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What Are The Stages Of Ketosis

What Is The Ketogenic Diet?

What Is The Ketogenic Diet?

Are you new to the ketogenic diet or are unsure what this latest diet trend is all about? Are your clients curious about ketosis and whether it can help them achieve their health and weight goals? Here’s your ketosis 101. What is the Ketogenic Diet? The ketogenic diet is a very low-carbohydrate, high-fat diet that is gaining in popularity for its use in weight loss, insulin sensitivity, brain health and athletic performance, in addition to its original use for treating epilepsy. Following a ketogenic diet forces the body to use up all of its stored carbohydrates and turn to its alternative fuel source—fat (body fat and dietary fat)—which it converts to ketones and uses for energy. On a ketogenic diet, the macronutrient composition looks like this: 70-80% fat 10-20% protein 5-10% carbohydrates Given those numbers, you may wonder how eating like this could be healthy. After all, fat has been the dietary bad guy for years. However, numerous studies have been conducted comparing ketogenic diets to traditional low-fat/high-carb diets and the results suggest that ketogenic diets can be effective. Keeping total carbohydrates low (usually less than 50 grams a day) by cutting out all starches, sugars and fruit keeps insulin production low. Insulin is the hormone that is produced by the pancreas to shuttle glucose from the bloodstream to the cell where it is burned for energy. When carbohydrate intake is continuously high (high-carb meals, frequent meals and snacks), insulin is constantly being produced and a state of insulin sensitivity develops. Instead of moving glucose into the cells for fuel, much of the glucose is converted to body fat. This leads to weight gain and an increased risk for diabetes and heart disease. What to Eat on a Ketogenic Diet A ketogenic diet is f Continue reading >>

The 11 Most Common Keto Side Effects

The 11 Most Common Keto Side Effects

The 11 Most Common Keto Side Effects The ketogenic diet is a powerful new tool to hit the mainstream recently. This style of eating has substantial data behind it showing that it can boost fat-burning, reduce inflammation, boost cognitive performance, and more. What has not been covered quite enough are common keto side effects and how you can avoid them to make the best of this powerful eating style. Although there can be many different side effects that manifest while becoming keto-adapted, many of them stem from similar underlying issues. In this article, I outline what those underlying issues are, their related side effects, and simple strategies to overcome them so you can become keto-adapted as smoothly as possible. Three Primary Causes Although there are a variety of symptoms that can arise during keto adaptation, they mostly manifest from the same three underlying causes. Hypoglycemia (low blood sugar), Hypothalamic-Pituitary-Adrenal (HPA) axis dysfunction, and electrolyte/mineral deficiencies. While these three causes are seemingly different, they are actually all related. When becoming keto-adapted initially, your body has been running on sugar for years. When you suddenly switch to fats, your body has to essentially build the cellular machinery necessary to generate and utilize ketone bodies as a fuel source. This means that instead of generating tons of ketones from the very beginning, most people experience hypoglycemia for a period of time. With hypoglycemia comes a disruption in cortisol signaling which is what accounts for the HPA axis dysfunction. Finally, HPA axis dysfunction leads to an increase in secretion of minerals from the body in the urine. Together these three causes can create all kinds of side effects. Once you understand them, though, a lit Continue reading >>

P-r-o-f-i-l-e Yourself.

P-r-o-f-i-l-e Yourself.

