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What Are The Side Effects Of Ketosis?

Are There Any Side Effects Of Protein Powder? If Yes, How Do I Overcome Them?

Are There Any Side Effects Of Protein Powder? If Yes, How Do I Overcome Them?

Consuming high levels of protein in the form of protein powders or even from food alone can be detrimental for our health. Fat gain Adding extra protein to the diet in the form of protein powder adds extra calories. As excess protein cannot be stored in its original form in the body, if you are not burning these calories by doing a sufficient amount of physical activity, or doing enough weight bearing activities to build more muscle, these extra calories are likely to be converted to fat. (See also: How to burn more fat while exercising) An increase in protein intake as well as calories without an increase in physical activity levels is likely to result in an equal gain in both fat and muscle, which may not be exactly what you are looking for when you supplement protein powder. Bone loss High levels of protein intake generates a large amount of acid in the body due to the excess sulphates and phosphates that are introduced. The kidneys then try to restore the balance of acid by excreting more acid, at the same time the skeleton releases calcium which is also lost in the urine as a buffer. This results in the loss of calcium from bones which can increase the risk of osteoporosis if it occurs over a longer time frame, particularly in high risk groups such as women. There is a possibility however, that a diet which is high in alkaline fruit and vegetables in addition to protein may help to counteract this effect. Kidney damage High protein diets can put increased strain on the kidneys due to the need to excess waste products called ketones that are generated with such a diet and the need to excrete these products. For people with reduced kidney function this stress can worsen the condition and may even contribute to reduced function in people with healthy kidneys if follow Continue reading >>

What Are The Long Term Possible Side Effects Of Ketogenic Diet? Say, If One Chooses To Be On It For Rest Of His/her Life?

What Are The Long Term Possible Side Effects Of Ketogenic Diet? Say, If One Chooses To Be On It For Rest Of His/her Life?

There is not enough research on long term use of Ketogenic diet. The current available data on is based on 12 years of Ketogenic living which suggest there is no side effects on continuing keto diet for a longer period of time. Although there is no major side effects of living a Ketogenic lifestyle for rest of your life, however there are certain things which you might need to monitor over a period of time. I'll list down few possible side effects: Vitamins or Minerals deficiency which may occur if you eat less veggies. Clogged artiries if you are eating too much of saturated fat especially red meat. It will increase your bad cholesterol levels which may lead to heart disease. Some people can go from long term state to ketoacidosis. In this state the blood becomes acidic and the person who get this condition tend to be people history of Diabetes or alcoholism. Osteoporosis due to low calcium intake. Kidney problems / stones if water intake is low. If you follow the Ketogenic diet for a long term, make sure you are monitored for red flags you are experiencing during the state permanently. That can help to avoid becoming very sick. Having said that, there are many people and cultures that go into ketosis and stay there for years and years without any negative effects. I hope this helps. Akshay, Certified Nutrition Specialist Continue reading >>

What Are The Health Effects Of Using Marijuana?

What Are The Health Effects Of Using Marijuana?

Studies are still being carried out to answer the question as to whether marijuana can cause lung cancer, and there is no real evidence either way as yet. What is known, though, is that marijuana cigarettes contain benzyprene - the tar of both tobacco and cannabis cigarettes - and we know that benzyprene causes cancer. It alters a gene called p53, which is a tumor suppressor gene. It has also been scientifically proven that 3 out of 4 lung cancers (75%) occur in people who have faulty p53 genes, and that the p53 gene is linked to many other cancers. It also contains at least 50 of the damaging properties found in tobacco cigarettes. See this article from Cancer Research UK: Does smoking cannabis cause cancer? It should also be noted that cannabis has a different effect on young people to what the effect is on adults. While it doesn't really affect cognitive behavioral functionality in adults, it definitely does have a detrimental effect on the youth. Furthermore, smoking marijuana has a different effect on continuous users depending on when they started smoking it. If you started smoking it as a youngster and have basically been a lifelong user, chances are very good that your cognitive functions have been damaged. (This can be reversed, though.) The effect on cognitive behavioral skills in those who started smoking it as an adult, is minimal to none. You can read about that here: Study: Teenage weed use may hurt verbal skills later Apart from the above, young cannabis smokers are often binge-eaters (munchies), which is not good for the body. It also causes them to feel heavy, resulting in little movement - also not good for the body. In the end, one just shouldn't smoke plants or anything else. Our lungs were not designed for it and our bodies not for the foreign stuff Continue reading >>

