diabetestalk.net

What Are The Features Of Ketosis

Basics Of Nutritional Ketosis

Basics Of Nutritional Ketosis

If carbohydrates are available, your body will burn that first. If carbs are not available, your body will burn fat & your fat stores! “Keto” (scientifically known as “Nutritional Ketosis” but usually referred to as just “keto” or a “ketogenic diet”) involves restricting your diet to moderate protein, very low carbohydrates and high fat. It’s similar to the the Atkins diet, but with more solid science. When you are consuming enough protein to keep muscles happy, restricting carbohydrates as low as possible and making up the rest of your calories in fat, your body switches into a fat burning mode. Your liver will begin converting fats into energy molecules known technically as “ketone bodies” – which is where the name of the diet comes from. People end up with MORE energy and vitality on a ketogenic diet. Muscle cells are finally gaining energy instead of all the fuel getting stored away in fat cells because of insulin, specifically insulin resistance. The details of Keto can get difficult but the basics are easy: Get most of your calories from fat & moderate protein, things like: sausage, bacon, fatty steak, ground beef/pork, cheese, eggs, salmon, avocado, chicken (with the skin), olive oil, butter, coconut oil, more sausage, and bacon. You get vitamins and minerals from low glycemic vegetables (no carrots or potatoes, look for green veggies). Avoid carbohydrates as much as possible. You’ll need to stay below 20 or 30g a day. Get used to looking at food labels! Get enough electrolytes. Keto depletes your sodium, potassium, and other electrolytes. If you do not have enough electrolytes in your system, you’ll experience “keto flu” and feel miserable. It’s an easy fix: drink some 0 carb broth or eat salty foods. After 2-3 days, you’ll be Continue reading >>

Long-term Effects Of A Ketogenic Diet In Obese Patients

Long-term Effects Of A Ketogenic Diet In Obese Patients

Go to: Abstract Although various studies have examined the short-term effects of a ketogenic diet in reducing weight in obese patients, its long-term effects on various physical and biochemical parameters are not known. To determine the effects of a 24-week ketogenic diet (consisting of 30 g carbohydrate, 1 g/kg body weight protein, 20% saturated fat, and 80% polyunsaturated and monounsaturated fat) in obese patients. In the present study, 83 obese patients (39 men and 44 women) with a body mass index greater than 35 kg/m2, and high glucose and cholesterol levels were selected. The body weight, body mass index, total cholesterol, low density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol, high density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol, triglycerides, fasting blood sugar, urea and creatinine levels were determined before and after the administration of the ketogenic diet. Changes in these parameters were monitored after eight, 16 and 24 weeks of treatment. The weight and body mass index of the patients decreased significantly (P<0.0001). The level of total cholesterol decreased from week 1 to week 24. HDL cholesterol levels significantly increased, whereas LDL cholesterol levels significantly decreased after treatment. The level of triglycerides decreased significantly following 24 weeks of treatment. The level of blood glucose significantly decreased. The changes in the level of urea and creatinine were not statistically significant. The present study shows the beneficial effects of a long-term ketogenic diet. It significantly reduced the body weight and body mass index of the patients. Furthermore, it decreased the level of triglycerides, LDL cholesterol and blood glucose, and increased the level of HDL cholesterol. Administering a ketogenic diet for a relatively longer period of time did Continue reading >>

