general, hard liquor is usually a better choice than beer and wine. Hard liquor has less total carbs and less total calories compared to beer or wine. Drinking alcohol will slow the rate in which you lose weight. The strange thing is that drinking alcohol helps your liver make more ketones. The liver takes the alcohol and makes triglycerides which make more ketones. This can cause you to get drunk faster. It is important to drink lots of water because being in ketosis can make a hangover worse. Here is a list of low-carb alcohols: Liquor – Whiskey, Tequila, Vodka and Gin. Beer – Michelob Ultra, Bud Select and Miller 64. Wine – Dry red or white wines. Here are some different brands and their carb contents: Whiskey – most contain 96 – 105 calories Johnnie Walker 0 carbs Chivas Regal 0 carbs Jack Daniels 0 carbs Tequila – most contain 96 – 104 calories Don Julio 0 carbs Patron 0 carbs Cazadores 0 carbs Vodka – most contain 96 – 105 calories Smirnoff 0 carbs Grey Goose 0 carbs Ciroc 0 carbs Gin – most contain 96 – 116 calories Seagram’s 0 carbs Bombay 0 carbs Tanqueray 0 carbs Red Wine – most contain 121 – 129 calories Cabernet 4 carbs Pinot Noir 3 carbs Merlot 4 carbs Beer – most contain 55 – 119 calories Budweiser Select 3 carbs Miller 64 2 carbs Michelob Ultra 3 carbs What is the best low carb mixer? Sparkling water – this is the best choice. In general, most of the mixers such as diet sodas may be low in carbs but they are horrible for your health. They also m Continue reading >>

Does Alcohol Stop Ketosis?

Does Alcohol Stop Ketosis?

Does alcohol stop ketosis? What happens if you eat more fat than your body needs? And will a slightly higher carb intake kick you out of ketosis? Get the answers in this week’s Q&A with Dr. Andreas Eenfeldt: Alcohol stopping ketosis? We are trying to get into ketosis and measuring blood ketones which seem to be sitting around 1.0 mmol/L. We have adjusted and readjusted our protein and carb amounts to be within the limits you suggest. Last night I had three vodkas – being no-carb alcohol, can this still affect ketosis levels or would we be doing something else wrong? Thank you, Meg Alcohol should not have any major effect on ketosis, as long as it’s no-carb alcohol like vodka (without sweet ingredients in a drink of course). If anything, pure alcohol tends to somewhat increase ketosis. For best results choose low-carb alcoholic drinks like wine or other low-carb drinks, see the guide below. Also note that many people get more sensitive to alcohol on a ketogenic diet. Be careful and never drink and drive, this is especially true on keto. Best, Andreas Eenfeldt If I eat more fat than my body needs for fuel, what happens to the excess? I understand that if one eats more carbs (glucose) and/or protein than one’s body can immediately use, the excess can be stored as fat. What happens to dietary fat if one eats more of it than can be used? Is it, too, stored, or does the body excrete it? Kathleen It’s mostly stored, though there may be a slight increase in calories burned on low carb. Don’t eat when you’re not hungry, and this should not really be an issue on a low-carb diet, as fat is very satiating. Best, Andreas Eenfeldt Will going moderate low carb >50 carbs turn brain back to using carbs for fuel instead of ketones? I think I need to up carbs for energy. I e Continue reading >>

Alcohol On A Low Carb, Keto Diet!

Alcohol On A Low Carb, Keto Diet!

For years, I’ve read countless dieting books that prohibited me from drinking alcohol. Actually, it’s probably the first thing that many “diet gurus” say to cut out of your diet and for (somewhat) good reason. Alcohol gets a bad reputation because it’s basically empty calories. In an ideal world, sure. I’ll give up alcohol to lose weight. But let’s get serious. I’m 23 years old and I very much enjoy a tasty alcoholic beverage (or 5) and a wild night out on the town with my friends. The beauty of a ketogenic, low carb diet is that you can still enjoy yourself from time-to-time with alcohol and still lose weight! However, there are some guidelines as to what alcohols you can enjoy and those you should avoid. Liquor On average, one shot is the equivalent to about 1.5oz and for these spirits have a nutritional value of 0 carbs and roughly 64 calories. Of course, this will vary depending on how much is actually in your beverage (order a double? Double the nutritional stats). Approved spirits on a keto, low carb diet include: Vodka (Three Olives, Absolut, Grey Goose, etc.) Rum (Captain Morgan, etc) Gin (Tanqueray, Beefeater, etc) Tequila Whiskey (Jack Daniel’s, etc.) Scotch Brandy Cognac (Hennessy, etc.) Please note that these are for the original, unflavored versions. For flavored spirits (including flavored vodkas and some dark/coconut rums), always check up on nutritional information before consuming as they often contain carbohydrates. My spirit of choice is generally a nice gin (with soda water& lime) or cognac (with diet cola). I’ve been known to drink a fair share of Hennessy. Chasers & Mixers For mixing or chasing, you have many no sugar, no calorie options Diet sodas (Coke Zero, Diet Coke, Diet Ginger Ale) Soda water Diet tonic water Seltzer water Continue reading >>

Can You Get Into Ketosis While Drinking Alcohol?