To kick off National Nutrition Month we’re breaking down Profile so you can better understand what our program means to us and the thousands of individuals who are achieving success every day through the help of Profile. Plan The plan is one of the most valuable assets to our program. Developed by the Profile Clinical and Scientific Advisory Board, which consists of Sanford researchers, physicians ranging from OBGYN to internal medicine, diabetes educators and more. With this board, we built the plan to be tailored and personalized to fit the weight loss needs of all who join, ensuring a high quality experience that is simple, effective and sustainable. Results Profile focuses on setting short-term and long-term weight loss goals for members to see real results. The Profile plan uses three phases to help you lose weight responsibly. Phase one, a low-carb, high-protein meal plan that puts your body into a state of ketosis, changing the way energy is used in your body. The second phase is a transition period where you’ll lose weight gradually while working more grocery foods back into your meal plan. The final phase of the Profile program is a long-term plan for sustaining and managing your weight. A line of great tasting Profile products that are nutritionally formulated to accommodate your plan are a key component to results. One-on-One From the beginning, each Profile member will receive one-on-one coaching from a Certified Profile Coach. These individuals go through comprehensive training on nutrition, activity and lifestyle skills to help members get the most out of the program. Coaches answer questions, provide advice and help you address success and struggles. Through weekly meetings with your coach, you will create a relationship that results in accountability Continue reading >>

What Is “nutritional Ketosis”?

What Is “nutritional Ketosis”?

IN A NUTSHELL: Nutritional ketosis is a state of health in which your body is efficiently burning fat as its primary fuel source instead of glucose. When undergoing a ketogenic diet you are essentially converting yourself from a “sugar burner” to a “fat burner”. This is accomplished by reducing your consumption of carbohydrates, increasing your intake of fat, and consuming only an adequate amount of protein to meet your body’s needs. The term nutritional ketosis is claimed to have been coined by Dr. Stephen Phinney & Jeff Volek, two of the leading experts and researchers in the field of low carbohydrate dieting (Check out this informative video to hear a talk from Dr. Phinney). Ketosis is achieved by following a “ketogenic diet” which is high in fat, very low in carbohydrates, and adequate in protein (Please Note: It is “adequate” in protein, NOT “high” in protein. More on this later). By consuming more lipids you are enhancing your body’s fat burning function by up-regulating the enzymes and other “metabolic machinery” needed to burn fat more efficiently, therefore making it easier for your body to tap into stored adipose tissue as an energy source (i.e. you turn yourself into a fat-burning machine!). But don’t we NEED carbohydrates? While it’s true that our red blood cells and a small percentage of brain cells and kidney cells are exclusively glucose dependent, the body can actually GENERATE carbohydrates in a process called gluconeogenesis in which certain non-carbohydrate substrates like proteins (amino acids) and certain constituents of fatty acids (glycerol) can be converted into glucose. The quantities of glucose produced by the body are sufficient to meet the needs of these particular cells and also help to balance the body’s bl Continue reading >>

Keto-adaptation: What It Is And How To Adjust

Keto-adaptation: What It Is And How To Adjust

What is keto-adaptation? Keto-adaptation is the process of shifting your metabolism from relying mostly on glucose for fuel, to relying mostly on fat-based sources of fuel. Not only does fat oxidation itself increase, but your body starts producing enough ketones that they can be used as a significant source of fuel as well. Ketones are derived from partially metabolized fat, and they can be used in many of the same tissues of the body as glucose can, including much of the brain. The benefits of using fat and ketones rather than glucose for fuel are many, and are the main subject of this site. However, it takes time for the metabolism to adjust to producing and using ketones at a significant rate. Even though changes are evident within days of carbohydrate restriction, improvements continue for weeks. In brief: Carbohydrate-based fueling is a self-perpetuating cycle: it runs out quickly, and every time you eat more carbs you delay adaptation to fat-burning. Fat-based fueling is sustainable, because it allows access to a very large store of energy without you frequently stopping to refuel. Blood sugar is maintained though precise internal processes without wild swings. These two together create a desirable flow of even, stable energy, mood, and alertness. There is a delay between first reducing the amount of carbohydrates that you eat, and having a smoothly running fat metabolism. In the intervening days, you may feel slow, or even unwell. These symptoms can be minimized by making sure to eat lots of fat, staying hydrated, and using salt liberally. Other electrolytes may also be helpful to add -- homemade broth makes a good supplement. Keep carbs consistently low, or you will never adapt and the process will go on indefinitely. Carbohydrate-based fueling is a self-perpet Continue reading >>

