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What Do Exogenous Ketones Do?

How To Use Exogenous Ketones

How To Use Exogenous Ketones

Exogenous Ketones were introduced in 2014, about the same time as I was recovering from having my daughter, and therefore very concerned about weight loss. But let’s back up for a bit, because if you’re here reading about Exogenous Ketones, and how to drink ketones for weight loss, let’s start at the beginning so you have a firm foundation to build if you do decided to take a ketone supplement for weight loss. First of all, Exogenous Ketones (we’ll get to exactly what those are in just a sec…hang in there) were introduced as the Ketogenic Diet started gaining popularity among the health and fitness community, as well as with the scientific community. Why? Well, it’s all about health. For so long, doctors and researchers have preached the benefits of a low-fat diet to prevent and correct all sort of things like heart disease, high cholesterol, obesity, etc. But….they may have been wrong. I am not a doctor, and do not have a medical degree, but I’ve done my homework, and I’ve lived (and am currently living) a ketogenic lifestyle. So I’ve done this, I’ve read loads and loads about it, and I’ve even been able to help many of my friends use the things I’ve learned to lead healthier lives. But, as with anything concerning your health, please make sure you have a discussion with your doctor before making a drastic change. Related: I lost 23 pounds in 60 days of Keto. Here’s how. Ok, legal stuff over, here’s what a Ketogenic Diet is: A Ketogenic Diet, also know as the Keto Diet, is a very high fat, very low carb, moderate protein diet that is very popular because it can cause you to lose body fat very fast, and study after study after study has linked Keto with benefits against cancer, diabetes, Alzheimer’s, epilepsy, and more. Eating Ketogenical Continue reading >>

Do Exogenous Ketone Supplements Work?

Do Exogenous Ketone Supplements Work?

There’s debate raging about which dietary tactic is the god particle for making you leaner, faster and healthier. How the ketogenic diet option squares off against the low carb route is vital for understanding the ways in which exogenous ketone supplements work. To get into ketosis the natural way, you need to keep your carb intake low enough for long enough for your body to begin using use fat as fuel. Your liver then converts a portion of that fat into energy molecules called ketones. These work together with glucose as a fuel source, but can actually kick in faster, allowing your body to operate more economically during lengthy, high-energy exercise efforts. To be in ketosis, you need to get very specific about the macronutrient ratios hanging off your fork. This means eating 75% fats, 20% protein and 5% carbohydrates. It’ll see you getting 5-10% of your total calories from carbohydrates, which is roughly 25-30g of carbs per day, and diligently keeping this below the 50g threshold creates the ketosis that burns stored fat. Unlike the no-limit-protein option on the table when going low carb, eating more than 0.67-0.81g of protein per pound of bodyweight can hoof you out of ketosis because too much of it can be converted into glucose, blunting the benefits of the ketones. On the plus side, you will have a high fat intake, making your energy levels more balanced so you can train at higher intensities. Fortunately, you don’t need to be a dietary math savant to cash in on these rewards because the supplement eggheads took the liberty of creating exogenous ketones, which act as direct substitutes to the ones your body creates. Unlike other fat burners that give you the skits jitters, these are actually helping exercisers reach new personal bests while getting leaner, Continue reading >>

Exogenous Ketones For Fat Burn

Exogenous Ketones For Fat Burn

OVERVIEW Exogenous ketones are the newest scientific breakthrough in the world of health and wellness, making the job of achieving ketosis, the state in which the body is burning fat/ketones as fuel rather than glucose, much easier. They come in powder form and are ingested exogenously (a fancy word for outside the body). Exogenous ketones are comprised of beta-hydroxybutyrate salts, which flood your bloodstream with ketones and put the body in ketosis within 30-60 minutes. This means that you can reap all the amazing health benefits of being in ketosis in a simple and effective way (just mix the exogenous ketones with water & drink!). Research is now linking exogenous ketones to a multitude of benefits, including more efficient weight loss, athletic performance enhancement, cancer prevention, cognitive improvement, neuroprotection and anti-inflammatory properties. (See research links below.) In addition, exogenous ketones are an extremely useful tool to easily transition to the ketogenic diet. When taken daily, they can reduce carb/sugar cravings, turn on your fat burners, give you more energy, and keep "low-carb flu" at bay. So bottom line, exogenous ketones are perfect for anyone looking to improve their health and wellbeing. WHY USE THEM Reason #1 - Fat Burning Exogenous ketones for fat burn. Taking exogenous ketones will get you into ketosis quickly. Once your body is done using the exogenous ketones you ingested as fuel, then it will start looking for other places to get ketones from. And lucky for you, ketones are made from the fat stored in your body! So as your body produces more of these ketones as fuel, you end up burning fat. Reason #2 - Energy Our bodies use ketones via our mitochondria to generate energy. They are an alternative fuel source to glucose and Continue reading >>

