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What Do Ketones In The Urine Smell Like?

What Causes Smelly Urine And How To Get Rid Of Strong Urine Odor?

What Causes Smelly Urine And How To Get Rid Of Strong Urine Odor?

Smelly urine can be caused by many different factors, but most of them are non-threatening and can be addressed with simple solutions. While most of the time you can overlook the smelly odor of your urine (especially if it’s a temporary incident), in some cases, smelly urine is actually indicative of a serious health problem. Being aware of what can possibly cause smelly urine can help you address the issue effectively and give you peace of mind. Causes of foul-smelling urine As mentioned, there are numerous causes of smelly urine and they range in severity. For the most part, there’s nothing threatening about having a stronger odor to your urine and the condition can be easily resolved. Here are some factors that can make your urine smell. Urinary tract infection: Bacteria in the urinary tract can cause an infection along with smelly urine. Other symptoms include a higher frequency of urination, burning while urinating, and pain. Vaginitis: Vaginal infections can lead to smelly urine. Bacteria, yeast, and sexually transmitted diseases can cause vaginal discharge, painful urination, itchiness, and discomfort during sex. Prostatitis: Men who suffer from prostatitis can develop bladder infections, which can cause smelly urine along with abdominal pain, urine urgency, back pain, and groin pain. Kidney stones: Smelly urine, especially if it’s pinkish in color, could be an indication of kidney stones. You will also experience severe pain where your kidneys are located. Dehydration: If you haven’t had enough water, your urine will be darker in color and smell foul. Foods, drinks, and vitamin supplements: Many foods, beverages, and natural supplements can change the smell of your urine. Prominent examples include asparagus, B vitamins, and even caffeine. Medications: I Continue reading >>

Ketosis Breath: Causes & Solutions For Bad Breath

Ketosis Breath: Causes & Solutions For Bad Breath

Ultra-low carb diets have grown in popularity over recent years. These so-called “keto diets” aim to facilitate rapid weight loss, through the consumption of minimal carbohydrates. Keto diets have become understandably popular on account of their rapid results, together with the practical benefits of consuming healthy volumes of the right foods, making hunger less of a problem than on more typical calorie-controlled diets. However keto diets are not without their issues, and one of the most common complaints comes in the form of “ketosis breath”. Quite simply many individuals making use of very low carb diets suffer from pungent and unpleasant breath. The question is what can be done to counteract such a problem? The Cause of Ketosis Breath In order to learn how to get rid of keto breath, we first need to understand why breath can smell under such a regime. As it turns out there are two potential reasons(1), both of which can operate independently, or in conjunction. Ketone Release The most typical source of energy used by the body is glucose. This is typically derived from carbohydrates, where the digestive system breaks down complex sugars into simple glucose molecules. On very low carb diets, however, the body is unable to utilize such a fuel. Instead, the liver utilizes the fat present in the body as an energy source, producing “ketones” in the process(2). This is known as “ketosis” – and is the process from where keto diets get their unusual name. These ketone bodies come in three common forms; acetoacetate, beta-hydroxybutyrate and acetone(3). In large quantities they are removed from the body in the urine or through exhalation. Ketones can have quite a characteristic smell; they often make the dieter’s breath smell quite sweet and fruity, quit Continue reading >>

Do Ketone Levels Matter? And Does Keto-smell Go Away?

Do Ketone Levels Matter? And Does Keto-smell Go Away?

