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What Blood Sugar Level Can Cause Coma?

Diabetic Coma Symptoms, What You Need To Know

Diabetic Coma Symptoms, What You Need To Know

Diabetic coma symptoms are something we should all be aware of. It is true that type 1 diabetics are more likely to experience them than type 2, but as diabetics are living longer, the chance of experiencing symptoms is greater. One statistic is that up to 15% of diabetics will go into diabetic coma because of severe hypoglycemia. Coma is another word for unconscious. A diabetic is in a coma if he cannot be wakened and can't respond to sounds and sights. It does not mean the person in a coma will die. These days, with swift blood test results and treatment, a diabetic will come out of a coma very fast. Diabetic medical alert bracelets and necklaces keep us from being misdiagnosed as drunk or epileptic when we cannot speak. But just knowing you are a diabetic is not enough. If you are taken to an emergency room, the doctors look for diabetic alert charms. But diabetic coma symptoms still need to be diagnosed correctly so the proper treatment is started, because there are three different types of coma, and the complications of all three are brain damage and death. Oddly, either chronic high blood sugar or sudden low blood sugar can trigger diabetic coma symptoms. That's why it's good to know how we react to both of them. With high blood sugar, or hyperglycemia, you feel thirsty and have to urinate more often. You feel fatigue, and there is always nausea and vomiting, often for days. You can feel short of breath and have stomach pain. There is a fruity or acetone smell to your breath and a fast heartbeat. The symptoms are not sudden. But low blood sugar comes on very swiftly and can wake you out of a sound sleep. You feel shaky, nervous, tired and either hungry or nauseated. You sweat a lot and your heart races. You can get irritated and even aggressive for no reason, and Continue reading >>

Hyperglycemia: When Your Blood Glucose Level Goes Too High

Hyperglycemia: When Your Blood Glucose Level Goes Too High

Hyperglycemia means high (hyper) glucose (gly) in the blood (emia). Your body needs glucose to properly function. Your cells rely on glucose for energy. Hyperglycemia is a defining characteristic of diabetes—when the blood glucose level is too high because the body isn't properly using or doesn't make the hormone insulin. You get glucose from the foods you eat. Carbohydrates, such as fruit, milk, potatoes, bread, and rice, are the biggest source of glucose in a typical diet. Your body breaks down carbohydrates into glucose, and then transports the glucose to the cells via the bloodstream. Body Needs Insulin However, in order to use the glucose, your body needs insulin. This is a hormone produced by the pancreas. Insulin helps transport glucose into the cells, particularly the muscle cells. People with type 1 diabetes no longer make insulin to help their bodies use glucose, so they have to take insulin, which is injected under the skin. People with type 2 diabetes may have enough insulin, but their body doesn't use it well; they're insulin resistant. Some people with type 2 diabetes may not produce enough insulin. People with diabetes may become hyperglycemic if they don't keep their blood glucose level under control (by using insulin, medications, and appropriate meal planning). For example, if someone with type 1 diabetes doesn't take enough insulin before eating, the glucose their body makes from that food can build up in their blood and lead to hyperglycemia. Your endocrinologist will tell you what your target blood glucose levels are. Your levels may be different from what is usually considered as normal because of age, pregnancy, and/or other factors. Fasting hyperglycemia is defined as when you don't eat for at least eight hours. Recommended range without diabet Continue reading >>

