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What Are The Side Effects If You Stop Taking Metformin?

Metformin 850mg Tablets

Metformin 850mg Tablets

1. WHAT METFORMIN IS AND WHAT IT IS USED FOR The name of this medicine is Metformin 500mg or 850mg Tablets (called metformin in this leaflet). It belongs to a group of medicines called biguanides (a type of oral hypoglycaemic). Metformin is used for the sort of diabetes called Type 2 diabetes or non-insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus. In type 2 diabetes, there is too much sugar (glucose) in your blood. This is because your body does not make enough insulin or because it makes insulin that does not work properly. Insulin is a hormone that allows your body tissue to take glucose from the blood and use it for energy or for storage for future use. Metformin works by improving the sensitivity of your body to insulin. It helps your body to use glucose in the normal way again This medicine is given when diet and exercise alone has not been able to control your blood sugar levels. Metformin can be given on its own. However, sometimes it is given with other medicines for diabetes or with insulin. In patients who are overweight, long-term use of metformin also helps to lower the risk of any problems related to diabetes you are allergic (hypersensitive) to metformin or any of the other ingredients in this liquid (see section 6: Further information). An allergic reaction can include a rash, itching or shortness of breath. you have recently had a heart attack or any other heart problems you have severe circulation problems or difficulty in breathing you have had serious problems with your diabetes in the past called diabetic ketoacidosis. When you have this you lose weight quickly, feel sick (nausea) or are sick (vomiting). See also in Section 4: Possible side effects you have recently had a severe infection, injury or trauma (shock) you are going to have an X-ray where you will b Continue reading >>

Effects Of Withdrawal From Metformin On The Development Of Diabetes In The Diabetes Prevention Program

Effects Of Withdrawal From Metformin On The Development Of Diabetes In The Diabetes Prevention Program

Go to: Abstract OBJECTIVE— In the Diabetes Prevention Program (DPP), metformin significantly reduced the risk of diabetes in individuals with impaired glucose tolerance. Diabetes status was assessed by oral glucose tolerance tests (OGTTs) performed while participants were still taking metformin or placebo. To determine whether the observed benefit was a transient pharmacological effect or more sustained, we performed a repeat OGTT after a short “washout” period during which medications (metformin or placebo) were withheld. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS— All participants assigned to medication who had not developed diabetes at the end of the DPP were asked to have a repeat OGTT after discontinuing the study medication for 1–2 weeks. The predesignated outcome was the odds of diabetes in metformin versus placebo comparisons during the trial and washout combined. RESULTS— There were 1,274 participants who participated in the washout study and 529 who did not because they had already developed diabetes. Before the washout, the odds of diabetes in the metformin group was lower than that in the placebo group (odds ratio 0.66, 95% CI 0.54–0.82, P < 0.001). After the washout, diabetes was somewhat more frequently diagnosed in the metformin participants (1.49, 0.93–2.38, P = 0.098). Combining diabetes conversions during the DPP and during the washout, diabetes was diagnosed significantly less frequently in the metformin than the placebo group (0.75, 0.62–0.92, P = 0.005). CONCLUSIONS— The primary analysis of the DPP demonstrated that metformin decreased the risk of diabetes by 31%. The washout study shows that 26% of this effect can be accounted for by a pharmacological effect of metformin that did not persist when the drug was stopped. After the washout the inc Continue reading >>

Can You Drink Alcohol While Taking Metformin?

Can You Drink Alcohol While Taking Metformin?