So I thought I might be in ketosis. I don't eat a whole lot in the way of carbs, just potatoes, fruit, and a square or two of 85% dark chocolate, a few times a week. On potato or fruit days probably around 80g carbs, other days around 40g, I think. I'm estimating on the higher side because I don't really count them. I don't have a particular macro goal and weight loss isn't something I'm trying to do, but if it happens that is okay, too. I don't have keto-breath, but my armpit smell has been, ah, different lately (sharper, almost chemicallish which sounds kinda like the breath description, sorry if it's TMI) so I thought ketosis might be the cause. I got some ketostix and gave myself a test and came up on the trace level. (Also, last night was a potato night so perhaps that could affect it. I plan to continue testing for a few days, do a little N=1 experimentation.) Is this significant? Do you burn more fat/is it desirable when your ketone levels are higher or is it more of an on/off sort of thing? Also, if I am in ketosis and that's the cause of my yuck-smell, does that go away if you keep yourself in ketosis? Does it persist if you bounce around in and out of keto? I'm trying to decide, if I am in ketosis, if I want to stay here or not. I love my calendula deodorant, but to be honest Tom's of MAINE doesn't understand what summer in the South is like and I don't like the smell, assuming it is because of ketosis. If I am in ketosis and I like it, I can always go again in the winter when Tom's of Maine might have a chance. Continue reading >>

Q&a: What Is Causing Sweet-smelling Urine?

Q&a: What Is Causing Sweet-smelling Urine?

Q: Why does my urine smell like maple syrup? A: If you notice a very distinct sweet smell as you urinate, this could mean one of two things: maple syrup urine disease or diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA). Maple syrup urine disease is a metabolic disorder that causes certain amino acids to build up in the body. This disease is typically diagnosed in infancy and can be harmful. It must be closely monitored by a metabolic specialist. DKA is a potentially life-threatening complication of diabetes. It occurs when your body’s blood sugar spikes from a safe level of 70 to 100 milligrams to a dangerous level of over 250 milligrams, and remains there, untreated. DKA is a result of an insulin shortage, which prevents the body from processing sugar properly. In response, the body instead burns fatty acids that produce acidic ketone bodies. A warning sign of DKA is a person’s breath may develop a specific, sweet, fruity smell. Other symptoms may include vomiting, abdominal pain, shortness of breath, increased urination, generalized weakness, and confusion. Onset of symptoms is usually rapid. DKA happens most often in patients with type 1 diabetes, but can also occur in those with type 2 diabetes under certain circumstances. Triggers may include: Infection Not taking insulin correctly Stroke Certain medications that increase blood sugar, such as steroids It is typically diagnosed when testing finds high blood sugar, low blood pH, and the presence of ketoacids in either the blood or urine. DKA is treated primarily with intravenous fluids and insulin. Blood sugar and potassium levels are regularly monitored during treatment. Usually, potassium supplementation is needed to prevent the development of low blood potassium. Antibiotics may be required in those with an underlying infection. A Continue reading >>

Ketone Bodies (urine)

Ketone Bodies (urine)

Does this test have other names? Ketone test, urine ketones What is this test? This test is used to check the level of ketones in your urine. Normally, your body burns sugar for energy. But if you have diabetes, you may not have enough insulin for the sugar in your bloodstream to be used for fuel. When this happens, your body burns fat instead and produces substances called ketones. The ketones end up in your blood and urine. It's normal to have a small amount of ketones in your body. But high ketone levels could result in serious illness or death. Checking for ketones keeps this from happening. Why do I need this test? You may need this test if you have a high level of blood sugar. People with high levels of blood sugar often have high ketone levels. If you have high blood sugar levels and type 1 or type 2 diabetes, it's important to check your ketone levels. People without diabetes can also have ketones in the urine if their body is using fat for fuel instead of glucose. This can happen with chronic vomiting, extreme exercise, low-carbohydrate diets, or eating disorders. Checking your ketones is especially important if you have diabetes and: Your blood sugar goes above 300 mg/dL You abuse alcohol You have diarrhea You stop eating carbohydrates like rice and bread You're pregnant You've been fasting You've been vomiting You have an infection Your healthcare provider may order this test, or have you test yourself, if you: Urinate frequently Are often quite thirsty or tired Have muscle aches Have shortness of breath or trouble breathing Have nausea or vomiting Are confused Have a fruity smell to your breath What other tests might I have along with this test? Your healthcare provider may also check for ketones in your blood if you have high levels of ketones in your urine Continue reading >>

What Is Your Urine Trying To Tell You?

