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What Can Cause Metabolic Acidosis?

Chronic Metabolic Acidosis Destroys Pancreas

Chronic Metabolic Acidosis Destroys Pancreas

Peter Melamed and Felix Melamed Biotherapy Clinic of San Francisco, USA *Corresponding Author: Biotherapy Clinic of San Francisco 2215 Post Street, Suite 1, San Francisco, CA 94115, USA Phone 1 415 3776643 Fax 1 415 4093909 [email protected] Visit for more related articles at JOP. Journal of the Pancreas Abstract One primary reason for the current epidemic of digestive disorders might be chronic metabolic acidosis, which is extremely common in the modern population. Chronic metabolic acidosis primarily affects two alkaline digestive glands, the liver, and the pancreas, which produce alkaline bile and pancreatic juice with a large amount of bicarbonate. Even small acidic alterations in the bile and pancreatic juice pH can lead to serious biochemical/biomechanical changes. The pancreatic digestive enzymes require an alkaline milieu for proper function, and lowering the pH disables their activity. It can be the primary cause of indigestion. Acidification of the pancreatic juice decreases its antimicrobial activity, which can lead to intestinal dysbiosis. Lowering the pH of the pancreatic juice can cause premature activation of the proteases inside the pancreas with the potential development of pancreatitis.The acidification of bile causes precipitation of the bile acids, which irritate the entire biliary system and create bile stone formation. Aggressive mixture of the acidic bile and the pancreatic juice can cause erratic contractions of the duodenum’s walls and subsequent bile reflux into the stomach and the esophagus. Normal exocrine pancreatic function is the core of proper digestion. Currently, there is no effective and safe treatment for enhancing the exocrine pancreatic function. Restoring normal acid-base homeostasis can be a useful toolfor pathophysi Continue reading >>

Metabolic Acidosis

Metabolic Acidosis

Metabolic acidosis is a condition that occurs when the body produces excessive quantities of acid or when the kidneys are not removing enough acid from the body. If unchecked, metabolic acidosis leads to acidemia, i.e., blood pH is low (less than 7.35) due to increased production of hydrogen ions by the body or the inability of the body to form bicarbonate (HCO3−) in the kidney. Its causes are diverse, and its consequences can be serious, including coma and death. Together with respiratory acidosis, it is one of the two general causes of acidemia. Terminology : Acidosis refers to a process that causes a low pH in blood and tissues. Acidemia refers specifically to a low pH in the blood. In most cases, acidosis occurs first for reasons explained below. Free hydrogen ions then diffuse into the blood, lowering the pH. Arterial blood gas analysis detects acidemia (pH lower than 7.35). When acidemia is present, acidosis is presumed. Signs and symptoms[edit] Symptoms are not specific, and diagnosis can be difficult unless the patient presents with clear indications for arterial blood gas sampling. Symptoms may include chest pain, palpitations, headache, altered mental status such as severe anxiety due to hypoxia, decreased visual acuity, nausea, vomiting, abdominal pain, altered appetite and weight gain, muscle weakness, bone pain, and joint pain. Those in metabolic acidosis may exhibit deep, rapid breathing called Kussmaul respirations which is classically associated with diabetic ketoacidosis. Rapid deep breaths increase the amount of carbon dioxide exhaled, thus lowering the serum carbon dioxide levels, resulting in some degree of compensation. Overcompensation via respiratory alkalosis to form an alkalemia does not occur. Extreme acidemia leads to neurological and cardia Continue reading >>