Metformin is a medication that helps manage type 2 diabetes and occasionally prediabetes. In general, drinking alcohol while taking metformin is not helpful and not recommended by doctors. The side effects of metformin can be life-threatening with excessive alcohol consumption. Metformin and alcohol both put stress on the liver, so intensifying the harmful effects and increasing the risk of liver complications. How does metformin and alcohol affect the body? Metformin is a popular, effective, and inexpensive management medication, prescribed for the treatment of type 2 diabetes. In 2014, some 14.4 million people in the United States were prescribed metformin. Metformin is also being used more and more frequently in prediabetes cases. Metformin use in overweight people with type 1 diabetes may also reduce insulin requirements and increase metabolic control. The drug works by improving insulin sensitivity, promoting the uptake of glucose into tissues and lowering sugar levels in the bloodstream. By increasing how effectively the existing glucose is used, metformin reduces the amount of glucose the liver produces and the intestines absorb. Alcohol also affects blood sugars significantly. Alcohol digestion puts stress on the liver, an organ dedicated to the removal of poisons from the body. When the liver is forced to process high amounts of alcohol, it becomes overworked and releases less glucose. Long-term alcohol use can also make cells less sensitive to insulin. This means that less glucose is absorbed from the blood and levels in the bloodstream increase. Over time, alcohol consumption damages the liver, especially when it is consumed in excess. It reduces the liver's ability to produce and regulate glucose. Conditions like alcoholic hepatitis and cirrhosis of the live Continue reading >>

How One Man Stopped Metformin After Losing Weight

How One Man Stopped Metformin After Losing Weight

Exercise and weight loss lower blood sugar because they both reduce the body's insulin resistance, the key problem in people with type 2 diabetes. Therefore, increasing exercise or losing weight can sometimes lower or eliminate your need for diabetes medication. It's easier to keep your blood sugar in check without medication if your body is more sensitive to the insulin your body does make (most people with type 2 diabetes make at least some of the hormone). I was able to stop taking metformin, the drug I had been taking to lower my glucose—Louis Sarkes, Type 2 Diabetes Patient Louis Sarkes, 50, was diagnosed with type 2 diabetes in 2006 after a routine blood test during his annual physical exam. "I was surprised, but motivated to do something right away," said Sarkes, who is a money manager based in Baltimore, Md. He went to an all-day session on weight loss at Johns Hopkins University (where his doctor is based). He listened to doctors, nutritionists, and other patients talk about weight loss and exercise strategies, setbacks and successes. More about diabetes and exercise "I chose a diet low in sugars and high in fruits, vegetables and whole grains, and kept carbohydrates at 30 to 35 grams per meal, or no more than 100 grams in a day," says Sarkes. He didnt count every calorie, but kept a general sense and tried to keep the daily limit of calories to 1,800. "To get as much information as I could, especially on tips for sticking with the diet, I met with the nutritionist on my own, and also read everything on the Internet I could find," he said. He followed the advice of his nutritionist and didn't feel guilty if he went over his carbohydrate or calorie limithe just started again as soon a possible. He found healthy snacks he liked and avoided high-fat, high calori Continue reading >>

Surviving Metformin

Surviving Metformin

What was your first week on Metformin like? Horrendous? Terrible? Filled with waves of nausea? The sickest you’ve felt in your life? Let’s reminisce for a minute: About a dozen years ago, on December 24, I went to the doctor for a routine physical. Are you envious of my holiday plans? This was in the years before Pinterest, so I was carrying on with regular life activities on Christmas Eve morn rather than bedazzling the cap of an Elf on the Shelf. Anyway, at the Christmas Eve check-up, my physician mentioned that he had read promising things about Metformin being used in women with PCOS. We chatted about Metformin for a bit, talked about other PCOS things, finished up the tests, and then I headed to the pharmacy to pick up the prescription. We had our traditional Christmas Eve dinner of ham, funeral potatoes, salad with asparagus and strawberries; rolls, and other delicious items. Breaking with tradition, this year’s Christmas Eve dinner was followed by Metformin for me. After dinner, we read the Christmas story from the Bible, watched a short film depicting the events in Luke 2, read a new Christmas book, and headed off to bed. That’s when the fun began. In sum: Worst Christmas Ever. Pros: Family, friends, gifts, good music, good food. Cons: Visiting the loo every 15 minutes, constant nausea, wanting to curl up in bed and not wake up for days. Public Service Announcement: Do not start Metformin for the first time on the day prior to a major holiday. My first year on Metformin was pretty rough. I felt like I had morning sickness every single day. I had diarrhea and nausea every morning. When I skipped a few doses hoping for relief, my symptoms would be twice as bad when I re-started. Looking back, I’m actually amazed that I kept taking the medication. If I st Continue reading >>