What Is Your Urine Trying To Tell You?

I realize that it may seem strange to be reading a posting about urine. However, last week I wrote about urinary tract infections (which we know are common both in women and in people who have diabetes), so I think this week’s topic is relevant. Also, the color, smell, and consistency of your urine can give you and your doctor helpful information about what might be going on in your body. Historically, looking at urine has been a way for doctors to gauge a person’s health, especially before other types of testing were available. If you’ve had diabetes for a long time or know someone who has, you’ll know that urine testing was a way to figure out how well controlled (or uncontrolled) a persons’ diabetes was — this was done in the days before blood glucose meters were available. Now, of course, we have more sophisticated tools to convey glucose information. But urine still has its place. What is urine? Urine is a waste product that contains breakdown products from food, drinks, medicines, cosmetics, environmental contaminants, and by-products from metabolism and bacteria. Amazingly, urine contains more than 3,000 compounds — much more than what’s found in other body fluids, like saliva or cerebrospinal fluid. The kidneys do a remarkable job of filtering and concentrating to help get these compounds out of the body (you can understand why keeping your kidneys healthy is so important). So, what is your urine telling you? If your urine is… Bright yellow. This may look alarming, especially when your urine seems to be glowing in the dark. But don’t worry — the bright yellow color is likely due to vitamins, specifically, B vitamins and beta carotene. Green or blue. Green or blue urine seems like something straight out of a science fiction movie, but the co Continue reading >>

Ketoacidosis

Ketoacidosis

Ketones in the urine, as detected by urine testing stix or a blood ketone testing meter[1], may indicate the beginning of diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA), a dangerous and often quickly fatal condition caused by low insulin levels combined with certain other systemic stresses. DKA can be fixed if caught quickly. Diabetics of all species therefore need to be checked for ketones with urine testing stix, available at any pharmacy, whenever insulin level may be too low, and any of the following signs or triggers are present: Ketone Monitoring Needed: Little or no insulin in last 12 hours High blood sugar over 16 mmol/L or 300 mg/dL (though with low insulin, lower as well...) Dehydration (skin doesn't jump back after pulling a bit gums are tacky or dry)[2] Not eating for over 12 hours due to Inappetance or Fasting Vomiting Lethargy Infection or illness High stress levels Breath smells like acetone (nail-polish remover) or fruit. Note that the triggers and signs are somewhat interchangeable because ketoacidosis is, once begun, a set of vicious circles which will make itself worse. So dehydration, hyperglycemia, fasting, and presence of ketones are not only signs, they're also sometimes triggers. In a diabetic, any urinary ketones above trace, or any increase in urinary ketone level, or trace urinary ketones plus some of the symptoms above, are cause to call an emergency vet immediately, at any hour of the day. Possible False Urine Ketone Test Results Drugs and Supplements Valproic Acid (brand names) Depakene, Depakote, Divalproex Sodium[3] Positive. Common use: Treatment of epilepsy. Cefixime/Suprax[4] Positive with nitroprusside-based urine testing. Common use: Antibiotic. Levadopa Metabolites[5] Positive with high concentrations[6]. Tricyclic Ring Compounds[7][8] Positive. Commo Continue reading >>

The First Signs Most Owners Will Notice Is Theirdog Or Cat

The First Signs Most Owners Will Notice Is Theirdog Or Cat

Louise and Derek Frequently Asked Questions How do I know if my dog is a diabetic? The first signs most owners will notice is theirdog or cat urinating excessively and drinking excessively. If your pet has these sypmtoms, then there is no harm to take them to you local vet and have a urine glucose test done. This is a simple test where a fresh sample of urine is taken and a chemically treated dipping stick is placed in the sample and the results are read in a few seconds. If the results show there is glucose in the urine, then a small blood sample is taken (usually drawn from the foreleg) and tested for glucose. This is also done on the spot and the results are immediate. Will my dog get over diabetes? Once diabetes has developed in a dog, it is usually for life. There are many dogs who have lived with diabetes for 8 years plus. As with humans, diabetes can be managed with insulin, diet and exercise. It is not a death sentence. Can young dogs develop diabetes? Yes. Although not as common as found in older dogs. What is hypoglycemia? Hypoglycemia is when the blood glucose level falls below the normal rang Continue reading >>

