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What Blood Sugar Level Can Cause Coma?

Hypoglycemia (low Blood Sugar)

Hypoglycemia (low Blood Sugar)

What Is Hypoglycemia? Hypoglycemia may be described as low levels of sugar (glucose) in the blood. This is commonly seen in people who are diabetic, and their blood sugar levels fall too low - either because they took their medications and did not eat properly, or the dosage of medication is too high for them. Normal blood Glucose (sugar) levels are 60-110 mg/dL. Normal values may vary from laboratory to laboratory. Levels much lower than these can indicate hypoglycemia. Causes of Hypoglycemia: Causes of hypoglycemia may include: Excessive exercise, or lack of food intake Certain forms of alcohol may cause low blood sugar levels Certain kinds of tumors, affecting the pancreas (insulinomas) After stomach surgery People with kidney failure, who are on dialysis, may experience hypoglycemia. If you have liver disease, you may be at risk for hypoglycemia. You may have problems with your thyroid, adrenal, or pituitary glands. You may not be absorbing food that you eat very well, thus resulting in hypoglycemia. Symptoms of Hypoglycemia: You may feel sweaty, shaky or hungry. You may feel faint. Extremely low blood sugar levels may cause you to be confused, or disoriented. Severely low levels of blood sugar may cause coma. You may have a fast heartbeat, or feel palpitations. Things You Can Do About Hypoglycemia: If you are experiencing low blood sugar levels as a result of your treatment of diabetes, your healthcare provider may instruct you on the use of close blood sugar monitoring during this time. Follow all of your healthcare provider's instructions. Try to exercise. Low blood sugar levels are often temporary. If you are diabetic, you will have high blood sugars as well. Make a daily walk either alone, or with a friend or family member a part of your routine. Even light wal Continue reading >>

Diabetes With Coma In Cats

Diabetes With Coma In Cats

Owners must be very careful to monitor insulin dosages, because the dosages may need adjustment depending upon appetite, infection, energy level or behavior. If an insulin overdose is accidentally administered, the cat may become disoriented and sleepy and lose consciousness. Diabetes is divided into two diagnoses for cats, insulin-dependent and non-insulin-dependent. One out of 1,200 cats will become diabetic, and most diabetic cats will become insulin-dependent. These felines will require oral medications or insulin injections to control their diabetes. Diabetes mellitus is a common condition of older, obese felines. Male cats are more likely to become diabetic than females. Causes other than or combined with obesity may include: Hypothyroidism Cushing's disease Chronic pancreatitis A medication like prednisolone The Burmese breed of cat seems to be more susceptible to diabetes in Australia, New Zealand and the United Kingdom. The disease does not seem more prevalent in North American Burmese cats. Most diabetic cats will require injectable or oral insulin at some point. Each cat is quite different in eating habits and requirements of insulin. Maintaining insulin levels for some cats is easy for a pet owner to manage, but some cases prove more difficult. Regular blood sugar testing is necessary to determine the correct amount of insulin needed. If the insulin dose is too high, the cat will become lethargic and fall into a coma. Diabetic coma is a medical emergency. When insulin is not produced or a cat is insulin resistant, the cat cannot use sugars as an energy source. Then the body begins to break down and use fat and protein as an alternative. This is when pet owners begin to notice ravenous eating and weight-loss simultaneously. Water consumption and urine output Continue reading >>

What Happens When You Go Into A Diabetic Coma?

What Happens When You Go Into A Diabetic Coma?