Do Ketones Matter?

Do Ketones Matter?

A low-carb diet is, indisputably, one of the most effective ways to lose excess body fat. Over and over again, studies have proven the myriad benefits of carbohydrate restriction. Being fat-adapted brings several advantages, as you will have access to your greatest energy store - body fat. Do More Ketones Enhance Fat Loss? Contrary to what you may have thought, high levels of ketones will not guarantee enhanced fat loss. When you are in ketosis, the level of ketones in your bloodstream won't tell you how much fat you are burning. It will only tell you how much energy you currently have in your "fuel tank". Your body continuously produces and consumes ketones and over time, it will adapt and optimise the level of ketones in your body. Let's look at the evidence. This review of studies found a correlation between fat loss and the level of acetone, one of the ketone bodies that can be measured with a breath ketone meter. However, studies that are listed in the review compare the effects of a standard low-fat, high-carb diet to a high-fat, low-carb diet. As we know from several studies, low-carb diets over-perform high-carb diets. However, if we want to see how ketone levels affect fat loss, it would be necessary to compare low-carb diets and effects of different levels of carbohydrate restriction. High ketone levels over 3 mM (also known as starvation ketosis) may, in fact, slow down fat loss. High ketone levels will likely elevate your insulin levels and as a result block the release of free fatty acids from your cells. Ketosis is Not Just a Tool for Weight Loss It's simple: if you want to lose body fat, you need to stay in calorie deficit and use your body fat for energy. A low-carb diet is a great tool that will help you achieve that. With stabilised glucose levels and Continue reading >>

Ketones 101: Exploring The Benefits Of Exogenous Ketone Use

Ketones 101: Exploring The Benefits Of Exogenous Ketone Use

Walk into any supplement store and you’ll see the shelves adorned with what seems like an endless number of products making too-good-to-be-true claims: Lose weight in 24 hours! Lose two inches in two weeks! Between excessive praise and pushy salespeople, it can be difficult to know which supplements are reasonably worth trying—and why. So, when exogenous ketone supplements started showing up on the market, we were honestly a bit skeptical: Are these new supplements worth incorporating into our regimens, and are their apparent benefits backed up by actual scientific research? Today’s post is dedicated to explaining how we came to conclude that yes, exogenous supplements are worth including into your daily routine, and we’re about to tell you why. What are Exogenous Ketones? Simply put, the term “exogenous” refers to things that come from outside the body. Supplements are therefore considered exogenous because you ingest them rather than producing the contents of that supplement inside the body. The opposite of exogenous is “endogenous,” which refers to things that you do produce within your body. To define what “ketones” are, we need to briefly talk about how our metabolism works. Whenever you eat carbohydrates, they’re broken down into glucose (or sugar), which provides your body with the energy it needs to function; however, when you utilize a low-carb diet and don’t have enough glucose, your body adapts by looking for other sources of energy in the body. Eventually, it will turn to your fat cells. Whenever fats are broken down for energy, ketone bodies are produced as a result. Glucose is no longer your body’s primary fuel source, ketones are. (It’s important to note that ketones are always present in the blood, but their levels increase du Continue reading >>

What Are Exogenous Ketone Supplements And Are They Worth The Cost?

What Are Exogenous Ketone Supplements And Are They Worth The Cost?

