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What Are Side Effects Of Ketosis

Of The Keto Diet?

Of The Keto Diet?

There are many awesome benefits that come with adopting a low-carb ketogenic diet, such as weight loss, decreased cravings and even possibly reduce disease risks. With that being said, it’s also good to talk about possible ketosis side-effects when ingesting these specific ketone supplements, so you know fully what to expect when you get started on this mission. If you’ve already heard about some of the side-effects that come with this special diet and are starting to freak out, don’t panic. We’re going to break down everything you need to know when it comes to what your body will experience when using these supplements for the first time. It’s important to remember, not everyone experiences side-effects when starting a ketogenic diet and thankfully, the symptoms are all very temporary and it can pass very quickly. It varies with the individual, but just to make sure all your bases are covered, we’re going to break down each possible side effect that you could possibly experience. 1. Flu Symptoms Within the first 2-4 days of beginning this diet, a common side-effect is known as the “ketosis flu” or “induction flu” because it mimics the symptoms of the actual flu. This means you might experience: Headaches Lethargy Lack of motivation Brain fog or confusion Irritability​ Although these symptoms typically go away completely within a few days, they are also completely avoidable if you stay very hydrated and increase your salt intake and like always, be sure you're eating enough fat. 2. Dizzyness & Drowsiness​ As you start dumping water, you'll lose minerals such as salt, potassium and magnesium. Having lower levels of these minerals will make you tired, lightheaded or dizzy. You may also experience muscle cramps, headaches and skin itchiness. Fatigue Continue reading >>

Adverse Reactions To Ketogenic Diets: Caution Advised

Adverse Reactions To Ketogenic Diets: Caution Advised

As the ketogenic diet gains popularity, it’s important to have a balanced discussion regarding the merits of this diet. Let me emphasize right out of the gate that this is not a diet without merits (excuse the double negative); in fact, it has significant therapeutic potential for some clinical pathologies. However, it is also a diet with inherent risk, as evidenced by the extensive list of adverse reactions reported in the scientific literature—and this has not yet been a thorough enough part of the public discussion on ketogenic diets. The AIP Lecture Series is a 6-week video-based, self-directed online course that will teach you the scientific foundation for the diet and lifestyle tenets of the Autoimmune Protocol. This is the first of a series of articles discussing various facets of a ketogenic diet with an inclination toward balancing the discussion of the pros and cons of this high-fat, low-carb, low/moderate-protein diet. My interest in this topic stems from concerns I have over its general applicability and safety, simultaneous with its growing popularity. I feel a moral and social obligation to share what I understand of these diets, from my perspective as a medical researcher. The dangers of a ketogenic diet was, in fact, the topic of my keynote presentation at Paleo F(x) this year (links to video will be provided once available). This series of articles will share the extensive research that I did in preparation for this presentation, including all of the topics covered during my talk as well as several topics that I didn’t have time to discuss (also see the free PDF Literature Review at the bottom of this post). For every anecdotal story of someone who has regained their health with a ketogenic diet, there’s a counterpoint story of someone who derai Continue reading >>

7 Most Common Ketosis Side Effects And Solutions

7 Most Common Ketosis Side Effects And Solutions

The ketogenic diet is a high-fat, low-carbohydrate, and moderate-protein diet that has been proved to be an effective treatment among patients with epileptic conditions, such as glucose transporter 1 deficiency, pyruvate dehydrogenase deficiency, tuberous sclerosis complex, Rett syndrome, Dravet syndrome, and specific mitochondrial disorders (1, 2). Keto diet is also associated with reduced body weight and insulin resistance, thus it can be beneficial with obesity and diabetes type 2 patients (3). There are also many major benefits of ketogenic diet such as improving cardiovascular health, brain function, and having therapeutic effects in several other chronic conditions. What you should be aware of is the difference between ketosis and ketoacidosis because they are two very different things. Ketosis is a natural metabolic state whereas ketoacidosis, also known as diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA), is a dangerous condition in people with diabetes. Nonetheless, keto diets are also related with some adverse effects, most of them are temporary side effects and easily treated. Here we have a list of negative side effects of ketogenic diet, mostly occur at the beginning and some of them will go away on their own once you are fat-adapted. Remember these are only temporary and small side effects and not everyone will get these. In fact, a lot of people thrive on keto without experiencing these effects at all. 7 Most Common Side Effects #1. Keto Flu One of the most frequent adverse effects of the keto diet is the “low-carb flu” or “keto flu”, sometimes known as the induction flu. Symptoms usually include headache, weakness, brain fog, increased hunger, and fatigue. This happens usually because your body runs on glucose for energy, which derives from carbohydrates. By reducing Continue reading >>

