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What Are The Dangers Of Ketoacidosis

Ketosis Vs. Ketoacidosis: What You Should Know

Ketosis Vs. Ketoacidosis: What You Should Know

Despite the similarity in name, ketosis and ketoacidosis are two different things. Ketoacidosis refers to diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) and is a complication of type 1 diabetes mellitus. It’s a life-threatening condition resulting from dangerously high levels of ketones and blood sugar. This combination makes your blood too acidic, which can change the normal functioning of internal organs like your liver and kidneys. It’s critical that you get prompt treatment. DKA can occur very quickly. It may develop in less than 24 hours. It mostly occurs in people with type 1 diabetes whose bodies do not produce any insulin. Several things can lead to DKA, including illness, improper diet, or not taking an adequate dose of insulin. DKA can also occur in individuals with type 2 diabetes who have little or no insulin production. Ketosis is the presence of ketones. It’s not harmful. You can be in ketosis if you’re on a low-carbohydrate diet or fasting, or if you’ve consumed too much alcohol. If you have ketosis, you have a higher than usual level of ketones in your blood or urine, but not high enough to cause acidosis. Ketones are a chemical your body produces when it burns stored fat. Some people choose a low-carb diet to help with weight loss. While there is some controversy over their safety, low-carb diets are generally fine. Talk to your doctor before beginning any extreme diet plan. DKA is the leading cause of death in people under 24 years old who have diabetes. The overall death rate for ketoacidosis is 2 to 5 percent. People under the age of 30 make up 36 percent of DKA cases. Twenty-seven percent of people with DKA are between the ages of 30 and 50, 23 percent are between the ages of 51 and 70, and 14 percent are over the age of 70. Ketosis may cause bad breath. Ket Continue reading >>

Why Is Diabetic Ketoacidosis So Dangerous?

Why Is Diabetic Ketoacidosis So Dangerous?

The main thing, which Carol Linn Miller so very correctly points out, is that diabetic ketoacidosis can be fatal. But having been through it, what makes the condition so dangerous is you don't necessarily feel like you need to get it treated. You go off into a kind of la-la land, and don't take necessary action. If you wait too long, you may die. I didn't go to an ER until I suddenly went blind, and it turned out I was near death. I knew something was wrong, but the part of my brain that tells you "Danger! Danger!" wasn't working. Continue reading >>

What Are The Dangers Of The Ketosis Diet?

What Are The Dangers Of The Ketosis Diet?

In the late 1990s and early 2000s, when the "Atkins" and low carb dieting thing was just coming on in a big way, there was a terrific number of idiotic claims made about the dangers of it -- many of them confusing (as the questioner points out) diabetic ketoacidosis, a serious condition, with voluntary nutritional ketosis, even though there is no relation whatever. But, leaving all that aside, some caution is in order. The diet seems to stress the adrenals. This has been noted anecdotally by many people who've followed the diet. It was also noted by Dr Wolfgang Lutz, one of the early pioneers of the diet, who personally practiced the diet for 40-odd years, as well as advocated the diet to thousands of his patients. He noted in his book on the subject ("Life Without Bread" was the title, though it was published later I believe under a different title) that some patients would suffer mild autoimmune reactions that required small doses of corticosteroids to control. This sounds like what would happen if the adrenals are failing to produce a normal amount of steroids. You can find a lot more of a mostly-anecdotal nature by searching for "ketogenic jaminet". Paul Jaminet is a popular health blogger who has written about what he perceives to be problems with the ketogenic diet, including the possibility of deficiency of mucus and other key glycoproteins. He has some scientific backing for what he is saying, but it is far from air-tight. Read and judge for yourself. You can also learn a lot from the comments below his posts. Jaminet and others have also written about the risk of kidney stones on the ketogenic diet, and this is a serious concern, albeit a rare occurence. As far as the kidney stress goes: this would I believe be easy to avert simply by taking some alkali during Continue reading >>

What You Should Know About Diabetic Ketoacidosis

What You Should Know About Diabetic Ketoacidosis

Diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) is a serious condition that can occur in diabetes. DKA happens when acidic substances, called ketones, build up in your body. Ketones are formed when your body burns fat for fuel instead of sugar, or glucose. That can happen if you don’t have enough insulin in your body to help you process sugars. Learn more: Ketosis vs. ketoacidosis: What you should know » Left untreated, ketones can build up to dangerous levels. DKA can occur in people who have type 1 or type 2 diabetes, but it’s rare in people with type 2 diabetes. DKA can also develop if you are at risk for diabetes, but have not received a formal diagnosis. It can be the first sign of type 1 diabetes. DKA is a medical emergency. Call your local emergency services immediately if you think you are experiencing DKA. Symptoms of DKA can appear quickly and may include: frequent urination extreme thirst high blood sugar levels high levels of ketones in the urine nausea or vomiting abdominal pain confusion fruity-smelling breath a flushed face fatigue rapid breathing dry mouth and skin It is important to make sure you consult with your doctor if you experience any of these symptoms. If left untreated, DKA can lead to a coma or death. All people who use insulin should discuss the risk of DKA with their healthcare team, to make sure a plan is in place. If you think you are experiencing DKA, seek immediate medical help. Learn more: Blood glucose management: Checking for ketones » If you have type 1 diabetes, you should maintain a supply of home urine ketone tests. You can use these to test your ketone levels. A high ketone test result is a symptom of DKA. If you have type 1 diabetes and have a glucometer reading of over 250 milligrams per deciliter twice, you should test your urine for keton Continue reading >>

I'm 68 And Workout, But I Can't Get Rid Of Saggy Skin. What Can I Do, If Anything...