Five Steps To Jumpstart The Ketogenic Diet

Five Steps To Jumpstart The Ketogenic Diet

In this post we will take a look at how Heads Up Health can help you successfully navigate the challenges of implementing and maintaining a ketogenic diet. In particular, we will introduce tools that can help you track your progress, fine tune your approach and find exactly what works for your own body as you adopt a low-carb ketogenic lifestyle. If you want to skip ahead and start logging some data now, use the button below to create your account. Or read on for our “Five Steps to Jumpstart the Ketogenic Diet.” Step 1 – Master Your Macronutrients (Protein, Fat & Carbs) The hardest part about going keto, especially for beginners, is learning how to adjust your food intake to meet the requirements of a ketogenic diet. The ketogenic diet is a low-carb diet (25 grams of carbs per day is a common starting point). The rest of your daily calories will come from protein and fat, the exact amounts of each depend on your goals (muscle building, fat loss, endurance athletics, disease management etc.). If you’ve never counted calories or read food labels before, learning how to correctly adjust your diet can be tricky at first. Start by calculating your target protein, fat, carb and calorie goals by using a macronutrient calculator designed for ketogenic diets. We’ve included a few good calculators in the appendix. Example: When I first came off the Standard American Diet and started keto for general weight loss, I set a goal of 80% fat/15% protein/5% carbs. It took a few weeks of trial and error to learn which foods I could to eat in order to reach my goals, but it got easier with practice. Over the course of about six months my weight dropped from 197 pounds to 184 pounds and my body fat dropped from 24% to 20%. Overall I was very pleased with these initial results. On Continue reading >>

Ketosis As A Platform

Ketosis As A Platform

By Franco Cavaleri BSc NB PhDc Since the 1930’s, the importance of ketosis, induced through a ketogenic diet, has been well documented, particularly after early trials proved it a success in treating cases of drug resistant epilepsy. Shortly thereafter intensive studies were underway to unveil the therapeutic mechanism by which this extreme dietary program successfully treated the pathology of not just epilepsy but other diseases related to cognition (Alzheimer’s included), cardiovascular function and metabolic dysregulation, such as chronic inflammation, insulin resistance, diabetes, obesity. With such early success, why has ketosis cycled in and out of public awareness, to no lasting effect? Quite simply, Ketosis has only been possible through strict dietary protocols designed to induce endogenous ketones (ketosis), making it a very difficult program for practitioners to adhere to. Moreover, a ketogenic program hasn't always achieved therapeutic potential, since results vary to such a great degree on the diligence of adherents to such a restrictive diet, coupled to other lifestyle and genetic variances. What's been missing is a mechanism to induce ketosis through dietary supplementation that maintains or adds ketones, exogenous ketones, in the bloodstream, improving reliability of therapeutic outcomes. Now, such a supplement has been developed and it is about to change, reset, if you will, how we view metabolism. It's a dietary game changer overnight! How does ketosis work? In the absence of dietary carbs (and low gluconeogenic protein sources) and the abundance of dietary fat, the body will begin to utilize dietary fat as a source of energy. A typical diet to enter into and stay in ketosis is: 65-70% fat; 20% protein; 5-10% carb (with a max daily carb intake of 5 Continue reading >>

Effects Of Ketogenic Diet On The Clinical And Electroencephalographic Features Of Children With Drug Therapy-resistant Epilepsy.

Effects Of Ketogenic Diet On The Clinical And Electroencephalographic Features Of Children With Drug Therapy-resistant Epilepsy.

Abstract The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of a ketogenic diet (KD) on the clinical and electroencephalographic (EEG) features of children with drug therapy-resistant epilepsy. A total of 31 children with drug therapy-resistant epilepsy were selected, including 19 males and 12 females. The youngest was 7 months old and the oldest was 7 years old. Clinical seizures in the children prior to and 1 week, 1 month and 3 months after the initiation of the KD were compared and the clinical effect of the KD was evaluated. The ratio of fat to carbohydrate + protein in the KD was 4:1. Following the initiation of the KD treatment, the original antiepileptic drugs were not changed. The changes in occipital region background rhythm and interictal spike wave discharge index (SI) were evaluated prior to and 1 week, 1 month and 3 months after the initiation of the KD. The efficacy had an upward trend over time, with a total efficacy rate of 51.61% 1 week later, 67.74% 1 month later and 70.97% 3 months later. Doose syndrome showed the greatest response to KD, with a 100% efficacy rate. However, since there were only two cases in the study, its efficacy remains to be assessed. Infantile spasm also showed a good response to KD; 9 of the 16 patients were seizure free and the total efficacy rate was 81.25%. As the length of the KD treatment was increased, the background rhythms of the children underwent significant changes and the SI was significantly reduced. KD not only demonstrated good clinical efficacy, but also significantly reduced the frequency of interictal epileptic discharges and improved the EEG background rhythm. Continue reading >>

