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What Do Ketoacidosis Mean

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Dr. Laughlin shares the symptoms of hyperglycemia. For more information on diabetes visit http://www.empowher.com/condition/dia...

For A Diabetic, On Insulin And Oral Hypoglycemics, In Case Of Sudden Episode Of Hyperglycemia, Any Way To Reduce Sugar Urgently Without Medical Help?

What do you mean by sudden hyperglycaemia? In general, hyperglycaemia itself has no serious short-term symptoms. All the damage is long term. For the short term, take your oral medication or some short acting insulin and pee out the excess sugar. If the hyperglycaemia (plus lack of insulin and low water) is causing severe acute symptoms like feverish feeling, dehydration or difficulty thinking, this is possibly ketoacidosis and is serious. It is too late for a blood sugar reduction, rather it is time for an ambulance or at least a trip to the hospital. In the United States, most doctors will give you a sliding scale that tells you how many units of insulin to inject at various blood sugar levels. If your sugars are over 300 mg/dl (16–17 mmol/L), usually you’ll be told to call in to an advice nurse. Most emergency rooms would treat blood sugar levels that high if you come in—but if you don’t have insurance, that’s $5000 or more for a few units of insulin. I can’t tell you that a few units of insulin will take care of the problem for you, but if my sugars were 300+, and maybe once a year they are, that’s what I do for myself. Continue reading >>

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  1. James Pearson

    We get few actual fake calls, most are at least made with good intentions, even if they don’t really require an ambulance. When it comes to a fake call, drunk-abetics can be annoying.
    A drunk driver gets pulled over by the cops, he staggers out of his car, fails a field sobriety test, then tells the officer, “I’m not drunk, I’m diabetic, and my sugar is too high, I was going home to get my insulin”. The symptoms of hyperglycemia are similar to being drunk, including ketoacidosis, which causes a smell similar to alcohol on a person’s breath.
    So, we get dragged out of bed at 0200 (if we’re lucky enough to be in bed) to check a person’s blood sugar with a glucometer, and tell the cops that whatever is going on with their prisoner, it isn’t related to blood glucose levels.
    Another similar call is the stainless steel induced myocardial infarction (SSIMI). That’s when the application of handcuffs causes the patient to experience rapid onset chest pain and shortness of breath, which they are sure is an impending heart attack, meaning they should bypass the jail and go to the ER.
    Given a choice of ER or jail, the patient will usually beat the EMTs into the ambulance. Some of them, knowing that they will go to jail as soon as the ER clears them will decide to just go with the cops and get it over with. A very few actually end up admitted to the hospital for a genuine medical problem.

    Let me also add: This isn’t meant as any slam against diabetics, only those pretenders trying to avoid consequences. If someone is diabetic, and appears drunk, it’s a serious medical emergency. Do not assume anything, get help.

  2. David Wayne

    Chest pains from an “arguement”. Usually the patient is young (20s) with no medical history, they just want to get away from the arguement. Which I understand getting away to let things cool down, but an ambulance ride to the hospital is a bit much.

  3. Scarlett DéLìon

    This isn’t actually a fake call so much as one of the weirdest calls I have ever gone on. Recently we had been paged for a female patient with abdominal pain, she was also in that age range where there was a possibility of pregnancy.
    We get to the house and I walk in, announce “Ambulance.” and….. nothing…. no reply, no moaning, no groaning, nothing. I start to search the house, going to the living room from the kitchen (came in through the garage) and no one in the living room…. strange… but then again could be in the bedroom. Knock on the first bedroom door and nothing. No one. Still no sound. Go to the next room and same thing. Eventually me and my trainee have checked all rooms in the place and theres literally no one there but us.
    At this point I’m concerned, we get in contact with dispatch and they say that there was no vehicle at the location; which is why the patient called 911.

    Eventually we give up the search and return to station. I check facebook and look up the person that called. It’s a legit person, but they’ve been posting for the past hour or two, I never messaged them but it was somewhat annoying that they never even tried to make contact with 911 again after saying “hey I got a ride” or something.

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What Does A Doctor Do When A Patient Comes In For An Exam And Smells Really Bad?