Cause Of Diabetic Coma

Cause Of Diabetic Coma

Diabetic coma is a dangerous condition that can lead to unconsciousness and even death. Diabetic coma may affect 2% to 15% of all diabetics at least once in their lifetime and the condition that most commonly causes the coma is severe hypoglycaemia or low blood sugar. There are three main causes of coma in people with diabetes: diabetic ketoacidosis, severe hypoglycaemia and hyperglycaemic hyperosmolar state. However, despite the increased prevalence of diabetes across the globe, improved diagnosis and early treatment of these causative conditions has lessened the risk of death due to diabetic coma. A glucometer, for example, can detect high or low blood sugar in an unconscious diabetic patient within seconds and this can be confirmed in the laboratory within an hour. Furthermore, due to the widespread warnings and knowledge regarding the possibility of the three conditions, most patients are brought to an emergency unit before the onset of coma. The three causes of diabetic coma Severe hypoglycaemia If an individual’s sugar level in the blood and the brain drops to below 3.5 mmol/l, they are at risk of losing consciousness and falling into a diabetic coma. This risk is greater if an excess dose of insulin or other anti-diabetic medications has been taken, if alcohol is in the person’s body while they are hypoglycemic, or if vigorous exercise has depleted the body’s supply of glycogen. Diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) This condition is more common among people with type 1 diabetes or those with type 2 diabetes who are taking insulin. If there is shortage of insulin, the body fails to use the glucose in the blood for energy and instead fats are broken down in the liver to form acidic compounds called ketones. These ketones build up in the body causing DKA. The condition Continue reading >>

Diabetic Coma Causes High, Low Blood Sugar Level Symptoms For Emergency Treatment

Diabetic Coma Causes High, Low Blood Sugar Level Symptoms For Emergency Treatment

If you have diabetes, a too high or low blood sugar level for too long can cause you to lapse into a diabetic coma, or a state of unconsciousness. And when left untreated, it may cause permanent brain damage and potentially death. Coma in a diabetic has a couple different inducements. For type 1 diabetics, coma is most often caused by the buildup of ketones in the bloodstream, or ketoacidosis. Ketoacidosis occurs when insulin isn’t available for glucose metabolism, so fats are metabolized as a source of energy instead. This results in ketone accumulation and metabolic acidosis. Diabetic ketoacidosis is typically a type 1 diabetes health concern, but it can affect those with other types of diabetes. Another diabetic related health condition that can lead to a coma is diabetic hyperosmolar syndrome. It is caused by a high blood sugar level that causes your blood to thicken. In an effort to relieve syrupy blood condition, your body urinates the extra sugar coupled with a large amount of fluid. As a result, it can cause dehydration and a loss of consciousness. This high blood sugar dehydrating condition usually is seen in older folks with type 2 diabetes. Low blood sugar levels can also cause a diabetic coma via the lack of availability of glucose to your brain to sustain its need to function. Hence in severe cases, low blood sugar can cause you to pass out. Low blood sugar caused diabetic coma generally occurs because you: skipped meals took too much insulin exercised too vigorously Everyone suffering diabetes is at risk of a diabetic coma, especially those who don’t monitor their blood sugar levels regularly or aren’t even aware they even have it. However, failure to take insulin, excessive food consumption or stresses that increase you body’s need for insulin, li Continue reading >>

Coma (medical)

Coma (medical)

What is the Glasgow Coma Scale? The Glasgow Coma Scale was developed to provide healthcare professionals with a simple way of measuring the depth of coma based upon observations of eye opening, speech, and movement. Patients in the deepest level of coma: do not have any speech, and do not open their eyes. Those in lighter coma may offer some response to a verbal or painful stimulus, to the point they may even seem wake, yet meet the criteria of coma because they do not respond to their environment by initiating voluntary actions. The Glasgow Coma Scale is used as part of the initial evaluation of a patient, but does not assist in making the diagnosis as to the cause of coma. Since it "scores" the level of coma, the Glasgow Coma Scale can be used as a standard method for any healthcare professional, from EMT, paramedic, nurse, or neurosurgeon, to assess change in the patient's mental status over time. The best use of the Glasgow Coma Scale is to allow healthcare professionals of different clinical skills and training to consistently assess a patient over longer periods of time in order to determine whether the patient is improving, deteriorating, or remaining the same. In the initial care of a comatose patient, chronologically, there may be first responders, emergency medical technicians (EMTs), paramedics, nurses, emergency physicians, neurologists, and neurosurgeons, all evaluating the same patient in different places at different times. The Glasgow Coma Scale allows a standard assessment that can be shared. The Glasgow Coma Scale Table Eye Opening Spontaneous 4 To loud voice 3 To pain 2 None 1 Verbal Response Oriented 5 Confused, Disoriented 4 Inappropriate words 3 Incomprehensible words 2 None 1 Motor Response Obeys commands 6 Localizes pain 5 Withdraws from pain 4 A Continue reading >>