Diabetes comes along with a lot of complications and another such life-threatening condition that can affect both type 1 and type 2 diabetes patients is a diabetic coma. It is a situation, where the person although alive, cannot respond to any sights, sounds, or any other types of physical simulations. In this article, we shall know more about diabetes coma and what happens when a person slips into one. So, join in for the article “What Happens When You Go into a Diabetic Coma?” What is Diabetic Coma? Diabetic coma is a life-threatening condition caused due to either very high or very low glucose levels in a diabetes patient. It affects patients with both type 1 and type 2 diabetes. The major risk factors for this type of condition increases when you are on an insulin pump, have fallen sick and the blood sugar has risen dramatically, you have had a heart failure or a kidney-related disease, you have the habit of drinking too much of alcohol, or even when you have failed to manage your diabetes effectively. In the following paragraphs, we shall study the symptoms and causes of this fatal condition in detail. Symptoms of Diabetic Coma Let us now look into the signs and symptoms which help us understand that a person is slipping into diabetes coma. As mentioned above, it can occur either in cases of hyperglycemia or very high levels of blood glucose or in the case of hypoglycemia or low levels of blood glucose. So, let us look into the symptoms of each: Signs of hyperglycemia or high blood sugar The patient experiences high level of thirst and urination Stomach pain is another sign The body gives out a fruity odor Extreme fatigue Dry mouth Vomiting Difficult to breathe easily Heartbeat becomes really fast Signs of hypoglycemia or low blood sugar Difficulty in speaking Continue reading >>

Diabetic Coma

Diabetic Coma

A diabetic coma is a life-threatening diabetes complication that causes unconsciousness. It can occur when blood sugar gets too high or dangerously low. Usually it is most common in individuals who are elderly, chronically ill or disabled. Left untreated, a diabetic coma can be fatal. Luckily, there are safety steps that can be taken to help prevent a diabetic coma. Symptoms Before developing a diabetic coma, an individual may experience signs and symptoms of high blood sugar or low blood sugar. High blood pressure signs and symptoms: Tiredness Dry mouth Increased thirst Frequent urination Sickness and vomiting Foul smelling breath Difficulty breathing Abdominal pain Racing heartbeat Low blood pressure signs and symptoms: Tiredness Shaking and trembling Sweatin Increased appetite Sickness Anxiety Racing heartbeat Difficulty speaking Confusion Causes Causes of a diabetic coma are due to blood sugar levels being too low or too high. This can cause various conditions in an individual, all leading to a diabetic coma. The three main causes are known as: Diabetic ketoacidosis: A dangerous complication of diabetes caused by a lack of insulin in the body. Diabetic ketoacidosis is most common in individuals who have type 1 diabetes, but it can also affect people who have type 2 diabetes or gestational diabetes. Diabetic hyperosmolar syndrome: A serious condition caused by extremely high blood sugar levels. Diabetic hyperosmolar syndrome is most common in middle-aged and older individuals who have type 2 diabetes. Hypoglycemia: A serious condition caused by extremely low blood sugar levels. Risk factors Factors associated with an increased risk of a diabetic coma include the following: Type 1 diabetes (Low blood sugar- diabetic ketoacidosis) Type 2 diabetes (High blood sugar- dia Continue reading >>

Diabetic Coma

Diabetic Coma

The three types of diabetic coma include diabetic ketoacidosis coma, hyperosmolar coma and hypoglycaemic coma. Diabetic coma is a medical emergency and needs prompt medical treatment. Uncontrolled blood glucose levels may lead to hyperglycaemia or hypoglycaemia. Low or persistently high blood glucose levels mean your diabetes treatment needs to be adjusted. Speak to your doctor or registered diabetes healthcare professional. Prevention is always the best strategy. If it is a while since you have had diabetes education, make an appointment with your diabetes educator for a review. On this page: Diabetes mellitus is a condition characterised by high blood glucose (sugar) levels. Uncontrolled diabetes may lead to a diabetic coma or unconsciousness. The three types of coma associated with diabetes are diabetic ketoacidosis coma, hyperosmolar coma and hypoglycaemic coma. Diabetic ketoacidosis coma Diabetic ketoacidosis typically occurs in people with type 1 diabetes, which was previously known as juvenile diabetes or insulin dependent diabetes mellitus (IDDM), though it can occasionally occur in type 2 diabetes. This type of coma is triggered by the build-up of chemicals called ketones. Ketones are strongly acidic and cause the blood to become too acidic. When there is not enough insulin circulating, the body cannot use glucose for energy. Instead, fat is broken down and then converted to ketones in the liver. The ketones can build up excessively when insulin levels remain too low. Common causes of ketoacidosis include a missed dose of insulin or an acute infection in a person with type 1 diabetes. Ketoacidosis may be the first sign that a person has developed type 1 diabetes. Symptoms of ketoacidosis Symptoms of ketoacidosis are: extreme thirst lethargy frequent urination ( Continue reading >>

