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What Are The Symptoms Of Low Blood Sugar In Dogs?

Hypoglycemia In Dogs

Hypoglycemia In Dogs

Hypoglycemia in dogs is an emergency. It refers to a condition in which the blood sugar level is abnormally low. In dogs and puppies, this can lead to seizures and coma and immediate quick treatment is necessary. Read on and learn more about the symptoms, causes, and treatment of canine hypoglycemia. Canine hypoglycemia refers to a state of abnormally low blood sugar in dogs. Sugar (glucose) is a primary source of energy for all bodily functions. But the brain has little capacity in the storage of glucose, so hypoglycemia in dogs can cause problems to the nervous system, resulting in seizures and even coma. Prolonged low blood sugar in dogs can lead to severe brain damage. Hypoglycemia usually occurs in toy breed puppies when they are young (from 6-12 weeks of age), because they are less able to store and mobilize glucose. In addition, toy breeds have more brain mass per body weight compared to other breeds. As a result, they need more glucose for brain function. Adult dogs who are overly exhausted due to sustained exercise or activities, and those who have certain underlying diseases, can suffer from hypoglycemic attacks as well. Common Causes of Hypoglycemia in Dogs and Puppies In puppies, hypoglycemia is often caused by stress, such as being boarded in a kennel. Other common causes of hypoglycemia are things that may happen rather frequently (e.g. the puppy is too cold, too hungry, or too tired; or having an upset stomach). All these can easily cause hypoglycemia in puppies because the energy reserves in the liver are overly-taxed. Puppies who have had repeated episodes of hypoglycemia should be examined by a veterinarian to see if the problem is caused by some underlying diseases, such as liver shunt, or enzymatic or hormonal deficiencies. If hypoglycemia is not cau Continue reading >>

The Many Causes Of Hypoglycemia In Dogs And Cats

The Many Causes Of Hypoglycemia In Dogs And Cats

Hypoglycemia is when your pet's blood sugar drops and becomes too low. Find out here the causes, symptoms and treatment options available to pets whose glucose levels tend to rise and fall. Hypoglycemia, or low blood sugar, is a potentially life-threatening situation for a dog or cat. Your pet’s blood sugar, or glucose, is their primary source of energy. When glucose levels drop below normal, it results in a loss of energy and decreased ability to function. In severe cases, a pet may lose consciousness or even die. Hypoglycemia is not a disease. It is instead a symptom that points to an underlying medical condition. Here we will look at the causes of hypoglycemia in dogs and cats, and what symptoms to watch for in your pet. There are many causes of hypoglycemia in pets, but the most common is related to diabetes treatment. Diabetes occurs when the body is not able to properly produce or process insulin, the hormone that allows glucose to travel to cells and transform into energy. Without insulin, the glucose remains in the bloodstream, and this is what is referred to as high blood sugar. Insulin injections are given to diabetic pets in order to even out blood sugar levels. However, if a pet parent accidentally gives their pet too much of the drug, it can cause the body to metabolize too much glucose, resulting in low blood sugar, or hypoglycemia. Glucose can also be over-metabolized as a result of insulin-secreting tumors or conditions that require a great deal of energy from the pet, including certain cancers, infection, sepsis, and pregnancy. While the most common, over-metabolization of glucose is not the only cause of hypoglycemia. Low blood sugar can also occur due to decreased production of glucose by the liver (often caused by liver disease, liver shunts, or Ad Continue reading >>