What Are The Health Effects Of Using Marijuana?

What Are The Health Effects Of Using Marijuana?

Studies are still being carried out to answer the question as to whether marijuana can cause lung cancer, and there is no real evidence either way as yet. What is known, though, is that marijuana cigarettes contain benzyprene - the tar of both tobacco and cannabis cigarettes - and we know that benzyprene causes cancer. It alters a gene called p53, which is a tumor suppressor gene. It has also been scientifically proven that 3 out of 4 lung cancers (75%) occur in people who have faulty p53 genes, and that the p53 gene is linked to many other cancers. It also contains at least 50 of the damaging properties found in tobacco cigarettes. See this article from Cancer Research UK: Does smoking cannabis cause cancer? It should also be noted that cannabis has a different effect on young people to what the effect is on adults. While it doesn't really affect cognitive behavioral functionality in adults, it definitely does have a detrimental effect on the youth. Furthermore, smoking marijuana has a different effect on continuous users depending on when they started smoking it. If you started smoking it as a youngster and have basically been a lifelong user, chances are very good that your cognitive functions have been damaged. (This can be reversed, though.) The effect on cognitive behavioral skills in those who started smoking it as an adult, is minimal to none. You can read about that here: Study: Teenage weed use may hurt verbal skills later Apart from the above, young cannabis smokers are often binge-eaters (munchies), which is not good for the body. It also causes them to feel heavy, resulting in little movement - also not good for the body. In the end, one just shouldn't smoke plants or anything else. Our lungs were not designed for it and our bodies not for the foreign stuff Continue reading >>

What Is The Ketogenic Diet And Is It Healthy? Should It Be Used As A Normal Way Of Eating Instead Of A Weight Loss Diet?

What Is The Ketogenic Diet And Is It Healthy? Should It Be Used As A Normal Way Of Eating Instead Of A Weight Loss Diet?

Ketogenic diet, or in short Keto, is a form of diet that focuses on intentionally shifting the body’s metabolism from glucose (carbs) to Ketones (fats), in essence, to put it on Ketosis. In Ketosis, the cells in the body use Ketones (formed by breaking down fat cells) instead of glucose (formed from carbs or sugars) to derive energy for bodily functions and metabolism. In this diet, the dieter is expected to obtain their daily calorific requirements i.e., energy for metabolism, primarily from fats (65-75%) and proteins (15-25%) instead of carbohydrates (5-10%) depending on requirement. Although Ketogenic diet has existed for over a century, it has only found prominence in recent years owing to its considerable impact on weight loss and other health benefits. The unconventional mechanism of Ketogenic diet creates a considerable amount of doubt as well as curiosity among new dieters. People, who have gone through the diet, swear by it. However, at the same time the unorthodox nature of the diet coupled with the mechanism’s similarity with starvation, has led many researchers to question its efficacy. In fact, many believe that Ketogenic diet is actually harmful to the human body in the long-term. Keto, however, is a completely natural process and its effectiveness in weight loss, treating neurological diseases, preventing cancer, and other astonishing health benefits are proven through numerous studies and research. No long-term or even short-term impact on the health has been found or claimed in the scientific domain so far. In fact, many doctors and dietitians now swear by the effectiveness of the diet. How Ketogenic Diet is different from Regular High Carb Diets The major source of glucose in the body is from dietary carbohydrate. As long as muscle and liver glycog Continue reading >>

What Will Happen If I Don't Eat Carbs For 3 Weeks?

