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What Causes Kussmaul Respirations In Dka?

Consistently High Incidence Of Diabetic Ketoacidosis In Children With Newly Diagnosed Type 1diabetes

Consistently High Incidence Of Diabetic Ketoacidosis In Children With Newly Diagnosed Type 1diabetes

Consistently high incidence of diabetic ketoacidosis in children with newly diagnosed type 1diabetes Femke M A P Claessen, Kim Donaghue and Maria Craig Med J Aust 2012; 197 (4): . || doi: 10.5694/mja12.10686 To the Editor: The incidence of type 1diabetes (T1D) in children is rising globally, including in Australia. 1 Diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) is the leading cause of diabetes-related deaths in children. 2 Clinical manifestations of DKA include dehydration; rapid, deep, sighing (Kussmaul respiration); nausea; vomiting; abdominal pain and a reduced level of consciousness. 2 There is an inverse relationship between the frequency of presentation with DKA and background incidence of T1D in a given country, 3 suggesting that the diagnosis is more likely to be considered earlier in countries with higher incidence of T1D, such as Australia. The full article is accessible to AMA members and paid subscribers. Login to read more or purchase a subscription now. Continue reading >>

Kussmaul Breathing, Cheyne-stokes Respiration & Biot's Respiration Terms

Kussmaul Breathing, Cheyne-stokes Respiration & Biot's Respiration Terms

Technical Terms for Respiration There are several weird-sounding terms related to respiration that seem harder to understand than they really are. Actually, their definitions may vary just a bit depending on setting: academic or practical. These are Kussmaul's respiration, Cheyne-Stokes respiration, and Biot's (or Bee-oh's) respiration. It all sounds kind of technical and a bit out there, but, by the end of this lesson, you'll be a pro at explaining what these are. Kussmaul's Respiration There are different medical conditions that can affect the acid/base balance in your body, meaning your body can become more acidic or basic. When a person is acidotic, that is to say they are undergoing a pathological process (known as acidosis) that leads to acidemia, an abnormally low pH of the blood, they may experience Kussmaul's respiration. Kussmaul's respiration, as German physician Adolph Kussmaul himself described, is technically deep, slow, and labored breathing, which we now know is in response to severe acidemia stemming from metabolic acidosis. However, nowadays, it is sometimes used to describe rapid and shallow breathing patterns in cases of less severe acidemia as well. Why does this type of breathing pattern occur? Well, what do you breathe in? Oxygen, right? What do you breathe out? Carbon dioxide. Carbon dioxide is acidic. It lowers the pH of the blood. By breathing rapidly and/or deeply, the body tries to blow off excess CO2 to increase pH back to normal, like an old train engine tries to blow off steam to cool itself off. Such respiration can be seen in patients with diabetic ketoacidosis or renal (that is to say, kidney) failure among other problems. Cheyne-Stokes Respiration The next form of respiration I want to get to is a bit more difficult to understand, but Continue reading >>

Diabetic Emergencies: Ketoacidosis

Diabetic Emergencies: Ketoacidosis

Our flight crew was dispatched to a small local hospital for a 58 year old male with an altered level of consciousness and elevated blood sugar. His son had found him unresponsive on the couch and called EMS for help. While en route to the local hospital a bedside glucose was checked reporting "high." His respiratory rate was 36 and his heart rate was in the 150s. He was slow to respond, but woke to verbal commands and was orientated to person only. At the hospital, another bedside glucose returned "high" and he received 10 units of insulin IV. A foley catheter was inserted draining 1400 ml of urine immediately. The flight crew arrived to find our patient’s LOC without change. Pupils were equal at 3 mm, and sluggish in response to light. Mucous membranes were dry. He had a respiratory rate of 36 breaths per minute and shallow. His lung sounds were clear and equal bilateral. An incision at his right shoulder from a surgery one week ago appeared well healed with no redness or signs of infection. Lab results available at the time of transport were limited to: Glucose — 799 mg/dl CO2 — 3.1 mEq/L ph — 6.77 (venous) Fluid intake — 800 ml 0.9% sodium chloride Urine output — 1400 ml The only medication given so far was regular insulin 10 units IV. Definition: Diabetes mellitus is a chronic disease comprised of a group of hyperglycemic disorders, characterized by high serum glucose, and disturbances of carbohydrate and lipid metabolism. Type 1 The patient is usually less than 40 years old at the time of onset. Peak age of onset is 10 to 14 years old. They are typically lean and ketosis prone. Plasma insulin levels are low to absent. Type 2 This patient is usually 45 to 65 years old at the time of onset. These patients are typically overweight, with normal to high ins Continue reading >>