Genetic Welfare Problems Of Companion Animals

Genetic Welfare Problems Of Companion Animals

Poodle (all types) Diabetes Mellitus Related terms: Canine diabetes mellitus, DM, Diabetic Ketoacidosis VeNom term: Diabetes mellitus (VeNom code: 658). Related conditions: Cataract, Pancreatitis, Hyperadrenocorticism Outline: Diabetes mellitus is a hormonal disorder that occurs when there is a failure to adequately control blood sugar levels. Dogs that have the condition are unable to use blood sugar as an energy source for the cells in their body as they would normally, and therefore the level of sugar in the blood increases. The most common signs of diabetes mellitus are excessive thirst and urination with weight loss. The onset of diabetes mellitus occurs most commonly in middle aged or older dogs. Left untreated, diabetes mellitus can lead to complications including a severe illness called diabetic ketoacidosis where the body begins to break down body tissue, such as fats and muscle, to use as a source of energy in place of blood sugars. This process produces toxins that can cause dehydration, nausea and vomiting and can be life-threatening if left untreated. Diabetic dogs are generally reliant on dietary management and daily injections of the hormone insulin for the rest of their lives. There is evidence of a genetic basis for the development of diabetes mellitus, and Poodles have been shown to be at increased risk of the condition compared with the general dog population. Summary of Information (for more information click on the links below) 1. Brief description Diabetes mellitus is a hormonal disorder which results in high levels of sugar (glucose) in the blood. Glucose is an important source of energy in the body. In animals that are diabetic, the cells in the body are unable to absorb glucose properly, and this leads to an increase in the blood. In dogs, the m Continue reading >>

Diabetes Mellitus In Dogs

Diabetes Mellitus In Dogs

There are two forms of diabetes in dogs: diabetes insipidus and diabetes mellitus. Diabetes insipidus is sometimes called "drinking diabetes" and diabetes mellitus is also known as "sugar diabetes". Diabetes insipidus is a very rare disorder that results in failure to regulate body water content. Diabetes mellitus is more common in dogs, and is frequently diagnosed in dogs five years of age or older. This is also known as adult-onset diabetes. There is a congenital form that occurs in puppies called juvenile diabetes, but this is rare in dogs. Diabetes mellitus is a disease of the pancreas. This is a small but vital organ located near the stomach. It has two significant populations of cells. One group of cells produces the enzymes necessary for proper digestion. The other group, called beta-cells, produce the hormone insulin. Simply put, diabetes mellitus is a failure of the pancreatic beta cells to regulate blood sugar. Some people with diabetes take insulin shots, and others take oral medication. Is this true for dogs? In humans, two types of diabetes mellitus have been discovered. Both types are similar in that there is a failure to regulate blood sugar, but the basic mechanisms of disease differ somewhat between the two groups. Most dogs with diabetes mellitus will require daily insulin injections to regulate their blood glucose. Type I or Insulin Dependent Diabetes Mellitus results from total or near-complete destruction of the beta-cells. This is the most common type of diabetes in dogs. As the name implies, dogs with this type of diabetes require insulin injections to stabilise blood glucose levels. Type II or Non-Insulin Dependent Diabetes Mellitus is different because some insulin-producing cells remain. However, the amount produced is insufficient, there is a Continue reading >>

Hypoglycemia - Low Blood Sugar

Hypoglycemia - Low Blood Sugar

What is Hypoglycemia (Low Blood Sugar)? 1. The brain requires glucose (blood sugar) for normal functioning, and unlike many other organs, the brain has a very limited ability to store glucose. As such, the brain is the organ that is most affected when blood sugar gets too low. 2. Low blood sugar can cause seizures 3. Puppies - especially small breed puppies - are particularly susceptible to low blood sugar because their liver is not able to store sufficient amounts of glycogen, as compared with older dogs. 4. Hypoglycemia can be a life-threatening - even fatal - condition, and is known to be a cause of canine seizures. The occurrence of symptoms depends on how far, and how fast, the blood sugar has dropped 5. Treating Hypoglycemia (Low Blood Sugar): During an attack of hypoglycemia your goal is to stay calm, to bring the blood glucose back to a safe level, to continue to observe your dog. You can contact your veterinarian if you feel you need to. These are general guidelines for treating hypoglycemia. Ask your veterinarian for information that is specific to your dog. Severe hypoglycemia: If your dog is severely hypoglycemic, especially if it is having seizures or unconscious, you must give Haggen-Dazs vanilla ice cream immediately. Carefully rub small amounts of ice cream on the inside of the cheeks and gums. Do not put a lot of liquid in the dog's mouth, and be sure the dog does not choke. Do not stick your fingers inside the teeth of a dog that is having seizures - you may get bitten. Then, call your veterinarian if you feel you need further guidance. If your dog continues to be unconscious your dog should be taken to the veterinary emergency room immediately. Moderate hypoglycemia: Haggen-Dazs plain vanilla ice cream should be given, either alone, or combined with f Continue reading >>

What Is Hypoglycemia?