Acid/base Disorders: Metabolic Acidosis

Acid/base Disorders: Metabolic Acidosis

Are there clinical practice guidelines to inform decision-making? Does this patient have metabolic acidosis? Metabolic acidosis is generally defined by the presence of a low serum bicarbonate concentration (normal range 22-28 mEq/L), although occasionally states can exist where the serum bicarbonate is normal with an elevated anion gap (e.g., patients with a lactic acidosis who have received a bicarbonate infusion or patients on hemodialysis). In general, a metabolic acidosis is associated with a low urine pH but depending on the presence or absence of a respiratory alkalosis, this may also be normal or elevated. Thus, a patient can have an acidosis but not be acidemic. Metabolic acidoses occur when there is excess acid in the plasma. In the basal state, the body generates about 12,000 to 13,000 mmol of carbon dioxide (CO2), and 1-1.5 mmol per kilogram body weight of nonvolatile acid. The body has a large buffering capacity, with CO2-HCO3 as the major buffer system. The two major routes of acid excretion are the lungs (for CO2) and the kidneys (for nonvolatile acids) A metabolic acidosis can be caused by three major mechanisms: 1) increased acid production; 2) bicarbonate loss; and 3) decreased renal acid excretion Increased acid production leads to anion-gap (AG) metabolic acidosis, and involves a variety of different clinical processes, see An anion gap acidosis may also result for ingestion of an acid load. Both bicarbonate loss and decreased renal acid excretion lead to normal-anion gap (NG) metabolic acidosis. When there is HCO3 loss, chloride is retained to maintain electrical neutrality. The different clinical processes are summarized in Toxic ingestions are common causes of AG metabolic acidosis. The commonest causes are methanol and ethylene glycol intoxicatio Continue reading >>

Toxin-induced Metabolic Acidosis

Toxin-induced Metabolic Acidosis

Acid-base disorders, poisoning, toxic, toxins, overdose, metabolic acidosis, acidosis, anion gap metabolic acidosis, strong ion gap acidosis Metabolic acidosis is a common and serious presentation of several toxins. Toxin-induced metabolic acidosis can be due to multiple diverse pathways and can become become evident at various stages and time-frames of the poisoning. These include organic acid production through metabolic pathways, exogenous acid addition, tissue hypoperfusion, renal impairment and cytopathic pathways. These variable pathways and presentations make the diagnosis and treatment challenging, and when a poisoning is suspected, consultation with a regional poison center and toxicologist is hightly recommended. There are numerous toxins that produce acid-base disturbances; however, we will only discuss the most common and serious toxins that result in a metabolic acidosis. The clinical features of metabolic acidosis are similar regardless of the etiology. Depending on the toxin, type and amount of exposure, there may be other specific clinical features. These may include respiratory compensatory signs such as tachypnea and Kussmaul respirations. Hyperventilation (rapid shallow or Kussmaul respirations). Chest pain, cardiac dysrhythmias, palpations. Many poisoned patients are unable to provide a reliable history; therefore, laboratory and other ancillary testing is essential. Some patients will present with classic toxidromes (e.g. opioid, anticholinergic, cholinergic or sympathomimetic), others will have family or friends relay important information regarding recent activity and possible exposure. To adequately assess these patients, it is essential to use a systematic approach, as many different poisons will have subtle overlapping signs and symptoms. Mana Continue reading >>

Metabolic Acidosis

Metabolic Acidosis

What is metabolic acidosis? The buildup of acid in the body due to kidney disease or kidney failure is called metabolic acidosis. When your body fluids contain too much acid, it means that your body is either not getting rid of enough acid, is making too much acid, or cannot balance the acid in your body. What causes metabolic acidosis? Healthy kidneys have many jobs. One of these jobs is to keep the right balance of acids in the body. The kidneys do this by removing acid from the body through urine. Metabolic acidosis is caused by a build-up of too many acids in the blood. This happens when your kidneys are unable to adequately remove the acid from your blood. What are the signs and symptoms? Not everyone will have signs or symptoms. However, you may experience: Long and deep breaths Fast heartbeat Headache and/or confusion Weakness Feeling very tired Vomiting and/or feeling sick to your stomach (nausea) Loss of appetite If you experience any of these, it is important to let your healthcare provider know immediately. What are the complications of metabolic acidosis if I have kidney disease or kidney failure? Increased bone loss (osteoporosis): Metabolic acidosis can lead to a loss of bone in your body. This can lead to a higher chance of fractures in important bones like your hips or backbone. Progression of kidney disease: Metabolic acidosis can make your kidney disease worse. Exactly how this happens is not clear. As acid builds up, kidney function lowers; and as kidney function lowers, acid builds up. This can lead to the progression of kidney disease. Muscle loss: Albumin is an important protein in your body that helps build and keep muscles healthy. Metabolic acidosis lowers the amount of albumin created in your body, and leads to muscle loss, or what is called Continue reading >>