10 Side Effects Of Ketosis: The Pitfalls Of A Keto Diet

10 Side Effects Of Ketosis: The Pitfalls Of A Keto Diet

A low-carb, high-fat diet takes your body to a state of ketosis, when it burns fat for energy. Result is you lose weight fast, but mostly by dehydration. As this diet robs you of several vital nutrients, you suffer from constipation, headache, bone erosion, leg cramps, and even disrupted menses. Kidney stones may also be formed due to a rising acidity of the blood. When you follow a diet which drastically restricts the amount of carbs you consume, you will not have enough glucose in your blood to fuel your body. In this situation, your body turns to fats for energy. When your fats are broken down, small molecules called ketone bodies are produced, which act as an alternative source of energy. This condition is known as ketosis, and it is a natural state your body goes into. Since your brain requires a constant supply of energy, it would shut down if your body did not produce this alternative fuel source, but it cannot run on ketones forever. Low-carb diets or ketogenic diets, which help your body get into the state of ketosis, help you lose weight quickly but can adversely affect your overall health. 1. Fatigue When your body is in a state of ketosis, you will experience fatigue as your body has to adjust to using an alternative source of energy apart from glucose. If you work out, your workout routine can suffer. Make sure to consume lots of water and salts when on this diet to fight fatigue and lethargy. 2. Headaches And Anxiety You can experience splitting headaches within a few days when you follow a ketogenic diet. Your brain preferably wants to run on glucose; so it burns the last stores of glucose before switching to ketones for energy. You can feel anxious and find it difficult to concentrate as your brain adjusts to using this alternative energy source. 3. Bad Continue reading >>

Common Ketosis Side Effects And Treatments

Common Ketosis Side Effects And Treatments

There are many awesome benefits with come with adopting a low-carb ketogenic diet, such as weight loss, decreased cravings, and even possibly reduce diseases risks. That being said, it’s also good to talk about possible ketosis side effects so you know fully what to expect as you start this new health journey. Not everyone experiences side effects when starting a ketogenic diet, and thankfully, those who do don’t usually experience them for very long. It varies with the individual, but just to make sure all your bases are covered, we’re going to breaking down each possible side effect and go over ways to manage and alleviate them if needed. KETOSIS SIDE EFFECT 1 – Frequent Urination As your body burns through the stored glucose in your liver and muscles within the first day or two of starting a ketogenic diet, you’ll be releasing a lot of water in the process. Plus, your kidneys will start excreting excess sodium as the levels of your circulating insulin drop. Basically, you might notice yourself needing to pee more often throughout the day. But no worries; this side effect of ketosis takes care of itself once your body adjusts and is no longer burning through the extra glycogen. KETOSIS SIDE EFFECT 2 – Dizziness and Drowsiness As the body is getting rid of this excess water, it will also be eliminating minerals like potassium, magnesium, and sodium too. This can make you feel dizzy, lightheaded, and fatigued. Thankfully, this is also very avoidable; all it takes is a little preparation beforehand. Focus on eating foods that are rich in potassium, such as: Leafy greens (aim for at least two cups each day!) Broccoli Dairy Meat, poultry, and fish Avocados Add salt to your foods or use salty broth when cooking too. You can also dissolve about a teaspoon of regu Continue reading >>

What Is The Process Of The Ketogenic Diet?

What Is The Process Of The Ketogenic Diet?

Ketosis is a type of acidosis, a disturbance in the pH adjust of your body, that outcomes from the nearness of inordinate ketones in your blood. Ketones, or ketone bodies, are a side-effect of fat digestion. They are discharged when fat is separated for vitality. Ketosis is a condition that is basic amid starvation and intense assaults of diabetes. The nearness of a lot of ketone bodies in your circulatory system may prompt a condition called ketoacidosis, which may bring about unfriendly symptoms. Ketogenic diets, when directed by qualified therapeutic experts, can prompt huge measures of weight reduction in fat people, and they have demonstrated promising in the treatment and administration of epilepsy and certain types of disease. Ketosis comes about because of the development of ketone bodies, which are a result of fat digestion. At the point when glucose is not accessible for your body to be utilized as vitality, your body will start separating fat. At the point when fat is separated into glucose to be utilized for vitality, ketone bodies are created therefore, and flow all through your circulatory system, causing a condition of ketosis. The ketone bodies are delivered in your liver, and can be re-utilized for other metabolic procedures associated with vitality creation, or discharged from your body through your pee. Ketone bodies have a positive ionic charge, making them extremely acidic. Your body typically keeps up the corrosive base adjust in your circulation system by bi-carbonate buffering and differing the measures of CO2 in your circulatory system through breath. Notwithstanding, when an excessive number of ketone bodies are available in your circulation system, your body won't have the capacity to adjust the acids and bases, making your blood somewhat acid Continue reading >>