What Is Hypoglycemia?

Hypoglycemia (Low Blood Sugar) Hypoglycemia in a diabetic is often referred to as insulin reaction. In diabetes mellitus, hypoglycemia is the condition of having a glucose (blood sugar) level that is too low to effectively fuel the body's blood cells usually resulting from to much insulin circulating in the bloodstream. A good range of blood sugar in an animal is approximately 70 to 150 mg/dl (milligrams of glucose per deciliter of blood). Blood sugar levels under 70 are too low and are considered dangerous in a diabetic pet because unfortunately our pets can't talk and say I am feeling woozy and then proceed to the fridge and get a glass of orange juice like a human diabetic could. When blood glucose levels drop below 60 mg/dl, some animals will exhibit symptoms of shakiness, unsteady walking, trembling lip, etc. At this stage administration of karo syrup, pancake syrup or some fast acting carbohydrate and you should see a quick recovery. Below 20 mg/dl, the brain is seriously impaired and the animal will often lose consciousness, but unfortunately some animals display no visible signs of hypoglycemia. Permanent brain changes and death can result if emergency treatment for advanced hypoglycaemia is not given. An insulin reaction is an emergency, and it needs prompt attention and the immediate administration of glucose. Administer karo syrup, icing, pancake syrup, etc some quick form of glucose immediately. If the pet cannot swallow; administer by rubbing it on the gums in the mouth and it will be absorbed. What causes hypoglycemia? too much medication (error in dosage) a missed meal a delayed meal vomiting of the meal too little food eaten as compared to the amount of insulin given strenuous exercise(chasing a squirrel around the yard for an hour) taking certain medica Continue reading >>

Hypoglycemia In Dogs

Hypoglycemia In Dogs

Overview Hypoglycemia is often referred to as “low blood sugar.” When your dog’s body is deprived of sugar, its main source of energy, his ability to function declines and, in severe situations, loss of consciousness or even death can result. Low blood sugar is not a disease itself; rather, it is a symptom of an underlying disease or problem. There are many causes of hypoglycemia. Puppies, especially those under 3 months of age, have not fully developed their ability to regulate their blood glucose (sugar) levels. Hypoglycemia can be brought on when puppies are introduced to other stress factors such as poor nutrition, cold environments, and intestinal parasites. Toy breeds are especially susceptible to this problem. Hypoglycemia can also be brought on by fasting combined with rigorous exercise, or by Addison’s disease. Dogs treated for diabetes mellitus are at risk, as well as dogs with severe liver disease, tumors of the pancreas, or portosystemic shunts. Symptoms If your pet is hypoglycemic, you may notice the following symptoms: Muscle twitches Trembling Incoordination Unusual behavior Blindness Unconsciousness If your dog is suspected of being hypoglycemic, your veterinarian will perform a thorough physical exam, take a complete history, and may recommend diagnostic tests that could include: Measurement of blood glucose levels (sugar levels in the blood) Chemistry tests to evaluate kidney, liver, and pancreatic function A complete blood count (CBC) to rule out blood related conditions Electrolyte tests to ensure your pet isn’t dehydrated or suffering from an electrolyte imbalance Urine tests to screen for urinary tract infection and other disease, and to evaluate the ability of the kidneys to concentrate urine A thyroid test to determine if the thyroid gl Continue reading >>

All About Hypoglycemia (low Blood Sugar)

All About Hypoglycemia (low Blood Sugar)

Hypoglycemia refers to an abnormally low level of sugar, or glucose, in the blood. Hypoglycemia is not a disease in itself, it is a sign of a health problem. The brain uses a lot of energy and needs glucose to function. Because the brain cannot store or manufacture glucose, it needs a continuous supply. Signs of low blood sugar include hunger, trembling, heart racing, nausea, and sweating. Hypoglycemia is commonly linked with diabetes, but many other conditions can also cause low blood sugar. This article will discuss the causes, diagnosis, and treatment of hypoglycemia, and the difference between hypoglycemia and hyperglycemia. We will also look at how to prevent it. Here are some key points about hypoglycemia. More detail is in the main article. Hypoglycemia is not a disease but a symptom of another condition. Early symptoms include hunger, sweating, and trembling. A common cause is diabetes. Alcohol abuse and kidney disorders can also lower blood sugar levels. What is hypoglycemia? Hypoglycemia is a condition where there is not enough glucose, or sugar, in the blood. Levels of blood sugar are below 4 mmol/L (72mg/dL). Adults and children with mild hypoglycemia may experience the following early symptoms: hunger tremor or trembling sweating irritability a pale face heart palpitations accelerated heart rate tingling lips dizziness weakness Severe hypoglycemia is sometimes called diabetic shock. It may involve: concentration problems confusion irrational and disorderly behavior, similar to intoxication inability to eat or drink Complications If a person does not take action when symptoms of hypoclycemia appear, it can lead to: A person who regularly experiences hypoglycemia may become unaware that it is happening. They will not notice the warning signs, and this can lea Continue reading >>