**all supporting articles are linked in text Great question. Yes we are seeing exogenous ketone supplements all over the place now largely because of the growing popularity of the ketogenic diet. Let’s get into what they do and how to use them. What are Ketones and What is Ketosis? Ketones are fatty acids that your liver produces in mass quantities when you are in a state of ketosis. There are two main ketones that we produce: beta-hydroxybutyrate (BHB) and acetyl-acetate (AcAc). AcAc is created first and get’s converted to BHB creating Acetone as a byproduct that gets released through your breathing. Your body’s preferred source of fuel for your brain is glucose, but if that were all our brains could survive on, we wouldn’t be here. Our primitive ancestors often saw shortages of food and blood glucose, so we developed the ability to burn ketones for fuel. So when our bodies are short on carbohydrate to supply blood glucose, our livers begin converting our fat stores into ketones. You are said to be in a state of nutritional ketosis when your blood ketones rise to between 0.5 and 5mM. To get into a natural state of ketosis, you need to do one of two things: 1) fast for several days to deprive yourself of glucose and kick your body into ketosis, 2) consume a strict high fat, moderate protein, very low carbohydrate diet for a period of 10-21 days ignorer to adapt into ketosis. To learn more about this process, you can get a free keto-adaptation guide by signing up for our newsletter at Exogenous ketone supplements provide a method of getting into short periods of nutritional ketosis without going through these arduous processes. There are two forms of exogenous ketones: esters and salts. As of the writing of this article, esters are still in the experimental phase Continue reading >>

Why I’m Using Exogenous Ketone Supplements

Why I’m Using Exogenous Ketone Supplements

Exogenous ketone supplements have gotten extremely popular lately with high performers like Tim Ferriss posting non-stop about all the benefits they offer, so I decided to give it a try as a self-experiment. Man I am glad I did. I was a bit skeptical at first because of all the hype, but I really felt the difference it made for me. As with most guys in my generation, I’ve take tons of different supplements trying to find the perfect shortcut, putting all kinds of weird stuff into my body. Then I realized how ridiculous that was and stopped taking most supplements. Needless to say I was a little hesitant to try this stuff because I have pretty much only been taking protein, greens, and pre-workout sometimes (pretty basic and well-established supplements). But with a bunch of my friends and people I follow talking about the benefits of a ketogenic diet (or ketosis) I thought it would be worth giving it a shot. The reason I wasn’t turned off by exogenous ketones (and the reason for taking it actually makes sense to me) is that ketosis is a completely natural metabolic state your body goes into in the absence of carbohydrates. Instead of burning sugar for primary energy, your body starts burning the breakdown of fat (or ketones) as your primary energy source. The reason I really wanted to try them is that ketones are a far preferred energy source to your brain than glucose or carbs, but getting into ketosis can be miserable and I want to continue to eat carbs for the working out I do. Exogenous ketones are basically supplemental ketones. When you take them, your body immediately starts using ketones for energy just like you would if you were in a deep state of ketosis. This means no crash diets, no low carb craziness; I can just have the benefits of ketosis whenever I w Continue reading >>

Can You Cheat On Your Ketogenic Diet By Taking Keto Supplements?

Can You Cheat On Your Ketogenic Diet By Taking Keto Supplements?

A ketogenic diet is a strict low-carb eating plan that forces the body to burn fats for energy instead of carbohydrates. When carbs are restricted, the body moves into a state of ketosis, a metabolic state that produces ketones by breaking down fats in the liver, which are then used for diet. Is it Possible to Cheat On the Ketogenic Diet? In a regular moderate to high-carb diet, carbs are converted to glucose in the bloodstream. Glucose is the easiest molecule for the body to convert into energy so it will be used before any other energy source. When the glucose is used for energy, the fats consumed are not needed by the body and are stored, resulting in excess weight. The effectiveness of the diet depends on your carb intake. Normally an intake of between 20-30g of net carbs per day is recommended and reducing this intake to less than 15g will give faster results. As the carb intake of a “normal” diet can range between 150-400g of carbs per day, reducing them to the level required to get into the state can be quite challenging. Because of this, some people may be tempted to have a cheat day on keto. The good thing is that, there are many ways that you can do cheats days or meals without breaking your ketosis state which a lot of people who have been on the diet for years can attest to. So, yes, there are are many ways to do it which we will get into in just a little bit. Keto Supplements That Help You Stay in Ketosis ​There are various supplements available designed to benefit those on trying the keto diet. Some supplements also aim to induce a state of ketosis in the body, even if the blood glucose level is too high to be achieved naturally. These products or supplements can also help you stay in ketosis even if you decide to take a cheat day on keto: MCT (Mediu Continue reading >>