Can You Get Into Ketosis While Drinking Alcohol?

As I decided to change my evil ways and give up bread and pasta, as well as all the other carbs that suck me in like a tractor beam, I knew my inner imp would not allow me to perform this feat which I haven’t been able to do for some time without *some* rascality along the way. Because of this I decided to go through carb withdrawal while drinking copious amounts of red wine – 1 to 2 bottles a night. I didn’t track calories but would usually go through the day without much more than the fat from my coffee and cream in the morning and the use of Atkins shakes as a creamer in my coffee at work. There was a can or two of sardines in there as well. At home, I would accompany the wine with something small. Maybe a piece of salmon the size of my hand with 2 tablespoons of butter. A chopped veggie salad with oil and vinegar. 10 breakfast sausages with ketchup. I did not count calories but aside from the alcohol (which is not a carb but does have 7 calories per gram, making it calorically dense) the amounts eaten were small and even the rare carby stuff like the ketchup and 2 mouthfuls of mac and cheese I had would not have put me out of a carb total for any given day well below 50 grams. This worked extremely well in carb withdrawal. I seemed to lose my craving for carbs by the 2nd day in. I had 2 people at work discussing their prodigious eating over the weekend after I told them I started a diet and I said: “Thank you for telling me all this right after I told you I started a diet.” “You’re welcome.” One said without missing a beat, and they continued. I work with a tough crowd and certainly there was no maliciousness intended – busting chops is a sport where I work – a way of blowing off steam by busting one another. It is not for the faint of heart nor Continue reading >>

Ketogenic Diet And Alcohol Effects On Ketosis Is It Keto Friendly?

Ketogenic Diet And Alcohol Effects On Ketosis Is It Keto Friendly?

Ok, first thing is first, before we get into the Ketogenic diet and alcohol’s effect on ketosis; that is most western cultures drink far too much. Now I know most people (those on a keto diet included) don’t want to hear that, and I’m not trying to be a party-pooper, but I’m here to tell you the truth as I know it, not to tell you what you want to hear. Anyway, there’s a little room for debate depending on how you read the evidence on whether there’s room in a Ketogenic Diet for alcohol and whether alcohol will throw you out of ketosis, it may or may not, but there are certainly side effects to be aware of, some very dangerous. Ketogenic Diet and Alcohol Effects on Ketosis I’ve read quite a few articles and forums about keto and alcohol and almost all of them dance around it looking for some loophole in the figures to squeeze in some amount of alcohol. Many try to satisfy the vast majority who think giving away alcohol on a keto diet will be a deal breaker. They all try hard I have to say. Let’s be real, if you’re dying to fit alcohol into your ketogenic diet and it’s a must have for you, I doubt the small amount that could possibly fit in will satisfy you. Here are a few things to consider if you’re to drink alcohol while trying to maintain a keto diet: You will undoubtedly get drunk much quicker on a ketogenic diet than if you weren’t. Hangovers will be worse, as you know a keto diet flushes your body of water retention and the chances that you’ll be staying hydrated while drinking is slim, alcohol is notorious for dehydrating you. Even if alcohol itself doesn’t kick you out of ketosis, when tipsy self-control goes out the window, you’re likely to eat whatever is in front of you. If you are determined to include alcohol in your ketogenic Continue reading >>

Sugar Alcohol Facts

Sugar Alcohol Facts

Sugar alcohol sweeteners (also known as polyols) usually contain less calories than regular sugar, and have virtually no impact on blood sugar and dental health. Sounds great, except for some disclaimers: since they can't be digested in the human digestive system, these sweeteners can cause gut issues such as flatulence, bloating and diarrhea. In addition, most of these sweeteners are excreted in the urine, which increases the amount and frequency of urination. This increased urination will result in a higher loss of body minerals such as calcium, magnesium and potassium and possibly cause muscle cramping. At higher intake amounts, this effect is more pronounced, and in rat studies, has resulted in changes in kidney function and structure. (See this reference: Nutrient Requirements of Laboratory Animals,: Fourth Revised Edition, 1995, page 22). Some people with blood sugar issues may experience blood sugar spikes after eating these sweeteners, but this is an individual response. Since all of these types of sugar substitutes contain some calories and carbs, be sure to count them into your daily totals if you are on a low carb diet plan. Below is an overview of the most common sugar alcohol sweeteners: Erythritol Erythritol has about 3/4 the sweetening power as regular sugar, with only a tenth of the calories. One cup of erythritol contains about 10 grams of carbohydrate, and 40 calories. This sugar alcohol is best used in conjunction with other sugar substitutes such as stevia, sucralose and glycerin. Lauren over at the Healthy Indulgences Blog suggests using erythritol in desserts which are of a moist consistency for best results, since erythritol does not attract moisture as regular sugar and some other sweeteners do. Hence, it has a tendency to dry out the foods to wh Continue reading >>

Getting Drunk While On The Ketogenic Diet: Is It Safe?