What Will Happen If I Don't Eat Carbs For 3 Weeks?

In 2012, I wanted to lose weight extremely fast. I had been weight lifting for about a year and I had put on some muscle as well as some fat due to poor dieting choices. This is a photo from 2015 but it’s similar to what I looked like in 2012. Not majorly overweight, but chubby. So, I decided to try and find the shortest way possible to get ‘shredded’. I wanted to look like Zyzz (below). I read somewhere online that to lose body fat, Zyzz would go on a ketogenic diet. I Googled some more and found details about what a ketogenic diet was. After minimal research I discovered that many people had lost weight using a similar approach. I was excited, I had found the method I was going to use to lose weight. My searching told me that a ketogenic diet involved eating practically 0 carbs. So I cut every single source of carbohydrates out of my diet. I said so long to my beloved sweet potato, rice, bread, fruit, everything. I also was led to believe that fat was evil when trying to lose weight, so I cut all of what I knew were sources of fat out of my diet too. So now nuts were gone, milk, cheese, oils. What was even left? A diet of minimal fats or carbohydrates… So my food sources at this stage was practically meat and green vegetables. More specifically chicken and broccoli. No sauce. Nothing else. Every meal. This meal looks 10x better than what I was having. See that sauce on the chicken? Not on my meals. I went extreme. I would tell myself, “It’s only four weeks.” What happened next? I felt terrible. I had little to no energy. My daily existence was fuelled by caffeine and pre-workout supplements (more caffeine). I was not doing a proper ketogenic diet at all… I didn’t understand it at the time. I was eating lean meats and green vegetables, how could I be Continue reading >>

What Would Happen If I Had A High-protein, Low-carb, Low-fat Diet For A Month?

What Would Happen If I Had A High-protein, Low-carb, Low-fat Diet For A Month?

Hi Douglas - Thanks for reaching out! I believe I answered a similar question of your's earlier today. The type of diet you're suggesting would definitely put you in a state of ketosis, which is very effective for fat-burning. There's a lot of back-and-forth in the health and fitness community about whether or not ketosis is a healthy long-term dietary solution, with issues like kidney disease being brought to light if you're in a constant state of ketosis. Personally, I'd suggest a high fat, moderate protein and low carb diet. Carbs are a NON-ESSENTIAL macronutrient, meaning that our bodies produce more than enough 'fast energy' on their own to support optimal functioning. On the flip side, fat and protein are ESSENTIAL macronutrients, and are foods that we MUST eat frequently in order to insure optimal functioning, as our bodies do NOT produce enough of these macros on their own. Fat is important to ingest for the sake of cognition, of joint lubrication and of inflammation reduction. Protein helps to build and repair lean muscle tissue. Hope this helps! If you have any further questions, feel free to email me at the address below. Continue reading >>

First Week: Top 3 Keto Conundrums

First Week: Top 3 Keto Conundrums

The low carb lifestyle is known to sculpt some serious fat off your body. Many followers of the keto diet experience rapid weight loss, low hunger levels, and good energy levels. Since you cut out most of the high sugar foods, controlling your calories becomes a breeze. Sounds like an easy plan to success, right? Those who joined the ketogenic army can attest that the early weight loss comes with a toll. The first week of low carb living can be daunting, both mentally and physically. As your brain and body are adapting to a life without glucose, you may become outright miserable. Don’t go shoving cake down your neck just yet – the misery passes. To have an idea what you’ll go through, check out these common side effects that most go through when switching to a keto diet. Usually they only last for the first few days to a week, but preparing yourself for what might come will always help. Mental and Physical Fogginess The first major sign – coming 2 or 3 days into your ketogenic transition – will be the fogginess. You’re brain likes to take it easy and it if had a choice, would run on only glucose. As your body is switching from glucose to ketones as its main source of energy, your body will continue to burn the last stores of glycogen. This results in a foggy haze that might make it hard to concentrate. You might find yourself staring into space or feeling lethargic, but have no fear – it will pass. Headaches might pound at your door, nausea can pit in your stomach, muscle cramps can ruin your day and irritability can spark arguments, but knowing this can help you plan. Switch your diet in the middle of the week, so you will have the weekend to fully rest and recover from your transition. What we suggest is to go super low carb for the first week, which mea Continue reading >>

