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What Do Ketones In The Urine Smell Like?

Blood And Urine Ketones

Blood And Urine Ketones

WHAT YOU NEED TO KNOW: What are ketones? Ketones are made when your body turns fat into energy. This happens when your body does not have enough insulin to turn sugar into energy. Ketones are released into your blood. Your kidneys get rid of ketones in your urine. Why do I need to test for ketones? High levels of blood or urine ketones can lead to diabetic ketoacidosis. Diabetic ketoacidosis is a life-threatening condition that can cause seizures, coma, or death. Early treatment of high levels of blood or urine ketones may prevent diabetic ketoacidosis. When do I need to test for ketones? Your healthcare provider will tell you if you need to test your urine or blood. Test for ketones when you have any of the following: Your blood sugar level is higher than 300 mg/dl. You have nausea, abdominal pain, or are vomiting. You have an illness such as a cold or the flu. You feel more tired than usual. You are more thirsty than normal or have a dry mouth. Your skin is flushed. You urinate more than usual. How do I test for urine ketones? Ask your healthcare provider where to purchase a urine ketone test kit. The kit usually comes with a plastic cup, a bottle of test strips, and directions. Follow the instructions in the ketone test kit. Check the expiration date to make sure the kit has not expired. The following is an overview of how to test your urine for ketones: Urinate into a clean container. You can use a clean plastic cup if your kit does not come with a cup. Dip the test strip into the sample. The directions will tell you how long to hold the test strip in urine. Gently shake extra urine off of the strip. You can also urinate directly onto the test strip. The directions will tell you how long to hold the test strip in your stream of urine. Gently shake extra urine off of Continue reading >>

What Causes Smelly Urine And How To Get Rid Of Strong Urine Odor?

What Causes Smelly Urine And How To Get Rid Of Strong Urine Odor?

Smelly urine can be caused by many different factors, but most of them are non-threatening and can be addressed with simple solutions. While most of the time you can overlook the smelly odor of your urine (especially if it’s a temporary incident), in some cases, smelly urine is actually indicative of a serious health problem. Being aware of what can possibly cause smelly urine can help you address the issue effectively and give you peace of mind. Causes of foul-smelling urine As mentioned, there are numerous causes of smelly urine and they range in severity. For the most part, there’s nothing threatening about having a stronger odor to your urine and the condition can be easily resolved. Here are some factors that can make your urine smell. Urinary tract infection: Bacteria in the urinary tract can cause an infection along with smelly urine. Other symptoms include a higher frequency of urination, burning while urinating, and pain. Vaginitis: Vaginal infections can lead to smelly urine. Bacteria, yeast, and sexually transmitted diseases can cause vaginal discharge, painful urination, itchiness, and discomfort during sex. Prostatitis: Men who suffer from prostatitis can develop bladder infections, which can cause smelly urine along with abdominal pain, urine urgency, back pain, and groin pain. Kidney stones: Smelly urine, especially if it’s pinkish in color, could be an indication of kidney stones. You will also experience severe pain where your kidneys are located. Dehydration: If you haven’t had enough water, your urine will be darker in color and smell foul. Foods, drinks, and vitamin supplements: Many foods, beverages, and natural supplements can change the smell of your urine. Prominent examples include asparagus, B vitamins, and even caffeine. Medications: I Continue reading >>

Urine Smells Sweet Not Diabetes

Urine Smells Sweet Not Diabetes

A typical healthy individual, who consumes enough water, generally does not have strong smell in his urine. Strong smell or smelly urine may typically indicate something unusual, though not constantly a disease. It might be a temporary phenomenon taking place as a result of particular medication, foods, etc. It can also indicate an underlying medical condition. I understand that it might seem weird to be reading a publishing about urine. However, recently I discussed urinary tract infections, so I believe this week’s subject is relevant. Likewise, the color, smell, and consistency of your urine can give you and your doctor helpful details about what might be going on in your body. Historically, taking a look at urine has been a method for physicians to determine an individual’s health, especially prior to other types of testing were offered. If you’ve had diabetes for a long period of time or know someone who has, you’ll understand that urine screening was a method to determine how well controlled (or unchecked) an individuals’ diabetes was– this was carried out in the days prior to blood glucose meters were offered. Now, of course, we have more sophisticated tools to communicate glucose details. However urine still fits. Urine is a waste product that contains breakdown products from food, beverages, medications, cosmetics, ecological impurities, and by-products from metabolic process and bacteria. Remarkably, urine includes more than 3,000 compounds– much more than what’s discovered in other body fluids, like saliva or cerebrospinal fluid. The kidneys do an impressive task of filtering and focusing to assist get these compounds from the body (you can comprehend why keeping your kidneys healthy is so important). So, what is your urine informing you? If Y Continue reading >>

How Does Type 2 Diabetes Affect Urine Odor?