Ketosis

Ketosis

Tweet Ketosis is a state the body may find itself in either as a result of raised blood glucose levels or as a part of low carb dieting. Low levels of ketosis is perfectly normal. However, high levels of ketosis in the short term can be serious and the long term effects of regular moderate ketosis are only partially known at the moment. What is ketosis? Ketosis is a state the body goes into if it needs to break down body fat for energy. The state is marked by raised levels of ketones in the blood which can be used by the body as fuel. Ketones which are not used for fuel are excreted out of the body via the kidneys and the urine. Is ketosis the same as ketoacidosis? There is often confusion as to the difference between ketosis and ketoacidosis. Ketosis is the state whereby the body is producing ketones. In ketosis, the level of ketones in the blood can be anything between normal to very high. Diabetic ketoacidosis, also known as DKA, only describes the state in which the level of ketones is either high or very high. In ketoacidosis, the amount of ketones in the blood is sufficient to turn the blood acidic, which is a dangerous medical state. When does ketosis occur? Ketosis will take place when the body needs energy and there is not sufficient glucose available for the body. This can typically happen when the body is lacking insulin and blood glucose levels become high. Other causes can be the result of being on a low carb diet. A low level of carbohydrate will lead to low levels of insulin, and therefore the body will produce ketones which do not rely on insulin to get into and fuel the body’s cells. A further cause of ketosis, less relevant to people with diabetes, is a result of excessive alcohol consumption. Is ketosis dangerous? The NHS describes ketosis as a pote Continue reading >>

The Ugly Truth About Ketogenic Diets

The Ugly Truth About Ketogenic Diets

Here's what you need to know... Ketosis occurs when carbs are in such low quantities that your body relies almost exclusively on fatty acid oxidation and ketone metabolism. Ketogenic diets have about 70-75% of your daily caloric intake coming from fat and about 5% from carbohydrates. Ingesting protein above approximately .8 grams per pound is enough to kick you out of ketosis. Ketogenic diets improve body comp, but so does any diet that reduces calories from any source. There is no literature to support that a ketogenic diet is beneficial for promoting increases in muscle mass. Ketogenic diets affect performance negatively. Questions About Ketosis While the ketogenic diet has been used widely and rather effectively in some cases, there's still a lot of confusion about it. What exactly is a ketogenic diet? How does it differ from low carb dieting? Most importantly, at least for the T Nation demographic, is the question of whether ketogenic diets allow you to put on, or at least keep, muscle. Ketosis: What is it? Ketosis is a metabolic state that occurs when dietary carbohydrates are in such low quantities that your body must rely almost exclusively on fatty acid oxidation and ketone metabolism. That sounds simple on the surface, but let's unpack that explanation a bit. To function, your body requires a substantial amount of energy in the form of ATP. So, let's just assume that the average person uses about 1,800 calories per day to create enough ATP to keep him alive (not including any physical activity). Now this is where it gets interesting. You have this thing in your skull called a brain. It uses about 400 or so calories per day and runs almost exclusively on glucose. (There's some evidence it can use small amounts of fat and lactate, but in the big picture it's not Continue reading >>

What Are The Major Causes Of Ketosis?

What Are The Major Causes Of Ketosis?