Diabetes In Dogs: Learn More About Types, Symptoms And Possible Treatments

Diabetes In Dogs: Learn More About Types, Symptoms And Possible Treatments

Does your dog look depressed or nauseated recently? Does he urinate more often? The chances are you need to check your dog’s blood sugar levels! Diabetes in dogs is one of the most common medical conditions that older dogs develop in their lives. Just like diabetes in humans, the same condition is manageable and treatable in dogs, with necessary care. 5 Worst Arthritis Foods Limit these foods to decrease arthritis pain and inflammation. naturalhealthreports.net With negligence, the complexity of the matter increases to develop into deadlier diseases. With due awareness, information, tests and professional assistance of a veterinarian, you can help your diabetic dog to be happy, healthy and energetic! What does diabetes in dogs mean? The complex situation of diabetes is, caused due to an imbalance in the production or absorption of the hormone insulin in the body. The sickness or onset of illness happens either because there is insufficient insulin in the dog’s body or due to the dog’s abnormal response to insulin. For a healthy digestion to occur in a dog, the food should be broken down into the tiniest levels of that of the glucose, which then is absorbed by the cells with the help of adequate secretion of insulin in the dog’s body. When the pancreas do not produce sufficient insulin required for digestion, the level of blood sugar in the dog’s blood increases. The subsequent medical condition is hypoglycaemia or low blood sugar in the body. This is diabetes mellitus in a dog. Types of diabetes in dogs Diabetes Mellitus is a diseases condition where the pancreas does not produce enough insulin for the body’s needs. There are varieties of diabetes in dogs that is similar to the diabetes in human diagnosis of the same, the Type I and the Type II diabetes. Typ Continue reading >>

Why Is Your Dog Aggressive?

Why Is Your Dog Aggressive?

If your dog becomes aggressive, don’t assume it’s a behavioral problem or that he’s just being “bad”. It could mean he’s ill or in pain. Jake was a cheerful, loving dog. The Shih tzu cross was friendly with everyone and enjoyed romps at the local dog park. Then one day, without warning, he became aggressive and bit his person, Meg, when she tried to pet him. Hurt and shocked, she took Jake to the vet where she learned he had a painful ear infection that made him sensitive to touch. With the proper treatment, Jake was soon back to his sociable and affectionate self. Not all dogs are as fortunate as Jake. Every year, thousands of aggressive dogs find themselves in shelters because their families assume they’ve developed behavioral problems that can’t be fixed. Many of these dogs are euthanized because they are deemed untrainable. Whether a dog’s aggression occurs suddenly or develops gradually over time, it’s important to consider the possibility that the cause might be physical rather than behavioral. In fact, more than 50 medical conditions can turn Fido into Cujo. They include injury, arthritis, congential defects, oral problems, ear infections, diminishing eyesight and more. Behaviors arising from such physical problems can include “growling, baring of teeth, and tail tucked between the legs if the dog is fearful,” according to veterinarian Dr. Mark Newkirk. “The tail may also be up or straight out in a dominant position.” Snapping and biting may also occur, depending on the problem. Because we usually associate these postures with anger or fear, it’s natural to assume they spring from behavorial rather than physical causes, especially if there are no other visible symptoms. But before seeking the help of a trainer or behavior specialist, Continue reading >>

