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What Are The Effects Of Ketosis

Is Ketosis Safe And Does It Have Side Effects?

Is Ketosis Safe And Does It Have Side Effects?

Some people think that ketosis is extremely dangerous. However, they might be confusing ketosis with ketoacidosis, which is completely different. While ketoacidosis is a serious condition caused by uncontrolled diabetes, ketosis is a natural metabolic state. In fact, ketosis and ketogenic diets have been studied extensively and shown to have major benefits for weight loss (1, 2). Ketogenic diets have also been shown to have therapeutic effects in epilepsy, type 2 diabetes and several other chronic conditions (3, 4, 5, 6). Ketosis is generally considered to be safe for most people. However, it may lead to a few side effects, especially in the beginning. First, it's necessary to understand what ketosis is. Ketosis is a natural part of metabolism. It happens either when carbohydrate intake is very low (such as on a ketogenic diet), or when you haven't eaten for a long time. Both of these lead to reduced insulin levels, which causes a lot of fat to be released from your fat cells. When this happens, the liver gets flooded with fat, which turns a large part of it into ketones. During ketosis, many parts of your body are burning ketones for energy instead of carbs. This includes a large part of the brain. However, this doesn't happen instantly. It takes your body and brain some time to "adapt" to burning fat and ketones instead of carbs. During this adaptation phase, you may experience some temporary side effects. These are generally referred to as the "low-carb flu" or "keto flu." In ketosis, parts of the body and brain use ketones for fuel instead of carbs. It can take some time for your body to adapt to this. In the beginning of ketosis, you may experience a range of negative symptoms. They are often referred to as "low-carb flu" or "keto flu" because they resemble symptom Continue reading >>

Common Ketosis Side Effects And Treatments

Common Ketosis Side Effects And Treatments

There are many awesome benefits with come with adopting a low-carb ketogenic diet, such as weight loss, decreased cravings, and even possibly reduce diseases risks. That being said, it’s also good to talk about possible ketosis side effects so you know fully what to expect as you start this new health journey. Not everyone experiences side effects when starting a ketogenic diet, and thankfully, those who do don’t usually experience them for very long. It varies with the individual, but just to make sure all your bases are covered, we’re going to breaking down each possible side effect and go over ways to manage and alleviate them if needed. KETOSIS SIDE EFFECT 1 – Frequent Urination As your body burns through the stored glucose in your liver and muscles within the first day or two of starting a ketogenic diet, you’ll be releasing a lot of water in the process. Plus, your kidneys will start excreting excess sodium as the levels of your circulating insulin drop. Basically, you might notice yourself needing to pee more often throughout the day. But no worries; this side effect of ketosis takes care of itself once your body adjusts and is no longer burning through the extra glycogen. KETOSIS SIDE EFFECT 2 – Dizziness and Drowsiness As the body is getting rid of this excess water, it will also be eliminating minerals like potassium, magnesium, and sodium too. This can make you feel dizzy, lightheaded, and fatigued. Thankfully, this is also very avoidable; all it takes is a little preparation beforehand. Focus on eating foods that are rich in potassium, such as: Leafy greens (aim for at least two cups each day!) Broccoli Dairy Meat, poultry, and fish Avocados Add salt to your foods or use salty broth when cooking too. You can also dissolve about a teaspoon of regu Continue reading >>

Ketosis: Is Fasting After Binging An Effective Mitigation?

Ketosis: Is Fasting After Binging An Effective Mitigation?

I've done some experimentation around this, and just fasting is mediocre. Doing the "bulletproof fast" - having the bulletproof coffee as my only calories during on a Monday following an "indulgence" day leads to a better Monday day, but still a tough Monday afternoon. But eating some exogenous ketones (betahydroxy butyrate) in the form of KetoCaNa - Prototype Nutrition in addition to the coffee keeps my energy levels high as my body re-adapts. I will admit, I did those experiments in the order that I described, and so there may have been some other adaptation. It would be good for me to reverse the order of the experiments and test that the pattern is better ascribed to the eating strategies, rather than my adaptation. Continue reading >>

Is Taking A Ketone Supplement As Effective As Achieving Natural Ketosis In Terms Of Weight Loss?