Breaking Down Your Urinalysis

Breaking Down Your Urinalysis

Contents: Introduction Conclusion Introduction If you’re a lupus patient, I’m sure at some point you’ve heard those wonderful words “…now, go pee in this cup.” Unfortunately, holding your morning pee while trying to aim into the miniature size sterile Dixie® cup is the easy part. What is not so easy to understand is the medical jargon that follows when you get the results of your urinalysis. Doctors causally throw out words like ketones and you think, “What, my pee is musical?” Or leukocytes and you go, “Isn’t that some sort of dinosaur fossil? Or creatinine and you ponder, “Are you speaking Latin?” These are just some of the many medical terms that often leave lupus patients scratching their already itchy heads (thanks alopecia) and wondering what on earth is going on? So why don’t we delve a little deeper….into the toilet. Let’s translate what your pee really says about you. Sometimes, doctors don’t have the time to explain the complicated medical jargon – which isn’t very helpful. So how about the CliffsNotes® version? Let’s get down to it, and trust me, urine for a real treat. Sorry I just couldn’t hold that in! Back to top The Basics DEFINITION A urinalysis is the physical, chemical, and microscopic examination of your pee. It involves a slew of different tests to measure various compounds and detect the stuff that pass through the urine. WHY PEE IN A CUP? Urinalyses are done as part of a medical exam to look for signs of disease. If you have signs of kidney disease or nephritis, your doctor will most likely have you perform tests on a regular basis. Sometimes urinalyses are used to detect acute conditions like urinary tract or kidney infections. In a nutshell, your kidneys take out the trash. They filter waste material, fl Continue reading >>

What Causes Urine To Smell Like Popcorn And How Is This Treated?

What Causes Urine To Smell Like Popcorn And How Is This Treated?

Is this cause for concern? Everyone knows that urine has a distinct odor. In fact, everyone’s urine has its own unique scent. This is normal, and nothing to be concerned about. Small fluctuations in odor — usually caused by what you’ve eaten and how much you’ve had to drink — typically aren’t cause for concern. Sometimes, your urine can even take on a popcorn-like scent. Here’s what may be causing this, other symptoms to watch for, and when you should see your doctor. Advanced diabetes can sometimes cause strong, sweet-smelling urine. This is due to the sugar and ketones that have accumulated in your urine. Although this can occur in people who have already been diagnosed with diabetes, it usually affects people who haven’t previously been diagnosed. Your doctor can diagnose high amounts of sugar or ketones with a simple urinalysis test. Other symptoms of undiagnosed diabetes include: excessive thirst increased urination blurred vision tingling hands or feet slow-healing sores frequent infections weight loss fatigue Red, swollen, or tender gums What you can do Managing diabetes is crucial. Your doctor may prescribe insulin to help regulate your body’s blood sugar, and recommend that you follow a diet low in carbs and sugars. Reducing your blood sugar is essential to controlling the condition. This will also help to reduce the sugar and ketones stored in the body, which will allow your urine to return to normal. If you’ve noticed that your urine just started smelling like popcorn, ask yourself if you’ve recently made changes in your diet. Foods all contain their own unique combinations of chemical compounds, and a change in diet can lead to a change in urine smell. Some common foods that may cause your urine to smell like popcorn include: popcorn (n Continue reading >>

What Should My Urine Smell Like?

What Should My Urine Smell Like?

