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What Are Net Carbs Keto?

Net Carb Keto Food List

Net Carb Keto Food List

Here you will find a lengthy, searchable list of hundreds of foods, with its NET CARB value. This will help you in knowing the carbs that impact your blood sugar. Use this when totaling your carb allocation for the day. Source: I do not own this list. The original source is here. All credits go to the owner of this list, as it’s an amazing amount of data which I feel my visitors would benefit from reading. CLICK HERE TO PRINT EXCEL FILE VERSION Search: NET CARBS FOOD LIST Serving Size Grams of Net carbs MEAT & SEAFOOD All seafood, red meat, white meat and organ meats are acceptable, but beware of: • The carb content of some shellfish and seafood. • Foods bulked out with rusk (flour) like sausage, “chicken shapes”, hot dogs and economy burgers • Anything coated in breadcrumbs or batter • Meats that come covered in sugary glazes or pre-packaged with starchy sauces • Meats cured with sugar/honey Seafood Serving Size Grams of Net carbs Raw Shrimp 1/4 lb 5 Squid 1/4 lb 9 Imitation Crab 1 oz 4.6 SALAD & VEGETABLES Serving Size Grams of Net carbs Alfalfa sprouts ½ cup 0.2 Artichoke hearts, marinated 4 pieces 2 Artichoke hearts, canned 1 heart 1 Arugula 1 cup 0.4 Avocado, Haas ½ fruit 1.8 Beans: green, snap, string, wax ½ cup, raw 2.1 Bok choy (pak choi) 1 cup, raw 0.4 Boston/Bibb lettuce 1 cup, raw 0.8 Broccoli florets ½ cup 0.8 Cabbage, green, red, savoy ½ cup, shredded 1.1 Cauliflower florets ½ cup 1.4 Celery 1 stalk 0.8 Celery root (celeriac) ½ cup, grated 3.5 Chicory greens ½ cup 0.1 Chinese cabbage ½ cup, shredded 0 Chives 1 tablespoon 0.1 Cucumber ½ cup, sliced 1 Daikon radish ½ cup 1 Endive ½ cup 0.4 Escarole ½ cup 0.1 Fennel ½ cup 1.8 Greens, mixed 1 cup 0.4 Iceberg lettuce 1 cup 0.2 Jicama ½ cup 2.5 Loose-leaf lettuce 1 cup 1 Mesclun 1 c Continue reading >>

Calories In Keto Diet Net Carbs Raw Spinach Raw Spinach 1 Cup

Calories In Keto Diet Net Carbs Raw Spinach Raw Spinach 1 Cup

Calories 7 Sodium 24 mg Total Fat 0 g Potassium 167 mg Saturated 0 g Total Carbs 0 g Polyunsaturated 0 g Dietary Fiber 1 g Monounsaturated 0 g Sugars 0 g Trans 0 g Protein 1 g Cholesterol 0 mg Vitamin A 56% Calcium 3% Vitamin C 14% Iron 5% *Percent Daily Values are based on a 2000 calorie diet. Your daily values may be higher or lower depending on your calorie needs. Continue reading >>

Total Carbs Or Net Carbs: What Really Counts?

Total Carbs Or Net Carbs: What Really Counts?

Disclaimer: You should consult any dietary changes with a health professional, especially if you have a health condition such as diabetes or heart disease. You may need an adjustment to the medication you are taking. Critical thinking is key to separating facts from personal opinions and unproven theories. With the ever increasing amount of misinformation, it's easy for people to get confused and fall for a diet or lifestyle dogma. My advice is to always do your own research and learn what works best for you - no diet plan fits all and you always need to make small adjustments to fit your needs. Here's a couple of examples that are frequently discussed within the low-carb community: One of the myths is that if you follow a low-carb diet, you can eat unlimited calories, while losing weight and staying healthy. Although it's not common to overeat due to natural appetite control of low-carb diets, this belief results in overconsumption which is never beneficial no matter which diet you follow. A great example of a post questioning the effects of high cholesterol and saturated fat intake can be found at Low Carb Dietitian. About 25% of people following a low carb diet experience very high cholesterol levels. There is increasing evidence that cholesterol and saturated fat do not cause heart disease. Does this mean that very high cholesterol levels are completely safe and even desirable? Not necessarily - even if your C-reactive protein test shows that your inflammation is low, it doesn't mean that it's safe to have very high cholesterol levels. Keep in mind that low-carb diets are not just about eating foods rich in saturated fat found in butter or fatty meat. In addition to saturated fats, many experts, including doctor Jeff Volek, emphasise the importance of heart-healthy Continue reading >>

Counting Carbs

Counting Carbs

Counting carbs is easy to do. All you need is a source of information that gives the carbohydrate and fiber counts in grams of specific portions of foods. It can be a book, or a database or website on the internet.. I can recommend the following since I have them in my own library or use them frequently: Dana Carpender's Carb Gram Counter: Usable Carbs, Protein, Fat, and Calories - Plus Tips on Eating Low-Carb! by Gary Scheiner, MS CDE. FitDay or other food counting software Food labels; but be aware food manufacturers have a bad habit of not being truthful about how many carbs are in their products. And you have to remember to check serving sizes as well. If you are looking at a large container of yogurt, and it says 16 carbs per serving, make sure you check to see if there is more than on serving in the container. If there are two servings, than the total carb count for that container is 32, not 16. Total versus "Net" or "Effective" Carbs The most important part of counting carbs is to understand the difference between total carbohydrate measures, and the measure of usable, impact, effective or "net" carb carbs. Total carb is the count of all of the carbohydrate grams available in the food, including fiber, sugar alcohols, and other indigestible carbohydrate. Usable, impact, effective or "net" carbs are a measure of the total carb grams MINUS the indigestible carb grams. So in most carb counting books, you'll see a measurement of total carb grams, fiber grams and then the net or usable carb grams. To count carbs accurately, use the net or usable carb number when adding up your carb intake. Aww, Do I Have To? If you are eating a ketogenic diet for weight loss, and you are new to counting carbs, I recommend that you keep track of what you are eating in order to be to co Continue reading >>