Is Taking A Ketone Supplement As Effective As Achieving Natural Ketosis In Terms Of Weight Loss?

From the research i’ve done, natural ketosis is best over suppliments (i think suppliments are scams at this point) BUT achieving ketosis is not that easy for most people to achieve and its not that enjoyable for most either. Also its not meant as a long term solution. It basically falls into the category of benefits brought about by fasting of which there are many and i have recommended on quora that daily intermittent fasting or time reduced fasting is a good way that i’ve lost weight (and keep it off). So thats eating within an 8–10 hour period and fasting the other 16–14 hours. Basically stop eating at 5pm until 7am the next day. Do this 4–5 times a week with moderate exercise (i recommend the strong lift 5x5 system) 3–4 days a week and you should see weight loss (and strength gain!). I put myself into a ketotonic state and i did not enjoy it. I felt like i had cotton in my brain, the world was in slow motion. I was tired. Did i lose weight? Probably a pound or two maybe over a few days. Worth it? Nah. There are better, less annoying ways to lose weight. Also when i went to the gym i had lost 30% of my lifting power. I had to take off 30% of the normal weight i like to move. This is because the bodies usual energy source, glucose, is gone and the body turns to ketones instead for its energy. Ketones are released slowy from your fat deposits. In my opinion this is not a reason to go into ketosis. On the other hand, if you are diagnosed with cancer then get yourself into ketosis because most cancers are metabolic and love sugar, glucose, carbohydrates. The Ketogenic Kitchen is a good cookbook that explains this and also has nice recipes if you must go into natural ketosis. Find your fitness digs into ketones and fasting a lot. Bulletproof digs into it a lo Continue reading >>

What Is Ketosis And How Effective Is It In Fat Loss?

What Is Ketosis And How Effective Is It In Fat Loss?

Ketosis represents a state of the organism characterized by the controlled and regulated production of ketone bodies in the blood via various metabolic processes.During very low carbohydrate intake, reduced insulin levels leads to a reduction in lipogenesis and fat accumulation. After several days of fasting, glucose reserves become insufficient both for normal fat oxidation and for the proper functioning of the brain. As the central nervous system is not able to use fatty acids for its energy because they cannot cross the blood-brain barrier,it normally utilizes glucose. Low carbohydrate intake forces the brain to find alternative energy source derived from the overproduction of acetyl coenzyme A (CoA). The production of ketone bodies in a process called ketogenesis ensues. Ketosis is a completely physiological mechanism and it needs to be differentiated from the pathological ketoacidosis seen in type 1 diabetes. Physiological ketosis that arises as a resultof ketogenic diets is characterized by ketone bodies in blood reaching a maximum level of 8 mmol/l with no change in pH, compared to uncontrolled diabetic ketoacidosis where their level can exceed 20 mmol/l and result in a lower blood pH.Ketone body metabolismThe term “ketone bodies” refers to three specific compounds: acetone, acetoacetate and beta-hydroxybutyrate (or beta-hydroxybutyric acid). The circulating levels of ketone bodies dependboth on their rate of production (i.e.ketogenesis) and their rate of utilization (i.e.ketolysis). They are of vital importance to the brain, which is unable to derive energy from other sources whenblood glucose levels are low. In healthy adults, the liver is able to produce 185 grams of ketone bodies eachday. The main ketone body produced is acetoacetate, but the primary circ Continue reading >>

Is Getting Into And Staying In Ketosis And/or Getting The Full Effects Of Ketosis Without Following A Strict Ketogenic Diet (using Supplements, Perhaps Also Fasting, Exercise) A Real Thing?

Is Getting Into And Staying In Ketosis And/or Getting The Full Effects Of Ketosis Without Following A Strict Ketogenic Diet (using Supplements, Perhaps Also Fasting, Exercise) A Real Thing?