The urine of a healthy and properly hydrated person should be light in color and have little odor. Health conditions, medications, supplements, the food you eat and dehydration can all affect the smell of your urine. Natural remedies can sometimes help, depending on the cause of your smelly urine. If you are concerned about the odor of your urine you should ask yourself these questions: When did I notice a change in odor? What medications or supplements do I take? Have I added or deleted any supplements from my regime? Do I drink enough water? What is the color of my urine? Do I have pain when I urinate? Do I have any other health conditions? Has my diet changed? Have I been exposed to any new toxins? The answers to the above questions may help you to connect the dots and figure out the cause of the odor of your urine. Rule Out Dehydration Urine will have a strong smell and dark color (like tea) when you are dehydrated. If you consume a lot of caffeine or alcohol, even if you drink enough fluids, you may be dehydrated. If you exercise a lot, even if you drink a lot, you could be dehydrated. Try to drink more water or herbal tea if you do not have plentiful and pale urine. Fluids are best consumed over the course of a day. Too much fluid at a time will just be flushed out of your body. Very large amounts of fluid at once can cause dangerous imbalances in your body. (Note – “sunshine yellow” urine can be cause by B vitamins. This bright yellow colored urine is not a cause for concern if it is caused by the vitamins; it is just your body flushing out the excess.) Sulfur Smell Certain foods can cause a sulfur smell (think of the smell of eggs boiling.) Garlic, onions and asparagus all have the potential to cause this type of odor in your urine. Ammonia Smell An ammoni Continue reading >>

You Asked: Why Does My Sweat Smell Like Ammonia?

You Asked: Why Does My Sweat Smell Like Ammonia?

TIME Health For more, visit TIME Health. Maybe you’ve noticed it after a big run: Your sweat has a strong, cloying odor, sort of like a public restroom, perhaps. You may disregard it as an inevitable byproduct of a strenuous workout, but that ammonia smell may be a red flag your diet isn’t keeping up with your energy needs. “Your body normally metabolizes carbohydrates to create the fuel it requires for exercise,” says Dr. William Roberts, a professor of sports and family medicine at the University of Minnesota. “But if you’re exercising hard and don’t have enough carbs to meet your body’s needs, your system will switch over to protein metabolism.” MORE: Is It Healthy To Sweat A Lot? When your body breaks down protein, ammonia is one of the byproducts, Roberts explains. Normally your liver would convert that ammonia into urea, a benign organic compound that your kidneys would dispel of in the form of urine. But if you’re starved of carbs and turning to protein for most of your energy, your liver may not be able to handle all the ammonia your body produces. In those instances, your sweat becomes the vehicle through which your body jettisons all of the extra ammonia in your system. “You see this more in people who eat low-carb and high-protein diets, or people who are over-exercisers, like ultra marathoners,” says Dr. Lewis Maharam, a New York-based physician and author of the Running Doc’s Guide to Healthy Running. Maharam says dehydration can also contribute to the smell because it makes your sweat more concentrated. “If your urine is very dark yellow or brown, you’re not drinking enough water, and that could be part of the reason you’re smelling that ammonia.” (He’s quick to add that over-hydration is a more common issue among endura Continue reading >>

Why Does My Sweat Smell Sweet?

Why Does My Sweat Smell Sweet?