Metabolic Acidosis: Practice Essentials, Background, Etiology

Metabolic Acidosis: Practice Essentials, Background, Etiology

Metabolic acidosis is a clinical disturbance characterized by an increase in plasma acidity. Metabolic acidosis should be considered a sign of an underlying disease process. Identification of this underlying condition is essential to initiate appropriate therapy. (See Etiology, DDx, Workup, and Treatment.) Understanding the regulation of acid-base balance requires appreciation of the fundamental definitions and principles underlying this complex physiologic process. Go to Pediatric Metabolic Acidosis and Emergent Management of Metabolic Acidosis for complete information on those topics. An acid is a substance that can donate hydrogen ions (H+). A base is a substance that can accept H+ ions. The ion exchange occurs regardless of the substance's charge. Strong acids are those that are completely ionized in body fluids, and weak acids are those that are incompletely ionized in body fluids. Hydrochloric acid (HCl) is considered a strong acid because it is present only in a completely ionized form in the body, whereas carbonic acid (H2 CO3) is a weak acid because it is ionized incompletely, and, at equilibrium, all three reactants are present in body fluids. See the reactions below. The law of mass action states that the velocity of a reaction is proportional to the product of the reactant concentrations. On the basis of this law, the addition of H+ or bicarbonate (HCO3-) drives the reaction shown below to the left. In body fluids, the concentration of hydrogen ions ([H+]) is maintained within very narrow limits, with the normal physiologic concentration being 40 nEq/L. The concentration of HCO3- (24 mEq/L) is 600,000 times that of [H+]. The tight regulation of [H+] at this low concentration is crucial for normal cellular activities because H+ at higher concentrations can b Continue reading >>

What Is Metabolic Acidosis?

What Is Metabolic Acidosis?

Metabolic acidosis happens when the chemical balance of acids and bases in your blood gets thrown off. Your body: Is making too much acid Isn't getting rid of enough acid Doesn't have enough base to offset a normal amount of acid When any of these happen, chemical reactions and processes in your body don't work right. Although severe episodes can be life-threatening, sometimes metabolic acidosis is a mild condition. You can treat it, but how depends on what's causing it. Causes of Metabolic Acidosis Different things can set up an acid-base imbalance in your blood. Ketoacidosis. When you have diabetes and don't get enough insulin and get dehydrated, your body burns fat instead of carbs as fuel, and that makes ketones. Lots of ketones in your blood turn it acidic. People who drink a lot of alcohol for a long time and don't eat enough also build up ketones. It can happen when you aren't eating at all, too. Lactic acidosis. The cells in your body make lactic acid when they don't have a lot of oxygen to use. This acid can build up, too. It might happen when you're exercising intensely. Big drops in blood pressure, heart failure, cardiac arrest, and an overwhelming infection can also cause it. Renal tubular acidosis. Healthy kidneys take acids out of your blood and get rid of them in your pee. Kidney diseases as well as some immune system and genetic disorders can damage kidneys so they leave too much acid in your blood. Hyperchloremic acidosis. Severe diarrhea, laxative abuse, and kidney problems can cause lower levels of bicarbonate, the base that helps neutralize acids in blood. Respiratory acidosis also results in blood that's too acidic. But it starts in a different way, when your body has too much carbon dioxide because of a problem with your lungs. Continue reading >>

Metabolic Acidosis.

Metabolic Acidosis.