Ketosis & Measuring Ketones

Ketosis & Measuring Ketones

Generally, ketone concentrations are lower in the morning and higher in the evening. Whatever time you pick to measure ketone levels, make sure to keep it consistent. Also, do not measure your ketone levels right after exercise. Ketone levels tend to be lower while your glucose levels higher so you won't get representative numbers. Keep in mind there are daily fluctuations caused by changes in hormone levels. Don't get discouraged! Another aspect that affects the level of ketones is the amount of fat in your diet. Some of you may show higher concentration of ketones after a high-fat meal. Coconut oil contains MCTs that will help you boost ketones. To easily increase your fat intake on a ketogenic diet, try fat bombs - snacks with at least 80% fat content. Ketone levels tend to be higher after extensive aerobic exercise as your body depletes glycogen stores. Exercise may help you get into ketosis faster. ketogenic "fruity" breath is not pleasant for most people. To avoid this, drink a lot of water, mint tea and make sure you eat foods rich in electrolytes. Avoid too many chewing gums and mints, as it may put you out of ketosis; there may be hidden carbs affecting your blood sugar. Increase your electrolyte intake, especially potassium. You are likely going to lose some sodium and potassium when switching to the keto diet. Finally, if you find it hard to lose weight on a ketogenic diet, there may be plenty other reasons than the level of ketone bodies: Not Losing Weight on Low-Carb Ketogenic Diet? Don’t Give Up and Read Further. Continue reading >>

What Is A Ketogenic Diet?

What Is A Ketogenic Diet?

So what is a ketogenic diet? Despite its popularity in today’s society, few truly understand what a ketogenic diet is. One of the best definitions I’ve come across is by a colleague of mine who stated that, “A ketogenic diet is one in which glucogenic substrates (non-fiber carbohydrates and glucogenic amino acids) are low enough to force the body to primarily rely on fat as substrate.” The ketogenic diet is traditionally a high-fat, moderate-protein, and very low-carbohydrate diet and through the appropriate balance of these three macronutrients (protein, fat, carbohydrates), we are able to alter our energy utilization and enter a unique metabolic state known as nutritional ketosis. Nutritional ketosis, not to be confused with diabetic ketoacidosis, is a state in which the body switches its preferred fuel source from carbohydrates to fat, which results in the production of an additional fuel source known as ketones or ketone bodies. These ketones can be rapidly broken down for energy production by various tissues throughout the body. As stated above, the ketogenic diet allows the body to use an alternative fuel source (i.e. ketones) to meet the demands of the body. The adaptations that allow us to enter ketosis take time, and this transition period is often referred to as keto-adaptation. Once keto-adaptation occurs, you are considered to be “fat-adapted”. There are several ways in which the body can enter a state of ketosis, with the most common being a ketogenic diet. When attempting to enter ketosis through dietary manipulation, it is essential to keep in mind the recommended fat, protein, and carbohydrate intakes. As with most diets, there is no “one-size-fits-all approach” for a ketogenic diet. The ratios and amounts of each macronutrient of the die Continue reading >>