Dog Saves Boy’s Life By Waking His Parents Up In The Middle Of The Night

Dog Saves Boy’s Life By Waking His Parents Up In The Middle Of The Night

Living with Type 1 diabetes is complicated, especially if you’re a child. Having to poke your finger, take insulin, and be aware of your blood sugar levels at all times is a lot to take on. Luckily, people have learned that dogs are capable of being trained to alert parents when a child has low blood sugar. This has led to many people adopting them to watch after their kids. For Luke, a young child with Type 1 diabetes, his parents knew that he was too young to recognize the symptoms of low blood sugar. That’s why they decided to adopt their diabetic alert dog Jedi, and it wouldn’t be long before they would be thanking themselves for doing so… Luke was diagnosed with Type 1 diabetes when he was two years old. Since he was too young to recognize the symptoms of low blood sugar (a common side effect of the disease,) his parents decided to adopt a diabetic alert dog, who was trained to learn the symptoms. A person’s blood sugar should be between 70-140. Anything below 70 is considered low and anything above 140 is high. Those who suffer from the Type 1 diabetes have pancreases that don’t naturally produce insulin, so they have to take injections to keep their levels within those numbers. Luke and Jedi quickly became inseparable, they did practically everything together. The dog understood his role and happily accepted it. Surprisingly, it wasn’t going to be long before he would be putting his training to some serious use… Recently, while Luke’s parents slept in their bedroom, Jedi started acting strange. His mom recounted the instance in a Facebook post. “This may just look like a dog, a sleeping boy and a number on a screen, but this, this moment right here is so much more. This is a picture of Jedi saving his boy,” her post began. Luke’s mother we Continue reading >>

Hypoglycemia - Low Blood Sugar In Dogs

Hypoglycemia - Low Blood Sugar In Dogs

Hypoglycemia Q: Dear Dr. Richards, Thank you very much for the information on stroke and vestibular syndrome. I have another question. (My Vet is still on vacation.) Is it possible that my Yorkie's stroke-like symptoms could be caused by hypoglycemia or an electrolyte imbalance? (She suffered a week long bout of vomiting and diarrhea prior to her symptoms.) After this was suggested to me, I started giving her a little sugar in her food and water. She does seem to be feeling better and walking more normally. Although, she still seems to be a little disoriented. If hypoglycemia is possible, what is the proper way to treat this? Again, thank you very much, Debra A: Debra- It is possible for disorientation, weakness and even seizures to occur with hypoglycemia. Small breeds are more likely to become hypoglycemic from illnesses than larger breeds but most older dogs do not have much problems with this whether they are large or small. Older dogs do have problems with insulin producing tumors of the pancreas sometimes, though. This is probably the most common cause of hypoglycemia in older dogs. A temporary fix is to feed several small meals a day rather than one or two large ones. That would help until your vet got back. Then the best thing to do would be a general lab panel or blood glucose test (but I'd run the whole panel most of the time) and check for hypoglycemia. If it is present then checking another sample is a good idea. Then checking the insulin/glucose ratio on a blood sample would be a more definitive test for excess insulin. Insulinomas can be treated surgically or medically but surgery has a chance of curing the dog and medical treatment doesn't. Good luck with this. Peripheral vestibular syndrome clears up in most cases spontaneously so response to therapy for Continue reading >>

Hazards Of Hypoglycemia (low Blood Sugar)

Hazards Of Hypoglycemia (low Blood Sugar)

Hypoglycemia is a serious risk factor in diabetes management. Recent studies suggest that approximately 10 percent of diabetic dogs experienced hypoglycemic episodes that required hospitalization. One large survey found that the majority of diabetic dogs presented for hypoglycemia were receiving high doses of insulin (0.7 units or more per pound of body weight). Overdosing, double-dosing, and persistent dosing despite weight loss or reduced food intake are common iatrogenic causes of hypoglycemia. (Iatrogenic diseases are caused by medical treatment.) Strenuous exercise or maldigestion caused by EPI, bacterial overgrowth, inflammatory bowel disease, or other digestive disorders can also lead to hypoglycemia in diabetic dogs. If you’re ever uncertain about whether insulin was administered, the safest option is to withhold the injection. The consequences of missing a single insulin dose are negligible, while overdosing can be fatal. Never add more if you are unsure, including if some insulin spills while you give the injection. Changes in body weight may require insulin dosage modifications. Dietary changes, particularly reduced carbohydrates, may require a reduced insulin dosage to prevent hypoglycemia. Severe hypoglycemia resulting from too much insulin can cause seizures, irreversible brain damage, and death. Warning signs include nervousness, hyperexcitability, anxiety, vocalization, muscle tremors, lack of coordination, wobbliness (the dog may appear drunk), and pupil dilation. If these signs are seen, the dog should be fed immediately. If the dog can’t or won’t eat, rub Karo syrup, pancake syrup, honey, or even sugar water on her gums before calling your veterinarian. If immediate improvement is not seen, transport your dog to the vet after feeding for further Continue reading >>