What Are The Negative Side Effects Of Following A Ketogenic Diet?

What Are The Negative Side Effects Of Following A Ketogenic Diet?

Switching to a ketogenic diet can come with several side effects. Fortunately, most of the commons ones are as minor as they are short lived. Let’s take a look at them, what causes them, and what you can do about them: “Keto Flu” When you first cut off your carbs and enter dietary ketosis you are likely to experience flu-like symptoms: headache, fatigue, nausea, and irritability. However, your symptoms aren’t caused by a virus; they’re caused by a combination of carbohydrate withdraw, dehydration, and your body adjusting to burning fat for fuel. These symptoms should go away within a week. And increasing your water intake above the normally recommended eight cups a day may help speed things up. Bad Breath Okay, if you’re not kissing someone while you become keto adapted, maybe this one isn’t such a big deal. But you (and those around you) may notice your breath smelling like overly ripe apples as you adjust to ketosis. This is caused by a type of ketone called acetone that’s excreted in your breath and urine. The smell tends to dissipate on its own in time, and again, water can help. Leg Cramps Early on in your transition to a keto diet most of the weight you lose is water weight. As this happens you also lose electrolytes and this can lead to a few choice words in the middle of the night as you jump out of bed in pain! To help prevent that make sure you’re getting plenty of magnesium, calcium, and potassium. If you find it difficult to get them in the foods you eat on a keto diet, not to worry. You can get all three together in one pill with Country Life Target Mins Calcium, Magnesium, Potassium. Constipation If a high percentage of your pre-keto calories came from carbs, it make take some time for your digestive system to adapt to the extra fat and p Continue reading >>

Is Ketosis Safe And Does It Have Side Effects?

Is Ketosis Safe And Does It Have Side Effects?

Some people think that ketosis is extremely dangerous. However, they might be confusing ketosis with ketoacidosis, which is completely different. While ketoacidosis is a serious condition caused by uncontrolled diabetes, ketosis is a natural metabolic state. In fact, ketosis and ketogenic diets have been studied extensively and shown to have major benefits for weight loss (1, 2). Ketogenic diets have also been shown to have therapeutic effects in epilepsy, type 2 diabetes and several other chronic conditions (3, 4, 5, 6). Ketosis is generally considered to be safe for most people. However, it may lead to a few side effects, especially in the beginning. First, it's necessary to understand what ketosis is. Ketosis is a natural part of metabolism. It happens either when carbohydrate intake is very low (such as on a ketogenic diet), or when you haven't eaten for a long time. Both of these lead to reduced insulin levels, which causes a lot of fat to be released from your fat cells. When this happens, the liver gets flooded with fat, which turns a large part of it into ketones. During ketosis, many parts of your body are burning ketones for energy instead of carbs. This includes a large part of the brain. However, this doesn't happen instantly. It takes your body and brain some time to "adapt" to burning fat and ketones instead of carbs. During this adaptation phase, you may experience some temporary side effects. These are generally referred to as the "low-carb flu" or "keto flu." In ketosis, parts of the body and brain use ketones for fuel instead of carbs. It can take some time for your body to adapt to this. In the beginning of ketosis, you may experience a range of negative symptoms. They are often referred to as "low-carb flu" or "keto flu" because they resemble symptom Continue reading >>