What's It Like: To Suffer A Diabetic Coma

What's It Like: To Suffer A Diabetic Coma

What is a diabetic coma? One of the risks associated with diabetes is what's known as a diabetic coma. A person with diabetes might suffer from a diabetic coma if his or her blood sugar levels get too high, a condition known as hyperglycemia, or go too low, which is referred to as hypoglycemia. A diabetic coma can result because of complications related to either. Diabetes is a group of diseases characterized by high blood glucose levels that result from defects in the body's ability to produce and/or use insulin. Type 2 diabetes is the most common form in Oklahoma, which has consistently ranked in the top 10 nationally for the prevalence of diabetes in the state. About 305,000 adults in Oklahoma have been diagnosed with diabetes. Oklahoma has one of the highest diabetes death rates in the nation, and it's the sixth leading cause of death in Oklahoma. How is it treated? A hyperglycemic hyperosmolar coma — a result of extremely high blood sugar — is a medical emergency. This is more common in people who have type 2 diabetes than type 1 diabetes patients. When blood sugar gets too high, it draws fluid from the inside of brain cells, and you suffer from brain dysfunction. To help pull the person out of the coma, medical professionals will give that person fluids and insulin. Symptoms of hyperglycemia include decreasing levels of consciousness, frequent bathroom trips and extreme thirst. Sometimes hyperglycemia can be brought on by another condition or illness, such as urinary tract infections or pneumonia. Meanwhile, a person suffering from a coma because of low blood sugar might have a faster turnaround time. Usually, these people notice symptoms related to hypoglycemia and then ingest glucose. Early symptoms for hypoglycemia include an increased heart rate, chest pal Continue reading >>

When You Need To Go To The Emergency Room With High Blood Sugars

When You Need To Go To The Emergency Room With High Blood Sugars

My uncle, like all his family, was a bit of a cheapskate. He hated to spend money unless it was absolutely necessary. He was thin and active, having only recently given up a career as a singer and dancer performing weekly on a nationally televised variety show. So when he felt unwell one weekend night, he turned down his wife's suggestion that she drive him to the emergency room and told her he'd wait til Monday when he could see his family doctor. Why waste all that money on an ER visit that was probably unnecessary? As it turned out, he didn't need to see his doctor on Monday. He died that night. He was a few years younger than I am now and the fatal heart attack he experienced was the first symptom he had of our family's odd form of inherited diabetes. But this is why, even though I've inherited the family "cheap" gene, if there's any possibility something dangerous is going on, I head for the ER. Usually it is a waste of money. I was in a small car accident a few weeks ago that left me with nerve pain running up and down my arms and legs. I sat for four hours at our local ER, saw the doctor for five minutes, and was sent home. The diagnosis, whiplash. The treatment, wait and see if it gets worse. The bill? Over $900. I went to the ER because I'd called my family doctor's office and they told me to. Whiplash usually resolves on its own, but occasionally it can cause swelling in your neck that can kill you. I'm not equipped to judge what kind I had, and unlike my uncle, I wasn't about to gamble. So with this in mind, you can understand my reaction when a stranger contacted me recently, after reading my web page, and told me that his blood sugar, which had been normal until very recently, was testing in the 500s on his meter except when his meter wasn't able to give hi Continue reading >>