Ketogenic Diet Side Effects

Ketogenic Diet Side Effects

Although the adverse effects related to the ketogenic diet are generally less serve than those of anticonvulsant medications used to treat epilepsy, individuals following the diet may experience a number of undesirable effects. Short-Term Side Effects There are several short-term side effects that are most evident at the beginning of therapy, particularly when patients commence the diet with an initial fast. Hypoglycemia is a common side effect in this instance, and noticeable signs may include: Excessive thirst Frequent urination Fatigue Hunger Confusion, anxiety and/or irritability Tachycardia Lightheadedness and shakiness Sweating and chills Additionally, patients may also experience some constipation and low-grade acidosis. These effects tend to improve when the diet is continued, as the body adapts to the new diet and adjust the ways in which it sources energy. Alteration in Blood Composition As a result of the changes in dietary consumption and the body’s adaptive mechanisms to cope with the reduced carbohydrate intake, there are several changes in the blood composition of individuals following the ketogenic diet. In particular, the levels of lipids and cholesterol in the blood are commonly higher than what is considered to be normal. More than 60% of patients have raised lipid levels and more than 30% have high levels of cholesterol. If these changes are profound and there is some concern about the health of the child, slight changes to the diet can be made for the individual patient. For example, saturated fat sources can be substituted for polyunsaturated fats. In some cases, it may be necessary to lower the ketogenic ratio and reduce the proportion of fat to carbohydrate and protein in the diet. Long-Term Effects When the ketogenic diet is continued for exte Continue reading >>

First Week: Top 3 Keto Conundrums

First Week: Top 3 Keto Conundrums

The low carb lifestyle is known to sculpt some serious fat off your body. Many followers of the keto diet experience rapid weight loss, low hunger levels, and good energy levels. Since you cut out most of the high sugar foods, controlling your calories becomes a breeze. Sounds like an easy plan to success, right? Those who joined the ketogenic army can attest that the early weight loss comes with a toll. The first week of low carb living can be daunting, both mentally and physically. As your brain and body are adapting to a life without glucose, you may become outright miserable. Don’t go shoving cake down your neck just yet – the misery passes. To have an idea what you’ll go through, check out these common side effects that most go through when switching to a keto diet. Usually they only last for the first few days to a week, but preparing yourself for what might come will always help. Mental and Physical Fogginess The first major sign – coming 2 or 3 days into your ketogenic transition – will be the fogginess. You’re brain likes to take it easy and it if had a choice, would run on only glucose. As your body is switching from glucose to ketones as its main source of energy, your body will continue to burn the last stores of glycogen. This results in a foggy haze that might make it hard to concentrate. You might find yourself staring into space or feeling lethargic, but have no fear – it will pass. Headaches might pound at your door, nausea can pit in your stomach, muscle cramps can ruin your day and irritability can spark arguments, but knowing this can help you plan. Switch your diet in the middle of the week, so you will have the weekend to fully rest and recover from your transition. What we suggest is to go super low carb for the first week, which mea Continue reading >>

What Are The Negative Side Effects Of Following A Ketogenic Diet?

What Are The Negative Side Effects Of Following A Ketogenic Diet?

Switching to a ketogenic diet can come with several side effects. Fortunately, most of the commons ones are as minor as they are short lived. Let’s take a look at them, what causes them, and what you can do about them: “Keto Flu” When you first cut off your carbs and enter dietary ketosis you are likely to experience flu-like symptoms: headache, fatigue, nausea, and irritability. However, your symptoms aren’t caused by a virus; they’re caused by a combination of carbohydrate withdraw, dehydration, and your body adjusting to burning fat for fuel. These symptoms should go away within a week. And increasing your water intake above the normally recommended eight cups a day may help speed things up. Bad Breath Okay, if you’re not kissing someone while you become keto adapted, maybe this one isn’t such a big deal. But you (and those around you) may notice your breath smelling like overly ripe apples as you adjust to ketosis. This is caused by a type of ketone called acetone that’s excreted in your breath and urine. The smell tends to dissipate on its own in time, and again, water can help. Leg Cramps Early on in your transition to a keto diet most of the weight you lose is water weight. As this happens you also lose electrolytes and this can lead to a few choice words in the middle of the night as you jump out of bed in pain! To help prevent that make sure you’re getting plenty of magnesium, calcium, and potassium. If you find it difficult to get them in the foods you eat on a keto diet, not to worry. You can get all three together in one pill with Country Life Target Mins Calcium, Magnesium, Potassium. Constipation If a high percentage of your pre-keto calories came from carbs, it make take some time for your digestive system to adapt to the extra fat and p Continue reading >>

How Does The Ketogenic Diet Work?