A lack of carbohydrates completely. In 2014 I ate a ketogenic diet which consists of only fat from meat and dairy. You want to eat a lot of fat cause just chicken isn’t enough since it’s mainly protein. See your brain uses carbs for fuel. So once you start eating only eggs,milk, burgers, cheese, bacon and half and half. Your brain has no carbs to use for fuel so it starts converting fat into fuel for the brain. It’s very important that the brain has fuel! Half and half was my favorite to drink it’s sweet and full of fat but also has carbs which didn’t help me get into ketosis. This wasn’t until I had already been eating nothing but bacon and eggs for breakfast and I mean copious amounts! Lol I remember eating rotisserie chickens like I had been living on a island. I remember one day I ate four of them all in one day and I was still hungry. I drank a gallon of water a day. I was always hungry I always felt unsatisfied. It was miserable. I knew I was in ketosis cause when I peed, it was very yellow and there was a salty smell every time. That’s how I knew. I read about it before evening trying it. I was very strict with my diet I never cheated. I had a six pack. I had ZERO fat on me. Until….I started eating like 6–8 burgers a day. Burgers were the only thing that made me feel satisfied or full. So I ate them a lot then I started to gain weight. Bye abs lol. Then I started powerlifting and I gained mass fast! I don’t recommend this diet because a diet high in fat is the number one leading cause of colon cancer. It’s the one macronutrient that if in excess can cause heart and colon problems. Carbs in excess can too with diabetes and such. But it’s a lot less harder. Really anything in excess isn’t healthy for you. And you need carbs. I didn’t las Continue reading >>

What Are The Symptoms Of Ketosis?

What Are The Symptoms Of Ketosis?

It's different for every individual. At first there's a switching over period from carb burning to fat burning where people feel flu-like. Broth, salt, plenty water magnesium and potassium helps that. Personally I don't get this. The more carbs you eat, the worse the feeling and the longer the process takes. Days to weeks even. In ketosis I get euphoria, plenty of energy, a huge thirst requiring ultra cold fizzy water to quench (it's unquenchable though), hot fire feeling in my throat like I'm a dragon, bad breath if you stand close (starvation breath I'm secretly proud of), you can also have stinky urine. Also I never feel hungry. I eat one Lchf meal a day, and maybe a fat bomb snack. You can test ketosis on a blood ketone meter. People who first start ketosis come up positive (pink to purple) on urine ketone strips but after a few weeks of adaption, urine ketones no longer show up, but blood ketones do. Continue reading >>

Macro Tracking Changes, Ketogenic Mode, & Body Snapshots

Macro Tracking Changes, Ketogenic Mode, & Body Snapshots

Today we have a few changes to the dynamic macronutrients feature. These changes are on the web version only, but will be rolled out in the mobile apps as well in their next updates. We’ve had the dynamic macronutrient targets feature for a long time, which lets you set and display preferred macronutrient ratio target. However, the macro targets have always been computed off of a fixed calorie target (the yellow bar). Today, we are changing this to also be dynamically derived from your energy expenditure (calories burned) and your weight goal. This is more in line with what people expect, and the old behaviour has caused a lot of confusion for people. If you stubbornly prefer it the old way, we can help you override it if you email our support. Ketogenic diets are becoming extremely popular. We’ve added some specific improvements for people following a nutritional ketosis diet. In the macronutrient settings, if you select the ‘Ketogenic’ option, now, instead of the previous fixed ratios, we dynamically calculate your maximum ketogenic protein and carbohydrate limits based on your lean body mass and exercise levels. Anything remaining, gets assigned to fats. We offer three ketogenic diet presets: Rigorous, Moderate, and Relaxed, as well as an option to choose custom values. You can now hover your cursor over the macronutrient bars to see the top contributors to that macronutrient in your diary. This is especially helpful on a strict ketogenic diet where it can be critical to figure out what foods might be tipping you over your carbohydrate and protein limits. In ketogenic mode, we also add some buttons next to the targets for easy logging of blood glucose and ketone measurements. Body Snapshots Under the trends tab we have added a new ‘Snapshots’ section wher Continue reading >>