Diabetic Coma

Diabetic Coma

Tweet Coma is relatively rare in diagnosed diabetes but it is very important to be aware of the situations that increase risk of coma. Causes of diabetic coma The main causes of coma occurring in people with diabetes are as a result of very low or very high blood glucose levels. The three most common causes of coma in people with diabetes are: Severe hypoglycemia and coma Severe hypoglycemia (very low blood glucose levels) can lead to loss of consciousness and coma if not treated. In most cases the body will restore blood sugar levels to normal by releasing glucagon to raise blood sugar levels. Coma is more likely to occur from low blood glucose levels if: A large insulin overdose is taken Alcohol is in the body during hypoglycemia Exercise has depleted the body’s glycogen supply Diabetic ketoacidosis and coma Diabetic ketoacidosis is a dangerous state of having very high blood glucose levels (typically above 17 mmol/L) in combination with high ketone levels. Ketoacidosis is able to occur if the body runs out of insulin and is therefore a factor for people with type 1 diabetes to be aware of. Insulin can prevent ketone levels rising and this is the key reason why people with diabetes are advised never to miss their long term (basal) insulin injections. The symptoms of ketoacidosis include nausea, vomiting, dehydration, disorientation and deep, laboured breathing. If someone with diabetes is displaying these symptoms call for emergency medical help as loss of consciousness and coma could follow. Illness in type 1 diabetes can lead to high blood glucose and ketone levels. It is advisable to test for ketones during periods of illness to prevent ketoacidosis developing. Diabetic coma at diagnosis of type 1 diabetes If the symptoms of type 1 diabetes are not spotted soon e Continue reading >>

Cranberry Sparkler

Cranberry Sparkler

A state of profound unconsciousness from which a person cannot be aroused. It may be the result of trauma, a brain tumor, loss of blood supply to the brain (as from cerebrovascular disease), a toxic metabolic condition, or encephalitis (brain inflammation) from an infectious disease. In people with diabetes, two conditions associated with very high blood glucose may cause coma; these are diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) and hyperosmolar hyperglycemic state (HHS). Severe hypoglycemia, or very low blood glucose, may also lead to coma. It’s important for all people with diabetes to learn to recognize these conditions and respond accordingly. Diabetic ketoacidosis is a serious imbalance in blood chemistry causing about 100,000 hospitalizations each year, with a mortality rate of under 5%. It typically occurs when a person has high blood sugar and insufficient insulin to handle it. Without adequate insulin, the body breaks down fat cells for energy, flooding the bloodstream with metabolic by-products called ketoacids. Meanwhile, the kidneys begin filtering large amounts of glucose from the blood and producing large amounts of urine. As the person urinates more frequently, the body becomes dehydrated and loses important minerals called electrolytes. If not treated, these serious imbalances can eventually lead to coma and death. Hyperosmolar hyperglycemic state most commonly affects elderly people. Like DKA, HHS starts with high blood glucose and insulin deficiency and causes people to urinate frequently and become dehydrated. HHS also impairs the ability of the kidneys to filter glucose from the bloodstream, making the blood glucose level rise even higher. Because of the extreme dehydration, HHS can be life-threatening, with a mortality rate of 15%, and can be even more difficul Continue reading >>