Metformin

Metformin

Metformin may rarely cause a serious, life-threatening condition called lactic acidosis. Tell your doctor if you have kidney disease. Your doctor will probably tell you not to take metformin. Also, tell your doctor if you are over 65 years old and if you have ever had a heart attack; stroke; diabetic ketoacidosis (blood sugar that is high enough to cause severe symptoms and requires emergency medical treatment); a coma; or heart or liver disease. Taking certain other medications with metformin may increase the risk of lactic acidosis. Tell your doctor if you are taking acetazolamide (Diamox), dichlorphenamide (Keveyis), methazolamide, topiramate (Topamax, in Qsymia), or zonisamide (Zonegran). Tell your doctor if you have recently had any of the following conditions, or if you develop them during treatment: serious infection; severe diarrhea, vomiting, or fever; or if you drink much less fluid than usual for any reason. You may have to stop taking metformin until you recover. If you are having surgery, including dental surgery, or any major medical procedure, tell the doctor that you are taking metformin. Also, tell your doctor if you plan to have any x-ray procedure in which dye is injected, especially if you drink or have ever drunk large amounts of alcohol or have or have had liver disease or heart failure. You may need to stop taking metformin before the procedure and wait 48 hours to restart treatment. Your doctor will tell you exactly when you should stop taking metformin and when you should start taking it again. If you experience any of the following symptoms, stop taking metformin and call your doctor immediately: extreme tiredness, weakness, or discomfort; nausea; vomiting; stomach pain; decreased appetite; deep and rapid breathing or shortness of breath; dizzi Continue reading >>

Pcos: Insulin And Metformin

Pcos: Insulin And Metformin

Young women with PCOS often have elevated insulin levels and are more likely to develop diabetes. Metformin is a medication often prescribed for women with PCOS to help prevent diabetes. A lifestyle that includes healthy nutrition and daily exercise is the most important part of a PCOS treatment plan. What is insulin? Insulin is a hormone made by an organ in the body called the pancreas. The food you eat is broken down into simple sugar (glucose) during digestion. Glucose is absorbed into the blood after you eat. Insulin helps glucose enter the cells of the body to be used as energy. If there’s not enough insulin in the body, or if the body can’t use the insulin, sugar levels in the blood become higher. What is insulin resistance? If your body is resistant to insulin, it means you need high levels of insulin to keep your blood sugar normal. Certain medical conditions such as being overweight or having PCOS can cause insulin resistance. Insulin resistance tends to run in families. What can insulin resistance do to me? High insulin levels can cause thickening and darkening of the skin (acanthosis nigricans) on the back of the neck, axilla (under the arms), and groin area. In young women with PCOS, high insulin levels can cause the ovaries to make more androgen hormones such as testosterone. This can cause increased body hair, acne, and irregular or few periods. Having insulin resistance can increase your risk of developing diabetes. How can I lower my insulin levels? You can help lower your insulin levels naturally by eating fewer starches and sugars, and more foods that are high in fiber and low in refined carbohydrates. Low glycemic foods, on the other hand, don’t raise your blood sugar or insulin levels as much as foods that are high in sugar or refined carbohydr Continue reading >>