I'm 68 And Workout, But I Can't Get Rid Of Saggy Skin. What Can I Do, If Anything...

The Big Three Pillars of Good Health Are: Exercise, Sleep, & Food These are the healthiest way back to good health if you have become over weight or out of shape. You don't give us many clues as to why you have sagging skin. If you have experienced major weight loss, such as by bariatric surgery, you may need to have cosmetic surgery to deal with surplus skin. Otherwise, if you just have old age skin, like I had a couple of years ago, try the following. My skin, which was thin, looked old, tore easily, and healed slowly improved dramatically on the Wheat Belly diet/lifestyle. 1. Exercise - Isn't it incredible that in a world where scientific disagreement is the norm, virtually everyone is in agreement that exercise is extremely vital and healthy? So much so some organizations are now recommending dropping the cautionary phrase of 'see your doctor before starting an exercise program' because deterring some people from starting immediately does more harm than good. 2. Sleep & Rest - Everything (physical, mental, spiritual, emotional, intellectual, etc.) about the human body thrives and builds resilience with stress and rest, stress and rest. Doing the same workout, exercise, game, or job all the time is less effective, because your body gets accustom to it and isn't stressed. Cross training and doing different things with different stresses is better. Meeting and interacting with new people instead of hanging out with the same few friends. Find lots of ways to MOVE out of your Comfort Zone very often and then rest well. 3. Real Food - Many Western countries have lots of very sick and obese people because they eat too much cheap government subsidized, artificial, fake food. (Examples: highly processed GMO grains & sugars, artificial sweeteners, HFCS). These untested fake f Continue reading >>

Why Is Type 2 Diabetes Dangerous?

Why Is Type 2 Diabetes Dangerous?

What Are The Symptoms Of Type 2 Diabetes? Fatigue, thirst, blurred vision, dry mouth, excessive urination, weight loss, hunger, etc are some of the common symptoms of type 2 diabetes. How Type 2 Diabetes Is Different From Type 1 Diabetes? The cells of our body that release insulin, gets destroyed by the body's immune system in type 1 diabetes. It reduces the insulin production from the body. In type 2 diabetes, our body still makes insulin but the cells don't use insulin in a right way and this condition is known as insulin resistance. What Is The Normal Range Of Blood Glucose Levels? Normal blood glucose levels for a diabetic person should be 70-130 mg/dL before meals and under 180 mg/dL is recommended, 2 hours after meals. Complications Of Type 2 Diabetes High blood sugar may affect our eyes, feet, skin, Heart and blood vessels. Even common infections may become serious if you are suffering from diabetes. Diabetic patients experience a rapid fall in weight, as like the other cells of the body, the fat cells are also not able to utilize the sugar available in blood for their maintenance. Dehydration is another feature which affects the body cells. The patient feels thirsty and anxious all the time. Painful and frequent urination which is accompanied by urinary tract infections. Nausea and vomiting LONG TERM COMPLICATIONS OF DIABETES Long term complications of Diabetes include stroke, peripheral vascular disease, hypertension, urinary infections and coronary artery disease. Continue reading >>

What Are The Dangers Of Not Treating Your Diabetes?

What Are The Dangers Of Not Treating Your Diabetes?

The effects of diabetes manifest in nearly all organ systems of the body and it left untreated, diabetes can lead to heart disease, kidney failure, loss of vision, loss of foot etc. But what is cause of these effects of diabetes? As you know, diabetics have higher blood glucose levels than do normal people, the excess blood sugar starts getting deposited in the blood vessels of diabetics, which in turn leads to two sets of long-term complications both related to abnormalities in blood vessel Microvascular complications: these complications are due to abnormalities in small blood vessels. They are Diabetic retinopathy affecting the eyes/vision: can result in sudden/accelerated loss of vision Diabetic nephropathy affecting the kidneys: diabetes type 2 is a leading cause of renal failure in India Diabetic neuropathy including diabetic foot, erectile dysfunction, GI and urinary problems, gangrene of foot etc . Increased risk of infection and sepsis: due to diabetic angiopathy (injury to blood vessels) and immune compromise To read in detail about what % of diabetics get these and after how many years and how good control of blood sugar levels help: read Diabetes complications: what is the cause and how good control helps? Tight control of blood sugar (HbA1c levels less than 7% and less than 6.5%, if possible) results in lesser microvascular complications in all diabetics, whereas for CVD risk reduction, tight control in the initial years of diabetes is most beneficial To know more about what does tight control actually mean, read ‘What does good control of blood sugar mean in diabetes?’ Also, diabetes experts recommend frequent monitoring of diabetic patients by blood tests and physical examination to detect and treat early the complications of diabetes as well as to en Continue reading >>

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