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What Are The Side Effects If You Stop Taking Metformin?

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Metformin 500 mg review is here! If you want to know about Metformin how it works and Metformin side effects and also lots of other answers of questions related to metformin is given in this video.

What Is Metformin?

MORE Metformin is a prescription drug used primarily in the treatment of Type II diabetes. It can be used on its own or combined with other medications. In the United States, it is sold under the brand names Fortamet, Glucophage, Glumetza and Riomet. "Metformin is very often prescribed as the first step in a diabetic's regime," said Ken Sternfeld, a New York-based pharmacist. How it works "When you're diabetic you lose the ability to use the insulin you need to offset the food," Sternfeld explained. "If you eat a carb or sugar that can't be metabolized or offset by the insulin you produce, your sugar levels will be higher. Metformin and drugs in that category will help your body better metabolize that food so that insulin levels will be able to stay more in line." Metformin aims to decrease glucose production in the liver, consequently lowering the levels of glucose in the bloodstream. It also changes the way that your blood cells react to insulin. "It makes them more sensitive to insulin," said Dr. Stephen Neabore, a primary care doctor at the Barnard Medical Center in Washington, D.C. "It makes the same amount of insulin work better. It transports the insulin to the cells in a mo Continue reading >>

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  1. DMS721

    **Pregnancy Mention**
    I'm 10w1d pregnant and have PCOS. I've been on metformin twice a day for several months now. Today my RE told me I could stop taking the metformin. She said to start just taking 1 pill for a week, and then none at all. I'm worried as I've heard that stopping it during the first trimester can lead to miscarriage (I previously had a m/c at 6 weeks, but that was before being diagnosed with PCOS). As much as I hate taking the metformin, I'm tempted to just continue taking it until I get to the 12 week mark, just for my own piece of mind. Will it cause any harm if I continue for 2 more weeks?
    Has anyone else stopped metformin while pregnant and what were the results?
    Thanks!
    Dawn

  2. brown_eyed_girl

    Hi Dawn,
    I have PCOS and have been on Metformin for a number of years. Right around the 6 week mark of this pregnancy, I ran out of my prescription. I called my family doctor to request a refill and he didn't feel comfortable filling it since I was pregnant. He referred me to my RE who said I didn't need to refill it since he didn't like his patients to stay on it past 6 weeks anyway. He didn't say that I needed to wean off of it or anything like that ~ but I did anyway. I'd say I was completely off of the Metformin by 8 weeks. I was a nervous wreck, especially since I ended up needing abdominal surgery to remove my right tube, ovary and cyst at 10 weeks. I'm now in my 26th week and have had no issues at all. That being said, I don't think there's anything wrong with waiting until 12 weeks. Apparently different doctors have differing views on how long PCOS'ers need to stay on Metformin and if it really helps prevent a miscarriage. I don't believe it casues any harm to the baby so it if it gives you some peace of mind, I wouldn't hesitate to stay on it for a few more weeks. I know some women have been on it their entire pregnancies.
    Good luck and congrats on your pregnancy!

  3. mmi

    I m/c twice before on met... so I do believe met does prevent miscarriages. I took it the third pregnancy till I was 13 weeks(1000mg a day) and then with my fourth, I had had mild gestational diabetes in my third(first successful) pregnancy, so I took it till DELIVERY. No problems with either baby. If you have enough, stay on it for the first trimester, then wean. Just my opinion but for me who m/c twice before taking it...... met was the key to me finally having a successful pregnancy. congrats.

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Part 2: Defending metformin (from the haters) http://youtu.be/oH_6yW_YKLA Please watch my Glycemic index video as a supplement to this http://youtu.be/wGBqEojeEDE Metformin is often times the first diabetic drug I use in new diabetics. It is inexpensive, can be used with many other diabetic drugs in combination, it can cause weight loss and has been shown to decrease cardiovascular risk and even pancreatic cancer. It can be used safely in non-diabetics, and pre-diabetics. It can cause GI side effects, so when I start someone on it, I usually give them 1000mg pills, and the goal is to take 1000mg twice a day. Start with 1/2 pill once a day at dinner, in one week, Take 1/2 pill twice a day with food, in another week, take 1/2 pill in the morning and one at dinner, Finally advance to 1 pill twice a day. Some people cannot tolerate the full dose, and have to take somewhat less of a dose. Switching to the ER version can be helpful. If you eat lots of carbs, you will have more side effects. Limiting carbs, helps to tolerate it better AND can help you to lose more weight.