Metformin And Saxagliptin

Metformin And Saxagliptin

What is the most important information I should know about metformin and saxagliptin? You should not use this medication if you are allergic to metformin (Actoplus Met, Avandamet, Fortamet, Glucophage, Riomet) or saxagliptin (Onglyza), if you have kidney disease, or if you are in a state of diabetic ketoacidosis (call your doctor for treatment with insulin). If you need to have surgery or any type of x-ray or CT scan using a dye that is injected into your veins, you will need to temporarily stop taking metformin and saxagliptin. Some people develop lactic acidosis while taking metformin. Early symptoms may get worse over time and this condition can be fatal. Get emergency medical help if you have: muscle pain or weakness, numb or cold feeling in your arms and legs, trouble breathing, stomach pain, nausea with vomiting, slow or irregular heart rate, dizziness, or feeling very weak or tired. What is metformin and saxagliptin? Metformin and saxagliptin are oral diabetes medicines that help control blood sugar levels. Metformin works by decreasing glucose (sugar) production in the liver and decreasing absorption of glucose by the intestines. Saxagliptin works by regulating the levels of insulin your body produces after eating. The combination of metformin and saxagliptin is used to treat type 2 diabetes. This medication is not for treating type 1 diabetes. Metformin and saxagliptin may also be used for purposes not listed in this medication guide. What should I discuss with my healthcare provider before taking metformin and saxagliptin? Some people develop a life-threatening condition called lactic acidosis while taking metformin. You may be more likely to develop lactic acidosis if you have liver or kidney disease, heart attack or congestive heart failure, a severe infecti Continue reading >>

Metformin (glucophage) Side Effects & Complications

Metformin (glucophage) Side Effects & Complications

The fascinating compound called metformin was discovered nearly a century ago. Scientists realized that it could lower blood sugar in an animal model (rabbits) as early as 1929, but it wasn’t until the late 1950s that a French researcher came up with the name Glucophage (roughly translated as glucose eater). The FDA gave metformin (Glucophage) the green light for the treatment of type 2 diabetes in 1994, 36 years after it had been approved for this use in Britain. Uses of Generic Metformin: Glucophage lost its patent protection in the U.S. in 2002 and now most prescriptions are filled with generic metformin. This drug is recognized as a first line treatment to control blood sugar by improving the cells’ response to insulin and reducing the amount of sugar that the liver makes. Unlike some other oral diabetes drugs, it doesn’t lead to weight gain and may even help people get their weight under control. Starting early in 2000, sales of metformin (Glucophage) were challenged by a new class of diabetes drugs. First Avandia and then Actos challenged metformin for leadership in diabetes treatment. Avandia later lost its luster because it was linked to heart attacks and strokes. Sales of this drug are now miniscule because of tight FDA regulations. Actos is coming under increasing scrutiny as well. The drug has been banned in France and Germany because of a link to bladder cancer. The FDA has also required Actos to carry its strictest black box warning about an increased risk of congestive heart failure brought on by the drug. Newer diabetes drugs like liraglutide (Victoza), saxagliptin (Onglyza) and sitagliptin (Januvia) have become very successful. But metformin remains a mainstay of diabetes treatment. It is prescribed on its own or sometimes combined with the newer d Continue reading >>

Brand Name Sandoz Metformin Fc Common Name Metformin

Brand Name Sandoz Metformin Fc Common Name Metformin

The content of this page: How does this medication work? What will it do for me? Metformin belongs to the class of medications called oral hypoglycemics, which are medications that lower blood sugar. It is used to control blood glucose (blood sugar) for people with type 2 diabetes. It is used when diet, exercise, and weight reduction have not been found to lower blood glucose well enough on their own. Metformin works by reducing the amount of glucose made by the liver and by making it easier for glucose to enter into the tissues of the body. Metformin has been found to be especially useful in delaying problems associated with diabetes for overweight people with diabetes. This medication may be available under multiple brand names and/or in several different forms. Any specific brand name of this medication may not be available in all of the forms or approved for all of the conditions discussed here. As well, some forms of this medication may not be used for all of the conditions discussed here. Your doctor may have suggested this medication for conditions other than those listed in these drug information articles. If you have not discussed this with your doctor or are not sure why you are taking this medication, speak to your doctor. Do not stop taking this medication without consulting your doctor. Do not give this medication to anyone else, even if they have the same symptoms as you do. It can be harmful for people to take this medication if their doctor has not prescribed it. How should I use this medication? The recommended adult dose of metformin ranges from 500 mg 3 or 4 times a day to 850 mg 2 or 3 times a day. The maximum daily dose should not exceed 2,550 mg daily. Tablets should be taken with food whenever possible to reduce the risk of nausea and vomiting. Me Continue reading >>

