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What Are The Adverse Effects Of Metformin?

Metformin: Side-effects & Benefits

Metformin: Side-effects & Benefits

Editor’s Note: Metformin is considered one of the safest and most effective treatments for type 2 diabetes. Although you should be aware of the side effects below, metformin is typically safe and well-tolerated. Metformin is used alone or with other medications, including insulin, to treat type 2 diabetes (condition in which the body does not use insulin normally and, therefore, cannot control the amount of sugar in the blood). Metformin is in a class of drugs called biguanides. Metformin helps to control the amount of glucose (sugar) in your blood. It decreases the amount of glucose you absorb from your food and the amount of glucose made by your liver. Metformin also increases your body’s response to insulin, a natural substance that controls the amount of glucose in the blood. I’m also beginning to see where metformin is used in addition to insulin to treat type 1 diabetes (condition in which the body does not produce insulin and therefore cannot control the amount of sugar in the blood). How about the associated long term side effects of metformin? Lets take a closer look! *Be sure to read this article: Patients Share their Experience on Metformin. Metformin and Lactic Acidosis: Although rare, lactic acidosis is potentially the most serious of the metformin side effects. The uptake of lactate by the liver is effected by metformin in a negative way. If the kidneys do not process the excess lactate the blood of the patient will acidify which can lead to a whole slew of problems. Most of which are similar to the feeling one gets after an intense workout. For example: anxiety, hyperventilation, irregular heart rate nausea and in some cases vomiting. This is the reason that metformin is generally only prescribed to people with a healthy kidney function. This side e Continue reading >>

How To Prevent And Manage Metformin Side Effects

How To Prevent And Manage Metformin Side Effects

Metformin is the oral drug of choice for type 2 diabetics who do not respond well to diet and lifestyle changes alone unless contraindicated due to kidney problems. It has a long safety record. Scientific research has proven that metformin is just as good or even better at controlling blood sugar levels than other oral antidiabetic drugs and it causes less weight gain, less low blood sugar, and less cardiovascular events. Metformin is sold under the brand names Glucophage, Glucophage XR, Riomet, Fortamet and is also found in other combination diabetes medications. Metformin comes in the immediate release and extended release formulations. The immediate release formulation releases the medication all at once while the extended release formulations release medication over time. The extended release formulation has fewer gastrointestinal (GI) side effects, increases adherence to medications due to its once daily dosing, and has proven to be safer, more effective, and better tolerated than the Immediate release formulation. Some of the side effects to expect from metformin include: diarrhea nausea vomiting abdominal pain the passing of gas loss of appetite Some patients may experience other side effects such as: change in taste sensation weight loss indigestion heartburn stomach upset abnormal stool headache rhinitis infection discoloration of the nails hives (rash) itching plaques (scalp, elbows, and knees) low blood sugar (hypoglycemia) Serious side effects may occur in some patients under certain circumstances. These serious side effects are rare and include: chest pain lactic acidosis vitamin B12 deficiency hepatitis Continue Prevention and Treatment of Metformin Side Effects Gastrointestinal Discomfort Gastrointestinal discomfort includes abdominal pain, flatus (gas), Continue reading >>

Metformin Side Effects

Metformin Side Effects

For the Consumer Applies to metformin: oral solution, oral tablet, oral tablet extended release Along with its needed effects, metformin may cause some unwanted effects. Although not all of these side effects may occur, if they do occur they may need medical attention. Check with your doctor immediately if any of the following side effects occur while taking metformin: More common Abdominal or stomach discomfort cough or hoarseness decreased appetite diarrhea fast or shallow breathing fever or chills general feeling of discomfort lower back or side pain muscle pain or cramping painful or difficult urination sleepiness Less common Anxiety blurred vision chest discomfort cold sweats coma confusion cool, pale skin depression difficult or labored breathing dizziness fast, irregular, pounding, or racing heartbeat or pulse feeling of warmth headache increased hunger increased sweating nausea nervousness nightmares redness of the face, neck, arms, and occasionally, upper chest seizures shakiness shortness of breath slurred speech tightness in the chest unusual tiredness or weakness Rare Behavior change similar to being drunk difficulty with concentrating drowsiness lack or loss of strength restless sleep unusual sleepiness Some side effects of metformin may occur that usually do not need medical attention. These side effects may go away during treatment as your body adjusts to the medicine. Also, your health care professional may be able to tell you about ways to prevent or reduce some of these side effects. Check with your health care professional if any of the following side effects continue or are bothersome or if you have any questions about them: More common Acid or sour stomach belching bloated excess air or gas in the stomach or intestines full feeling heartburn indiges Continue reading >>