Acid-base Physiology

Acid-base Physiology

An outline of management is presented: this should be tailored to individual circumstances. Management of DKA has passed through 3 stages in the last 100 years: Stage 1: Preinsulin era (Feature: mortality of 100%) Stage 2: High dose insulin regime (Feature: mortality down to 10% but metabolic complications due to the treatment) Stage 3 (the present): Low dose insulin regime (Feature: low mortality) Mortality with the low dose insulin regime is down to about 2 to 5% overall. In older patients with DKA precipitated by a major medical illness (eg acute pancreatitis, myocardial infarction, septicaemia), the mortality rate is still high due to the severity of the precipitating problem. Restore normal carbohydrate and lipid metabolism Management can be considered in terms of emergency and routine components. Protect by intubation with a cuffed tube if patient is significantly obtunded. Consider placing a nasogastric tube in all patients. Intubation may be necessary for airway protection or ventilation (eg if aspiration, coma, pneumonia, pulmonary oedema, acute pancreatitis and ARDS) but this is not common. Maintain compensatory hyperventilation in intubated patients Patients with metabolic acidosis (eg severe DKA) have marked hyperventilation (ie respiratory compensation, Kussmaul respirations) and typically low arterial pCO2 levels. If intubated and ventilated, ventilatory parameters (tidal volume and rate) need to be set to continue a high minute ventilation. If this is not done and pCO2 is inappropriately high, a severe acidaemia and consequent severe cardiovascular collapse may occur This is a particular problem in all situations where a patient with a compensated metabolic acidosis is intubated and ventilated. The rule of thumb is to aim for a pCO2 level of 1.5 times th Continue reading >>

Diabetic Ketoacidosis (dka)

Diabetic Ketoacidosis (dka)

A 12 year old boy, previously healthy, is admitted to the hospital after 2 days of polyuria, polyphagia, nausea, vomiting and abdominal pain. Vital signs are: Temp 37C, BP 103/63 mmHg, HR 112, RR 30. Physical exam shows a lethargic boy. Labs are notable forWBC 16,000,Glucose 534, K 5.9, pH 7.13, PCO2 is 20 mmHg, PO2 is 90 mmHg. result of insulin, glucagon, growth hormone, catecholamine increased tidal volume and rate as a result of metabolic acidosis due to gluconeogenesis and glycogenolysis tissues unable to use the high glucose as it is unable to enter cells anion gap due to ketoacidosis, lactic acidosis consumed in an attempt to buffer the increased acid glucose acts as an osmotic agent and draws water from ICF to ECF acidosis results in ICF/ECF exchange of H+ for K+ depletion of total body potassium due to cellular shift and losses through urine -hydroxybutyrate not detected with normal ketone body tests due to in capillary lipoprotein lipase activity H2PO4- is increased in urine, as it is titratable acid used to buffer the excess H+ that is being excreted must prevent resultant hypokalemia and hypophosphatemia labs may show pseudo-hyperkalemia prior to administartion of fluid and insulin due to transcellular shift of potassium out of the cells to balance the H+ being transfered into the cells Upon administration of insulin, potassium will shift intracellularly, possibly resulting in dangerous hypokalemia give phosphatesupplementation to prevent respiratory paralysis (M1.EC.31) A 17-year-old male presents to your office complaining of polyuria, polydipsia, and unintentional weight loss of 12 pounds over the past 3 months. On physical examination, the patient is tachypneic with labored breathing. Which of the following electrolyte abnormalities would you most likely Continue reading >>

[ketoacidotic Diabetic Metabolic Dysregulation: Pathophysiology, Clinical Aspects, Diagnosis And Therapy].