The human body gives off a surprising variety of odors, which people spend a great deal of money and effort trying to mask or neutralize. A strange body or breath odor-different from the typical locker-room type of body odor with which most of us are familiar-could indicate a health problem. If you notice that your sweat has begun to smell sweet, you should bring it to your doctor's attention. Smells and Medicine In the past, doctors followed their noses toward the source of many diseases. Unusual body odors can range from fish to rotten eggs to maple syrup or apples. Today, doctors still recognize that some diseases, like yeast infections, carry distinctive odors. For example, an uncommon metabolic disorder called maple syrup urine disease can cause a sweet body odor. The most common cause for sweet body odor is ketoacidosis, a complication of Type I diabetes. Ketoacidosis With undiagnosed or inadequately controlled Type I diabetes, the body has trouble producing enough insulin to break down sugars for energy. Instead, the body burns fats. This leads to a buildup of acids called ketones in the blood and urine. The ketones can cause a distinctive fruity odor on your breath and body. It may be the first symptom that sends you to a doctor. Left untreated, ketoacidosis can lead to diabetic coma and even death. Symptoms of Ketoacidosis Aside from the fruity body odor, symptoms of ketoacidosis include sustained thirst, loss of appetite, breathing problems, headache, fatigue, stupor or loss of consciousness, flushed face, dry skin and mouth, nausea and vomiting, muscle stiffness or pain, and if it goes on too long, you could slip into a diabetic coma and even die. That fruity body odor should be your first clue to see a doctor. Tests and Diagnosis If your doctor suspects keto Continue reading >>

Ketones In Urine

Ketones In Urine

I know this is an old post, but people may still be checking for answers. I work in a laboratory where we do urinalysis constantly all day every day. In a pregnant woman, you can see ketones in the urine in two, but separate, circumstances. First is ketones in combination with any urine glucose (sugar) level. This may be a sign of gestational diabetes and you should start asking your doctor questions about it. Second is ketones by themselves. I'm 12 weeks pregnant and had ketones in my urine and was instructed by my doctor to go to the ER and get IV fluids. This was directly related to my eating habits, which at that point were near null because of the morning sickness. Because I was eating so little, and barely able to keep water down, my body was using my fat stores to supply nutrients to the baby. This breakdown of fat in such large amounts causes ketones as a waste product, which is then excreted through your urine. Ketones occur in the absence of carbs, when your body starts to use fat for calories. You will see ketones when you are eating very low calorie, very low carb, or have impaired insulin function. Ketones are concentrated in a state of dehydration. Excess glucose in urine indicates eating too many carbs (if you're diabetic) and/or impaired insulin function. Both are hallmarked by sweet smelling urine. Make sure you eat small meals during the day and add a night time snack, with a protein, to prevent ketosis while sleeping. If you think you have diabetes see a physician. I am 38 weeks pregnant and my urin showed high ketones this week. My blood sugar was in "acceptable" level; however, my doctor said that the presence of ketones in my urine means I need to drink alot more water because my body is converting carbs to sugar faster than I can exp Continue reading >>

My Urine Smells Sweet!

My Urine Smells Sweet!

My urine is VERY strong in odor, like a sickeningly sweet smell. I check my blood sugar regularly, and it is consistently 85–105. I have never had diabetes. I frequently feel an urgency to urinate, though I do not experience any pain or burning. What could be some causes of the sweet-smelling urine? — Nancy, Arizona Odor is one of the characteristics of urine that can be used to identify and describe medical conditions. Urine odor can also be affected by many foods, medications, and vitamin supplements; asparagus, for instance, has a characteristic effect on urine odor. While most aspects of urinalysis are quantitative and objective, urine has a characteristic smell that varies by species and concentration. Sweet-smelling urine may be the result of either glucose or ketone excesses in the urine. Since you have blood sugars consistently in the 85–105 range, it does not appear that you suffer from diabetes. However, ketonuria could be the cause, which comes from excessive dieting or other rare metabolic conditions. For example, a rare inborn metabolic syndrome called "maple syrup urine" occurs in infants and children, but this condition is associated with neurological problems and would not present itself in adulthood. The sense of urgency that you feel is likely unrelated to the odor of your urine. Of course, all urine parameters are affected by urine volume. Patients with very low fluid intake will have very concentrated urine, which is more likely to exude a particular odor. All unexplained symptoms should be evaluated by a physician. A standard urinalysis is an important first step, along with a careful history and a detailed physical examination. Learn more in the Everyday Health Healthy Living Center. Continue reading >>

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