When You Need To Go To The Emergency Room With High Blood Sugars

When You Need To Go To The Emergency Room With High Blood Sugars

My uncle, like all his family, was a bit of a cheapskate. He hated to spend money unless it was absolutely necessary. He was thin and active, having only recently given up a career as a singer and dancer performing weekly on a nationally televised variety show. So when he felt unwell one weekend night, he turned down his wife's suggestion that she drive him to the emergency room and told her he'd wait til Monday when he could see his family doctor. Why waste all that money on an ER visit that was probably unnecessary? As it turned out, he didn't need to see his doctor on Monday. He died that night. He was a few years younger than I am now and the fatal heart attack he experienced was the first symptom he had of our family's odd form of inherited diabetes. But this is why, even though I've inherited the family "cheap" gene, if there's any possibility something dangerous is going on, I head for the ER. Usually it is a waste of money. I was in a small car accident a few weeks ago that left me with nerve pain running up and down my arms and legs. I sat for four hours at our local ER, saw the doctor for five minutes, and was sent home. The diagnosis, whiplash. The treatment, wait and see if it gets worse. The bill? Over $900. I went to the ER because I'd called my family doctor's office and they told me to. Whiplash usually resolves on its own, but occasionally it can cause swelling in your neck that can kill you. I'm not equipped to judge what kind I had, and unlike my uncle, I wasn't about to gamble. So with this in mind, you can understand my reaction when a stranger contacted me recently, after reading my web page, and told me that his blood sugar, which had been normal until very recently, was testing in the 500s on his meter except when his meter wasn't able to give hi Continue reading >>

Diabetic Coma Symptoms

Diabetic Coma Symptoms

A diabetic coma is a serious, life-threatening complication of diabetes in which the patient falls into a state of unconsciousness. It constitutes a medical emergency if left untreated, since it may result in permanent brain damage or death, as MayoClinic.com notes. Death rates can be as high as 50 percent. A diabetic coma occurs mainly due to severe and constant fluctuations in the patient’s blood sugar level. There are also several other causes and attendant symptoms associated with diabetic coma. Video of the Day What is Diabetic Coma? Diabetic coma is a reversible form of coma that is associated with diabetes. It arises mainly as a consequence of diabetes that is left unchecked. There are three variants: ketoacidotic coma, hypoglycemic coma and hyperosmolar coma. The particular symptoms of the diabetic coma depend largely on the conditions that give rise to it, Better Health Channel explains. Treatment options for this condition will therefore vary for the same reasons. However, in every case, diabetic coma is considered a medical emergency that requires immediate attention. Symptoms of Ketoacidotic Coma Ketoacidotic coma occurs mostly in patients with Type 1 diabetes, Diabetes.co.uk reports. It is caused by the build-up of ketones – by-products of fat breakdown – that cause the blood to become excessively acidic. When insulin is lacking, the body switches to using fat instead of glucose for energy, causing the ketone build-up. Usually, this is brought about or worsened by an infection or missed insulin dosage. Symptoms include fatigue, lethargy, extreme thirst, nausea, confusion, difficulty in breathing, vomiting, stomach pain, frequent urination and fruity smell on the breath. Extremely low blood sugar levels, or hypoglycemia, can lead to unconsciousness and Continue reading >>

Hypoglycemia

Hypoglycemia

Hypoglycemia Definition The condition called hypoglycemia is literally translated as low blood sugar. Hypoglycemia occurs when blood sugar (or blood glucose) concentrations fall below a level necessary to properly support the body's need for energy and stability throughout its cells. Description Carbohydrates are the main dietary source of the glucose that is manufactured in the liver and absorbed into the bloodstream to fuel the body's cells and organs. Glucose concentration is controlled by hormones, primarily insulin and glucagon. Glucose concentration also is controlled by epinephrine (adrenalin) and norepinephrine, as well as growth hormone. If these regulators are not working properly, levels of blood sugar can become either excessive (as in hyperglycemia) or inadequate (as in hypoglycemia). If a person has a blood sugar level of 50 mg/dl or less, he or she is considered hypoglycemic, although glucose levels vary widely from one person to another. Hypoglycemia can occur in several ways. Drug-induced hypoglycemia Drug-induced hypoglycemia, a complication of diabetes, is the most commonly seen and most dangerous form of hypoglycemia. Hypoglycemia occurs most often in diabetics who must inject insulin periodically to lower their blood sugar. While other diabetics also are vulnerable to low blood sugar episodes, they have a lower risk of a serious outcome than insulin-dependant diabetics. Unless recognized and treated immediately, severe hypoglycemia in the insulin-dependent diabetic can lead to generalized convulsions followed by amnesia and unconsciousness. Death, though rare, is a possible outcome. In insulin-dependent diabetics, hypoglycemia known as an insulin reaction or insulin shock can be caused by several factors. These include overmedicating with manufactur Continue reading >>