Getting Drunk While On The Ketogenic Diet: Is It Safe?

I get it. You want to adopt a healthy lifestyle but you don’t know if drinking alcohol on the ketogenic diet is a smart idea. Obviously alcohol is bad for you. We all know this. And it’s obviously one of the most abused yet socially acceptable substances out there. No one wants to be the guy/gal who doesn’t go out on a friday night just because you’re on a diet. With that being said, it’s important to take necessary precautions especially on a low carb high fat ketogenic diet. It’s completely possible to stay in ketosis and still enjoy a couple drinks here and there. Can I Still Drink Alcohol On The Ketogenic Diet? Yes but you have to be careful. If you want to successfully stay in ketosis, you have to choose your drinks wisely. Drinking low carb or zero carb drinks will ensure that after your body utilizes the alcohol as a source of fuel, that you are back into ketosis immediately after. When we consume alcohol, our body starts working to metabolize it in order to use it as energy. When we start to feel “drunk” this is due to our body’s metabolizing the alcohol. Drinking alcohol disrupts our fat burning processes because it prioritizes the processing of alcohol before anything else since it is toxic to our body’s. This is why some people experience the stalling of weight-loss when they drink alcohol. What Will Happen To My Alcohol Tolerance On The Ketogenic Diet? Since you are restricting any form of glycogen (through carbs) on the ketogenic diet, your liver glycogen storages are already depleted which means you are running off of fats instead of glucose, thus, burning fat more effectively. Someone on a high carb diet has plenty of glycogen stored in their body. This gives your body a buffer before metabolizing alcohol. So what does this all mean ex Continue reading >>

Alcohol On A Keto Diet: What Is Safe To Drink While In Ketosis?

Alcohol On A Keto Diet: What Is Safe To Drink While In Ketosis?

Can you drink alcohol on a keto diet? Yes. It’s okay if you like to go out on the town and party it up. A lot of us do. It’s a part of our lives that we don’t want to stop. But you’re on a keto diet and you know that alcohol isn’t necessarily part of your diet. Don’t hesitate to go out and have a good time just because you’re on a keto diet. You can go out. You can drink. You just have to be smart about your choices when you’re drinking. Note: If you’re just learning about the keto diet then check out our free Guide to the Ketogenic Diet. Alcohol on Keto Diet It may seem like a daunting task, but if you start watching everything you’re drinking, you won’t have to worry about your body getting out of ketosis. Your body will still be able to stay the fat burner it was meant to be. If you don’t keep a close eye on your drinking habits, then you will slip back into your old ways and your body will once again be just a sugar burner and you may slowly see the weight creeping back onto your body. Aren’t sure if your body is in ketosis? Here are 7 Signs You’re in Ketosis. The Breakdown When you drink alcohol, your body is going to start breaking it down immediately because your body sees it as toxic. Go figure. As soon as your body recognizes that alcohol has entered your system, it begins to metabolize it and break it down. When drinking alcohol in excess, you will probably find that your weight loss will start to slow down. It could even stall completely. This is something that you definitely don’t want to happen, especially when you’re starting to see a lot of results. I’m assuming that you are already in ketosis, so your body will start to feel the drinks quicker. Your body is used to burning fats first now, so when you add alcohol, your bo Continue reading >>

Drink Alcohol On Keto

Drink Alcohol On Keto

Drinking alcohol has become a big part of modern culture, as has eating carbs. But those things deserve more attention when on keto. How do you drink alcohol on the ketogenic diet? Keto and Alcohol Let’s look into the properties of alcohol. Alcohol is commonly thought of as the 4th macronutrient because it does have calories in it but gives no real energy to the body. The body has no mechanism to store alcohol endogenously because it’s still toxic. Whenever you consume alcohol, the liver will prioritize getting rid of it over everything else. Meaning, while metabolizing alcohol, the body isn’t metabolizing anything else. You’re not burning fat or producing ketones either. Do you get kicked out of ketosis when drinking alcohol? Not entirely, but it can still have some effects on your metabolism, weight loss and overall health. Alcohol While Keto But not all alcohol is created nor metabolized equally. Alcoholic beverages consist of many ingredients. Ethanol, which is the alcohol molecule, is one of them. Additionally, nearly all drinks contain some sort of a sugar compound, which determines the carb content and metabolic effects. Alcohol to avoid on keto Beer is made of barley, hops, yeast, and water. Rich in carbs. Ciders and long drinks are like alcoholic sodas. Wine has grape juice, some sweeter than others. More carbs. Cocktails and sugary mixers have soda, syrups, and juices. Flavored spirits have added sugar and more carbs. In general, the sweeter something tastes, the more carbs it has. You won’t get kicked out of ketosis by drinking a glass of wine or even two. But you will definitely do so with beer, cider, and cocktails. Those margaritas aren’t good for ketones or your waistline. Don’t eat food while drinking alcohol. Because it’s still a toxin, Continue reading >>

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