The Keto Diet Podcast Ep. #041: Responsible Exogenous Ketone Usage

The Keto Diet Podcast Ep. #041: Responsible Exogenous Ketone Usage

Interview with Dr. Gustin, a board certified sports physician and functional medicine practitioner, chatting about exogenous ketones – what they are, how they work, when and how to use exogenous ketones, ingredients in exogenous ketones, problems with the exogenous ketone market, and so much more. I’ll be the first to admit that I never, ever, thought in a million years that I’d be supplementing with exogenous ketones, let alone sharing them with you. But meeting many of you on the book tour, and speaking to individuals that have supplemented with ketones to compliment their ketogenic diet and help make the transition easier, I owed it to our crew to do some additional research, and here we are. Today, I interviewed the down-to-earth owner of Perfect Keto, asking him about all things exogenous ketones. From what they are, signs that you need them, signs that you don’t, the difference in products, ingredients used in exogenous ketones, whether they’re FODMAP or not, diet culture surrounding the product, accessibility issues, how exogenous ketones are digested, whether they lead to limited fat burn, and more. No stone left unturned. For podcast transcript, scroll down. SHOW NOTES + LINKS Subscribe on iTunes or your favorite podcast app Check out more from Dr. Gustin here and here TIMESTAMPS Problems with exogenous ketone supplementation (24:20) Ketone esters vs. salts (36:46) Exogenous ketone misconceptions (48:10) PARTNERS OF THE KETO DIET PODCAST The podcast is partnered with Wolfe Clinic Royal Flora, my choice in soil-based probiotics. Get 20% off your soil-based probiotics with the coupon code GUT at checkout. Thrive Market 35% savings – get an instant 35% off your favorite premium organic products. All you have to do is enter your email address, and the d Continue reading >>

Are Exogenous Ketones Right For You?

Are Exogenous Ketones Right For You?

I’ve spent a lot of time lately analysing three thousand ketone vs. glucose data points trying to determine the optimal ketone and blood sugar levels for weight loss, diabetes management, athletic performance and longevity. In this article, I share my insights and learnings on the benefits, side effects and risks of endogenous and endogenous ketosis. But first, I think it’s important to understand the difference between exogenous and endogenous ketosis: Endogenous ketosis occurs when we go without food for a significant period. Our insulin levels drop, and we transition to burning body fat and ketones in our blood rise. Exogenous ketosis occurs when we drink exogenous ketones or consume a ketogenic diet. Ketones are important. As blood glucose decreases, the ketones in your blood increase to keep our energy levels stable. The chart below shows three thousand blood glucose vs ketone values measured at the same time from a range of people following a low carbohydrate or ketogenic diet. While there is generally a linear relationship between glucose and ketones, each person has a unique relationship between their blood glucose and ketone values that provide a unique insight into a particular person’s metabolic health. Hyperinsulinemia has been called as the “unifying theory of chronic disease” [1] [2] [3] [4] [5]. It’s beneficial to understand where you stand on the spectrum of metabolic health and insulin sensitivity. The chart below shows the typical relationship between blood glucose and blood ketone for a range of different degrees of insulin resistance/sensitivity. If your blood glucose levels are consistently high it’s likely you are not metabolising carbohydrate well. When you go without food, endogenous ketones are slow to kick in because your insulin Continue reading >>

Exogenous Ketones, How The Hell Did I Get Here, And Who Are These People?

Exogenous Ketones, How The Hell Did I Get Here, And Who Are These People?