The Side Effects Of A Low Carb Diet

The Side Effects Of A Low Carb Diet

Who should go on a low-carb diet? Low-carbohydrate diets — like the ketogenic diet — are effective for weight loss and improving health. They are also especially helpful for anyone who: Is overweight or obese Is sedentary Has epilepsy Has polycystic ovarian syndrome (PCOS), fibroids or endometriosis Is diagnosed with type 1 or type 2 diabetes Has a neurodegenerative disease such as Alzheimer’s or Parkinson’s Has certain forms of cancer Has cardiovascular disease A typical low-carb diet limits the daily intake of carbohydrates to between 60 and 130 grams, while a ketogenic diet tends to stay below 30 grams of carbohydrates. This is done by excluding or limiting most grains, legumes, fruits, bread, sweets, pasta and starchy vegetables from the diet and replacing them with added fats, meat, poultry, fish, eggs, non-starchy vegetables, nuts, and seeds. When we eat in this way, our bodies begin to change dramatically — especially for those who habitually eat plenty of carbohydrates with each meal. Not all of these changes, however, are going to be positive. When carbohydrates are restricted, it is stressful for the body because it must find another way to fuel itself. This can cause side effects, like nausea and headaches, that is commonly called the “keto flu”. The lack of carbohydrates will also lead to fluid and mineral loss and hormonal changes that can cause health issues if not addressed. The Most Common Side Effects The most common side effects that are experienced when restricting carbohydrates are: Headache Bad breath Weakness Fatigue Constipation or diarrhea It is important, however, to consider how common these symptoms actually are. In studies that put obese patients on a ketogenic diet for 6 months or longer (up to two years), no side effects or co Continue reading >>

Low-carb Side Effects & How To Cure Them

Low-carb Side Effects & How To Cure Them

Are you struggling while starting out on a low-carb or keto diet? Do you get headaches, leg cramps, constipation or any of the other more common side effects? Use the information on this page to avoid them – and feel great while losing weight. The main solution to most common problems when starting low carb is to increase the intake of water and salt. It’s even better to do it preventatively during the first week. If you do, you’ll most likely not experience any of these problems, or they’ll only be minor. Use one of the shortcuts below for specific problems – or just continue reading for all of them. Top 6 common problems when starting Less common issues on low carb Low-carb myths Leg cramps Leg cramps are not uncommon when starting a strict low-carb diet. It’s usually a minor issue if it occurs, but it can sometimes be painful. It’s a side effect of the loss of minerals, specifically magnesium, due to increased urination. Here’s how to avoid it: Drink plenty of fluid and get enough salt. This may reduce loss of magnesium and help prevent leg cramps. If needed, supplement with magnesium. Here’s a suggested dosage from the book The Art and Science of Low Carbohydrate Living by Drs. Jeff Volek and Stephen Phinney: Take 3 slow-release magnesium tablets like Slow-Mag or Mag 64 a day for 20 days, then continue taking 1 tablet a day afterwards. If the steps above are not enough and the problem is bothersome, consider increasing your carb intake somewhat. This should eliminate the problem. The more carbs you eat though, the weaker the impact of the low-carb diet. Bad breath On a strict low-carb diet some people experience a characteristic smell from their breath, a fruity smell that often remind people of nail polish remover. The smell is from acetone, a ket Continue reading >>