I was a doctor in China, and grew up in a hospital because my father is a doctor too. (in the old days, the government run organizations usually have apartments for their employees, :) don't know if it's a good part of this communist country, at least you don't need to buy a house and maintain it, just kidding) So part of my childhood is weird compared to other kids.I usually did my homework with my father’s nurse in a small room next to my father’s office. I saw many things, people came here in a very severe health situation, people died here leaving their crying families alone. The most in my memory is crying, you can hear that everywhere in a hospital. About smell, I don't think they have time to think about this. Then, as a doctor, I don't care about that too. When I pick my friends or I teach my kids, an important thing is to “respect others”, that means I want them to be “appropriate” in normal life ( I don't know if I use this word correctly, English is not my native language) including a well dress style and being clean. But, a patient, not “normal”, sometimes they can't take a shower because they are very sick, sometimes they forgot taking a shower because Continue reading >>

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Popular Questions

  1. James Pearson

    We get few actual fake calls, most are at least made with good intentions, even if they don’t really require an ambulance. When it comes to a fake call, drunk-abetics can be annoying.
    A drunk driver gets pulled over by the cops, he staggers out of his car, fails a field sobriety test, then tells the officer, “I’m not drunk, I’m diabetic, and my sugar is too high, I was going home to get my insulin”. The symptoms of hyperglycemia are similar to being drunk, including ketoacidosis, which causes a smell similar to alcohol on a person’s breath.
    So, we get dragged out of bed at 0200 (if we’re lucky enough to be in bed) to check a person’s blood sugar with a glucometer, and tell the cops that whatever is going on with their prisoner, it isn’t related to blood glucose levels.
    Another similar call is the stainless steel induced myocardial infarction (SSIMI). That’s when the application of handcuffs causes the patient to experience rapid onset chest pain and shortness of breath, which they are sure is an impending heart attack, meaning they should bypass the jail and go to the ER.
    Given a choice of ER or jail, the patient will usually beat the EMTs into the ambulance. Some of them, knowing that they will go to jail as soon as the ER clears them will decide to just go with the cops and get it over with. A very few actually end up admitted to the hospital for a genuine medical problem.

    Let me also add: This isn’t meant as any slam against diabetics, only those pretenders trying to avoid consequences. If someone is diabetic, and appears drunk, it’s a serious medical emergency. Do not assume anything, get help.

  2. David Wayne

    Chest pains from an “arguement”. Usually the patient is young (20s) with no medical history, they just want to get away from the arguement. Which I understand getting away to let things cool down, but an ambulance ride to the hospital is a bit much.

  3. Scarlett DéLìon

    This isn’t actually a fake call so much as one of the weirdest calls I have ever gone on. Recently we had been paged for a female patient with abdominal pain, she was also in that age range where there was a possibility of pregnancy.
    We get to the house and I walk in, announce “Ambulance.” and….. nothing…. no reply, no moaning, no groaning, nothing. I start to search the house, going to the living room from the kitchen (came in through the garage) and no one in the living room…. strange… but then again could be in the bedroom. Knock on the first bedroom door and nothing. No one. Still no sound. Go to the next room and same thing. Eventually me and my trainee have checked all rooms in the place and theres literally no one there but us.
    At this point I’m concerned, we get in contact with dispatch and they say that there was no vehicle at the location; which is why the patient called 911.

    Eventually we give up the search and return to station. I check facebook and look up the person that called. It’s a legit person, but they’ve been posting for the past hour or two, I never messaged them but it was somewhat annoying that they never even tried to make contact with 911 again after saying “hey I got a ride” or something.

