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What Do Ketones Do To Your Kidneys?

Blood In The Urine

Blood In The Urine

Your child’s urine tests positive for blood during an annual physical. You’re understandably anxious and concerned. Most of the time blood in the urine is not a problem -- but occasionally it is. Dr. John Foreman, a pediatric kidney specialist, explains when an appointment with a specialist is needed. Studies in the United States, and other parts of the world, have examined large numbers of children and have found that hematuria, the medical term for blood in the urine, is a relatively common finding. In fact, two to five percent of school age children had tiny amounts of blood in their urine at some point in time during every day. About one percent of school-aged children continue to have blood in their urine when it is repeatedly tested. While this might seem scary, most causes of hematuria are harmless. Only a very few children who continued to have hematuria had serious kidney problems. The vast majority remained perfectly healthy and the blood disappeared after a number of years. Usually the blood cannot be seen with the naked eye and can only be detected in the laboratory using a special urine dipstick that measures blood, protein, sugar, ketones, and products from bacterial infection. The urine dipsticks are very sensitive and turn positive with tiny amounts of blood that may be seen only when the urine is observed under the microscope (called microscopic hematuria). Most of the time blood in the urine causes no pain to your child. Even when blood is visible to the naked eye, it is very rarely a lot of blood, so you don’t have to worry about your child losing too much blood. Causes of Blood in the Urine Besides kidney problems, there are other causes of hematuria. The tests that your doctor may perform depend on whether there are other findings from the uri Continue reading >>

What You Should Know About Ketones

What You Should Know About Ketones

When the body cannot obtain energy from food sources of carbohydrates such as bread, potatoes, rice, noodles, cereal, etc., due to the lack of available insulin, the body is starved for energy and starts breaking down fat as an energy source. A by-product of fat breakdown is ketone production, which is toxic to the body. This complication is known as diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) and can lead to illness or even death. Ketones are produced mainly by type 1 diabetics (children and adults), insulin pump users who may stop getting their insulin for some reason, as well as pregnant women who have gestational, type 1 or type 2 diabetes. Although more rare, people with type 2 diabetes can also produce ketones when they are ill, have an acute trauma incident, or have an infection. During illness, the body is under a great deal of stress and produces extra hormones like adrenaline. Adrenaline helps fight off the infection, but this works against insulin, which then leads to ketone production. Ketones accumulate in the blood and can be recognized in the blood about 2-4 hours prior to appearing in urine. This makes a blood test more accurate than a urine test to detect ketone levels. Time is very important in diagnosing ketoacidosis. There are multiple urine ketone testing strips on the market, but a new meter called the Nova Max Plus has the ability to test glucose as well as ketones in one meter. Here is how it works: The meter will alert you to test for ketones when the glucose reading is over 250mg/dl. A blood drop is taken only from your finger tips (not an alternate site) and used with a special ketone strip, which is green (the blue strip is used for glucose testing). The meter will indicate KET to let you know you are testing for ketones. The strip must be used within 2 minu Continue reading >>

Ketosis & Kidney Failure

Ketosis & Kidney Failure

Ketosis happens when your body resorts to fat for energy after your stored carbohydrates have been burned out. It often occurs when people fast and exercise. But most commonly, ketosis occurs in people who eat low-carb, high-protein diets, which are also called ketogenic diets. There’s some evidence that ketosis can tax your kidneys, leading to kidney stones and low blood pressure. In diabetics, a variant of ketosis can be fatal. However, a small but growing group of health professionals say ketosis is not the poison you’ve been lead to think it was, and it may be better for you than high-carbohydrate eating. Your specific dietary habits are best advised by your healthcare provider or nutritionist. Video of the Day Ketosis happens when you get a buildup of a substance known as ketones, or ketone bodies in your blood. They are released when your body’s carbohydrate stores run out and you have to break down fat stores for energy. Dieters tend to deliberately cause ketosis because it makes you feel less hungry. However, ketosis also makes you feel tired and sluggish, because as "Medical News Today" reports, ketones aren’t the most efficient source of energy, especially for your brain. Ketosis can also harm your kidneys. Annually, more than 100,000 people are diagnosed with kidney failure in the United States, reports the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases, or NIDDK. The condition is marked by the inability of your kidneys to do their job of eliminating wastes. One treatment for kidney failure is dialysis, a draining and lengthy artificial blood cleansing process. Another option is a kidney transplant. The NIDDK states that the cost of care for patients with kidney failure reached close to $32 billion in 2005. The federal government sub Continue reading >>

Ketosis: What Is Ketosis?