Diabetic Coma

Diabetic Coma

Tweet Coma is relatively rare in diagnosed diabetes but it is very important to be aware of the situations that increase risk of coma. Causes of diabetic coma The main causes of coma occurring in people with diabetes are as a result of very low or very high blood glucose levels. The three most common causes of coma in people with diabetes are: Severe hypoglycemia and coma Severe hypoglycemia (very low blood glucose levels) can lead to loss of consciousness and coma if not treated. In most cases the body will restore blood sugar levels to normal by releasing glucagon to raise blood sugar levels. Coma is more likely to occur from low blood glucose levels if: A large insulin overdose is taken Alcohol is in the body during hypoglycemia Exercise has depleted the body’s glycogen supply Diabetic ketoacidosis and coma Diabetic ketoacidosis is a dangerous state of having very high blood glucose levels (typically above 17 mmol/L) in combination with high ketone levels. Ketoacidosis is able to occur if the body runs out of insulin and is therefore a factor for people with type 1 diabetes to be aware of. Insulin can prevent ketone levels rising and this is the key reason why people with diabetes are advised never to miss their long term (basal) insulin injections. The symptoms of ketoacidosis include nausea, vomiting, dehydration, disorientation and deep, laboured breathing. If someone with diabetes is displaying these symptoms call for emergency medical help as loss of consciousness and coma could follow. Illness in type 1 diabetes can lead to high blood glucose and ketone levels. It is advisable to test for ketones during periods of illness to prevent ketoacidosis developing. Diabetic coma at diagnosis of type 1 diabetes If the symptoms of type 1 diabetes are not spotted soon e Continue reading >>

High Blood Sugar (hyperglycemia)

High Blood Sugar (hyperglycemia)

What is hyperglycemia? Hyperglycemia is a high level of sugar in the blood. Blood sugar is also called glucose. How does it occur? Hyperglycemia can occur in healthy people for a brief time after they eat foods very high in sugar. For example, after drinking a large milkshake or eating a large dessert you may have a brief high blood sugar level, but the body will process the sugar and the level of sugar in the blood will soon return to normal. Hyperglycemia is the main problem if you have diabetes. If you have the form of diabetes called type 1 diabetes, hyperglycemia occurs because you do not have enough insulin to move sugar from the blood into all your cells. (Insulin is made by the pancreas.). In type 2 diabetes, high blood sugar usually occurs because the cells have become unable to use insulin. In both Type 1 and Type 2 diabetes the sugar cannot move from the blood into the cells, so high levels of sugar build up in the blood. Hyperglycemia may occur if you are not diabetic but have another illness that makes it hard for your body to process sugar, such as an inflammation of the pancreas (called pancreatitis). High blood sugar can also happen with some medicines, especially steroids. These conditions are usually temporary and your blood sugar usually becomes normal after you are no longer ill or your medicine can be stopped. What are the symptoms? Usually hyperglycemia causes no symptoms. However, if the blood sugar rises to 16.5 mmol/L or higher, symptoms may occur. Symptoms may include: · Blurry vision · Dry mouth · Feeling unusually thirsty · Feeling the need to drink large amounts of liquids · Increased urination · Tiredness. Severe hyperglycemia, blood sugars of 34 mmol/L or higher, can cause coma and even death. How is it diagnosed? The level of sugar Continue reading >>

Cranberry Sparkler

Cranberry Sparkler

A state of profound unconsciousness from which a person cannot be aroused. It may be the result of trauma, a brain tumor, loss of blood supply to the brain (as from cerebrovascular disease), a toxic metabolic condition, or encephalitis (brain inflammation) from an infectious disease. In people with diabetes, two conditions associated with very high blood glucose may cause coma; these are diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) and hyperosmolar hyperglycemic state (HHS). Severe hypoglycemia, or very low blood glucose, may also lead to coma. It’s important for all people with diabetes to learn to recognize these conditions and respond accordingly. Diabetic ketoacidosis is a serious imbalance in blood chemistry causing about 100,000 hospitalizations each year, with a mortality rate of under 5%. It typically occurs when a person has high blood sugar and insufficient insulin to handle it. Without adequate insulin, the body breaks down fat cells for energy, flooding the bloodstream with metabolic by-products called ketoacids. Meanwhile, the kidneys begin filtering large amounts of glucose from the blood and producing large amounts of urine. As the person urinates more frequently, the body becomes dehydrated and loses important minerals called electrolytes. If not treated, these serious imbalances can eventually lead to coma and death. Hyperosmolar hyperglycemic state most commonly affects elderly people. Like DKA, HHS starts with high blood glucose and insulin deficiency and causes people to urinate frequently and become dehydrated. HHS also impairs the ability of the kidneys to filter glucose from the bloodstream, making the blood glucose level rise even higher. Because of the extreme dehydration, HHS can be life-threatening, with a mortality rate of 15%, and can be even more difficul Continue reading >>