Ketogenic Diet: How To Become A Fat Burning Machine

Ketogenic Diet: How To Become A Fat Burning Machine

How the Ketogenic Diet can get you shedding fat and building muscle faster than you knew was possible. Disclaimer: Always follow the recommendations of your doctor before implementing any new dietary changes. [bctt tweet=”Quit blaming the butter for what the bread did.”] Many people judge the keto diet. It’s built around tons of fats and almost no carbs – and that doesn’t seem like a very healthy diet. I mean how do people lose weight by devouring bacon and eggs or adding oil and cream to everything? But surprisingly, the keto diet is one of the fastest way to get into the fat burning stages we all hope for. And even if you love bacon or other delicious fats, this can be a very tricky diet to follow. But if you can successfully commit, you can reap huge fat loss rewards. What is the ketogenic diet? The ketogenic diet is a highly controlled carb diet. There is no room for error and cheat meals come with big side effects. Now we know most diets are low carb, but the keto diet takes this to a different level. It is very low carb and very high fat. But it’s a super successful diet for dropping fat and slimming down. Here’s why. When you eat carbs, your body turns them into glucose. Insulin then turns the glucose into usable energy. That’s how you function. How you run, train, and survive your draining work days. Through those insulin spikes. [If you want a carb refresher, check out this post here]. The problem is, those insulin spikes give you big problems with your energy levels, your fat burning, and your hormones. And when you eat too many carbs, all of that glucose can’t be used for energy. The extra glucose gets stored in the fat cells. Tired, cranky, hormonal and fat. Not a good system to live by. Yet that’s the diet most of us follow daily. The ke Continue reading >>

My Six-week Keto Diet Experiment

My Six-week Keto Diet Experiment

When Ros Lawrence first heard of a diet that allowed her to eat foods she normally denied herself, especially peanut butter, she immediately decided to give it a go. What would you say if I told you there's a diet where you can eat all the food you normally deny yourself, stop counting tedious calories, shift some weight, gain extra muscle and get an energy boost too? If you're anything like me you'd be asking 'where do I sign up?'! So when I heard about the ketogenic diet from a colleague I was immediately intrigued. This simply sounded too good to be true. Could I really eat fat and get lean? Enjoy peanut butter treats and squeeze into my skinny jeans? Never one to shy away from a challenge, I decided to see for myself, and so began my six-week experiment with the ketogenic diet… What is a ketogenic diet? In its simplest form, this is an extremely low-carb, high-fat diet. It's based on the principle that by lowering your carb intake your body is pushed into a metabolic state known as ketosis (pronounced key -tow -sis), where it switches from burning carbs as its primary energy source to burning fat. To be more precise, it uses ketone bodies or ketones from the breakdown of fatty acids in the liver – hence the name, ketosis. Now that fatty fuel can come from a meal you've just eaten or from the stores of fat on your body (aka, the evil muffin top). Ketosis is a metabolic process that the body initiates to help us survive when our food intake is low. Typically our bodies run on glucose derived from the breakdown of carbs – this is because glucose is the easiest molecule for the body to convert and use as energy, so it will be chosen over any other energy source. But when your body doesn't have enough carbs for your energy needs it will switch to ketosis to keep yo Continue reading >>

10 Signs And Symptoms That You're In Ketosis

10 Signs And Symptoms That You're In Ketosis

The ketogenic diet is a popular, effective way to lose weight and improve health. When followed correctly, this low-carb, high-fat diet will raise blood ketone levels. These provide a new fuel source for your cells, and cause most of the unique health benefits of this diet (1, 2, 3). On a ketogenic diet, your body undergoes many biological adaptions, including a reduction in insulin and increased fat breakdown. When this happens, your liver starts producing large amounts of ketones to supply energy for your brain. However, it can often be hard to know whether you're "in ketosis" or not. Here are 10 common signs and symptoms of ketosis, both positive and negative. People often report bad breath once they reach full ketosis. It's actually a common side effect. Many people on ketogenic diets and similar diets, such as the Atkins diet, report that their breath takes on a fruity smell. This is caused by elevated ketone levels. The specific culprit is acetone, a ketone that exits the body in your urine and breath (4). While this breath may be less than ideal for your social life, it can be a positive sign for your diet. Many ketogenic dieters brush their teeth several times per day, or use sugar-free gum to solve the issue. If you're using gum or other alternatives like sugar-free drinks, check the label for carbs. These may raise your blood sugar levels and reduce ketone levels. The bad breath usually goes away after some time on the diet. It is not a permanent thing. The ketone acetone is partly expelled via your breath, which can cause bad or fruity-smelling breath on a ketogenic diet. Ketogenic diets, along with normal low-carb diets, are highly effective for losing weight (5, 6). As dozens of weight loss studies have shown, you will likely experience both short- and long Continue reading >>

Ketosis – What Is That All About?