This article is about seven months in the making So if I don’t bore you, which I do my best not to (like writing 6,000 word articles on something as trivial as butt wink), then I hope you’ll hang in there long enough to get through this one. As it took me months of arguing, seeing both anecdotal results and reading a metric ass load of studies, and hearing about a hundred overwhelming testimonials to finally sit down and write this. Rewind about seven months ago to one day in the gym. I was just about to finish up my training session when this woman I sorta-kinda knew approached me. Mind out of the gutter guys…not in that way. She asked me what I thought of ketogenic diets. “Not really a big fan. Good for fat loss, but outside of that I’m not a fan.” “What if I told you I was involved with a company making exogenous ketones?” “Ok, and?” I shrugged. “Do you know much about ketones?” she asked, in a rather smart ass way. “Yes I know about ketones.” “Well” she smirked “this is a supplement you can take, pee on a stick and it shows you are using ketones for energy.” “Ok.” I said, in about the most lukewarm manner you could reply to someone with. “You don’t find that fascinating?” “Oh yes, peeing my pants over here.” I can’t remember if that’s what I said, but it was something to that effect. Either way, I wasn’t impressed nor enthralled by her information. Who the fuck cares about ketones? A few weeks later a friend of mine she was working with that was preparing for a men’s bikini competition asked me the same series of questions. Once again, my response was a lukewarm “I don’t give a shit” kind of one. “Dude, they are awesome.” he said. “How so?” I asked. “Just the focus and energy you get from them Continue reading >>

Exogenous Ketones: To Ketone Or Not To Ketone

Exogenous Ketones: To Ketone Or Not To Ketone

My thoughts on Exogenous Ketones After being contacted (following the Youtube Q&A) by several folks – both members of Ketogains and Internet strangers, I felt compelled to write as fair and even-handed a write-up on exogenous ketone supplementation as I feel can be mustered. I condition my response by saying this – I want to deal only in evidence and hypotheses grounded in biochemistry. I admit up front that this will probably become something of a treatise on what constitutes a well-formulated ketogenic diet. I don’t have the time (or the energy) to put together a document that covers all facets of the use of exogenous ketones in sufficient depth, so what I want to do is to address the folks that I see asking me about them most often – those who have excess body fat, and are looking to lose weight. They have been told about the potential benefits to fat loss via exogenous ketones, and they want to know if the hype is real. Those of you who know me (or read my previous post here) know that I like to respond with “it depends.” So…when the question is raised, “Should I supplement with exogenous ketones?” what do you think my answer will be? Probably not! (HA, I tricked you!)…but let’s explore why. As I’m sure this is going to be hotly debated enough (as the topic is raging in numerous ketogenic groups) there isn’t any value in dealing with speculation that doesn’t have a basis in science, nor in anecdotes. The challenge in dealing with exogenous ketone supplementation is two-fold: One side of the debate has a product to sell. Anytime someone’s livelihood is tied to your purchase of their product, bias and subjective interpretation of the evidence should be considered. The evidence (either for or against) their supplemental use by average schl Continue reading >>

Exogenous Ketones Pros And Cons

Exogenous Ketones Pros And Cons

What Are Exogenous Ketones? Exogenous Ketones (EK for short) are ketone supplements and by definition, a supplement is a thing added to something else in order to complete or enhance it. Think about it like building muscle, good supplements can enhance your results, but if you don’t eat right and exercise, supplements are just useless. You can’t just sit on the couch to watch TV, eat potato chips all day and drink some supplements and expect to gain muscle. A supplement is not a miracle. It’s just an addition and before you add it to your diet, you need to get the basic right first, which is dieting and exercise in the case of building muscles. The supplements are not going to lift the heavy weights for you. You do! Back to the case of EK. If you cheat on your keto diet and eat a ton of carbs, and you want to use EK as a way to feel better and less guilty about it, it’s probably not a smart choice because EK won’t do anything for you (more on this later). However, if you are eating LCHF and somehow you’re not feeling your best, EK can be helpful and we will explain more below. Our Approach We own and manage a few growing Keto Facebook groups with tens of thousands of members and we often see the exogenous ketones topic comes up. We have seen a lot of confusion and criticism as well as support from our members. Most of the complaints are normally because of the expensive price of some products, the lack of understanding about what the product is and what it does to your body or because some sellers/promoters try to bend the truth to get you buy their products or recruit you into their multi level marketing team. We recently ran a survey in our private group and asked people if they have used EK before and if it worked for them. Here’s the result: Many peopl Continue reading >>

Exogenous Ketones: The Truth You Need To Know!