How Does Type 2 Diabetes Affect Urine Odor?

Before digging into “How Diabetes Type 2 Affects Urine Odor?” we’d like to first cover normal urine odor. What’s considered normal urine odor? Your urine or pee is a way for your body to get rid of extra water. In addition, your body tries to flush out a lot of unnecessary materials through your urine. The urine contains a chemical called ammonia, which sometimes gives your urine a strong odor (smell). Urine is a way for the body to get rid of things that might be harmful to it or might be building up in excess within the body. Normally, your urine is yellowish in color and has no specific or somewhat strong odor. What happens to urine odor in diabetes? Something strange happens to the urine odor for type 2 diabetes. The urine starts smelling “sweet or fruity”. Why does the smell change? Your body needs sugar to accomplish all your daily activities. This sugar comes from the food you eat. To turn this sugar into energy, your body relies on a hormone called “insulin”. Think of insulin as a messenger that signals your cells to convert sugar into energy. But in diabetes type 2, your body stops responding to the insulin in your body. Your insulin is still there but it does not work the way it is supposed to. It’s the same as getting a key stuck in a door lock. The key is there but it’s not functioning the way it should. This is what happens in diabetes type 2 as well. As already mentioned, the main function of insulin is to decrease blood sugar levels by signaling body cells and turning them into energy. Once your bodies insulin fails to perform its function, your cells do not get the signal to turn blood sugar into energy and your blood levels of sugar start to rise. Once your blood sugar levels are high enough, your body cells start breaking sugar into Continue reading >>

Ketosis Symptoms

Ketosis Symptoms

Ketosis symptoms are a result of the way the body gets rid of the excess ketone bodies which build up in the blood stream when a person eats a low carb, ketogenic diet. In short, the body has three ways of dealing with excess ketone bodies: First, the muscles liver and brain can burn them for energy in the cells. Second, the body can breathe ketones out through the lungs. And third, the body can flush ketones out through the kidneys and urine. Legionella Testing Lab - High Quality Lab Results CDC ELITE & NYSDOH ELAP Certified - Fast Results North America Lab Locations legionellatesting.com The ketosis symptoms associated with the benign dietary ketosis caused by eating a low carb, ketogenic diet are not dangerous. They may differ for each individual, with the most common symptoms being: Ketosis breath, which has a fruity odor, and the person in deep ketosis may feel a sort of slight burning in the nose and a slight smell of ammonia. Dry mouth, which is alleviated by drinking more regular tap or bottled water. (Reverse osmosis water will make this worse.) In the first week of beginning a ketogenic diet, most people experience frequent urination followed by fatigue, as insulin levels come down, and the kidneys release extraneous water stores. Minerals such as sodium, magnesium and potassium are also lost with excreted urine, and it is the mineral loss that causes the fatigue. This can be offset by eating more salt, drinking more fluids, and increasing the intake of magnesium and potassium containing foods. (Dairy foods and avocados are high in potassium, and you can drink broth for more sodium.) A slight headache at first which goes away in a few days. This is usually a sign of not getting enough salt. Ketone bodies become detectable in the urine. Ketone bodies are molecu Continue reading >>

Diabetic Ketoacidosis

Diabetic Ketoacidosis

As fat is broken down, acids called ketones build up in the blood and urine. In high levels, ketones are poisonous. This condition is known as ketoacidosis. Diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) is sometimes the first sign of type 1 diabetes in people who have not yet been diagnosed. It can also occur in someone who has already been diagnosed with type 1 diabetes. Infection, injury, a serious illness, missing doses of insulin shots, or surgery can lead to DKA in people with type 1 diabetes. People with type 2 diabetes can also develop DKA, but it is less common. It is usually triggered by uncontrolled blood sugar, missing doses of medicines, or a severe illness. Continue reading >>