15 Health Conditions That May Benefit From A Ketogenic Diet

15 Health Conditions That May Benefit From A Ketogenic Diet

By Franziska Spritzler, RD, CDE Ketogenic diets have become incredibly popular. Early research suggests this high-fat, very low-carb diet may benefit several health conditions. Although some of the evidence is from case studies and animal research, results from human controlled studies are also promising. Here are 15 health conditions that may benefit from a ketogenic diet. 1. Epilepsy Epilepsy is a disease that causes seizures due to excessive brain activity. Anti-seizure medications are effective for some people with epilepsy. However, others don’t respond to the drugs or can’t tolerate their side effects. Of all the conditions that may benefit from a ketogenic diet, epilepsy has by far the most evidence supporting it. In fact, there are several dozen studies on the topic. Research shows that seizures typically improve in about 50% of epilepsy patients who follow the classic ketogenic diet. This is also known as a 4:1 ketogenic diet because it provides 4 times as much fat as protein and carbs combined. The modified Atkins diet (MAD) is based on a considerably less restrictive 1:1 ratio of fat to protein and carbs. It has been shown to be equally effective for seizure control in most adults and children older than two years of age. The ketogenic diet may also have benefits on the brain beyond seizure control. For example, when researchers examined the brain activity of children with epilepsy, they found improvements in various brain patterns in 65% of those following a ketogenic diet — regardless of whether they had fewer seizures. Bottom Line: Ketogenic diets have been shown to reduce seizure frequency and severity in many children and adults with epilepsy who don’t respond well to drug therapy. 2. Metabolic Syndrome Metabolic syndrome, sometimes referred to a Continue reading >>

Ketosis

Ketosis

Not to be confused with Ketoacidosis. Ketosis is a metabolic state in which some of the body's energy supply comes from ketone bodies in the blood, in contrast to a state of glycolysis in which blood glucose provides energy. Ketosis is a result of metabolizing fat to provide energy. Ketosis is a nutritional process characterised by serum concentrations of ketone bodies over 0.5 mM, with low and stable levels of insulin and blood glucose.[1][2] It is almost always generalized with hyperketonemia, that is, an elevated level of ketone bodies in the blood throughout the body. Ketone bodies are formed by ketogenesis when liver glycogen stores are depleted (or from metabolising medium-chain triglycerides[3]). The main ketone bodies used for energy are acetoacetate and β-hydroxybutyrate,[4] and the levels of ketone bodies are regulated mainly by insulin and glucagon.[5] Most cells in the body can use both glucose and ketone bodies for fuel, and during ketosis, free fatty acids and glucose synthesis (gluconeogenesis) fuel the remainder. Longer-term ketosis may result from fasting or staying on a low-carbohydrate diet (ketogenic diet), and deliberately induced ketosis serves as a medical intervention for various conditions, such as intractable epilepsy, and the various types of diabetes.[6] In glycolysis, higher levels of insulin promote storage of body fat and block release of fat from adipose tissues, while in ketosis, fat reserves are readily released and consumed.[5][7] For this reason, ketosis is sometimes referred to as the body's "fat burning" mode.[8] Ketosis and ketoacidosis are similar, but ketoacidosis is an acute life-threatening state requiring prompt medical intervention while ketosis can be physiological. However, there are situations (such as treatment-resistant Continue reading >>