Diabetic Coma And Type 2 Diabetes

Diabetic Coma And Type 2 Diabetes

A diabetic coma could happen when your blood sugar gets too high -- 600 milligrams per deciliter (mg/dL) or more -- causing you to become very dehydrated. It usually affects people with type 2 diabetes that isn’t well-controlled. It’s common among those who are elderly, chronically ill, and disabled. Doctors aren’t sure why, but they think they these people may not realize they’re thirsty or may not be able to get enough to drink. This is a serious condition, and if it isn’t spotted soon and treated quickly, it could be fatal. Knowing the symptoms can help you stay safe. If you have diabetes and you’ve had a heavy thirst and gone to the bathroom more often than usual for a few weeks, check with your doctor -- especially if your blood sugar isn’t well-controlled. As your body loses more and more water, you may notice: Drowsiness Altered mental state Restlessness Inability to speak Visual problems Paralysis These factors may lead to dehydration and coma: Once your doctor spots the early signs, he may send you to the hospital. You’ll get an IV to replace lost fluids and electrolytes such as potassium. And you’ll get insulin or other medication to control your blood sugar. The coma can lead to death if left untreated. Take these simple steps to help protect yourself: Check your blood sugar regularly, as your doctor recommends. Know your target blood sugar ranges and what to do if the readings are too high. Plan how often to check your blood sugar when you’re sick. Take extra care of yourself if you’re ill. Continue reading >>

Diabetic Coma: Causes, What Happens When You Go Into A Diabetic Coma?

Diabetic Coma: Causes, What Happens When You Go Into A Diabetic Coma?

What is Diabetic Coma and What Happens When You go Into a Diabetic Coma? Diabetic coma is a fatal complication that leads to unconsciousness. Any diabetic person with extremely high (hyperglycemia) or low (hypoglycemia) level of blood sugar can be affected by diabetic coma. A person who has slipped into diabetic coma will not be able to respond to any physical stimulation except for being alive. Diabetic coma can cause death when left untreated or not properly treated on time. There are very less chances of hopes in case of diabetic coma. However one can control his or her health conditions to avoid occurrence of diabetic coma. One should follow their diabetes management plan strictly to avoid a turn towards diabetic coma. Diabetic coma is of three types, ketoacidosis coma, hyperosmolar coma and hypoglycemic coma. Emergency medical facility is required in case of a diabetic coma Hyperglycaemia or hypoglycaemia is caused by huge rate of fluctuation in the blood sugar level leading to diabetic coma. Whenever there is any extreme fluctuation in the glucose level of the blood, the same has to be reported to the doctor immediately. Never forget that "prevention is better than cure". Make yourself more aware on diabetes and learn the likely consequences of the disease to keep yourself alert. Frequently Asked Questions (F.A.Q's) on Diabetic Coma A person can fall in to diabetic coma while suffering from Diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA). The person will not remain conscious in this sleep-like state. This state which can be caused by hyperglycemia (high blood glucose) or hypoglycemia (low blood glucose), can remain for long time or sometimes lead to death. "Ketones" are generated in the human body when it uses body fat for energy. Ketones are also generated when there is minimum insu Continue reading >>

Diabetes With Coma In Cats

Diabetes With Coma In Cats

Owners must be very careful to monitor insulin dosages, because the dosages may need adjustment depending upon appetite, infection, energy level or behavior. If an insulin overdose is accidentally administered, the cat may become disoriented and sleepy and lose consciousness. Diabetes is divided into two diagnoses for cats, insulin-dependent and non-insulin-dependent. One out of 1,200 cats will become diabetic, and most diabetic cats will become insulin-dependent. These felines will require oral medications or insulin injections to control their diabetes. Diabetes mellitus is a common condition of older, obese felines. Male cats are more likely to become diabetic than females. Causes other than or combined with obesity may include: Hypothyroidism Cushing's disease Chronic pancreatitis A medication like prednisolone The Burmese breed of cat seems to be more susceptible to diabetes in Australia, New Zealand and the United Kingdom. The disease does not seem more prevalent in North American Burmese cats. Most diabetic cats will require injectable or oral insulin at some point. Each cat is quite different in eating habits and requirements of insulin. Maintaining insulin levels for some cats is easy for a pet owner to manage, but some cases prove more difficult. Regular blood sugar testing is necessary to determine the correct amount of insulin needed. If the insulin dose is too high, the cat will become lethargic and fall into a coma. Diabetic coma is a medical emergency. When insulin is not produced or a cat is insulin resistant, the cat cannot use sugars as an energy source. Then the body begins to break down and use fat and protein as an alternative. This is when pet owners begin to notice ravenous eating and weight-loss simultaneously. Water consumption and urine output Continue reading >>