Side Effects Of Metformin 500 Mg Tablets

Side Effects Of Metformin 500 Mg Tablets

Metformin is a prescription medication used primarily in the management of type 2 diabetes. This pill is sold under brand names such as Glucophage and Riomet. A member of the drug group known as biguanides, this drug’s 500 mg tablet is the smallest available pill -- and a common starting dose for this first-line diabetes medication. This widely used medication is an effective tool to help lower blood glucose levels, used alone or in conjunction with other pills or insulin. However, metformin can also produce adverse effects. Video of the Day The most common side effects from metformin use include gastrointestinal (GI) discomfort, including diarrhea, nausea, vomiting, gas and abdominal pain. A diabetes prevention trial, published in the April 2012 issue of “Diabetes Care,” noted that over a 4-year period, 9.8 percent of metformin users reported GI side effects, while only 1.1 percent of those using placebo had these adverse effects. These side effects usually occur at the beginning of metformin therapy and go away as the body becomes adjusted to the medication. Taking the metformin with food and having the dose gradually increased also helps minimize these adverse effects. Extended-release tablets, such as metformin XR (Glucophage XR, Glumetza or Fortamet) may be easier on the stomach -- and an option for anyone who has these common metformin side effects. Other Less Common Side Effects As with most medications, the potential list of side effects is lengthy. Insight into the adverse reactions experienced by metformin users was noted in an analysis of multiple studies published in the February 2012 issue of “Diabetes Care.” While less common than GI discomfort, other potential metformin side effects include dizziness, headache, palpitations, urinary tract infect Continue reading >>

How Much Do You Know About Metformin?

How Much Do You Know About Metformin?

Metformin is a drug commonly used in the treatment of Type 2 diabetes. It is sold as a generic and under several brand names, including Glucophage, Glumetza, Riomet, and Fortamet. Both the American Diabetes Association (ADA) and the American Association of Clinical Endocrinologists (AACE) recommend metformin as a cornerstone of therapy for Type 2 diabetes when exercise and dietary changes aren’t enough to keep blood glucose levels in target range. The low cost of the generic forms along with a long history of use make it a good choice for many individuals with Type 2 diabetes. Although metformin has helped many people lower their blood glucose levels, it does have some potential side effects that are worth knowing about. Understanding the risks and benefits of metformin is key to using it successfully. Take this quiz to test your knowledge of this popular diabetes medicine. (You can find the answers later in the article.) Q 1. How does metformin work to lower blood glucose levels? A. It stimulates the pancreas to make more insulin. B. It decreases the amount of glucose produced by the liver and makes it easier for cells to accept glucose from the bloodstream. C. It slows the digestive system’s breakdown of carbohydrates into glucose, allowing more time for insulin to work. D. It suppresses appetite, slows stomach emptying, and inhibits the release of glucagon (a hormone that raises blood glucose levels). 2. In addition to lowering blood glucose, metformin sometimes causes moderate weight loss. TRUE FALSE 3. In research studies, metformin use was associated with which of the following benefits in people with Type 2 diabetes? A. Reduced risk of morning high blood glucose. B. Reduced neuropathy (nerve damage). C. Reduced retinopathy (damage to the retina, a membrane in Continue reading >>