As asked, no. Supplements, fasting and exercise (presumably periodically) by themselves may get you into light ketosis or at least put ketones in your bloodstream periodically (if you for example consume some XCT oil) but will only do so for short periods, after which they will get removed when you eat an excess of carbohydrates again and you’ll drop back out of ketosis. Your body’s metabolism will therefore mostly not be prompted to become ketogenically adapted very much, and not nearly as much as when on a strict ketogenic diet. A ketogenic diet keeps carbs low enough to ensure your body is prompted to produce sufficient energy for operation via its ketogenic pathways in earnest, as well as prompting adaptation of tissues and muscles to utilise this fuel source effectively. Which is why the answer to your question is no, getting the full effects of ketosis without following a strict ketogenic diet is (IMHO) not “a thing”. That being said, there are obviously benefits to exercise, there are benefits to fasting and there are potentially benefits to supplements (depending what we’re talking about exactly.) So again, by themselves the things you mention are not an “easy” way to get keto adapted without going on a full ketogenic diet. They do make sense IMHO as possible add-ons to a ketogenic diet however to help the process along. Continue reading >>

Can One Experience The Sleep-reducing Effects Of Ketosis By Simply Eliminating Carb Intake At Dinner But Still Allowing Oneself To Eat Carbs In The Morning?

Can One Experience The Sleep-reducing Effects Of Ketosis By Simply Eliminating Carb Intake At Dinner But Still Allowing Oneself To Eat Carbs In The Morning?

The only effect would be reduced drowsiness because of a light dinner. A heavy dinner will still produce drowsiness, regardless of the scarcity of carbs, because of blood being routed to the stomach for digestion. Light meals are a good rule for general alertness throughout the day (not just at dinner) in my experience. However, if you are keto adapted and you "binge" on carbs, you *will* experience a dramatic onset of drowsiness that can literally make you lie down for a nap (also in my experience). So carb yourself with caution. :) Continue reading >>

Weight Loss

Weight Loss

Results Weight loss Most people can lose weight if they restrict the number of calories consumed and increase physical activity levels. To lose 1 to 1.5 pounds (0.5 to 0.7 kilogram) a week, you need to reduce your daily calories by 500 to 750 calories. Low-carb diets, especially very low-carb diets, may lead to greater short-term weight loss than do low-fat diets. But most studies have found that at 12 or 24 months, the benefits of a low-carb diet are not very large. A 2015 review found that higher protein, low-carbohydrate diets may offer a slight advantage in terms of weight loss and loss of fat mass compared with a normal protein diet. Cutting calories and carbs may not be the only reason for the weight loss. Some studies show that you may shed some weight because the extra protein and fat keeps you feeling full longer, which helps you eat less. Other health benefits Low-carb diets may help prevent or improve serious health conditions, such as metabolic syndrome, diabetes, high blood pressure and cardiovascular disease. In fact, almost any diet that helps you shed excess weight can reduce or even reverse risk factors for cardiovascular disease and diabetes. Most weight-loss diets — not just low-carb diets — may improve blood cholesterol or blood sugar levels, at least temporarily. Low-carb diets may improve high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol and triglyceride values slightly more than do moderate-carb diets. That may be due not only to how many carbs you eat but also to the quality of your other food choices. Lean protein (fish, poultry, legumes), healthy fats (monounsaturated and polyunsaturated) and unprocessed carbs — such as whole grains, legumes, vegetables, fruits and low-fat dairy products — are generally healthier choices. A report from the Ame Continue reading >>