[ketoacidotic Diabetic Metabolic Dysregulation: Pathophysiology, Clinical Aspects, Diagnosis And Therapy].

Abstract When glucose utilisation is impaired due to decreased insulin effect, ketones are produced by the liver from free fatty acids to supply an alternate source of energy. This adaptation may be associated with severe metabolic acidosis and tends to occur in patients with type I (insulin-dependent) diabetes mellitus. In addition, hypovolemia is an almost invariable finding with marked hypoglycemia and is primarily induced by the associated glucosuria. Ketoacidosis stimulates both the central and peripheral chemoreceptors controlling respiration, resulting in alveolar hyperventilation (Kussmaul's respiration). With the ensuing fall in pCO2 the patient tries to raise the extracellular pH. A fruity odor of acetone on the patient's breath sometimes suggests that ketoacidosis is present. The classical triad of symptoms associated with hyperglycemia are polyuria, polydipsia, and weight loss. Circulatory insufficiency with hypotension is not uncommon due to the marked fluid loss and acidemia. In more severely affected patients, neurologic abnormalities may be seen, including lethargy, seizures or coma. Some patients also have marked vomiting and abdominal pain. The history and physical examination may provide important clues to the presence of uncontrolled diabetes mellitus. Once suspected, the diagnosis can be easily confirmed by measuring the plasma glucose concentration. Glucosuria and ketonuria can be semiquantitatively detected with reagent sticks. Blood gas analysis and anion gap give objective information as to the severity of the metabolic acidosis. Therapy must be directed toward each of the metabolic disturbances: hyperosmolality, ketoacidosis, hypovolemia and potassium, and phosphate depletion. The mainstays of therapy are the administration of low-dose insulin Continue reading >>

Diabetic Ketoacidosis

Diabetic Ketoacidosis

Diabetic ketoacidosis often occurs in type 1 diabetic patients but can also happen in any type of diabetes. As an acute complication, ketoacidosis is highly dangerous and can lead to coma and even death. Ketoacidosis mainly results from insulin insufficiency, a condition where the human body cannot use glucose to obtain energy. Hence, the body dissolves fat for energy. The ketone bodies produced from the metabolic process build up. Excessive amount of ketone bodies eventually increases the acidity of the blood and results in ketoemia. Symptoms of ketoacidosis include: thirst, frequent urination, high blood sugar, urine ketone, nausea, vomiting, abdominal pain and Kussmaul respiration which is breath with fruity odor. The possible cause of ketoacidosis encompasses: lack of insulin medication, infection, illness and intensive stress. When the body suffers from infection, illness or intensive stress accompanied by high blood sugar 240mg/dL (13.3mmol/L), the level of blood sugar and urine ketone should be closely monitored. If urine ketone is found in the urine, medical treatment should be sought immediately. With excellent control and regular monitoring of blood sugar, and adequate pressure relief measures, diabetic ketoacidosis can be effectively prevented. Continue reading >>

Diabetic Ketoacidosis

Diabetic Ketoacidosis

Diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) is a serious problem that can occur in people with diabetes if their body starts to run out of insulin. This causes harmful substances called ketones to build up in the body, which can be life-threatening if not spotted and treated quickly. DKA mainly affects people with type 1 diabetes, but can sometimes occur in people with type 2 diabetes. If you have diabetes, it's important to be aware of the risk and know what to do if DKA occurs. Symptoms of diabetic ketoacidosis Signs of DKA include: needing to pee more than usual being sick breath that smells fruity (like pear drop sweets or nail varnish) deep or fast breathing feeling very tired or sleepy passing out DKA can also cause high blood sugar (hyperglycaemia) and a high level of ketones in your blood or urine, which you can check for using home-testing kits. Symptoms usually develop over 24 hours, but can come on faster. Check your blood sugar and ketone levels Check your blood sugar level if you have symptoms of DKA. If your blood sugar is 11mmol/L or over and you have a blood or urine ketone testing kit, check your ketone level. If you do a blood ketone test: lower than 0.6mmol/L is a normal reading 0.6 to 1.5mmol/L means you're at a slightly increased risk of DKA and should test again in a couple of hours 1.6 to 2.9mmol/L means you're at an increased risk of DKA and should contact your diabetes team or GP as soon as possible 3mmol/L or over means you have a very high risk of DKA and should get medical help immediately If you do a urine ketone test, a result of more than 2+ means there's a high chance you have DKA. When to get medical help Go to your nearest accident and emergency (A&E) department straight away if you think you have DKA, especially if you have a high level of ketones in Continue reading >>

