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What Body Systems Are Affected By Ketoacidosis?

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Diabetic Ketoacidosis (dka)

Diabetes is a long-term condition that can have a major impact on the life of a child or young person, as well as their family or carers. In addition to insulin therapy, diabetes management should include education, support and access to psychological services, as detailed here and in this guideline. Preparations should also be made for the transition from paediatric to adult services, which have a somewhat different model of care and evidence base. Rapid‐acting insulin analogues (artificial insulin such as insulin lispro, insulin aspart, or insulin glulisine) act more quickly than regular human insulin. In people with a specific type of life‐threatening diabetic coma due to uncontrolled diabetes, called diabetic ketoacidosis, prompt administration of intravenous regular insulin is standard therapy. The rapid‐acting insulin analogues, if injected subcutaneously, act faster than subcutaneously administered regular insulin. The need for a continuous intravenous infusion, an intervention that usually requires admission to an intensive care unit, can thereby be avoided. This means that subcutaneously given insulin analogues for diabetic ketoacidosis might be applied in the emerge Continue reading >>

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Popular Questions

  1. Swiggy

    I have been firmly sticking to lchf since the end of January but my fbg hasn't dropped. I started testing before and after meals and I am usually back to within .3 mmol of my pre meal level after two hours.
    I have completely cut out all the obvious carbs - bread, rice, pasta, fruit etc. I don't have a sweet tooth so I don't eat cake, biscuits, sweets or drink fizzy drinks.
    I have been checking labels and weighing out portions and I am confident that I have only gone above 40g of carbohydrate on fewer than six days since starting lchf and I haven't been eating huge quantities of protein.
    I feel great. I haven't been hungry and I feel satisfied after eating small meals. After gaining five pounds since starting I decided that I was embracing cream too enthusiastically and cut back to 100ml a day and I am happy to report a two pound loss this week.
    Apologies for the amount of background but I have two questions.
    Can you be burning fat and still have blood glucose levels in the sevens and eights?
    What's the best time to check urine for ketones? I have bought some Bayer Ketostix which are due to be delivered today.

  2. GrantGam

    LCHF won't immediately eradicate higher than ideal fasting BG levels. Although you are LCHF, your body will still be converting protein into glucose; a process known as gluconeogenesis. The situation manifests itself in a similar fashion for a lot of T1's, where we still need insulin for meals that don't contain carbs but do contain protein.
    Insulin resistance and dawn phenomenon are a further two factors which will increase your fasting BG. Insulin resistance tends to improve with weight loss and increased activity levels. Dawn phenomenon however is more or less a permanent battle that many diabetics have to deal with...
    In terms of when to test your ketones, I wouldn't have thought it would matter much. If you are aiming for a state of permanent ketosis then any time of day should be fine in my opinion.

  3. BrianTheElder

    Swiggy said: ↑
    I have been firmly sticking to lchf since the end of January but my fbg hasn't dropped. I started testing before and after meals and I am usually back to within .3 mmol of my pre meal level after two hours.
    I have completely cut out all the obvious carbs - bread, rice, pasta, fruit etc. I don't have a sweet tooth so I don't eat cake, biscuits, sweets or drink fizzy drinks.
    I have been checking labels and weighing out portions and I am confident that I have only gone above 40g of carbohydrate on fewer than six days since starting lchf and I haven't been eating huge quantities of protein.
    I feel great. I haven't been hungry and I feel satisfied after eating small meals. After gaining five pounds since starting I decided that I was embracing cream too enthusiastically and cut back to 100ml a day and I am happy to report a two pound loss this week.
    Apologies for the amount of background but I have two questions.
    Can you be burning fat and still have blood glucose levels in the sevens and eights?
    What's the best time to check urine for ketones? I have bought some Bayer Ketostix which are due to be delivered today.
    Click to expand... Hi
    @Swiggy My answers are:
    I think proteins are the key, if you eat a lot, then gluconeogenesis will operate and that will increase your blood glucose. So I limit my proteins to 0.8g/kg of target body weight. However, as @GrantGam says, there are many other factors involved. For me, though I seem to be particularly susceptible to increased bs and weight if I eat more protein.
    I don't think it matters much, but I test at 21:30 every night, because that's definitely 2 hours after my last food of the day and it allows me to set an alarm on my computer so I don't forget. I also think it's a good idea with any series of readings to keep variables under control as much as possible. I always weigh and test my fasting bs at the same time each day. Hope that helps.

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