Ketosis: What Is Ketosis?

Ketosis is a normal metabolic process. When the body does not have enough glucose for energy, it burns stored fats instead; this results in a build-up of acids called ketones within the body. Some people encourage ketosis by following a diet called the ketogenic or low-carb diet. The aim of the diet is to try and burn unwanted fat by forcing the body to rely on fat for energy, rather than carbohydrates. Ketosis is also commonly observed in patients with diabetes, as the process can occur if the body does not have enough insulin or is not using insulin correctly. Problems associated with extreme levels of ketosis are more likely to develop in patients with type 1 diabetes compared with type 2 diabetes patients. Ketosis occurs when the body does not have sufficient access to its primary fuel source, glucose. Ketosis describes a condition where fat stores are broken down to produce energy, which also produces ketones, a type of acid. As ketone levels rise, the acidity of the blood also increases, leading to ketoacidosis, a serious condition that can prove fatal. People with type 1 diabetes are more likely to develop ketoacidosis, for which emergency medical treatment is required to avoid or treat diabetic coma. Some people follow a ketogenic (low-carb) diet to try to lose weight by forcing the body to burn fat stores. What is ketosis? In normal circumstances, the body's cells use glucose as their primary form of energy. Glucose is typically derived from dietary carbohydrates, including: sugar - such as fruits and milk or yogurt starchy foods - such as bread and pasta The body breaks these down into simple sugars. Glucose can either be used to fuel the body or be stored in the liver and muscles as glycogen. If there is not enough glucose available to meet energy demands, th Continue reading >>

Protein In Urine

Protein In Urine

Your kidneys filter waste products from your blood while retaining what your body needs — including proteins. However, some diseases and conditions allow proteins to pass through the filters of your kidneys, causing protein in urine. Conditions that can cause a temporary rise in the levels of protein in urine, but don't necessarily indicate kidney damage, include: Diseases and conditions that can cause persistently elevated levels of protein in urine, which might indicate kidney disease, include: Amyloidosis (buildup of abnormal proteins in your organs) Certain drugs, such as nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs Endocarditis (an infection of the inner lining of the heart) Focal segmental glomerulosclerosis (FSGS) Glomerulonephritis (inflammation in the kidney cells that filter waste from the blood) Hodgkin's lymphoma (Hodgkin's disease) (Hodgkin's disease) IgA nephropathy (Berger's disease) (kidney inflammation resulting from a buildup of the antibody immunoglobulin A) Orthostatic proteinuria (urine protein level rises when in an upright position) Pregnancy Sarcoidosis (development and growth of clumps of inflammatory cells in your organs) Continue reading >>

Can Keto//os Cause Kidney Stones?

Can Keto//os Cause Kidney Stones?

The use of exogenous ketones is a new and novel technology. So the safety profile of a ketone supplement like KETO//OS begins to emerge as more research is being done. Often people are concerned about kidney or liver health when it comes to exogenous ketones. What the studies are actually finding, is that ketones, specifically beta hydroxybutyrate (BHB), is actually beneficial to the health of our liver and kidneys. There are also many other benefits of taking ketones as well. The risk of kidney stones can be a concern, as we know there is a small risk from a ketogenic diet standpoint. However, potassium supplementation decreases that risk of getting kidney stones substantially. Exogenous ketone and potassium supplementation while following a ketogenic diet, is an effective combination. To learn more about, and order exogenous ketones, go to the Prüvit online store. Continue reading >>

Ketosis

Ketosis

Tweet Ketosis is a state the body may find itself in either as a result of raised blood glucose levels or as a part of low carb dieting. Low levels of ketosis is perfectly normal. However, high levels of ketosis in the short term can be serious and the long term effects of regular moderate ketosis are only partially known at the moment. What is ketosis? Ketosis is a state the body goes into if it needs to break down body fat for energy. The state is marked by raised levels of ketones in the blood which can be used by the body as fuel. Ketones which are not used for fuel are excreted out of the body via the kidneys and the urine. Is ketosis the same as ketoacidosis? There is often confusion as to the difference between ketosis and ketoacidosis. Ketosis is the state whereby the body is producing ketones. In ketosis, the level of ketones in the blood can be anything between normal to very high. Diabetic ketoacidosis, also known as DKA, only describes the state in which the level of ketones is either high or very high. In ketoacidosis, the amount of ketones in the blood is sufficient to turn the blood acidic, which is a dangerous medical state. When does ketosis occur? Ketosis will take place when the body needs energy and there is not sufficient glucose available for the body. This can typically happen when the body is lacking insulin and blood glucose levels become high. Other causes can be the result of being on a low carb diet. A low level of carbohydrate will lead to low levels of insulin, and therefore the body will produce ketones which do not rely on insulin to get into and fuel the body’s cells. A further cause of ketosis, less relevant to people with diabetes, is a result of excessive alcohol consumption. Is ketosis dangerous? The NHS describes ketosis as a pote Continue reading >>