Abstract Acute metabolic acidosis is frequently encountered in critically ill patients. Metabolic acidosis can occur as a result of either the accumulation of endogenous acids that consumes bicarbonate (high anion gap metabolic acidosis) or loss of bicarbonate from the gastrointestinal tract or the kidney (hyperchloremic or normal anion gap metabolic acidosis). The cause of high anion gap metabolic acidosis includes lactic acidosis, ketoacidosis, renal failure and intoxication with ethylene glycol, methanol, salicylate and less commonly with pyroglutamic acid (5-oxoproline), propylene glycole or djenkol bean (gjenkolism). The most common causes of hyperchloremic metabolic acidosis are gastrointestinal bicarbonate loss, renal tubular acidosis, drugs-induced hyperkalemia, early renal failure and administration of acids. The appropriate treatment of acute metabolic acidosis, in particular organic form of acidosis such as lactic acidosis, has been very controversial. The only effective treatment for organic acidosis is cessation of acid production via improvement of tissue oxygenation. Treatment of acute organic acidosis with sodium bicarbonate failed to reduce the morbidity and mortality despite improvement in acid-base parameters. Further studies are required to determine the optimal treatment strategies for acute metabolic acidosis. Continue reading >>

Metabolic Acidosis

Metabolic Acidosis

Metabolic acidosis is the most common acid–base disorder and can be life threatening. It results from excessive cellular acid production, reduced acid secretion, or loss of body alkali. The body has two buffering mechanisms to counteract an increase in acid. The initial response is to increase carbon dioxide excretion by increasing ventilation. The second response is increased renal excretion of acids and renal regeneration of bicarbonate. The adequacy of compensation can be assessed by the quick check method or the Winter formula (Table 2). Metabolic acidosis can be classified into two categories using the anion gap. Each category has a distinct differential diagnosis. Anion gap = [Sodium] – ([Chloride] + [Bicarbonate]) Normally, the anion gap is approximately 12 ± 2 meq/L (12 ± 2 mmol/L). Most unmeasured anions consist of albumin. Therefore, the presence of either a low albumin level or an unmeasured cationic light chain, which occurs in multiple myeloma, results in a low anion gap. Increased hydrogen ion concentration or decreased bicarbonate concentration will increase the gap. When the primary disturbance is a metabolic acidosis, the anion gap helps to narrow the diagnostic possibilities to an increased anion gap acidosis or a normal anion gap acidosis. Increased Anion Gap Metabolic Acidosis Common causes include ketoacidosis (diabetes mellitus, alcohol abuse, starvation), lactic acidosis, chronic kidney disease, salicylate toxicity, and ethylene glycol and methanol poisoning. Diabetic ketoacidosis is the most common cause of an increased anion gap acidosis, but a normal anion gap acidosis may be present early in the disease course when the extracellular fluid (ECF) volume is nearly normal. Ketoacidosis also may develop in patients with a histor Continue reading >>

Metabolic Acidosis - Endocrine And Metabolic Disorders - Merck Manuals Professional Edition

Metabolic Acidosis - Endocrine And Metabolic Disorders - Merck Manuals Professional Edition

(Video) Overview of Acid-Base Maps and Compensatory Mechanisms By James L. Lewis, III, MD, Attending Physician, Brookwood Baptist Health and Saint Vincent’s Ascension Health, Birmingham Metabolic acidosis is primary reduction in bicarbonate (HCO3−), typically with compensatory reduction in carbon dioxide partial pressure (Pco2); pH may be markedly low or slightly subnormal. Metabolic acidoses are categorized as high or normal anion gap based on the presence or absence of unmeasured anions in serum. Causes include accumulation of ketones and lactic acid, renal failure, and drug or toxin ingestion (high anion gap) and GI or renal HCO3− loss (normal anion gap). Symptoms and signs in severe cases include nausea and vomiting, lethargy, and hyperpnea. Diagnosis is clinical and with ABG and serum electrolyte measurement. The cause is treated; IV sodium bicarbonate may be indicated when pH is very low. Metabolic acidosis is acid accumulation due to Increased acid production or acid ingestion Acidemia (arterial pH < 7.35) results when acid load overwhelms respiratory compensation. Causes are classified by their effect on the anion gap (see The Anion Gap and see Table: Causes of Metabolic Acidosis ). Lactic acidosis (due to physiologic processes) Lactic acidosis (due to exogenous toxins) Toluene (initially high gap; subsequent excretion of metabolites normalizes gap) HIV nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors Biguanides (rare except with acute kidney injury) Normal anion gap (hyperchloremic acidosis) Renal tubular acidosis, types 1, 2, and 4 The most common causes of a high anion gap metabolic acidosis are Ketoacidosis is a common complication of type 1 diabetes mellitus (see diabetic ketoacidosis ), but it also occurs with chronic alcoholism (see alcoholic ketoacidos Continue reading >>