Ketosis – What Is That All About?

What’s it all about? Is it good for you? Is it bad for you? What’s it like? How do I ‘do’ ketosis? How do I know I’m in ketosis? The questions everyone who’s Banting wants the answers to. Ketosis, in chef speak, is quite simply a state your body enters once it has been deprived of glucose. Your body switches to burning fat for energy (stored fat or fat that you have eaten) instead of glucose. A side-effect of that process is the release of ketone bodies into the blood stream. When you’re starved of glucose, your body has no choice but to burn fat for fuel, so it needs little explanation as to why ketosis works at melting fat like a blow heater on an ice sculpture. Ketosis comes with some added extras, namely a commonly noted sense of euphoria or lucidity and increased energy levels. A downside includes toothbrush-proof halitosis, which stems from the secretion of ammonia through the lungs as a side effect of burning all that fat. Some people on low-carb diets have reported kidney stones, gallstones and a number of other ailments. Scientific research on both sides of this debate is being done all the time, but in our experience from talking to the members of our community and tracking their data, it is generally a case of what was done before they started Banting and not Banting itself. But, this post isn’t here to debate that, it serves as a ‘how to’ and not as a ‘you should’. Eat more buttery or creamy sauce on your steak and eat less steak. Your body can convert protein into glucose so too much meat will hinder your progress. What doIdo? Theoretically it is very easy. Avoid anything with high carbs in it. If you’re not sure what those might be, consult the Real Meal Revolution ‘Red List’. Even dipping your toe into the red list will ruin Continue reading >>

How Does It Work?

How Does It Work?

PronoKal® Method Stages The method is divided into three stages: Active, Physiological Adaptation and Maintenance. In the first stage, the Active Stage, duration varies according to the weight loss that is required. This is when 80% of excess weight is lost by combining PronoKal® products with permitted foods. At this stage, the patient enters a state of controlled ketosis in which the body expends its energy reserves due to a low intake of fats and carbohydrates. Weight is lost at the expense of accumulated fat, whilst preserving the muscle mass. In the next stage, Physiological Adaptation, the remaining weight (20% of excess weight) is lost, while the body adapts to the physiological changes it is undergoing. Specifically, the patient’s hormonal system, basal metabolism and insulin levels will become stabilised. These changes, together with the gradual reintroduction of all types of foods and the incorporation of new dietary habits and a healthy lifestyle will help the patient maintain weight loss in the long term. During the laststage –the Maintenance Stage– the patient, after reaching their target weight, is regularly monitored to help to maintain his or her long-term weight goal. This stage is adapted to the energy characteristics of each patient and combines traditional food products and PronoKal® Maintenance products. From the start, and up to two years after the end of treatment, the patient receives the support and advice from the PronoKal® team of dietitians, experts in physical activity and experts in coaching (emotional reinforcement). Continue reading >>

The 3 Stages Of The Ketogenic Diet

The 3 Stages Of The Ketogenic Diet

Is the ketogenic diet the best one out there? Do you have to be in ketosis all the time? These questions are relevant for dissecting the 3 stages of the ketogenic diet. The more I learn about ketosis and the ketogenic diet, the more I’m amazed by how powerful it is for overall health, cognition, and physical performance. It’s truly one of those optimal human diets because it not only keeps you healthy but also puts you into this post-optimal state where your body can create its own fuel without calories. Even though I could happily eat the ketogenic diet for the rest of my life because you feel amazing all the time – and the foods are also delicious – I still recommend you to occasionally dip in and out of ketosis. There are many reasons for it – not because it’s unhealthy or to voluntarily go through the drudgery of keto flu again – but to increase metabolic flexibility and improve diversity in the microbiome. People do the ketogenic diet for many reasons – to lose fat, to battle diabetes, improve their health or to eat bacon – but healthy people who simply want to live the keto lifestyle should follow certain stages on their ketosis journey. I’m going to share with you the 3 stages of the ketogenic diet you should go through. The first purpose of the ketogenic diet is to maintain nutritional ketosis for the vast majority of time – to be in this fat burning state where you’re body burns ketones the ketones in your bloodstream. That energy can come from either dietary fat intake or straight from your adipose tissue when you’re in a caloric deficit. If you’re doing keto because of diabetes, then you should pay particularly close attention to this because irregular ups and downs of insulin can make your disease worse. That’s the reason why th Continue reading >>