Low-carb Dieting And Kidney Health: Setting The Record Straight

Low-carb Dieting And Kidney Health: Setting The Record Straight

A s I walk down my hospital unit, on my way to the lunch room, I try to not be so conspicuous. The aroma of crisp fatty bacon leaves a trail of evidence that I simply can’t cover. In normal situations, I wouldn’t care if people saw me eating bacon. However, I’m a dietitian, and unless you are caught up on research, registered nutritionists should NOT be eating bacon. Explaining myself sometimes takes a lot of energy, and the last thing I need on my lunch break is a headache. Thus, I often chose my battles when it comes to explaining my low-carb, high-fat lifestyle. For clinical workers who are not up to speed, I may be viewed as a clinician who lacks integrity. Those of us who follow Carb Nite® or Carb Backloading™, know that simply isn’t the case, and in fact, quite the opposite. One of the biggest misconceptions I find is the thought that higher protein, or low-carb diets, cause damage to the kidneys. As I chomp on my bacon people often look at me with a dumbfounded look and ask, “Isn’t all that protein bad on your kidneys?” I thought this topic was old news. I was incorrect. It’s actually one of the most common questions, next to the saturated fat topic, that seems to keep resurfacing with whoever questions the low-carb lifestyle. It’s time to set the record straight. • Higher protein diets are safe for the general population. • There is a small population who may need to keep their protein intake at a minimum. • High-fat, moderate protein diets may have a protective effect in those with insulin resistance. It’s important to note the researched reviewed was not done on athletes; the recommendations made are for the average population. Higher protein diets are safe, for most people Research shows that high-protein diets may be harmful for Continue reading >>

Abnormal Contents Of Urine

Abnormal Contents Of Urine

Normally, urine contains water and wastes, such as urea, uric acid, creatinine, and some ions. However, some of these substances may be abnormally elevated, which usually indicates that something is wrong with the body. The following are some of the abnormal constituents of urine and some possible causes. Albumin Albumin is a type of protein, which is a normal component of plasma—the fluid component of blood. When albumin is found to be excessive in the urine, it may indicate that the tiny filtering units in the kidney, called nephrons, are damaged or destroyed. Elevated albumin in the urine is termed albuminuria. Bilrubin Bilirubin, when modified by the kidneys, contributes to the classical yellow color of urine. It is a byproduct that results from the breakdown of hemoglobin—the red pigment in red blood cells. When levels of bilirubin in urine is above normal, the condition is called bilirubinuria. This may indicate liver disease or obstructive biliary disease. Glucose The presence of glucose or blood sugar in urine is called glucosuria. It may indicate that the person has diabetes. Ketone bodies The presence of ketone bodies in the urine may indicate diabetes or anorexia. It may also be elevated during fasting and starvation. Microbes The presence of microorganisms, such as bacteria or fungus may indicate urinary tract infection. Blood The red blood cells in blood should not be found in urine because they are too large to pass through the nephrons. Hematuria is the clinical term used when red blood cells are present in the urine. It may indicate damage to the kidney, such as in renal or kidney disease. Sometimes, blood may be present because of the presence of kidney stones. White blood cells When white blood cells are present in the urine, it may indicate infect Continue reading >>