The 11 Most Common Keto Side Effects

The 11 Most Common Keto Side Effects

The 11 Most Common Keto Side Effects The ketogenic diet is a powerful new tool to hit the mainstream recently. This style of eating has substantial data behind it showing that it can boost fat-burning, reduce inflammation, boost cognitive performance, and more. What has not been covered quite enough are common keto side effects and how you can avoid them to make the best of this powerful eating style. Although there can be many different side effects that manifest while becoming keto-adapted, many of them stem from similar underlying issues. In this article, I outline what those underlying issues are, their related side effects, and simple strategies to overcome them so you can become keto-adapted as smoothly as possible. Three Primary Causes Although there are a variety of symptoms that can arise during keto adaptation, they mostly manifest from the same three underlying causes. Hypoglycemia (low blood sugar), Hypothalamic-Pituitary-Adrenal (HPA) axis dysfunction, and electrolyte/mineral deficiencies. While these three causes are seemingly different, they are actually all related. When becoming keto-adapted initially, your body has been running on sugar for years. When you suddenly switch to fats, your body has to essentially build the cellular machinery necessary to generate and utilize ketone bodies as a fuel source. This means that instead of generating tons of ketones from the very beginning, most people experience hypoglycemia for a period of time. With hypoglycemia comes a disruption in cortisol signaling which is what accounts for the HPA axis dysfunction. Finally, HPA axis dysfunction leads to an increase in secretion of minerals from the body in the urine. Together these three causes can create all kinds of side effects. Once you understand them, though, a lit Continue reading >>

Low Carb Diet Side Effects

Low Carb Diet Side Effects

Low carb diet side effects are manageable if you understand why they happen and how to minimize them. Understanding your physical reactions will help you avoid the worst of the symptoms, and keep you from quitting before you get out of the chute, so to speak. After several weeks, these side effects will subside as you become "keto-adapted" and able to burn fat instead of glucose for fuel. The list below includes the most common low carb diet side effects, and I've included tips on how to handle them. The only caveat is that you have no contraindicated health conditions. I have detailed here who should NOT follow a ketogenic diet. Frequent Urination After the first day or so, you'll notice that you are in the bathroom urinating more often. Your body is burning up the extra glycogen (stored glucose) in your liver and muscles. Breaking down glycogen releases a lot of water. As your carb intake and glycogen stores drop, your kidneys will start dumping this excess water. In addition, as your circulating insulin levels drop, your kidneys start excreting excess sodium, which will also cause more frequent urination. (see this reference). Fatigue and Dizziness As you start dumping water, you'll lose minerals such as salt, potassium and magnesium as well. Having lower levels of these minerals will make you very, very tired, lightheaded or dizzy, give you muscle cramps, and headaches. You may also experience skin itchiness. Fatigue and dizziness are the most common of the low carb diet side effects, and they can be avoided for the most part by making sure you stay ahead of mineral loss. You can counteract mineral losses by eating more salt or sipping salty broth throughout the day, and eating potassium rich foods. (Dairy foods, green leafy vegetables and avocados are high in potas Continue reading >>

Are There Any Side Effects Of Protein Powder? If Yes, How Do I Overcome Them?

Are There Any Side Effects Of Protein Powder? If Yes, How Do I Overcome Them?

Consuming high levels of protein in the form of protein powders or even from food alone can be detrimental for our health. Fat gain Adding extra protein to the diet in the form of protein powder adds extra calories. As excess protein cannot be stored in its original form in the body, if you are not burning these calories by doing a sufficient amount of physical activity, or doing enough weight bearing activities to build more muscle, these extra calories are likely to be converted to fat. (See also: How to burn more fat while exercising) An increase in protein intake as well as calories without an increase in physical activity levels is likely to result in an equal gain in both fat and muscle, which may not be exactly what you are looking for when you supplement protein powder. Bone loss High levels of protein intake generates a large amount of acid in the body due to the excess sulphates and phosphates that are introduced. The kidneys then try to restore the balance of acid by excreting more acid, at the same time the skeleton releases calcium which is also lost in the urine as a buffer. This results in the loss of calcium from bones which can increase the risk of osteoporosis if it occurs over a longer time frame, particularly in high risk groups such as women. There is a possibility however, that a diet which is high in alkaline fruit and vegetables in addition to protein may help to counteract this effect. Kidney damage High protein diets can put increased strain on the kidneys due to the need to excess waste products called ketones that are generated with such a diet and the need to excrete these products. For people with reduced kidney function this stress can worsen the condition and may even contribute to reduced function in people with healthy kidneys if follow Continue reading >>

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