Kussmaul Breathing

Kussmaul Breathing

Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Legal, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia. Related to Kussmaul breathing: Biot's breathing Kussmaul breathing abnormally deep, very rapid sighing respirations characteristic of diabetic ketoacidosis. Kussmaul breathing Air hunger Clinical medicine Rapid, deep respiration 2º to stimulation of the respiratory center of the brain triggered by ↓ pH, normal during exercise, and common in Pts with severe metabolic acidosis–eg, DKA. See Metabolic acidosis, Diabetes. breathing (breth'ing) abdominodiaphragmatic breathing A controlled method of breathing in which the diaphragm is used for inspiration and the abdominal muscles for expiration. This technique improves exertional dyspnea, esp. in patients with chronic pulmonary disease. Synonym: diaphragmatic breathing apneustic breathing An abnormal breathing pattern marked by prolonged inspiration followed by an inspiratory pause. This is usually associated with brainstem injuries. assisted breathing Any technique that improves respiration. Such breathing includes the provision of supplemental oxygen, bag-valve-mask ventilation, noninvasive ventilation, mechanical ventilation, and mouth-to-mouth ventilation. asthmatic breathing Harsh breathing with prolonged wheezing heard throughout expiration. ataxic breathing An irregular, uncoordinated breathing pattern common in infants. belly breathing Abdominal respiration. Biot breathing See: Biot breathing bronchial breathing Bronchial sounds. Cheyne-Stokes breathing See: Cheyne-Stokes respiration continuous positive-pressure breathing A method of mechanically assisted pulmonary inflation. A device administers air or oxygen to the lungs under a continuous pressure that is always greater than zero. Synonym: continuous positive-pressure ventilation diaphragmat Continue reading >>

Pulmcrit- Dominating The Acidosis In Dka

Pulmcrit- Dominating The Acidosis In Dka

Management of acidosis in DKA is an ongoing source of confusion. There isn’t much high-quality evidence, nor will there ever be (1). However, a clear understanding of the physiology of DKA may help us treat this rationally and effectively. Physiology of ketoacidosis in DKA Ketoacidosis occurs due to an imbalance between insulin dose and insulin requirement: Many factors affect the insulin requirement: Individuals differ in their baseline insulin resistance and insulin requirements. Physiologic stress (e.g. hypovolemia, inflammation) increases the level of catecholamines and cortisol, which increases insulin resistance. Hyperglycemia and metabolic acidosis themselves increase insulin resistance (Souto 2011, Gosmanov 2014). DKA treatment generally consists of two phases: first, we must manage the ketoacidosis. Later, we must prepare the patient to transition back to their home insulin regimen. During both phases, success depends on balancing insulin dose and insulin requirement. Phase I (Take-off): Initial management of the DKA patient with worrisome acidosis Let’s start by considering a patient who presents in severe DKA with worrisome acidosis. This is uncommon. Features that might provoke worry include the following: bicarbonate < 7 mEq/L pH < 7 (if measured; there is generally little benefit from measuring pH) clinically ill-appearing (e.g., dyspnea, marked Kussmaul respirations) These patients generally have severe metabolic acidosis with respiratory compensation. This creates two concerns: If the metabolic acidosis worsens, they may decompensate. The patient is depending on respiratory compensation to maintain their pH. If they should fatigue and lose the ability to hyperventilate, their pH would drop. It is important to reverse the acidosis before the patient m Continue reading >>