Hypoglycemia Associated With Oleander Toxicity In A Dog

Hypoglycemia Associated With Oleander Toxicity In A Dog

Go to: Introduction Nerium oleander is an evergreen ornamental flowering shrub of the family Apocyanaceae. All parts of the plant are toxic, and the toxicity is due to toxic cardenolides [1]. These compounds are cardiac glycosides, and cause inhibition of plasmalemma Na+,K+ATPase [1]. The resulting effects in humans and animals are similar [2, 3] with gastrointestinal irritation, hyperkalemia, and cardiac arrhythmias, the predominant symptoms. In addition, renal damage has been noted in horses with oleander toxicosis [4]. Nerium oleander plant extracts have been under investigation as hypoglycemic agents in the study of diabetes mellitus in experimental animal models [5, 6]. In an experimental rat model, Mwafy and Yassin (2011) [5] demonstrated lower blood glucose levels in diabetic rats treated with Nerium oleander extract compared with controls. In another study [6], experimentally induced diabetic rats had improved pancreatic beta cell function when administered Nerium oleander distillate, suggesting insulin secretagogue and sensitizing effects of the extract. Further analysis by spectrometric analysis [7] has identified chlorogenic acid in Nerium leaves, a noncompetitive inhibitor of alpha-glucosidase. In in vivo [7] rat models, chlorogenic acid suppressed the post-prandial rise in blood glucose and inhibited absorption of glucose from rat intestine in vitro [7]. Hypoglycemia has not been previously documented as a sequelae to Nerium oleander toxicosis. In this case report, we describe the successful treatment of a dog with documented oleander toxicosis, with hypoglycemia as a pertinent clinical finding. Case Presentation A 7-year-old female spayed, 2.4-kg Maltese was evaluated at the VCA All-Care Animal Referral Center Emergency Service approximately 24 h after ing Continue reading >>

Diabetes Mellitus (diabetes) In Dogs

Diabetes Mellitus (diabetes) In Dogs

Animals Affected Dogs Overview Diabetes mellitus (known simply as diabetes) is a serious disease of dogs. The main characteristic of diabetes is an inability to control the level of sugar in the blood. This leads to chronically high blood sugar levels, which in turn lead to the symptoms of the disease. Management of diabetes in dogs is challenging but possible. With proper treatment, many diabetic dogs lead essentially normal lives. However, without treatment the disease inevitably leads to serious complications. Diabetes in dogs is similar to type 1 (juvenile onset) diabetes in humans. Symptoms Symptoms of diabetes include: Weight loss Normal or increased appetite in the early stages of the disease; appetite may decline in the later stages. Lethargy A sudden change in the appearance of the eyes due to the formation of cataracts. In the end stages of the disease, coma and death Risk Factors and Prevention A genetic or hereditary predisposition to diabetes appears to be a primary risk factor. Dogs that suffer from one or multiple bouts of pancreatitis may develop diabetes as a consequence of damage to the pancreas. Dogs aged 4 - 14 years are at highest risk of pancreatitis. Female dogs are diagnosed with diabetes more often than males. Miniature Poodles, Miniature Schnauzers, Pugs, Samoyeds, and Toy Poodles suffer diabetes at higher rates than other breeds. Syndromes such as Cushing's disease and periodontal disease predispose dogs to diabetes. Complications Untreated diabetes leads to emaciation, chronic lethargy and weakness. Diabetic dogs are prone to urinary tract infections. House soiling may occur as well, due to increased frequency of urination. Insulin administration is the main method of treating diabetes in dogs. However, some dogs may suffer from accidental ov Continue reading >>

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