Metformin Side Effects And How To Deal With Them

Metformin Side Effects And How To Deal With Them

Metformin side effects include diabetic neuropathy, brain fog, and digestive issues. You can address them through diet, Vitamin B12, CoQ10, and exercise. Let us understand the drug Metformin in detail and study different forms of metformin, its uses and common metformin side effects along with how to deal with them. Metformin: What Is It Used For? Metformin is an old warhorse in the pharma battle against diabetes. It has been the mainstay in the treatment of Type 2 Diabetes for more than fifty years, often matching or outperforming newer drugs. In fact, many new combination drugs are often created with metformin as one of the main ingredients. Thanks to its long run in the pharmaceutical world, the side effects of Metformin are also well known. The Metformin-PCOS connection has been studied extensively since a majority of health complications associated with PCOS (polycystic ovarian syndrome) are due to hyperinsulinemia (high amounts of insulin in the blood stream). Metformin is known to reduce circulating insulin levels. The use of this drug in women with PCOS has shown highly encouraging results. RELATED: 10 Easy Breakfast Ideas For Diabetics Most Prescribed Names in Metformin Category Include: Fortamet: It is an extended-release formulation that contains metformin hydrochloride. The tablets are designed for once-a-day administration. They deliver either 500 mg or 1000 mg of metformin. The tablet is made using a patented technology called SCOTTM that delivers the active compound slowly and at a constant rate. Glucophage: Glucophage tablets contain metformin hydrochoride. They contain either 500 mg, 850 mg or 1000 mg of the active compound. Glucophage tablets do not contain any special covering and need to be taken multiple times a day until the prescribed dosage is me Continue reading >>

Side Effects Of Metformin Are More Serious Than You Think

Side Effects Of Metformin Are More Serious Than You Think

The Side Effects of Metformin can range from not so serious, to deadly, are the risks of Metformin and Glucophage side effects worth it? This page will give you information that might be able to help you decide that for yourself. Also known as Glucophage, this is an antidiabetic medicine most often used in those with Type 2 Diabetes who are also overweight. It’s also used extensively in women with Polycystic Ovarian Syndrome, a condition known as PCOS, which is often accompanied by higher blood sugar readings which often benefit from the blood sugar lowering effects of Metformin. While at first glance it seems that Side Effects of Metformin are rare, a closer look and a little math show that there are some serious problems that can occur when taking this drug, and others that can and should be prevented easily, but are usually not due to a medical community that simply does not use nutritional supplements in the prevention of even well-known, easily preventable Glucophage side effects. Vitamin B12 Deficiency Vitamin B12 and Folic Acid Deficiency are well-known and well-studied side effects of Metformin. Despite the fact that there have been many studies confirming this problem over and over again in the medical literature, just like the Side Effects of Nitrous Oxide, few doctors warn their patients of this or recommend that they take simple, cheap over the counter Vitamin B12 Supplements in order to avoid this potentially devastating nutritional deficiency. In addition, the long term use of the ‘antacid’ drugs known as H2 receptor antagonist or proton pump inhibitors like Famotidine or Omeprazole, some of the most widely prescribed drugs, can increase this risk, as is mentioned in the Omeprazole Side Effects page. The Vitamin B12 Deficiency Symptoms range anywhere Continue reading >>

What Are The Possible Side Effects Of Glipizide And Metformin (metaglip)?

What Are The Possible Side Effects Of Glipizide And Metformin (metaglip)?