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What is GENETICALLY MODIFIED BACTERIUM? What does GENETICALLY MODIFIED BACTERIUM mean? GENETICALLY MODIFIED BACTERIUM meaning - GENETICALLY MODIFIED BACTERIUM definition - GENETICALLY MODIFIED BACTERIUM explanation. Source: Wikipedia.org article, adapted under https://creativecommons.org/licenses/... license. SUBSCRIBE to our Google Earth flights channel - https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC6Uu... Genetically modified bacteria were the first organisms to be modified in the laboratory, due to their simple genetics. These organisms are now used for several purposes, and are particularly important in producing large amounts of pure human proteins for use in medicine. The first example of this occurred in 1978 when Herbert Boyer, working at a University of California laboratory, took a version of the human insulin gene and inserted into the bacterium Escherichia coli to produce synthetic "human" insulin. Four years later, it was approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration. The drug industry has made use of this discovery to produce medication for diabetes. Similar bacteria have been used to produce clotting factors to treat haemophilia, and human growth hormone to treat various fo

Would You Eat Food That Was Genetically Modified?

Not only do I eat GMOs, I willingly inject myself with GMOs 5–8 times a day! It is my secret to a long life. “What?” I can hear your gasping disbelief from here. “Why would you do something so harmful to yourself? Don't you realize how BAD GMOS are?” I have Type 1 diabetes. For those of you who don't know, it is an autoimmune disease that causes the islet cells of the pancreas (they are responsible for producing insulin) to die off. When your body cannot produce its own insulin, you must inject man made insulin several times a day. If you don't, your blood glucose levels will rise to dangerous levels and your blood chemistry goes wonky (scientific medical term). Without insulin, your blood begins burning fat and muscle for fuel instead of carbs. The acidic byproduct is called ketones. You may have heard of low-carb diets that suggest you check your urine for ketones and applaud you if you manage to get a pink square on the ketone strip. However, with Type 1, that pink square is terrifying. It means you are going into ketoacidosis, which is a life threatening emergency. Without treatment, you will die. Quickly. If you have Type 1 diabetes (only loosely related to Type 2 di Continue reading >>

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Popular Questions

  1. Liang-Hai Sie

    Nothing to do with his diabetes, more with his molar problem?
    He might have contracted a foodborne infection, often seen when living under less than optimal hygienic circumstances... That can also be a viral infection e.g. acute viral gastro-enteritis, viral hepatitis (there are so many, A and e aren't transfered by blood contact) etc. etc.
    For his health, he better take good care of his diabetes, if not can get blind, have a heart attack, a stroke, or terminal end stage kidney disease (in the US 1 out of 3 is due to diabetes!). Many not well educated diabetics aren't motivated to do anything about controling their diabetes since it doesn't cause any symptom, and wait until catastrophe strikes, by then having been so much damaged that all we docs can do is minimal damage control, too late: Complications of diabetes

  2. Michael Soso

    If he has a history of nauseating headache, the headaches could simply be migraine attacks, unrelated to his diabetes and tooth problem. This is the least alarming interpretation of the facts provided.
    Unfortunately, other possibilities are much more concerning. If he has a dental abscess, the possible complications in the presence of poorly controlled diabetes are numerous, as other posters have indicated. Visits to a dentist and a doctor would appear warranted.
    I hope it all proves to be minor and resolves without much trouble. The comments provided by healthcare providers describe some of the more serious problems that might develop. The Original Poster needs to read these judiciously.
    I suspect some physicians reading your question would immediately want to send a MedEvac helicopter to airlift your father to a major urban hospital. To grossly understate the situation, physicians are worrywarts. If you show us a hangnail, we're already worrying about your imminent need for amputation before you die from gangrene and sepsis because, believe me, we've seen it. No symptom, no matter how seemingly innocuous to a patient, is casually dismissed by a thoughtful doctor. To the contrary, we can't suppress the reflexive review of all the horrors we might be overlooking.
    Consequently, I hope the comments your question elicits are helpful rather than simply terrifying. Best wishes to you and your father.

  3. Steve Rapaport

    Could mean several things, but one of them is deadly dangerous, diabetes related, and easily preventable, so I'd suggest preventing that one right away.
    Tell your dad to drink lots of water, and take a bit of insulin if he has some.
    That way if he's working his way up to a Diabetic Ketoacidosis or an HHS attack, you can head it off right away. They both result from inadequate insulin levels and inadequate water levels, and can be triggered by an inflammation or infection (such as a tooth problem).
    More on both here: Diabetic Ketoacidosis and Hyperglycemic Hyperosmolar Syndrome

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