Exogenous Ketones: The Truth You Need To Know!

Can Exogenous Ketones really give you the benefits of the actual ketogenic diet? Or is it just another marketing scam done correctly? Let’s dig in and find out! What are Exogenous Ketones and how do they work? What are Ketones? It only makes sense to start with what ketones are before we discuss about Exogenous Ketones. Ketones are a byproduct produced by your liver to be used as fuel when there’s a lack of glucose in your body. They’re always present in your blood and there are 3 types of Ketone bodies [1]: Acetoacetate (AcAc) 3 beta-hydroxybutyrate (3HB) Acetone These are called Endogenous ketones because they’re naturally produced by your body internally. 3 Times Your Body Produces more ketones: Fasting Long period of exercise Diabetes (pathological cause) Endogenous Ketones vs Exogenous Ketones: Exogenous ketones, on the other hand, are the same ketone bodies injected into your body in the form of Ketone supplements and drinks (Salts and Esters). Claim: Exogenous Ketones are being marketed as an instant way to put your body into Ketosis with or without the need to follow a Ketogenic diet. It’s important to remember that Ketogenic diet has been clinically proven to have many health benefits including weight loss. However, we’re discussing the external ketones that you can take in the form of supplements and drinks. What does Clinical research say about Exogenous Ketones? Research evidence: No evidence for the claim that Exogenous Ketone supplements can put you in instant ketosis. No human studies whatsoever. Some brands that talk about the benefits of their supplements seem to focus on the benefits of ketogenic diet rather than any evidence for the supplement. Here’s a study I found: Exogenous Ketones on Rats by Dr. Dominic D’Agostino In this study, t Continue reading >>

Effects Of Exogenous Ketone Supplementation On Blood Ketone, Glucose, Triglyceride, And Lipoprotein Levels In Sprague–dawley Rats

Effects Of Exogenous Ketone Supplementation On Blood Ketone, Glucose, Triglyceride, And Lipoprotein Levels In Sprague–dawley Rats

Abstract Nutritional ketosis induced by the ketogenic diet (KD) has therapeutic applications for many disease states. We hypothesized that oral administration of exogenous ketone supplements could produce sustained nutritional ketosis (>0.5 mM) without carbohydrate restriction. We tested the effects of 28-day administration of five ketone supplements on blood glucose, ketones, and lipids in male Sprague–Dawley rats. The supplements included: 1,3-butanediol (BD), a sodium/potassium β-hydroxybutyrate (βHB) mineral salt (BMS), medium chain triglyceride oil (MCT), BMS + MCT 1:1 mixture, and 1,3 butanediol acetoacetate diester (KE). Rats received a daily 5–10 g/kg dose of their respective ketone supplement via intragastric gavage during treatment. Weekly whole blood samples were taken for analysis of glucose and βHB at baseline and, 0.5, 1, 4, 8, and 12 h post-gavage, or until βHB returned to baseline. At 28 days, triglycerides, total cholesterol and high-density lipoprotein (HDL) were measured. Exogenous ketone supplementation caused a rapid and sustained elevation of βHB, reduction of glucose, and little change to lipid biomarkers compared to control animals. This study demonstrates the efficacy and tolerability of oral exogenous ketone supplementation in inducing nutritional ketosis independent of dietary restriction. Background Emerging evidence supports the therapeutic potential of the ketogenic diet (KD) for a variety of disease states, leading investigators to research methods of harnessing the benefits of nutritional ketosis without the dietary restrictions. The KD has been used as an effective non-pharmacological therapy for pediatric intractable seizures since the 1920s [1–3]. In addition to epilepsy, the ketogenic diet has elicited significant therapeut Continue reading >>

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