How Does The Ketogenic Diet Work?

The Keto diet is not really a diet, but rather a lifestyle change. A Ketogenic diet is best described as a low carb, moderate protein, and high fat diet. This combination changes the way energy is used in the body. Fat is converted in the liver into fatty acids and ketone bodies. Another effect of the diet is that it lowers glucose levels and improves insulin resistance. An elevated level of ketone bodies in the blood, a state known as ketosis, leads to a reduction in the occurrence of epileptic seizures. Ketogenic Diet Macros Typically, the ketogenic diet consists of only 30-50 grams of carbohydrates a day. High in fat Moderate Protein The beginning of a ketogenic diet can be challenging for some who are not used to eating a very low carbohydrate diet. You’ll probably experience a lack of energy and brain fog as your body is in the beginning stages of making a metabolic shift. This shift is simply your body beginning to use fat for fuel rather than glucose. Your brain and body actually prefers to run on keytones rather than glucose for energy. The goal here is to use the fat on your body as fuel rather than glucose (from sugar or carbs) to burn fat and for overall daily energy requirements. For a full explanation as the ketogenic diet, please see more at: Fastest Method to Burn Fat WITHOUT Exercise Continue reading >>

Low Carb Diet Side Effects

Low Carb Diet Side Effects

Low carb diet side effects are manageable if you understand why they happen and how to minimize them. Understanding your physical reactions will help you avoid the worst of the symptoms, and keep you from quitting before you get out of the chute, so to speak. After several weeks, these side effects will subside as you become "keto-adapted" and able to burn fat instead of glucose for fuel. The list below includes the most common low carb diet side effects, and I've included tips on how to handle them. The only caveat is that you have no contraindicated health conditions. I have detailed here who should NOT follow a ketogenic diet. Frequent Urination After the first day or so, you'll notice that you are in the bathroom urinating more often. Your body is burning up the extra glycogen (stored glucose) in your liver and muscles. Breaking down glycogen releases a lot of water. As your carb intake and glycogen stores drop, your kidneys will start dumping this excess water. In addition, as your circulating insulin levels drop, your kidneys start excreting excess sodium, which will also cause more frequent urination. (see this reference). Fatigue and Dizziness As you start dumping water, you'll lose minerals such as salt, potassium and magnesium as well. Having lower levels of these minerals will make you very, very tired, lightheaded or dizzy, give you muscle cramps, and headaches. You may also experience skin itchiness. Fatigue and dizziness are the most common of the low carb diet side effects, and they can be avoided for the most part by making sure you stay ahead of mineral loss. You can counteract mineral losses by eating more salt or sipping salty broth throughout the day, and eating potassium rich foods. (Dairy foods, green leafy vegetables and avocados are high in potas Continue reading >>

The Side Effects Of A Low Carb Diet

The Side Effects Of A Low Carb Diet

Who should go on a low-carb diet? Low-carbohydrate diets — like the ketogenic diet — are effective for weight loss and improving health. They are also especially helpful for anyone who: Is overweight or obese Is sedentary Has epilepsy Has polycystic ovarian syndrome (PCOS), fibroids or endometriosis Is diagnosed with type 1 or type 2 diabetes Has a neurodegenerative disease such as Alzheimer’s or Parkinson’s Has certain forms of cancer Has cardiovascular disease A typical low-carb diet limits the daily intake of carbohydrates to between 60 and 130 grams, while a ketogenic diet tends to stay below 30 grams of carbohydrates. This is done by excluding or limiting most grains, legumes, fruits, bread, sweets, pasta and starchy vegetables from the diet and replacing them with added fats, meat, poultry, fish, eggs, non-starchy vegetables, nuts, and seeds. When we eat in this way, our bodies begin to change dramatically — especially for those who habitually eat plenty of carbohydrates with each meal. Not all of these changes, however, are going to be positive. When carbohydrates are restricted, it is stressful for the body because it must find another way to fuel itself. This can cause side effects, like nausea and headaches, that is commonly called the “keto flu”. The lack of carbohydrates will also lead to fluid and mineral loss and hormonal changes that can cause health issues if not addressed. The Most Common Side Effects The most common side effects that are experienced when restricting carbohydrates are: Headache Bad breath Weakness Fatigue Constipation or diarrhea It is important, however, to consider how common these symptoms actually are. In studies that put obese patients on a ketogenic diet for 6 months or longer (up to two years), no side effects or co Continue reading >>