Side Effects Of A Ketogenic Diet

Side Effects Of A Ketogenic Diet

Tweet Like any significant change to your diet, when starting a ketogenic diet, it is normal to experience one or more side effects as the body adapts to a new way of eating. When going on a ketogenic diet, the body has to switch its fuel source from the glucose in carbohydrate to using its own fat stores, and this can lead to experiencing some of the following side effects: Loss of salts Keto-flu Changes in bowel habits Leg cramps Bad breath Loss of energy Usually these side effects are temporary and can usually be remedied. Loss of salts There are some changes with fluid balance that can typically occur within the first couple of weeks of a ketogenic diet. This happens as the body uses up its stored sugar (glycogen) which releases water into the blood that gets passed out of the body through urine. As fluid is passed out of the body, salts in the body can get depleted too. As a result, you may experience a loss of fluid and salts as you move into and maintain ketosis. Make sure you keep yourself hydrated through the day. Water is the best drink for hydration but tea and coffee are also fine as long as they’re not very milky. Ensure you have enough salt as this can prevent side effects such as headaches and wooziness. You are free to add sea salt to your food and can take salts by drinking vegetable or bone broths and bouillons too. Potassium and magnesium are other important salts. As long as you are eating healthy, natural foods (such as nuts, meat, fish, dairy and a range of vegetables), you shouldn’t have a problem getting enough magnesium and potassium. Keto-flu The first few weeks of transitioning to a ketogenic diet can be challenging for some people. Whereas others adapt to it more easily. Your body may be used to relying mainly on glucose for energy and so Continue reading >>

Ketosis

Ketosis

Tweet Ketosis is a state the body may find itself in either as a result of raised blood glucose levels or as a part of low carb dieting. Low levels of ketosis is perfectly normal. However, high levels of ketosis in the short term can be serious and the long term effects of regular moderate ketosis are only partially known at the moment. What is ketosis? Ketosis is a state the body goes into if it needs to break down body fat for energy. The state is marked by raised levels of ketones in the blood which can be used by the body as fuel. Ketones which are not used for fuel are excreted out of the body via the kidneys and the urine. Is ketosis the same as ketoacidosis? There is often confusion as to the difference between ketosis and ketoacidosis. Ketosis is the state whereby the body is producing ketones. In ketosis, the level of ketones in the blood can be anything between normal to very high. Diabetic ketoacidosis, also known as DKA, only describes the state in which the level of ketones is either high or very high. In ketoacidosis, the amount of ketones in the blood is sufficient to turn the blood acidic, which is a dangerous medical state. When does ketosis occur? Ketosis will take place when the body needs energy and there is not sufficient glucose available for the body. This can typically happen when the body is lacking insulin and blood glucose levels become high. Other causes can be the result of being on a low carb diet. A low level of carbohydrate will lead to low levels of insulin, and therefore the body will produce ketones which do not rely on insulin to get into and fuel the body’s cells. A further cause of ketosis, less relevant to people with diabetes, is a result of excessive alcohol consumption. Is ketosis dangerous? The NHS describes ketosis as a pote Continue reading >>

Ketosis

Ketosis

Tweet Ketosis is a state the body may find itself in either as a result of raised blood glucose levels or as a part of low carb dieting. Low levels of ketosis is perfectly normal. However, high levels of ketosis in the short term can be serious and the long term effects of regular moderate ketosis are only partially known at the moment. What is ketosis? Ketosis is a state the body goes into if it needs to break down body fat for energy. The state is marked by raised levels of ketones in the blood which can be used by the body as fuel. Ketones which are not used for fuel are excreted out of the body via the kidneys and the urine. Is ketosis the same as ketoacidosis? There is often confusion as to the difference between ketosis and ketoacidosis. Ketosis is the state whereby the body is producing ketones. In ketosis, the level of ketones in the blood can be anything between normal to very high. Diabetic ketoacidosis, also known as DKA, only describes the state in which the level of ketones is either high or very high. In ketoacidosis, the amount of ketones in the blood is sufficient to turn the blood acidic, which is a dangerous medical state. When does ketosis occur? Ketosis will take place when the body needs energy and there is not sufficient glucose available for the body. This can typically happen when the body is lacking insulin and blood glucose levels become high. Other causes can be the result of being on a low carb diet. A low level of carbohydrate will lead to low levels of insulin, and therefore the body will produce ketones which do not rely on insulin to get into and fuel the body’s cells. A further cause of ketosis, less relevant to people with diabetes, is a result of excessive alcohol consumption. Is ketosis dangerous? The NHS describes ketosis as a pote Continue reading >>

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