Approach To The Adult With Metabolic Acidosis

Approach To The Adult With Metabolic Acidosis

INTRODUCTION On a typical Western diet, approximately 15,000 mmol of carbon dioxide (which can generate carbonic acid as it combines with water) and 50 to 100 mEq of nonvolatile acid (mostly sulfuric acid derived from the metabolism of sulfur-containing amino acids) are produced each day. Acid-base balance is maintained by pulmonary and renal excretion of carbon dioxide and nonvolatile acid, respectively. Renal excretion of acid involves the combination of hydrogen ions with urinary titratable acids, particularly phosphate (HPO42- + H+ —> H2PO4-), and ammonia to form ammonium (NH3 + H+ —> NH4+) [1]. The latter is the primary adaptive response since ammonia production from the metabolism of glutamine can be appropriately increased in response to an acid load [2]. Acid-base balance is usually assessed in terms of the bicarbonate-carbon dioxide buffer system: Dissolved CO2 + H2O <—> H2CO3 <—> HCO3- + H+ The ratio between these reactants can be expressed by the Henderson-Hasselbalch equation. By convention, the pKa of 6.10 is used when the dominator is the concentration of dissolved CO2, and this is proportional to the pCO2 (the actual concentration of the acid H2CO3 is very low): TI AU Garibotto G, Sofia A, Robaudo C, Saffioti S, Sala MR, Verzola D, Vettore M, Russo R, Procopio V, Deferrari G, Tessari P To evaluate the effects of chronic metabolic acidosis on protein dynamics and amino acid oxidation in the human kidney, a combination of organ isotopic ((14)C-leucine) and mass-balance techniques in 11 subjects with normal renal function undergoing venous catheterizations was used. Five of 11 studies were performed in the presence of metabolic acidosis. In subjects with normal acid-base balance, kidney protein degradation was 35% to 130% higher than protein synthesi Continue reading >>

Acute Metabolic Acidosis: Characterization And Diagnosis Of The Disorder And The Plasma Potassium Response

Acute Metabolic Acidosis: Characterization And Diagnosis Of The Disorder And The Plasma Potassium Response

Acute Metabolic Acidosis: Characterization and Diagnosis of the Disorder and the Plasma Potassium Response *From the Medizinische Universitaetsklinik Kantonsspital Bruderholz, Bruderholz, Switzerland; and †Institute of Physiology, Departement of Veterinary Medicine, University of Zurich, Switzerland; and ‡Genentech Inc., South San Francisco, California. Correspondence to Dr. Reto Krapf, Medizinische Universitaetsklinik, Kantonsspital Bruderholz, CH 4101 Bruderholz/Basel, Switzerland. Phone: 0041-61-436-21-81; E-mail: reto.krapf{at}ksbh.ch Received for publication December 30, 2003. Accepted for publication February 25, 2004. ABSTRACT. Despite the high incidence of acute metabolic acidosis, there are no reliable human data to enable physicians to accurately diagnose this disorder. In addition, there is uncertainty about the direction and magnitude of plasma potassium changes in acute metabolic acidosis. The systemic and renal acid-base, electrolyte, and endocrine response to acute acid loads (imposed by three timed NH4Cl infusions into the duodenum, 0.9 mmol of NH4Cl per kg of body weight over 30 min each) was characterized in six healthy male subjects in whom a metabolic steady-state had been established. Arterialized blood CO2 tension decreased by 0.85 mmHg per mmol/L decrease in plasma bicarbonate concentration and blood hydrogen ion concentration increased by 0.45 nmol/L per mmol/L decrease in plasma bicarbonate concentration. Plasma potassium did not change significantly (+0.02 ± 0.02 mmol/L per mmol decrease in plasma bicarbonate concentration). Plasma insulin increased and plasma glucagon levels decreased in acute metabolic acidosis, while catecholamines and aldosterone were not affected significantly. These data provide the first diagnostic criteria for the Continue reading >>