Diabetes - Low Blood Sugar - Self-care

Diabetes - Low Blood Sugar - Self-care

Low blood sugar is called hypoglycemia. A blood sugar level below 70 mg/dL (3.9 mmol/L) is low and can harm you. A blood sugar level below 54 mg/dL (3.0 mmol/L) is cause for immediate action. You are at risk for low blood sugar if you have diabetes and are taking any of the following diabetes medicines: Insulin Glyburide (Micronase), glipizide (Glucotrol), glimepiride (Amaryl), repaglinide (Prandin), or nateglinide (Starlix) Chlorpropamide (Diabinese), tolazamide (Tolinase), acetohexamide (Dymelor), or tolbutamide (Orinase) Know how to tell when your blood sugar is getting low. Symptoms include: Weakness or feeling tired Shaking Sweating Headache Hunger Feeling uneasy, nervous, or anxious Feeling cranky Trouble thinking clearly Double or blurry vision Fast or pounding heartbeat Sometimes your blood sugar may be too low even if you do not have symptoms. If it gets too low, you may: Faint Have a seizure Go into a coma Talk with your health care provider about when you should check your blood sugar every day. People who have low blood sugar need to check their blood sugar more often. The most common causes of low blood sugar are: Taking your insulin or diabetes medicine at the wrong time Taking too much insulin or diabetes medicine Not eating enough during meals or snacks after you have taken insulin or diabetes medicine Skipping meals Waiting too long after taking your medicine to eat your meals Exercising a lot or at a time that is unusual for you Not checking your blood sugar or not adjusting your insulin dose before exercising Drinking alcohol Preventing low blood sugar is better than having to treat it. Always have a source of fast-acting sugar with you. When you exercise, check your blood sugar levels. Make sure you have snacks with you. Talk to your provider about r Continue reading >>

Diabetic Coma

Diabetic Coma

Diabetic coma is a reversible form of coma found in people with diabetes mellitus. It is a medical emergency.[1] Three different types of diabetic coma are identified: Severe low blood sugar in a diabetic person Diabetic ketoacidosis (usually type 1) advanced enough to result in unconsciousness from a combination of a severely increased blood sugar level, dehydration and shock, and exhaustion Hyperosmolar nonketotic coma (usually type 2) in which an extremely high blood sugar level and dehydration alone are sufficient to cause unconsciousness. In most medical contexts, the term diabetic coma refers to the diagnostical dilemma posed when a physician is confronted with an unconscious patient about whom nothing is known except that they have diabetes. An example might be a physician working in an emergency department who receives an unconscious patient wearing a medical identification tag saying DIABETIC. Paramedics may be called to rescue an unconscious person by friends who identify them as diabetic. Brief descriptions of the three major conditions are followed by a discussion of the diagnostic process used to distinguish among them, as well as a few other conditions which must be considered. An estimated 2 to 15 percent of diabetics will suffer from at least one episode of diabetic coma in their lifetimes as a result of severe hypoglycemia. Types[edit] Severe hypoglycemia[edit] People with type 1 diabetes mellitus who must take insulin in full replacement doses are most vulnerable to episodes of hypoglycemia. It is usually mild enough to reverse by eating or drinking carbohydrates, but blood glucose occasionally can fall fast enough and low enough to produce unconsciousness before hypoglycemia can be recognized and reversed. Hypoglycemia can be severe enough to cause un Continue reading >>

Diabetic Coma Causes High, Low Blood Sugar Level Symptoms For Emergency Treatment

Diabetic Coma Causes High, Low Blood Sugar Level Symptoms For Emergency Treatment