F A C T S H E E T F O R P A T I E N T S A N D F A M I L I E S

Diabetes Medications: What is metformin? Metformin is used to treat type 2 diabetes and insulin resistance. Metformin is taken by mouth (orally) as a pill. Like other diabetes medications, it works best when you follow the rest of your treatment plan. This means checking your blood glucose regularly, following your meal plan, and exercising every day. What does it do? Metformin helps lower your blood glucose (blood sugar). It does this in two ways: • Decrease the amount of glucose released by your liver. Less glucose enters into your bloodstream. • Increase the ability of your muscles to use glucose for energy. As more glucose is used, more glucose leaves your bloodstream. Why is metformin important for my health? Metformin can’t cure your diabetes. But by helping control your blood glucose, it lowers the chance that your diabetes will cause serious problems. As you know, when you have diabetes, you tend to have high blood glucose. Over time, this can damage your blood vessels and nerves, leading to heart attack or stroke, kidney and eye disease, and problems with your teeth, feet, and skin. If you have high blood pressure or high cholesterol — like many p Continue reading >>

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Popular Questions

  1. DMS721

    **Pregnancy Mention**
    I'm 10w1d pregnant and have PCOS. I've been on metformin twice a day for several months now. Today my RE told me I could stop taking the metformin. She said to start just taking 1 pill for a week, and then none at all. I'm worried as I've heard that stopping it during the first trimester can lead to miscarriage (I previously had a m/c at 6 weeks, but that was before being diagnosed with PCOS). As much as I hate taking the metformin, I'm tempted to just continue taking it until I get to the 12 week mark, just for my own piece of mind. Will it cause any harm if I continue for 2 more weeks?
    Has anyone else stopped metformin while pregnant and what were the results?
    Thanks!
    Dawn

  2. brown_eyed_girl

    Hi Dawn,
    I have PCOS and have been on Metformin for a number of years. Right around the 6 week mark of this pregnancy, I ran out of my prescription. I called my family doctor to request a refill and he didn't feel comfortable filling it since I was pregnant. He referred me to my RE who said I didn't need to refill it since he didn't like his patients to stay on it past 6 weeks anyway. He didn't say that I needed to wean off of it or anything like that ~ but I did anyway. I'd say I was completely off of the Metformin by 8 weeks. I was a nervous wreck, especially since I ended up needing abdominal surgery to remove my right tube, ovary and cyst at 10 weeks. I'm now in my 26th week and have had no issues at all. That being said, I don't think there's anything wrong with waiting until 12 weeks. Apparently different doctors have differing views on how long PCOS'ers need to stay on Metformin and if it really helps prevent a miscarriage. I don't believe it casues any harm to the baby so it if it gives you some peace of mind, I wouldn't hesitate to stay on it for a few more weeks. I know some women have been on it their entire pregnancies.
    Good luck and congrats on your pregnancy!

  3. mmi

    I m/c twice before on met... so I do believe met does prevent miscarriages. I took it the third pregnancy till I was 13 weeks(1000mg a day) and then with my fourth, I had had mild gestational diabetes in my third(first successful) pregnancy, so I took it till DELIVERY. No problems with either baby. If you have enough, stay on it for the first trimester, then wean. Just my opinion but for me who m/c twice before taking it...... met was the key to me finally having a successful pregnancy. congrats.