Diabetic Ketoacidosis: What It Is And How To Avoid It

Diabetic Ketoacidosis: What It Is And How To Avoid It

Diabetic ketoacidosis is a life threatening complication. It is common in people with Type 1 Diabetes because their pancreas does not produce insulin. But, it can also happen in individuals with Type 2 Diabetes when their blood sugar reaches critical level. During episodes of DKA, the body runs low on insulin so it burns fats as an alternative energy source. This process produces high level of ketone acids causing the following symptoms: Nausea Vomiting coffee-ground color Excessive thirst and urination Severe abdominal pain which may be cause by pancreatitis, GI tract perforation Kussmaul respiration (a deep and laborious breathing) Confusion Lethargy Dehydration Elevated heart rate (tachycardia) Comatose (severe cases) Blurring of the vision Fruity breath odor Diabetic ketoacidosis has four characteristics that result in the development of the symptoms: hyperglycemia, acidosis, dehydration, and electrolyte imbalance. During hyperglycemia, which causes the blurry vision, the glucose accumulates in the blood. The lack of insulin prevents glucose from entering the cells (hepatic glucose overproduction). The production of counter regulatory hormones such as catecholamines, cortisol, and glucagon, also increases. Gluconeogenesis and glycogenolysis take place. Insulin resistance increases during this stage. This makes it more difficult for the tissues to absorb glucose. The increase in counter-regulatory hormone levels and insulin resistance cause the release of glycerol and fatty acids. The liver starts oxidizing free fatty acids producing high levels of ketone acids. This process leads to ketoanemia. The ketone acids break down into hydrogen ions and ketone anions. The body then tries to bind the hydrogen ions by using up its alkali reserves causing acidosis. To address a Continue reading >>

Starvation Ketoacidosis: A Cause Of Severe Anion Gap Metabolic Acidosis In Pregnancy

Starvation Ketoacidosis: A Cause Of Severe Anion Gap Metabolic Acidosis In Pregnancy

Copyright © 2014 Nupur Sinha et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. Pregnancy is a diabetogenic state characterized by relative insulin resistance, enhanced lipolysis, elevated free fatty acids and increased ketogenesis. In this setting, short period of starvation can precipitate ketoacidosis. This sequence of events is recognized as “accelerated starvation.” Metabolic acidosis during pregnancy may have adverse impact on fetal neural development including impaired intelligence and fetal demise. Short periods of starvation during pregnancy may present as severe anion gap metabolic acidosis (AGMA). We present a 41-year-old female in her 32nd week of pregnancy, admitted with severe AGMA with pH 7.16, anion gap 31, and bicarbonate of 5 mg/dL with normal lactate levels. She was intubated and accepted to medical intensive care unit. Urine and serum acetone were positive. Evaluation for all causes of AGMA was negative. The diagnosis of starvation ketoacidosis was established in absence of other causes of AGMA. Intravenous fluids, dextrose, thiamine, and folic acid were administered with resolution of acidosis, early extubation, and subsequent normal delivery of a healthy baby at full term. Rapid reversal of acidosis and favorable outcome are achieved with early administration of dextrose containing fluids. 1. Introduction A relative insulin deficient state has been well described in pregnancy. This is due to placentally derived hormones including glucagon, cortisol, and human placental lactogen which are increased in periods of stress [1]. The insulin resistance increases with gestational age Continue reading >>

What Is Kussmaul Breathing?

What Is Kussmaul Breathing?

Kussmaul breathing is a deep, labored breathing pattern that indicates that the body or organs have become too acidic. The body is constantly doing work to maintain an average temperature and neutral blood acidity. To make sure this balance happens; the kidneys and cells rely on bases or buffers, chemical compounds that bind with hydrogen ions. Disruptions to these compounds cause Kussmaul breathing, which is typically associated with conditions that cause metabolic disturbances, such as kidney failure and diabetes. Contents of this article: Kussmaul breathing is a type of hyperventilation that is the lung's emergency response to acidosis. Kussmaul breathing causes a labored, deeper breathing rate. It is most commonly associated with conditions that cause metabolic acidosis, particularly diabetes. Because Kussmaul breathing is a sign of severe metabolic acidosis, which is a life-threatening condition, hospitalization is usually necessary. What is Kussmaul breathing? When the body produces or ingests too much acid; or the kidneys or lungs are failing, blood acid levels increase. If the blood becomes too acidic, acidosis occurs, and the body takes action to restore the imbalance. By using deeper, longer breaths, the lungs can expel more acidic carbon dioxide (C02) than normal. The condition takes its name from Adolph Kussmaul, the German physician who first described the breathing pattern in 1874. Symptoms As a type of hyperventilation, some people describe Kussmaul breathing as panicked breathing, where someone appears to be gasping for breath. The deep, powerful breathing associated with Kussmaul breathing often causes inhalation and exhalation to become more evident and loud. Some compare the sound to exaggerated sighing. Symptoms of acidosis Before the deep and labore Continue reading >>