A A A Medications and Drugs Brand Names: Metaglip Generic Name: glipizide and metformin (Pronunciation: GLIP ih zyd and met FOR min) What is glipizide and metformin (Metaglip)? Glipizide and metformin is a combination of two oral diabetes medicines that help control blood sugar levels. Glipizide and metformin is for people with type 2 diabetes who do not use daily insulin injections. This medication is not for treating type 1 diabetes. Glipizide and metformin may also be used for purposes not listed in this medication guide. Get emergency medical help if you have any of these signs of an allergic reaction: hives; difficult breathing; swelling of your face, lips, tongue, or throat. This medication may cause lactic acidosis (a build-up of lactic acid in the body, which can be fatal). Lactic acidosis can start slowly and get worse over time. Get emergency medical help if you have even mild symptoms of lactic acidosis, such as: muscle pain or weakness, numb or cold feeling in your arms and legs, trouble breathing, stomach pain, nausea with vomiting, slow or uneven heart rate, dizziness, or feeling very weak or tired. Stop taking this medication and call your doctor at once if you have a serious side effect such as: feeling short of breath, even with mild exertion, swelling or rapid weight gain; pain or burning with urination; nausea, upper stomach pain, itching, loss of appetite, dark urine, clay-colored stools, jaundice (yellowing of the skin or eyes); or dangerously high blood pressure (severe headache, blurred vision, buzzing in your ears, anxiety, confusion, chest pain, shortness of breath, uneven heartbeats, seizure). Less serious side effects may include: cold symptoms such as stuffy nose, sneezing, sore throat; headache, dizziness; mild nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, st Continue reading >>

What Are The Possible Side Effects Of Metformin?

What Are The Possible Side Effects Of Metformin?

Medicines and their possible side effects can affect individual people in different ways. The following are some of the side effects that are known to be associated with metformin. Just because a side effect is stated here does not mean that all people using this medicine will experience that or any side effect. Very common (affect more than 1 in 10 people) Disturbances of the gut such as nausea, vomiting, diarrhoea or abdominal pain. Loss of appetite. The above side effects are most likely to occur when you first start taking metformin and tend to improve over time. They can be prevented or minimised by taking the medicine during or after meals, and by increasing the dose gradually when treatment is started. Follow the instructions given by your doctor. Common (affect between 1 in 10 and 1 in 100 people) Taste disturbance, usually a metallic taste. Very rare (affect fewer than 1 in 10,000 people) Lactic acidosis - a potentially serious condition where there is too much acid in the blood. Symptoms may include breathing difficulties and non-specific symptoms such as feeling weak, sick or generally unwell, vomiting, abdominal pain, or unusual muscle pains or discomfort. It's important to consult your doctor straight away if you experience these symptoms. Kidney problems, dehydration, prolonged fasting and drinking excessive amounts of alcohol increase the risk. Skin reactions such as rash, itching or flushing. If you want any more information about the possible side effects of metformin you should talk to your doctor or pharmacist, or read the leaflet that comes with the medicine. If you think you have experienced a side effect, did you know you can report this using the yellow card website? Last updated: 16/06/2016 Continue reading >>

Metformin, Oral Tablet

Metformin, Oral Tablet

Metformin oral tablet is available as both a generic and brand-name drug. Brand names: Glucophage, Glucophage XR, Fortamet, and Glumetza. Metformin is also available as an oral solution but only in the brand-name drug Riomet. Metformin is used to treat high blood sugar levels caused by type 2 diabetes. FDA warning: Lactic acidosis warning This drug has a Black Box Warning. This is the most serious warning from the Food and Drug Administration (FDA). A black box warning alerts doctors and patients to potentially dangerous effects. Lactic acidosis is a rare but serious side effect of this drug. In this condition, lactic acid builds up in your blood. This is a medical emergency that requires treatment in the hospital. Lactic acidosis is fatal in about half of people who develop it. You should stop taking this drug and call your doctor right away or go to the emergency room if you have signs of lactic acidosis. Symptoms include tiredness, weakness, unusual muscle pain, trouble breathing, unusual sleepiness, stomach pains, nausea (or vomiting), dizziness (or lightheadedness), and slow or irregular heart rate. Alcohol use warning: You shouldn’t drink alcohol while taking this drug. Alcohol can affect your blood sugar levels unpredictably and increase your risk of lactic acidosis. Kidney problems warning: If you have moderate to severe kidney problems, you have a higher risk of lactic acidosis. You shouldn’t take this drug. Liver problems warning: Liver disease is a risk factor for lactic acidosis. You shouldn’t take this drug if you have liver problems. Metformin oral tablet is a prescription drug that’s available as the brand name drugs Glucophage, Glucophage XR, Fortamet, and Glumetza. Glucophage is an immediate-release tablet. All of the other brands are extended-r Continue reading >>