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ford brewer md mph PrevMedHeartRisk.com There are 2 basic differences between LDL and HDL: content and protein type. LDL has 25% or less protein. HDL has 50% or more protein. In addition, the proteins are slightly different. the HDL protein is called A1; the protein with LDL, VLDL and other large lipoprotein groups is apo B. Why the prefix "apo"? Apo as a prefix simply means "part of". And Lipoproteins are the proteins that our bodies use to safely transport fats, oils, and cholesterol. About Dr. Brewer - Ford Brewer is a physician that started as an Emergency Doctor. After seeing too many patients coming in dead from early heart attacks, he went to Johns Hopkins to learn Preventive Medicine. He went on the run the post-graduate training program (residency) in Preventive Medicine at Hopkins. From there, he made a career of practicing and managing preventive medicine and primary care clinics. His later role in this area was Chief Medical Officer for Premise, which has over 500 primary care/ prevention clinics. He was also the Chief Medical Officer for MDLIVE, the second largest telemedicine company. More recently, he founded PrevMed, a heart attack, stroke, and diabetes prevention clinic. At PrevMed, we focus on heart attack and stroke and Type 2 diabetes prevention by reducing or eliminating risk through attentive care and state-of-the-art genetic testing, imaging, labs and telemedicine options. We serve patients who have already experienced an event as well as those have not developed a diagnosis or event. Our team of senior clinicians includes internationally recognized leaders in the research and treatment of cardiovascular disease, preventive medicine and wellness. We also provide preventive medicine by telemedicine technology to over 30 states. Contact Dr. Brewer at [email protected] or visit http://prevmedheartrisk.com.

Apo-metformin Tablets

Brand Information Consumer medicine information (CMI) leaflet Please read this leaflet carefully before you start using APO-Metformin Tablets. Download CMI (PDF) Download large text CMI (PDF) What is in this leaflet Read this leaflet carefully before taking your medicine. This leaflet answers some common questions about metformin. It does not contain all the available information. It does not take the place of talking to your doctor or pharmacist or diabetes educator. The information in this leaflet was last updated on the date listed on the last page. More recent information on this medicine may be available. Ask your doctor or pharmacist: if there is anything you do not understand in this leaflet, if you are worried about taking your medicine, or to obtain the most up-to-date information. You can also download the most up-to-date leaflet from www.apotex.com.au. All medicines have risks and benefits. Your doctor has weighed the risks of you using this medicine against the benefits they expect it will have for you. Pharmaceutical companies cannot give you medical advice or an individual diagnosis. Keep this leaflet with your medicine. You may want to read it again. What this medici Continue reading >>

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  1. Dr.Eve

    Muscle Weakness on metformin???

    I have been on metformin for about 3 months and at 3 weeks developed severe weakness. Subsequently I have had to stop working out (aerobic cycling and weight lifting) due to severe pain in my back as a result of the induced weakness. I am taking Coenzyme Q10 and B12. Has anyone else had a simlar problem? What have you and your physician done to counteract the problem?

  2. kleto

    I am also looking for advice. I have been on Metformin for over a year now and have been going to see my GP every month to let him know that I am suffering from fatigue, wobbly legs, extreme tiredness and other similar symptoms. I have also lost about 10 kgs since I have started Metformin. Innitially I was given to understand that I would need to get used to the medication as I also was suffering from bouts of diarrhoes.. I also told him that I may be defficient in Vitamin B12. He does not give me any straight answers. On a previous visit I requested him to do the V-B12 test but he never gave me the results. Am wondering if prescribing these Vitamins is expensive. I am reading all over the internet the connection between Metformin and B12 deficiency and related problems. I am only 57 years old and my Mother-in-Law who is 87 has more energy than me. Frustrated with the way the doctors are treating me...... I am wondering if I can take B12 without him knowing of it.

  3. colin95803

    Metformin causes some malabsorption which can lead to lowered B12 and Folate levels. If this becomes significant, both can cause anaemia. Doctors and laboratories are reluctant to test B12 and Folate levels unless there are signs of anaemia in the blood; this means they are not interested in preventing anaemia before it happens, which to me seems illogical. Many doctors are not aware of this side effect. I believe there is a case for routinely monitoring B12 and Folate, say annually, together with any other vitamins or essentials that may be not absorbed due to Metformin.

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