Diabetic Ketoacidosis

Diabetic Ketoacidosis

4 Evaluation 5 Management Defining features include hyperglycemia (glucose > 250mg/dl), acidosis (pH < 7.3), and ketonemia/ketonuria Leads to osmotic diuresis and depletion of electrolytes including sodium, magnesium, calcium and phosphorous. Further dehydration impairs glomerular filtration rate (GFR) and contributes to acute renal failure Due to lipolysis / accumulation of of ketoacids (represented by increased anion gap) Compensatory respiratory alkalosis (i.e. tachypnea and hyperpnea - Kussmaul breathing) Breakdown of adipose creates first acetoacetate leading to conversion to beta-hydroxybutyrate Causes activation of RAAS in addition to the osmotic diuresis Cation loss (in exchange for chloride) worsens metabolic acidosis May be the initial presenting of an unrecognized T1DM patient Presenting signs/symptoms include altered mental status, tachypnea, abdominal pain, hypotension, decreased urine output. Perform a thorough neurologic exam (cerebral edema increases mortality significantly, especially in children) Assess for possible inciting cause (especially for ongoing infection; see Differential Diagnosis section) Ill appearance. Acetone breath. Drowsiness with decreased reflexes Tachypnea (Kussmaul's breathing) Signs of dehydration with dry mouth and dry mucosa. Perform a thorough neurologic exam as cerebral edema increases mortality significantly, especially in children There may be signs from underlying cause (eg pneumonia) Differential Diagnosis Insulin or oral hypoglycemic medication non-compliance Infection Intra-abdominal infections Steroid use Drug abuse Pregnancy Diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) Diagnosis is made based on the presence of acidosis and ketonemia in the setting of diabetes. Bicarb may be normal due to compensatory and contraction alcoholosis so the Continue reading >>

Respiratory System And Diabetes

Respiratory System And Diabetes

Tweet The respiratory system is the system of organs that allow the body to take in oxygen and expel carbon dioxide, this process is known as gaseous exchange. We generally breathe between 12 and 20 times a minute. There are a number of complications of diabetes that can negatively affect our breathing. Parts of the respiratory system The following parts of the body make up the respiratory system: Mouth and nose Trachea (windpipe) Lungs Diaphragm How the respiratory system works Breathing is usually initiated by contraction of the diaphragm, a muscle which separates the chest cavity from the abdomen. Tweet Type 2 diabetes mellitus is a metabolic disorder that results in hyperglycemia (high blood glucose levels) due to the body: Being ineffective at using the insulin it has produced; also known as insulin resistance and/or Being unable to produce enough insulin Type 2 diabetes is characterised by the body being unable to metabolise glucose (a simple sugar). This leads to high levels of blood glucose which over time may damage the organs of the body. From this, it can be understood that for someone with diabetes something that is food for ordinary people can become a sort of metabolic poison. This is why people with diabetes are advised to avoid sources of dietary sugar. The good news is for very many people with type 2 diabetes this is all they have to do to stay well. If you can keep your blood sugar lower by avoiding dietary sugar, likely you will never need long-term medication. Type 2 diabetes was formerly known as non-insulin-dependent or adult-onset diabetes due to its occurrence mainly in people over 40. However, type 2 diabetes is now becoming more common in young adults, teens and children and accounts for roughly 90% of all diabetes cases worldwide. How serious Continue reading >>

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