Does Your Urine Smell? Here Are 5 Reasons Why

Does Your Urine Smell? Here Are 5 Reasons Why

Tap here to turn on desktop notifications to get the news sent straight to you. 07/06/2016 07:16 am ETUpdatedDec 06, 2017 Does Your Urine Smell? Here Are 5 Reasons Why Now that summer's here, it's important to keep hydrated. But, you know how it is: The more you drink, the more you have to urinate. On a daily basis, we typically produce almost seven cups of urine. This waste product contains more than 3,000 different compounds that are broken down from food, drinks, medicine and other by-products. These compounds are then filtered out of the blood by our kidneys. If you are healthy and hydrated, urine barely has any odor. If you do notice an usual smell, it could be a sign that something is wrong. Here are five reasons why your urine may smell: If you aren't drinking enough water, you may notice that your urine has an odor that is stronger than usual. This can be a sign that your urine has become extremely concentrated, which happens when there's a lack of water to balance out its compounds and chemicals. This can be resolved by drinking more fluids. A sure sign that you are drinking enough is when your urine is pale yellow or clear. Certain foods can give your urine a strong smell. Asparagus is a likely culprit. It contains a specific compound that, once in your system, gets broken down into sulfur compounds. These are responsible for that smell of rotten eggs. No reason to worry though - the smell goes away after a few rounds of urination. Certain medications can cause a strong odor, too. If unwelcome bacteria have gathered in your bladder through the urethra, this may result in a urinary tract infection (UTI). Women tend to suffer from UTIs more than men. This is because their urethras are shorter than men's, which enables bacteria to get into the bladder and multip Continue reading >>

Body Odor & Diabetes: Does Diabetes Cause Body Odor?

Body Odor & Diabetes: Does Diabetes Cause Body Odor?

Are you diabetic? Does your body emanate bad breath which it has never done before? Do not worry. You are not the only one experiencing something of this sort. The high level of blood glucose combined with many complications in diabetes tends to cause body odor in the patients. In this article, we shall analyze the reasons and the relationship between diabetes and body odor. Join in for the article Body Odor and Diabetes: Does Diabetes Cause Body Odor?” What is Diabetes Body Odor? Diabetes body odor refers to the sudden change of smell that you experience due to diabetes. There are several reasons why diabetes might lead to bad odor in the patients. There are two main types of sweat one of which could be responsible for the bad body odor in a diabetes patient. One of these sweats is called eccrine which is essentially odorless and is mainly responsible for controlling the temperature of the body. The second of these sweats is known as the apocrine. This is the sweat you generally get under your armpits and is secreted by the apocrine gland. This is the one which is mainly responsible for producing bad odor as when it gets hit by bacteria, there is an unpleasant smell that is emitted. The following paragraph explains in detail the causes of bad odor in diabetes patients. Causes of Body Odor in Diabetes There are several reasons and ways in which diabetes can cause body odor in the patients. These reasons and causes of the same are explained in the following points: People with diabetes are known to be affected by a number of complications in the body. One such complication is the infection that can be caused in the urinary tract of the patient. This may very much lead to a fruity smell in the diabetes patients. Another reason for the bad odor could be the high levels o Continue reading >>

Ammonia Smell In Urine: Causes And What To Do About It

Ammonia Smell In Urine: Causes And What To Do About It

A strong smell of ammonia in urine is usually caused when there is a high concentration of waste products in the urine. Urine mainly consists of water and usually doesn’t have a strong odor to it. However, certain foods, not drinking enough water, or an infection can cause an ammonia smell in urine. Most of the time, there is nothing to worry about if occasionally your pee has a smell of ammonia. This could be caused by something as simple as dehydration or eating asparagus. However, serious medical conditions like a urinary tract infection, liver infection, or kidney disease can cause your urine to emit a foul smell. Along with the strong-smelling urine, an infection may cause other changes in your urine. For example, your urine may become a milky cloudy color, cause pain when peeing, and you may have a fever. In this article, I will explore the various reasons why urine can give off a strong ammonia odor. I will also look at when the symptoms of smelly urine are serious enough to see a doctor. Reasons why Urine Smells of Ammonia First of all, let’s look at some of the less serious reasons why your urine may smell of ammonia. After that, I will examine the more serious causes of an ammonia-like smell in urine that may require visiting a doctor. Dehydration Not drinking enough water can lead to dehydration which can cause a smell of ammonia to come from your urine. The odor is produced by chemicals in your urine which become very concentrated due to a lack of water. You may also notice more bubbles in your urine when you pee. Dr. Melinda Ratini on WebMD explains that urine is made from water, salt, and chemicals. Normal urine should be a pale yellow to gold color. If you are dehydrated, your urine becomes very concentrated and can give off a strong ammonia smell. A Continue reading >>

Why Does My Breath Smell Like Acetone?

Why Does My Breath Smell Like Acetone?