If you have diabetes, a too high or low blood sugar level for too long can cause you to lapse into a diabetic coma, or a state of unconsciousness. And when left untreated, it may cause permanent brain damage and potentially death. Coma in a diabetic has a couple different inducements. For type 1 diabetics, coma is most often caused by the buildup of ketones in the bloodstream, or ketoacidosis. Ketoacidosis occurs when insulin isn’t available for glucose metabolism, so fats are metabolized as a source of energy instead. This results in ketone accumulation and metabolic acidosis. Diabetic ketoacidosis is typically a type 1 diabetes health concern, but it can affect those with other types of diabetes. Another diabetic related health condition that can lead to a coma is diabetic hyperosmolar syndrome. It is caused by a high blood sugar level that causes your blood to thicken. In an effort to relieve syrupy blood condition, your body urinates the extra sugar coupled with a large amount of fluid. As a result, it can cause dehydration and a loss of consciousness. This high blood sugar dehydrating condition usually is seen in older folks with type 2 diabetes. Low blood sugar levels can also cause a diabetic coma via the lack of availability of glucose to your brain to sustain its need to function. Hence in severe cases, low blood sugar can cause you to pass out. Low blood sugar caused diabetic coma generally occurs because you: skipped meals took too much insulin exercised too vigorously Everyone suffering diabetes is at risk of a diabetic coma, especially those who don’t monitor their blood sugar levels regularly or aren’t even aware they even have it. However, failure to take insulin, excessive food consumption or stresses that increase you body’s need for insulin, li Continue reading >>

Diabetic Coma And Type 2 Diabetes

Diabetic Coma And Type 2 Diabetes

A diabetic coma could happen when your blood sugar gets too high -- 600 milligrams per deciliter (mg/dL) or more -- causing you to become very dehydrated. It usually affects people with type 2 diabetes that isn’t well-controlled. It’s common among those who are elderly, chronically ill, and disabled. Doctors aren’t sure why, but they think they these people may not realize they’re thirsty or may not be able to get enough to drink. This is a serious condition, and if it isn’t spotted soon and treated quickly, it could be fatal. Knowing the symptoms can help you stay safe. If you have diabetes and you’ve had a heavy thirst and gone to the bathroom more often than usual for a few weeks, check with your doctor -- especially if your blood sugar isn’t well-controlled. As your body loses more and more water, you may notice: Drowsiness Altered mental state Restlessness Inability to speak Visual problems Paralysis These factors may lead to dehydration and coma: Once your doctor spots the early signs, he may send you to the hospital. You’ll get an IV to replace lost fluids and electrolytes such as potassium. And you’ll get insulin or other medication to control your blood sugar. The coma can lead to death if left untreated. Take these simple steps to help protect yourself: Check your blood sugar regularly, as your doctor recommends. Know your target blood sugar ranges and what to do if the readings are too high. Plan how often to check your blood sugar when you’re sick. Take extra care of yourself if you’re ill. Continue reading >>

Diabetic Coma

Diabetic Coma

Print Overview A diabetic coma is a life-threatening diabetes complication that causes unconsciousness. If you have diabetes, dangerously high blood sugar (hyperglycemia) or dangerously low blood sugar (hypoglycemia) can lead to a diabetic coma. If you lapse into a diabetic coma, you're alive — but you can't awaken or respond purposefully to sights, sounds or other types of stimulation. Left untreated, a diabetic coma can be fatal. The prospect of a diabetic coma is scary, but fortunately you can take steps to help prevent it. Start by following your diabetes treatment plan. Symptoms Before developing a diabetic coma, you'll usually experience signs and symptoms of high blood sugar or low blood sugar. High blood sugar (hyperglycemia) If your blood sugar level is too high, you may experience: Increased thirst Frequent urination Fatigue Nausea and vomiting Shortness of breath Stomach pain Fruity breath odor A very dry mouth A rapid heartbeat Low blood sugar (hypoglycemia) Signs and symptoms of a low blood sugar level may include: Shakiness or nervousness Anxiety Fatigue Weakness Sweating Hunger Nausea Dizziness or light-headedness Difficulty speaking Confusion Some people, especially those who've had diabetes for a long time, develop a condition known as hypoglycemia unawareness and won't have the warning signs that signal a drop in blood sugar. If you experience any symptoms of high or low blood sugar, test your blood sugar and follow your diabetes treatment plan based on the test results. If you don't start to feel better quickly, or you start to feel worse, call for emergency help. When to see a doctor A diabetic coma is a medical emergency. If you feel extreme high or low blood sugar signs or symptoms and think you might pass out, call 911 or your local emergency nu Continue reading >>

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