Metformin Side Effects

Metformin Side Effects

Tweet Metformin does have several common side effects. Like almost all medication, Metformin will affect different people in different ways. The following lists details Metformin side effects, but this does not mean that all people taking Metformin will experience any or all of the following side effects. To make it easier to understand the frequency of the side effects of Metformin, we have divided them by how often they occur. Very common - affecting over 1 in 10 people taking Metformin Disturbance to the gut Nausea Vomiting Diarrhoea Abdominal pain Loss of appetite Common - affecting between 1 in 10 and 1 in 100 people taking Metformin Taste disturbance, usually a metallic taste Very rare - affecting under 1 in 10,000 people taking Metformin Elevated levels of lactic acid in the blood (lactic acidosis) Decreased absorption of vitamin B12 during long-term use Skin reactions such as rash, itching or flushing To find out more about Metformin side effects, people with diabetes should discuss the medication with their doctor and read the information provided by the manufacturer. The list of side effects above does not purport to be a full list of all recognised side effects of Metformin. What should I do if I experience Metformin side effects? All medicines take some getting used to. You should speak to your doctor if any of the side effects become troublesome or painful. If you find your breathing is being affected, along with drowsiness, dizziness and confusion you should stop taking Metformin at once and seek urgent medical attention. These are the symptoms of lactic acidosis, a rare but very serious condition that can be caused by Metformin. Tweet Type 2 diabetes mellitus is a metabolic disorder that results in hyperglycemia (high blood glucose levels) due to the body Continue reading >>

The Evaluation Of Risk Factors Associated With Adverse Drug Reactions Bymetformin In Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus.

The Evaluation Of Risk Factors Associated With Adverse Drug Reactions Bymetformin In Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus.

The evaluation of risk factors associated with adverse drug reactions bymetformin in type 2 diabetes mellitus. Okayasu S(1), Kitaichi K, Hori A, Suwa T, Horikawa Y, Yamamoto M, Takeda J, Itoh Y. (1)Department of Pharmacy, Gifu University Hospital, Japan. Metformin is a drug to improve glycemic control by reducing insulin resistanceand is currently considered to be one of the first-choice drugs for type 2diabetes mellitus (T2DM). However, during metformin use, adverse drug reactions(ADRs) including gastrointestinal adverse events were frequently observed. Thus, in the present study, we investigated the incidence of ADRs induced by metformin and further analyzed risk factors for ADRs in Japanese patients with type 2diabetes mellitus who initially administered metformin (500-750 mg). One hundred and one hospitalized patients receiving metformin during September 1, 2009 andAugust 31, 2010 were studied. The incidence of ADRs and changes in laboratorydata including hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) were monitored retrospectively. Theanti-glycemic effect of metformin was successfully observed as indicated bydecreased HbA1c. Among ADRs, diarrhea was most frequently occurred duringmetformin use (26.7% of patients) although the symptom of diarrhea was mild inmost cases and disappeared within 3 d after the initial use. A logisticregression analysis showed the existence of six risk factors, including initialdose (750 mg), female, age (65), body mass index (25), aspartateaminotransferase (30 IU/L) and alkaline phosphatase (270 IU/L). The incidenceof diarrhea increased linearly as the number of risk factors increased. Inconclusion, in order to avoid ADRs, especially diarrhea, subsequently improvingthe quality of life during metformin use, the optimization of the dose ofmetformin by considering Continue reading >>