Metabolic Acidosis

Metabolic Acidosis

Metabolic acidosis occurs when the body produces too much acid. It can also occur when the kidneys are not removing enough acid from the body. There are several types of metabolic acidosis. Diabetic acidosis develops when acidic substances, known as ketone bodies, build up in the body. This most often occurs with uncontrolled type 1 diabetes. It is also called diabetic ketoacidosis and DKA. Hyperchloremic acidosis results from excessive loss of sodium bicarbonate from the body. This can occur with severe diarrhea. Lactic acidosis results from a buildup of lactic acid. It can be caused by: Alcohol Cancer Exercising intensely Liver failure Medicines, such as salicylates Other causes of metabolic acidosis include: Kidney disease (distal renal tubular acidosis and proximal renal tubular acidosis) Poisoning by aspirin, ethylene glycol (found in antifreeze), or methanol Continue reading >>

Acidosis

Acidosis

When your body fluids contain too much acid, it’s known as acidosis. Acidosis occurs when your kidneys and lungs can’t keep your body’s pH in balance. Many of the body’s processes produce acid. Your lungs and kidneys can usually compensate for slight pH imbalances, but problems with these organs can lead to excess acid accumulating in your body. The acidity of your blood is measured by determining its pH. A lower pH means that your blood is more acidic, while a higher pH means that your blood is more basic. The pH of your blood should be around 7.4. According to the American Association for Clinical Chemistry (AACC), acidosis is characterized by a pH of 7.35 or lower. Alkalosis is characterized by a pH level of 7.45 or higher. While seemingly slight, these numerical differences can be serious. Acidosis can lead to numerous health issues, and it can even be life-threatening. There are two types of acidosis, each with various causes. The type of acidosis is categorized as either respiratory acidosis or metabolic acidosis, depending on the primary cause of your acidosis. Respiratory acidosis Respiratory acidosis occurs when too much CO2 builds up in the body. Normally, the lungs remove CO2 while you breathe. However, sometimes your body can’t get rid of enough CO2. This may happen due to: chronic airway conditions, like asthma injury to the chest obesity, which can make breathing difficult sedative misuse deformed chest structure Metabolic acidosis Metabolic acidosis starts in the kidneys instead of the lungs. It occurs when they can’t eliminate enough acid or when they get rid of too much base. There are three major forms of metabolic acidosis: Diabetic acidosis occurs in people with diabetes that’s poorly controlled. If your body lacks enough insulin, keton Continue reading >>

Drug-induced Metabolic Acidosis

Drug-induced Metabolic Acidosis

Go to: Introduction Metabolic acidosis is defined as an excessive accumulation of non-volatile acid manifested as a primary reduction in serum bicarbonate concentration in the body associated with low plasma pH. Certain conditions may exist with other acid-base disorders such as metabolic alkalosis and respiratory acidosis/alkalosis 1. Humans possess homeostatic mechanisms that maintain acid-base balance ( Figure 1). One utilizes both bicarbonate and non-bicarbonate buffers in both the intracellular and the extracellular milieu in the immediate defense against volatile (mainly CO 2) and non-volatile (organic and inorganic) acids before excretion by the lungs and kidneys, respectively. Renal excretion of non-volatile acid is the definitive solution after temporary buffering. This is an intricate and highly efficient homeostatic system. Derangements in over-production, under-excretion, or both can potentially lead to accumulation of excess acid resulting in metabolic acidosis ( Figure 1). Drug-induced metabolic acidosis is often mild, but in rare cases it can be severe or even fatal. Not only should physicians be keenly aware of this potential iatrogenic complication but they should also be fully engaged in understanding the pathophysiological mechanisms. Metabolic acidosis resulting from drugs and/or ingestion of toxic chemicals can be grouped into four general categories ( Figure 2): Some medications cannot be placed into one single category, as they possess multiple mechanisms that can cause metabolic acidosis. In suspected drug-induced metabolic acidosis, clinicians should establish the biochemical diagnosis of metabolic acidosis along with the evaluation of respiratory compensation and whether there is presence of mixed acid-based disorders 2, then convert the bioche Continue reading >>

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