Low-carb Side Effects & How To Cure Them

Low-carb Side Effects & How To Cure Them

Are you struggling while starting out on a low-carb or keto diet? Do you get headaches, leg cramps, constipation or any of the other more common side effects? Use the information on this page to avoid them – and feel great while losing weight. The main solution to most common problems when starting low carb is to increase the intake of water and salt. It’s even better to do it preventatively during the first week. If you do, you’ll most likely not experience any of these problems, or they’ll only be minor. Use one of the shortcuts below for specific problems – or just continue reading for all of them. Top 6 common problems when starting Less common issues on low carb Low-carb myths Leg cramps Leg cramps are not uncommon when starting a strict low-carb diet. It’s usually a minor issue if it occurs, but it can sometimes be painful. It’s a side effect of the loss of minerals, specifically magnesium, due to increased urination. Here’s how to avoid it: Drink plenty of fluid and get enough salt. This may reduce loss of magnesium and help prevent leg cramps. If needed, supplement with magnesium. Here’s a suggested dosage from the book The Art and Science of Low Carbohydrate Living by Drs. Jeff Volek and Stephen Phinney: Take 3 slow-release magnesium tablets like Slow-Mag or Mag 64 a day for 20 days, then continue taking 1 tablet a day afterwards. If the steps above are not enough and the problem is bothersome, consider increasing your carb intake somewhat. This should eliminate the problem. The more carbs you eat though, the weaker the impact of the low-carb diet. Bad breath On a strict low-carb diet some people experience a characteristic smell from their breath, a fruity smell that often remind people of nail polish remover. The smell is from acetone, a ket Continue reading >>

What Will Happen If I Don't Eat Carbs For 3 Weeks?

What Will Happen If I Don't Eat Carbs For 3 Weeks?

In 2012, I wanted to lose weight extremely fast. I had been weight lifting for about a year and I had put on some muscle as well as some fat due to poor dieting choices. This is a photo from 2015 but it’s similar to what I looked like in 2012. Not majorly overweight, but chubby. So, I decided to try and find the shortest way possible to get ‘shredded’. I wanted to look like Zyzz (below). I read somewhere online that to lose body fat, Zyzz would go on a ketogenic diet. I Googled some more and found details about what a ketogenic diet was. After minimal research I discovered that many people had lost weight using a similar approach. I was excited, I had found the method I was going to use to lose weight. My searching told me that a ketogenic diet involved eating practically 0 carbs. So I cut every single source of carbohydrates out of my diet. I said so long to my beloved sweet potato, rice, bread, fruit, everything. I also was led to believe that fat was evil when trying to lose weight, so I cut all of what I knew were sources of fat out of my diet too. So now nuts were gone, milk, cheese, oils. What was even left? A diet of minimal fats or carbohydrates… So my food sources at this stage was practically meat and green vegetables. More specifically chicken and broccoli. No sauce. Nothing else. Every meal. This meal looks 10x better than what I was having. See that sauce on the chicken? Not on my meals. I went extreme. I would tell myself, “It’s only four weeks.” What happened next? I felt terrible. I had little to no energy. My daily existence was fuelled by caffeine and pre-workout supplements (more caffeine). I was not doing a proper ketogenic diet at all… I didn’t understand it at the time. I was eating lean meats and green vegetables, how could I be Continue reading >>

Adverse Reactions To Ketogenic Diets: Caution Advised

Adverse Reactions To Ketogenic Diets: Caution Advised

As the ketogenic diet gains popularity, it’s important to have a balanced discussion regarding the merits of this diet. Let me emphasize right out of the gate that this is not a diet without merits (excuse the double negative); in fact, it has significant therapeutic potential for some clinical pathologies. However, it is also a diet with inherent risk, as evidenced by the extensive list of adverse reactions reported in the scientific literature—and this has not yet been a thorough enough part of the public discussion on ketogenic diets. The AIP Lecture Series is a 6-week video-based, self-directed online course that will teach you the scientific foundation for the diet and lifestyle tenets of the Autoimmune Protocol. This is the first of a series of articles discussing various facets of a ketogenic diet with an inclination toward balancing the discussion of the pros and cons of this high-fat, low-carb, low/moderate-protein diet. My interest in this topic stems from concerns I have over its general applicability and safety, simultaneous with its growing popularity. I feel a moral and social obligation to share what I understand of these diets, from my perspective as a medical researcher. The dangers of a ketogenic diet was, in fact, the topic of my keynote presentation at Paleo F(x) this year (links to video will be provided once available). This series of articles will share the extensive research that I did in preparation for this presentation, including all of the topics covered during my talk as well as several topics that I didn’t have time to discuss (also see the free PDF Literature Review at the bottom of this post). For every anecdotal story of someone who has regained their health with a ketogenic diet, there’s a counterpoint story of someone who derai Continue reading >>

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