Take Metformin If You Have Prediabetes

Take Metformin If You Have Prediabetes

Do you have prediabetes? You might be able to ward it off with the help of one of the diabetes drugs. Metformin might stop you from getting diabetes and could also help you in other ways. But persuading your doctor to prescribe it could be a challenge. The biggest and perhaps the best study of people who have prediabetes showed that taking metformin cuts the risk of diabetes by 31 percent. While this was less than the reduction of 58 percent that the “lifestyle intervention” provided, in real life we usually aren’t able to get that much guidance from our medical team. By “lifestyle intervention” the researchers meant being in a program that provided information, guidance, and support to help participants lose 7 percent or more of their weight and to get moderately intense physical activity — like brisk walking — for at least 150 minutes a week. But without that guidance, it typically takes a long time to help, and in fact it most people just don’t do it. Who Metformin Helps Most The study showed that metformin helped the most among younger people, and with people who had a high body mass index (BMI) or a high fasting blood glucose level. It doesn’t help seniors much. But the biggest problem with metformin is to have your doctor prescribe it. Only 3.7 percent of insured adults who had a prediabetes diagnosis were taking it between 2010 and 2012, according to a study that the Annals of Internal Medicine published last year. This very low proportion is probably because the U.S. Food and Drug Administration hasn’t approved metformin — or any other drug — for prediabetes. While doctors are free to prescribe it “off label,” some of them are hesitant to do that. Some Side Effects Like any drugs, metformin sometimes has unwanted side effects. The mos Continue reading >>

Oral Diabetes Medications

Oral Diabetes Medications

A list of oral diabetes medications with advantages, disadvantages, and side effects. Click on the name of a drug for more information. Biguanides Glucophage (generic name: metformin) Glucophage XR (generic name: metformin hydrochloride) extended release Fortamet (generic name: metformin hydrochloride) extended release Glumetza (generic name: metformin hydrochloride) extended release Riomet (generic name: metformin hydrochloride liquid) What are Biguanides? Metformin is the only member of the biguanides family in use today. Metformin (met-FOR-min) helps lower blood glucose by making sure your liver does not put extra glucose into the system when it is not needed. The ADA Standards of Medical Care in Diabetes recommend the inclusion of metformin (along with diet and exercise) in initial diabetes treatment. A good thing about metformin is that it does not cause blood glucose to get too low (hypoglycemia) when it is the only diabetes medicine you take. Who can take this medicine? Adults with type 2 diabetes can take metformin with their doctor’s approval and supervision. You should avoid metformin if you have liver or kidney problems, lung or heart disease, or conditions that cause low blood oxygen levels. Who should not take this medicine? People with certain types of heart problems, such as congestive heart failure, should use caution with this medicine. People with reduced kidney function or kidney disease should probably not take metformin. It should be used with caution if you regularly consume more than two to three drinks daily, so check with your doctor about that. Advantages Metformin, when used alone, is unlikely to cause low blood sugar. It is one of those medicines that always seems to help even after people have had diabetes for a while, and, for this reason Continue reading >>