Ketogenic Diets And Alzheimer’s Disease

Ketogenic Diets And Alzheimer’s Disease

1. Introduction Alzheimer’s disease (AD) is a chronic neurodegenerative disease and the most common cause of dementia, accounting for over 50% of individuals affected [1]. This disease is characterized by progressive memory impairment and cognitive decline interfering with daily life activities. The most common early symptom of AD is difficulty remembering recent events. The symptoms of patients with advancing disease can include executive dysfunction, disorientation, problems with language, mood swings, behavioral changes and impaired self-care [2]. Age-standardized prevalence for individuals aged over 60 years varied between 5% and 7% in most world regions [3]. An estimated 35.6 million people lived with dementia worldwide in 2010, with numbers expected to almost double every 20 years [3]. AD has a long preclinical phase of several decades and the most important risk factor for AD is increasing age. Impaired vascular health has been shown to be another major risk factor for cognitive decline and interventions for cardiovascular risk may therefore improve cognitive health at the population level [4,5]. Other lifestyle-related factors, such as obesity, diabetes, smoking, diet, physical and mental inactivity, have been suggested to play a role in dementia, and potential preventive measures related to these risk factors should be investigated [6]. AD is neuropathologically defined by neuronal loss and the accumulation of extracellular amyloid β-peptide (Aβ)-containing plaques and intracellular hyperphosphorylated tau protein-containing neurofibrillary tangles in the brain [7]. The accumulation of abnormally folded Aβ and tau proteins in amyloid plaques and neuronal tangles, respectively, appear to be causally associated with the neurodegeneration in AD [8]. However, Continue reading >>

Ketosis

Ketosis

Tweet Ketosis is a state the body may find itself in either as a result of raised blood glucose levels or as a part of low carb dieting. Low levels of ketosis is perfectly normal. However, high levels of ketosis in the short term can be serious and the long term effects of regular moderate ketosis are only partially known at the moment. What is ketosis? Ketosis is a state the body goes into if it needs to break down body fat for energy. The state is marked by raised levels of ketones in the blood which can be used by the body as fuel. Ketones which are not used for fuel are excreted out of the body via the kidneys and the urine. Is ketosis the same as ketoacidosis? There is often confusion as to the difference between ketosis and ketoacidosis. Ketosis is the state whereby the body is producing ketones. In ketosis, the level of ketones in the blood can be anything between normal to very high. Diabetic ketoacidosis, also known as DKA, only describes the state in which the level of ketones is either high or very high. In ketoacidosis, the amount of ketones in the blood is sufficient to turn the blood acidic, which is a dangerous medical state. When does ketosis occur? Ketosis will take place when the body needs energy and there is not sufficient glucose available for the body. This can typically happen when the body is lacking insulin and blood glucose levels become high. Other causes can be the result of being on a low carb diet. A low level of carbohydrate will lead to low levels of insulin, and therefore the body will produce ketones which do not rely on insulin to get into and fuel the body’s cells. A further cause of ketosis, less relevant to people with diabetes, is a result of excessive alcohol consumption. Is ketosis dangerous? The NHS describes ketosis as a pote Continue reading >>

What Are The Health/cardio Risks Of Getting Into Ketosis?

What Are The Health/cardio Risks Of Getting Into Ketosis?

There are not specific health/cardio risks of getting into Ketosis. Ketosis, in general, is an adaptation to removing carbohydrates from the diet. That may be due to a fast, starvation, or a very controlled (eating plenty of fats, drinking lots of water, etc) change - like you are suggesting. If you are otherwise "healthy" enough to do a three day fast (almost all people are), then you do not face any health risks. Things to look out for are pre-existing liver and kidney conditions, a compromised immune system, or generally any kind of medical dependence you already have. There is some confusion about the fact that you're eating lots of fat and therefore that will carry some kind of cardio risk, but recently it's been shown that dietary cholesterol intake does not contribute significantly to blood cholesterol levels. That said, it sounds anecdotally that if you are getting the bulk of your calories from dairy, your blood cholesterol levels may be higher than "normal" (though this particular "normal" preference has not been demonstrated robustly to contribute to heart/general health). As in all things, variety is good, doing too much of one certain thing is less good. You feel great pretty quickly (especially if you are supplementing with MCT oils during your transition) - just a few days. Disclaimer: You should request the advice of an actual physician (I'm not one and don't play one on the internet even though I have a Ph.D. in chemistry). Continue reading >>

More in ketosis