People often associate strong smelling breath with the food someone has eaten or poor dental hygiene. But it may reveal much more than that. If a person's breath smells like acetone or nail polish remover, it could indicate health conditions, including diabetes. The way a person's breath smells can be an indicator of their overall health. This article explores why a person's breath might smell like acetone and what this might mean about their health. Contents of this article: How diabetes can affect breath Diabetes can affect the way a person's breath smells and can cause bad breath, or halitosis. In a 2009 study, researchers found that analyzing a person's breath helped to identify prediabetes when diabetes is in its early stages. There are two conditions associated with diabetes that can cause bad breath: gum disease and a high ketone level. The proper name for gum diseases in periodontal disease, and its forms include: Diabetes can be associated with an increased risk of gum disease, which may cause a person's breath to smell bad. However, gum disease does not cause a person's breath to smell like acetone. If a person has diabetes and their breath smells like acetone, this is usually caused by high levels of ketones in the blood. Diabetes and acetone breath When diabetes is not managed well, the body does not make enough insulin to break down glucose in the blood. This means that the body's cells do not receive enough glucose to use as energy. When the body cannot get its energy from sugar, it switches to burning fat for fuel instead. The process of breaking down fat to use as energy releases by-products called ketones. Ketone bodies include acetone. Acetone is the same substance that is used in nail varnish remover and is distinguished by its fruity smell. When a pe Continue reading >>

What You Can Learn About Your Health By Analyzing The Color And Smell Of Your Urine

What You Can Learn About Your Health By Analyzing The Color And Smell Of Your Urine

By Dr. Mercola Urine can reveal important information about your body's waste elimination process, providing clues about your overall health status. Your kidneys serve to filter excess water and water-soluble wastes out of your blood, getting rid of toxins and things that would otherwise build up and cause you to become ill. Many things — from excess protein and sugar to bacteria and yeast — may make their way into your urine. Instead of ignoring your urine and dashing back to whatever important activity having to pee interrupted, take this golden opportunity to become familiar with your "normal." If you notice changes in the way your urine looks or smells, the cause might be something as benign as what you had for dinner last night, such as beets or asparagus. Or, your astuteness may potentially alert you to a serious condition. If you suspect you have a urinary tract problem, you should consult your physician. One of the first things he or she is likely to do is a urine test. Urine tests have been around for more than 6,000 years1 and are easy, noninvasive tools for quickly assessing your health status2. Minding Your Pees and Cues In your lifetime, your kidneys filter more than one million gallons of water, enough to fill a small lake. Amazingly, one kidney can handle the task perfectly well. In fact, if you lose a kidney, your remaining kidney can increase in size by 50 percent within two months, to take over the job of both.3 Urine is 95 percent water and five percent urea, uric acid, minerals, salts, enzymes, and various substances that would cause problems if allowed to accumulate in your body4. Normal urine is clear and has a straw yellow color, caused by a bile pigment called urobilin. As with your stool, your urine changes color depending on what foods you Continue reading >>

How To Pinpoint The Health Of Your Kidneys, Lungs, And Gums By Smelling Your Breath

How To Pinpoint The Health Of Your Kidneys, Lungs, And Gums By Smelling Your Breath

For thousands of years, doctors have used their noses as a way to diagnose patients but naturally, this science has fallen out of practice with more modern techniques. However, there’s still a purpose for these methods as they help us understand our bodies quickly and conveniently. Identifying illnesses early and promptly can be the most significant step in defeating and treating disease. By looking out for these odors, you may protect yourself from diabetic ketoacidosis, chronic kidney failure, and rubella. Have Bad Breath? Bad breath, or halitosis, can not only be socially unacceptable but a sign of underlying health concerns as well! Some diseases that produce odors on your breath are diabetic ketoacidosis, chronic kidney disease, and gingivitis. [i] Fruity Smell or Sweet Smelling Breath This could be a sign of a life-threatening condition called diabetic ketoacidosis. This disease is usually found in people with type 1 diabetes who leave their blood sugar uncontrolled. It occurs when the body uses fat for energy instead of glucose because it can’t break down sugar without insulin. Using fat for energy leads to the production of ketones which are poisonous in high doses.[xxi] [xxii] [xiii] Ketone buildup if not monitored appropriately can lead to:[ii] Brain swelling Loss of consciousness Diabetic coma Death What to do if you have sweet breath: If you are diabetic the first thing to do is seek medical attention, as soon as you experience symptoms or believe you are at risk. To detect ketones early, use ketone strips when your blood sugar is too high. Treatments may include rehydrating, to replace the significant amount of water you’ll lose. In addition to diluting the extra glucose in your blood. If you continue to have high levels of ketones, work with your doc Continue reading >>