Metformin Hcl

Metformin Hcl

Uses Metformin is used with a proper diet and exercise program and possibly with other medications to control high blood sugar. It is used in patients with type 2 diabetes. Controlling high blood sugar helps prevent kidney damage, blindness, nerve problems, loss of limbs, and sexual function problems. Proper control of diabetes may also lessen your risk of a heart attack or stroke. Metformin works by helping to restore your body's proper response to the insulin you naturally produce. It also decreases the amount of sugar that your liver makes and that your stomach/intestines absorb. How to use Metformin HCL Read the Patient Information Leaflet if available from your pharmacist before you start taking metformin and each time you get a refill. If you have any questions, consult your doctor or pharmacist. Take this medication by mouth as directed by your doctor, usually 1-3 times a day with meals. Drink plenty of fluids while taking this medication unless otherwise directed by your doctor. The dosage is based on your medical condition, response to treatment, and other medications you may be taking. Be sure to tell your doctor and pharmacist about all the products you use (including prescription drugs, nonprescription drugs, and herbal products). To reduce your risk of side effects (such as upset stomach), your doctor may direct you to start this medication at a low dose and gradually increase your dose. Follow your doctor's instructions carefully. Take this medication regularly in order to get the most benefit from it. Remember to use it at the same times each day. If you are already taking another diabetes drug (such as chlorpropamide), follow your doctor's directions carefully for stopping/continuing the old drug and starting metformin. Check your blood sugar regularly a Continue reading >>

Metformin

Metformin

Metformin may rarely cause a serious, life-threatening condition called lactic acidosis. Tell your doctor if you have kidney disease. Your doctor will probably tell you not to take metformin. Also, tell your doctor if you are over 65 years old and if you have ever had a heart attack; stroke; diabetic ketoacidosis (blood sugar that is high enough to cause severe symptoms and requires emergency medical treatment); a coma; or heart or liver disease. Taking certain other medications with metformin may increase the risk of lactic acidosis. Tell your doctor if you are taking acetazolamide (Diamox), dichlorphenamide (Keveyis), methazolamide, topiramate (Topamax, in Qsymia), or zonisamide (Zonegran). Tell your doctor if you have recently had any of the following conditions, or if you develop them during treatment: serious infection; severe diarrhea, vomiting, or fever; or if you drink much less fluid than usual for any reason. You may have to stop taking metformin until you recover. If you are having surgery, including dental surgery, or any major medical procedure, tell the doctor that you are taking metformin. Also, tell your doctor if you plan to have any x-ray procedure in which dye is injected, especially if you drink or have ever drunk large amounts of alcohol or have or have had liver disease or heart failure. You may need to stop taking metformin before the procedure and wait 48 hours to restart treatment. Your doctor will tell you exactly when you should stop taking metformin and when you should start taking it again. If you experience any of the following symptoms, stop taking metformin and call your doctor immediately: extreme tiredness, weakness, or discomfort; nausea; vomiting; stomach pain; decreased appetite; deep and rapid breathing or shortness of breath; dizzi Continue reading >>

Metformin

Metformin

Metformin, marketed under the trade name Glucophage among others, is the first-line medication for the treatment of type 2 diabetes,[4][5] particularly in people who are overweight.[6] It is also used in the treatment of polycystic ovary syndrome.[4] Limited evidence suggests metformin may prevent the cardiovascular disease and cancer complications of diabetes.[7][8] It is not associated with weight gain.[8] It is taken by mouth.[4] Metformin is generally well tolerated.[9] Common side effects include diarrhea, nausea and abdominal pain.[4] It has a low risk of causing low blood sugar.[4] High blood lactic acid level is a concern if the medication is prescribed inappropriately and in overly large doses.[10] It should not be used in those with significant liver disease or kidney problems.[4] While no clear harm comes from use during pregnancy, insulin is generally preferred for gestational diabetes.[4][11] Metformin is in the biguanide class.[4] It works by decreasing glucose production by the liver and increasing the insulin sensitivity of body tissues.[4] Metformin was discovered in 1922.[12] French physician Jean Sterne began study in humans in the 1950s.[12] It was introduced as a medication in France in 1957 and the United States in 1995.[4][13] It is on the World Health Organization's List of Essential Medicines, the most effective and safe medicines needed in a health system.[14] Metformin is believed to be the most widely used medication for diabetes which is taken by mouth.[12] It is available as a generic medication.[4] The wholesale price in the developed world is between 0.21 and 5.55 USD per month as of 2014.[15] In the United States, it costs 5 to 25 USD per month.[4] Medical uses[edit] Metformin is primarily used for type 2 diabetes, but is increasingly be Continue reading >>

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