Ketones

Ketones

By-products formed when the body breaks down fat for energy. When the body is starved of glucose or, as in the case of Type 1 diabetes, does not have enough insulin to use the glucose that is in the bloodstream, it begins breaking down fat reserves for energy. Unlike glucose, which “burns clean,” the breakdown of fat creates potentially toxic by-products called ketones, which accumulate in the blood. An excessive amount of ketones in the blood is called ketosis. When the kidneys filter ketones into the urine, the condition is called ketonuria and can be detected by urine ketone tests. If enough ketones accumulate in the blood, they can cause a potentially life-threatening chemical imbalance known as ketoacidosis. The symptoms of ketoacidosis include nausea, vomiting, tiredness, frequent urination, and a fruity odor to the breath. Anyone with symptoms of ketoacidosis should seek medical help immediately. Ketoacidosis is often what causes people to first be diagnosed with Type 1 diabetes: Beta cells in the pancreas stop making enough insulin, thus preventing body cells from getting energy in the form of glucose. The body responds by burning fats for fuel, creating an excess of ketones in the blood. As dehydration also sets in, the person develops ketoacidosis. The nausea and vomiting that accompany ketoacidosis are sometimes mistaken for the symptoms of a bad flu. People with diabetes, particularly those with Type 1 diabetes, are at increased risk of ketoacidosis when they are sick. The stress of illness tends to raise blood glucose levels. But since illness often decreases a person’s appetite, resulting in less food intake than usual, some people mistakenly decrease their insulin dosages. In fact, increased amounts of insulin are often needed when a person is sick. Continue reading >>

Does A Ketogenic Diet Cause Kidney Stones?

Does A Ketogenic Diet Cause Kidney Stones?

I remember the first time I learned about the connection between a diet high in sugar and gout, kidney stones and heart disease. I was reading a book (I don’t remember which one) that was laying out the evidence that showed a clear link between sugar consumption and those diseases and it immediately peaked my interest because I didn’t know that gout was still a thing. I had only heard of old French monarchs having it and honestly didn’t know it was still around until just a few weeks before reading that book. Just a few weeks prior to reading that, I learned that my son’s Father in Law had gout and occasional kidney stones and as I read that passage in the book, I thought about calling him and telling him what I read. I decided against it and figured I would bring it up the next time I saw him at church. Unfortunately, before I ever got a chance to say anything to him, he had a heart attack. He’s fine now but I have always felt bad I didn’t immediately make a call. I realize it wouldn’t have done much given how quickly it all happened but still, I should have said something. Since then, probably the most common question I get about the ketogenic diet is whether or not it will cause kidney stones and there is definitely a connection but possibly not how you think. First let’s go over how kidney stones are formed. How Kidney Stones are Formed At one point in time it was thought that uric acid was produced solely from the breakdown of purines found in foods like liver, pork, mushrooms, anchovies, mackerel and dried beans which is why most patients that were susceptible to kidney stones or gout were put on a low purine diet. Unfortunately those diets didn’t work too well and almost always had to be supplemented with additional medications that controlled t Continue reading >>

Breaking Down Your Urinalysis

Breaking Down Your Urinalysis

Contents: Introduction Conclusion Introduction If you’re a lupus patient, I’m sure at some point you’ve heard those wonderful words “…now, go pee in this cup.” Unfortunately, holding your morning pee while trying to aim into the miniature size sterile Dixie® cup is the easy part. What is not so easy to understand is the medical jargon that follows when you get the results of your urinalysis. Doctors causally throw out words like ketones and you think, “What, my pee is musical?” Or leukocytes and you go, “Isn’t that some sort of dinosaur fossil? Or creatinine and you ponder, “Are you speaking Latin?” These are just some of the many medical terms that often leave lupus patients scratching their already itchy heads (thanks alopecia) and wondering what on earth is going on? So why don’t we delve a little deeper….into the toilet. Let’s translate what your pee really says about you. Sometimes, doctors don’t have the time to explain the complicated medical jargon – which isn’t very helpful. So how about the CliffsNotes® version? Let’s get down to it, and trust me, urine for a real treat. Sorry I just couldn’t hold that in! Back to top The Basics DEFINITION A urinalysis is the physical, chemical, and microscopic examination of your pee. It involves a slew of different tests to measure various compounds and detect the stuff that pass through the urine. WHY PEE IN A CUP? Urinalyses are done as part of a medical exam to look for signs of disease. If you have signs of kidney disease or nephritis, your doctor will most likely have you perform tests on a regular basis. Sometimes urinalyses are used to detect acute conditions like urinary tract or kidney infections. In a nutshell, your kidneys take out the trash. They filter waste material, fl Continue reading >>