Common Questions About Diabetes Medicines

Common Questions About Diabetes Medicines

How do I know if my diabetes pill is working? The best way to find out how well your diabetes pill is working is to test your blood sugar. Ask a member of your health care team what time of day is best for testing. You'll want to test when your diabetes medicine is expected to be most active in your body. Keep a record of your blood sugar levels (PDF) during that time to see if they're at or near your goal. If your levels are at or near your goal and you're not having any problems with the medicine, then it's probably working well. If you're still not sure, talk to your doctor or other member of your care team. Can I stop taking my diabetes medicine after my blood sugar is under control? It's reasonable to think that after a person gets good blood sugar control, it means the end of managing diabetes. But that's not the case. People with type 1 diabetes aren't able to make their own insulin, so they will always need to take insulin shots every day. For people with type 2 diabetes who are on medicine, the answer isn't as clear. Sometimes when people are first diagnosed, they start on pills or insulin right away. If the person also works hard to control diabetes with diet and exercise, he or she can lower the need for medicine and might be able to stop taking it altogether. As long as the person is able to keep blood sugar levels normal with diet and exercise, there isn't a need for medicine. However, type 2 diabetes changes over time. The change can be fast or slow, but it does change. This means that even if a person was able to stop taking medicine for a while, he or she might need to start taking it again in the future. If a person is taking medicine to keep blood sugar normal, then it's important to keep taking it to lower the chances for heart disease and other healt Continue reading >>

The Low Down On Metformin And Vitamin B12 Deficiency

The Low Down On Metformin And Vitamin B12 Deficiency

So many women with PCOS are prescribed Metformin (an insulin-sensitizing drug) to manage their Polycystic Ovarian Syndrome. And for good reason too. Metformin has been shown to improve many aspects of PCOS, including weight loss, fertility and improved testosterone levels (1). But, it also leads to Vitamin B12 deficiency if used at high doses or for long periods of time. So, here’s what you need to know about Metformin and Vitamin B12 deficiency with PCOS. What is Metformin? As I have already mentioned, Metformin is an insulin sensitizing drug that is often prescribed for women withPCOS. It works by decreasing absorption of glucose through the intestines, lowering the amount of glucose produced by the liver and making the body more sensitive to the insulin that is being produced. The overall effect of Metformin use for PCOS is lowered testosterone levels, improved ovulation and fertility as well as a more regular menstrual cycle. This is all sounding good, right? Well, it is good although there are some nasty side effects. A full discussion on Metformin is not going to be dealt with now, though. I really want to hone in on Metformin’s effect of Vitamin B12 levels as this could be affecting you right now. A free 6 lesson course that has helped women with PCOS around the world learn how to see lasting changes in their PCOS symptoms. Ready to join? Vitamin B12 Vitamin B12 is a vitamin that is vital for the body’s functioning. It is important for red blood cell formation, neurological function and DNA formation. If you are deficient in this important vitamin, it could lead to anaemia and neurological problems. (including memory loss – something that I have seen cropping up more often in PCOS communities). (2) Metformin and Vitamin B12 Right, so this is where it gets Continue reading >>

Diabetes Type 2

Diabetes Type 2

Many people with type 2 diabetes are prescribed tablets to help control their blood glucose levels. Metformin is the first-line medication for diabetes in the UK but there are many more types of medication for type 2 diabetes discussed below. Most people had tried initially to control their blood glucose with a regimen of diet and exercise before being given oral medication. Many people took metformin alone to control blood glucose, and some were taking metformin and gliclazide. Both medications help to reduce blood glucose but work differently. Metformin reduces the amount of glucose produced in the liver, and also makes muscle tissue absorb more glucose; gliclazide increases the amount of insulin produced by the pancreas. While people found that the medication they took had helped reduce and control their blood glucose, many had experienced side effects. Metformin can cause diarrhoea and other digestive problems and many people went back to their GPs for advice. Some people felt concerned about the risks they might face from certain drugs after reading negative reports in the media (see 'Misunderstandings about diabetes'). Rosiglitazone has been linked to an increased risk of heart attack and stroke. Since these interviews were conducted in 2008, there has been growing concern about the potential harmful effects of rosiglitazone (Avandia, but also contained in Avandamet and Avaglim) and from September 2010 in the UK and Europe, new prescribing of this drug has stopped, and most people who were taking the drug have been changed to alternative medication. Most people we interviewed had been prescribed higher dosages of medication to control their blood glucose as their diabetes got worse over time. Some people had transferred to insulin while continuing on metformin (se Continue reading >>

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