Urine Smell During Weight Loss

Urine Smell During Weight Loss

Weight-loss plans focus on eating less and exercising more. As a result, your body begins to burn fat for energy. While this effect is necessary for losing weight, it can change the way your urine smells while you are dieting. Dehydration, a common side effect of strenuous exercise and eating a low-calorie diet, can also change the way your urine smells. Video of the Day Low-calorie diets force your body to burn fat for energy instead of the carbohydrates it normally burns. The byproducts of burning fat, called ketones, cause your urine to smell sweet or fruity. High-protein, low-carbohydrate plans and very-low-calorie diets are most likely to cause this effect and should be supervised by your doctor to make sure your body is getting the nutrients it needs. The simplest solution for strong-smelling urine may be to increase your water intake. Eating a low-calorie diet tends to be dehydrating in and of itself. If you are also exercising more than usual, you may be losing extra fluids through sweating. Other signs of dehydration, in addition to a strong urine odor, include dark urine, dry skin, dry tongue and fatigue. Contact your doctor right away if you notice signs and symptoms of diabetes mellitus, including unwanted weight loss and sweet, fruity-smelling urine. Symptoms indicating medical problems might include cola-colored urine or blood in the urine. Continue reading >>

10 Signs And Symptoms That You're In Ketosis

10 Signs And Symptoms That You're In Ketosis

The ketogenic diet is a popular, effective way to lose weight and improve health. When followed correctly, this low-carb, high-fat diet will raise blood ketone levels. These provide a new fuel source for your cells, and cause most of the unique health benefits of this diet (1, 2, 3). On a ketogenic diet, your body undergoes many biological adaptions, including a reduction in insulin and increased fat breakdown. When this happens, your liver starts producing large amounts of ketones to supply energy for your brain. However, it can often be hard to know whether you're "in ketosis" or not. Here are 10 common signs and symptoms of ketosis, both positive and negative. People often report bad breath once they reach full ketosis. It's actually a common side effect. Many people on ketogenic diets and similar diets, such as the Atkins diet, report that their breath takes on a fruity smell. This is caused by elevated ketone levels. The specific culprit is acetone, a ketone that exits the body in your urine and breath (4). While this breath may be less than ideal for your social life, it can be a positive sign for your diet. Many ketogenic dieters brush their teeth several times per day, or use sugar-free gum to solve the issue. If you're using gum or other alternatives like sugar-free drinks, check the label for carbs. These may raise your blood sugar levels and reduce ketone levels. The bad breath usually goes away after some time on the diet. It is not a permanent thing. The ketone acetone is partly expelled via your breath, which can cause bad or fruity-smelling breath on a ketogenic diet. Ketogenic diets, along with normal low-carb diets, are highly effective for losing weight (5, 6). As dozens of weight loss studies have shown, you will likely experience both short- and long Continue reading >>

The 4 Ketosis Symptoms You Should Be Looking For

The 4 Ketosis Symptoms You Should Be Looking For

Ketosis is the condition in which your body begins burning fat instead of carbs for its energy source. The benefits of ketosis range widely, but some of the best include: fat loss increased endurance less cravings shredded physique neurological optimization But how do you know when you’re in ketosis? Are there symptoms that you’re in ketosis? Is there a way to “feel” like you’re in ketosis? Obviously the best way to see if you’re in ketosis is to test you breath, blood, or urine. However, we’ve constructed the following list to help you detect the signs that you’ve transitioned into ketosis and turned your body into a fat burning machine! If you’ve been on the Ketogenic Diet for at least a week, run through this list of ketosis symptoms, and see if they fit what you’re experiencing! 1. Ketosis Breath A popular report from many low-carb and keto dieters is that their breath is less than desirable. The smell has been compared to fingernail polish remover, which is believed to come from the presence of acetone. Acetone is, of course, a ketone body, and is also found in many brands of nail-polish remover. 2. Keto Flu After a life full of ingesting large portions of carbs for energy, dropping carbs and moving into ketosis can often result in ketosis symptoms known collectively as the “keto flu.” It’s not unheard to feel light-headed, fatigued, or anemic when your body runs out of carb stores and begins turning to fat for its fuel source. You might feel irritable, or short-tempered; this is your body’s natural reaction to having sugar removed. Much like an addict in rehab, when you cut out mass amounts of processed sugars, you turn into a bit of a monster. Ketosis symptoms also include nausea, or stomach aches. These can be caused by your stomach r Continue reading >>

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