Diabetic Coma Symptoms, Risks & Causes

Diabetic Coma Symptoms, Risks & Causes

What is diabetic coma? Diabetic coma, a medical emergency, is the condition in which a person with diabetes lapses into a coma (unconsciousness) due to complications in diabetes. In most cases, low blood sugar or severe hypoglycemia causes a person with diabetes to pass out. This reversible form of coma often occurs to people with type 1 diabetes mellitus as they are most vulnerable to episodes of hypoglycemia. There are three types of diabetic coma medically identified as: Diabetic hypoglycemia –severe low blood sugar level Diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) –hyperglycemia, dehydration, & exhaustion Hyperosmolar nonketotic coma –due to extreme hypoglycemia & dehydration Diabetic coma symptoms and causes Diabetic coma is caused by either hypoglycemia (severely low blood sugar level) or hyperglycemia (high blood sugar level). Left untreated, diabetic coma can be fatal. That's why it's important for people with diabetes and their love ones to be aware of symptoms that can lead to diabetic coma. Signs & symptoms of hypoglycemia (low blood sugar level) A diabetic experiencing a hypoglycemic episode may exhibit: twitching or convulsions, fatigue and unusual hunger, sweating, irregular or racing heartbeat, nausea, difficulty speaking, and confusion. Signs & symptoms of hyperglycemia (high blood sugar level) A diabetic experiencing a hyperglycemic episode may show signs such as increased thirst, frequent urination, fatigue, nausea & vomiting, very dry mouth, rapid heartbeat, shortness of breath, stomach pain, & fruity breath odor. Diabetic coma treatment Treatment of diabetic coma depend upon the underlying causes: Diabetic Hypoglycemia —treatment usually involves administering of intravenous glucose or injected glucagon to rapidly raise the patient's blood glucose level. Dia Continue reading >>

Diabetic Coma

Diabetic Coma

A diabetic coma is a life-threatening diabetes complication that causes unconsciousness. It can occur when blood sugar gets too high or dangerously low. Usually it is most common in individuals who are elderly, chronically ill or disabled. Left untreated, a diabetic coma can be fatal. Luckily, there are safety steps that can be taken to help prevent a diabetic coma. Symptoms Before developing a diabetic coma, an individual may experience signs and symptoms of high blood sugar or low blood sugar. High blood pressure signs and symptoms: Tiredness Dry mouth Increased thirst Frequent urination Sickness and vomiting Foul smelling breath Difficulty breathing Abdominal pain Racing heartbeat Low blood pressure signs and symptoms: Tiredness Shaking and trembling Sweatin Increased appetite Sickness Anxiety Racing heartbeat Difficulty speaking Confusion Causes Causes of a diabetic coma are due to blood sugar levels being too low or too high. This can cause various conditions in an individual, all leading to a diabetic coma. The three main causes are known as: Diabetic ketoacidosis: A dangerous complication of diabetes caused by a lack of insulin in the body. Diabetic ketoacidosis is most common in individuals who have type 1 diabetes, but it can also affect people who have type 2 diabetes or gestational diabetes. Diabetic hyperosmolar syndrome: A serious condition caused by extremely high blood sugar levels. Diabetic hyperosmolar syndrome is most common in middle-aged and older individuals who have type 2 diabetes. Hypoglycemia: A serious condition caused by extremely low blood sugar levels. Risk factors Factors associated with an increased risk of a diabetic coma include the following: Type 1 diabetes (Low blood sugar- diabetic ketoacidosis) Type 2 diabetes (High blood sugar- dia Continue reading >>

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