Urinalysis And Urine Culture

Urinalysis And Urine Culture

Urinalysis is testing of the urine. A urine sample is usually collected using the clean-catch method or another sterile method. For example, a method to obtain an uncontaminated urine sample involves passing a catheter through the urethra into the bladder. Urine cultures, in which bacteria from a urine sample are grown in a laboratory, are done to diagnose a urinary tract infection. Cultures are not part of routine urinalysis. The sample of urine must be obtained by the clean-catch method (see Obtaining a Clean-Catch Urine Sample) or by briefly inserting a sterile catheter through the urethra into the bladder. Urinalysis can be used to detect and measure the level of various substances in the urine, including protein, glucose (sugar), ketones, blood, and other substances. These tests use a thin strip of plastic (dipstick) impregnated with chemicals that react with substances in the urine and quickly change color. Sometimes the test results are confirmed with more sophisticated and accurate laboratory analysis of the urine. The urine may be examined under a microscope to check for the presence of red and white blood cells, crystals, and casts (impressions of the kidney tubules created when urinary cells, protein, or both precipitate out in the tubules and are passed in the urine). Protein in the urine (proteinuria) can usually be detected by dipstick when present in large amounts. Protein may appear constantly or only intermittently in the urine, depending on the cause. Proteinuria may occur normally after strenuous exercise, such as marathon running, but is usually a sign of a kidney disorder. Small amounts of protein in the urine may be an early sign of kidney damage due to diabetes. Such small amounts may not be detected by dipstick. In these cases, urine will need to Continue reading >>

Of The Keto Diet?

Of The Keto Diet?

There are many awesome benefits that come with adopting a low-carb ketogenic diet, such as weight loss, decreased cravings and even possibly reduce disease risks. With that being said, it’s also good to talk about possible ketosis side-effects when ingesting these specific ketone supplements, so you know fully what to expect when you get started on this mission. If you’ve already heard about some of the side-effects that come with this special diet and are starting to freak out, don’t panic. We’re going to break down everything you need to know when it comes to what your body will experience when using these supplements for the first time. It’s important to remember, not everyone experiences side-effects when starting a ketogenic diet and thankfully, the symptoms are all very temporary and it can pass very quickly. It varies with the individual, but just to make sure all your bases are covered, we’re going to break down each possible side effect that you could possibly experience. 1. Flu Symptoms Within the first 2-4 days of beginning this diet, a common side-effect is known as the “ketosis flu” or “induction flu” because it mimics the symptoms of the actual flu. This means you might experience: Headaches Lethargy Lack of motivation Brain fog or confusion Irritability​ Although these symptoms typically go away completely within a few days, they are also completely avoidable if you stay very hydrated and increase your salt intake and like always, be sure you're eating enough fat. 2. Dizzyness & Drowsiness​ As you start dumping water, you'll lose minerals such as salt, potassium and magnesium. Having lower levels of these minerals will make you tired, lightheaded or dizzy. You may also experience muscle cramps, headaches and skin itchiness. Fatigue Continue reading >>

Diabetes: Ketone Testing

Diabetes: Ketone Testing

www.CardioSmart.org Not having enough insulin can keep your body from using sugar for energy, even when your blood sugar level is very high. Instead, your body has to break down fats to get the fuel it needs. The fats are broken down into a type of acid which, if it builds up, can cause serious problems with vital organs. These acids are called ketones. When ketone levels get high, your kidneys release them into your urine. Having large amounts of ketones can be a sign of diabetic ketoacidosis. This is a dangerous condition caused by a lack of insulin. When to test for ketones Test for ketones whenever: • You feel sick to your stomach, are vomiting, or have belly pain. • You have an illness or infection. • You are dehydrated. • Your blood sugar is higher than the level your doctor set for you (for example, above 300). • You have missed a dose of your diabetes medicine. • You have symptoms of high blood sugar. • You are pregnant. Ask your doctor about testing for ketones during pregnancy. Symptoms of high blood sugar If you have mild high blood sugar, you may feel very thirsty and may urinate more, especially at night. Your skin may be warm and dry. If you have moderate high blood sugar, your breathingmay be fast and deep. Your breath may have a fruity odor. You may lose your appetite and have stomach pain and vomiting. You may become dizzy and weak when you sit or stand. Your urine may be dark, and you may urinate less. Your vision could become blurred. If you have severe high blood sugar, you may have rapid, deep breathing with a strong, fruity breath odor. You may feel very sleepy and weak, and you may faint. You may have a fast heart rate and a weak pulse. This is a very dangerous condition. How to test for ketones Blood test Continue reading >>

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