Symptoms Of Ketosis:

Symptoms Of Ketosis:

If you are considering the ketogenic diet or have already started down this carb-free road, you may wonder what you can expect. Here’s the thing. Ketosis looks different for everyone, but I will share many of the most common symptoms with you today. If something other than what’s listed here is happening to you, just do a quick Google search for that symptom and keto. You should be able to find what you’re looking for! The Early Signs: The early signs of ketosis vary from person to person. The biggest impact on how quickly you notice the symptoms of ketosis will have a lot to do with how you ate before you started the diet. If your diet was very high carb, you might get hit pretty quickly and furiously with what we like to call the “Keto Flu.” This can last anywhere from 3 days to a week or more. Once your body has adapted to burning ketones for energy instead of glucose, you’ll be golden so don’t give up! Here’s what you can expect within the first 2-3 days of starting the Ketogenic Diet: Fatigue & Weakness (lack of concentration) Headaches Metallic taste or sweet taste in your mouth (I experienced this, and it tasted like blood in my mouth) Lightheaded / Dizzy upon standing Heightened Thirst Hunger / Sweet or Carb Cravings Dry Mouth possibly paired with “Keto Breath.” Stomach Discomfort / Mild Nausea / Cramping Trouble Sleeping or Staying Asleep (early waking) Water weight loss (perhaps an excessive loss of weight within the first two weeks) Frequent Urination Allergies or cold like symptoms may flair up For the ladies: Period issues: You may experience a longer, shorter, earlier, later period because of Keto. Seriously it causes all of that. Each woman is different, and I have experienced every one of those issues with my period since starting ket Continue reading >>

Three Phases To Keto Mastery

Three Phases To Keto Mastery

Starting the ketogenic lifestyle can be a difficult choice. Let’s be honest, it’s a different way of living, and it’s not for everyone. But it can be incredibly rewarding. I’ve broken down what I think are the three phases to the keto journey. The Introduction Phase This phase has two parts, really. The first part is where you get mentally prepared to deal with the changes you are about to make. You have to get your mind set right and focused on the goal you have put in place. But after that (or at the same time), you have to start getting a handle on the right kinds of foods to eat. In this phase, you will be ejecting all the bad stuff from your pantry. Toss the sugar, bread, pasta, sweets, fruits (berries are okay…but not Crunch Berries or Frankenberries), sodas (yes, diet soda, too), alcohol, potatoes, etc. Get rid of all the bad foods that have gotten you to this point. Also, you need to start getting used to eating copious amounts of fat and eating cleaner carbs (veggies). You’re going to change the kinds of meat you eat from the lean stuff to the fatty stuff (or, as I like to call it…the delicious stuff). You’re going to realize that dessert doesn’t signal the end of a meal, being full does. This phase requires a lot of discipline so that you can start to develop good habits. This is the rigid, structured, unbending phase. It is a necessary phase and it will take anywhere from 21 days to 12 months. Adjustment Phase This phase is when you finally get your Introduction Phase goods figured out, dialed in, and settled. You have, by this point, figured out what keto foods you like and you’ve gotten good at sticking to them. When you get to this point, you have developed traits and habits that you can rely upon. THIS IS IMPORTANT: If you haven’t go Continue reading >>

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