What Are Net Carbs? The Difference Between Effective And Non-impact Carbs

What Are Net Carbs? The Difference Between Effective And Non-impact Carbs

What are net carbs? Not all carbs are created equal. The word carbohydrate is just a conjunction of the words “carbon” and “hydrate.” Any molecule that contains carbon, hydrogen, and oxygen, with a 2:1 ratio of hydrogen to oxygen (think H2O) is considered a carbohydrate. But the wide range of molecules that fit in this class have very different effects from your blood and your cells perspective. There’s a very big difference to understand. Some carbs are actually incredibly good for you. Carbohydrates in general, as an innocent nutrient source, are actually very good for you. This post is dedicated to what you need to know about net carbs in ketosis. This may be a little difficult to “digest,” considering most modern diet plans basically treat carbs like the devil. But it’s all about making the right choices: if you eat bad carbs, you’ll receive negative health effects as a result. Eat good carbs, though, and they’ll affect you positively! It’s really the media and the celebrity world that have helped to paint this hugely negative image of carbohydrates. Even when following the ketogenic diet, the idea isn’t to completely remove carbs. Rather, you want to ensure the body no longer relies on them as its primary fuel source. When people follow modern nutrition plans, they often make the mistake of thinking that because a plan is low-carb, it means carbohydrates are bad and should be avoided wherever possible. But that is misguided. In order to free yourself from this limiting pre-conception and enjoy a stress-free life of sensible nutrition, it’s important to learn the difference between carbohydrate types. Impact Vs Non-Impact Carbs There are two types of carbs to consider here: impact carbs and non-impact carbs. Impact Carbs An impact carb is b Continue reading >>

All You Need To Know About Carbs On A Low-carb Ketogenic Diet

All You Need To Know About Carbs On A Low-carb Ketogenic Diet

When it comes to ideal carbs intake, I've discussed it in my post here: How Many Carbs per Day on Low-Carb Ketogenic Diet? However, daily carbs intake is not the only aspect you should focus on. Does our body need carbs? It's a common misconception that our body, especially our brain needs carbs. In fact, the brain can either use glucose or ketones. When you restrict the intake of carbohydrates, your body will switch to using ketone bodies instead of using glucose. Not only that, ketones are a better fuel for our body and brain than glucose, even for highly active individuals. Once you get keto-adapted (3-4 weeks), you will experience improved energy levels. Although a small amount of glucose is still needed, our body can produce glucose on demand via gluconeogenesis. Dr Volek and Dr Phinney, The Art and Science of Low Carbohydrate Performance (2012): "Ketone bodies are an important lipid-based fuel, especially for the brain, when dietary carbohydrates are restricted." It has been estimated that about 200 grams of glucose can be generated daily just from protein (Dr Briffa, Escape the Diet Trap, 2012). Our body needs some glucose (e.g. for the thyroid health) but according to Dr Volek, it's a very small amount. As I said in my post here, there is no need for everybody to follow a very low-carb / "zero-carb" diet and you may need to adjust the level of carbs to fit your needs. Types of carbs in ketogenic diets Generally, you should avoid any sugary or starchy foods. The best measure to represent "good" and "bad" carbohydrates is their Glycemic Load (GL), which measures how much insulin will be released by your body for a given food measured in standard portions. This is different to Glycemic Index (GI), which doesn't take the serving size into account. As a result, some Continue reading >>

How Do You Count Carbs On A Ketogenic Diet?

How Do You Count Carbs On A Ketogenic Diet?

If you are using the Keto Zone Diet for weight loss then you are probably paying a lot of attention to how many carbohydrates you are consuming. You are likely already aware of the myriad of benefits of a ketogenic. They include weight loss, improved energy, and enhanced cognitive performance. However, in order to reap the benefits, you need to keep your daily consumption of carbs below 20 grams per day, especially for the first 2-4 weeks. Keto Macros The macronutrient ratios (macros) of daily caloric intake for a successful ketogenic diet look like this: High healthy fat intake at 60%-80% of calories. Moderate clean protein intake at 15%-35% of calories. Low carbohydrate intake at 0%-5% of calories Many people initially scoff at these ratios as ridiculous or even impossible. The fact is, however, that it is not only possible, but once the body is adapted it is actually incredibly easy to maintain. This is because once the body has adapted to using ketones (fat) for fuel instead of glucose (sugar), hunger diminishes dramatically and cravings virtually disappear. But first, you must make it through the keto adaptation phase. Keto Adaptation The human body is designed to efficiently burn fat for fuel. That is actually why the body stores fat to begin with, as a backup fuel supply when no food is available. For those of us in the Western world, food is always available, so most of us never tap into our body fat reserves and instead pile on body weight from all the excess calories. The easiest way to access these fat reserves would be to simply not eat (i.e. fast), but that is simply too difficult for most people with busy lives. A ketogenic diet restricts carbohydrates and protein to a degree that mimics the metabolic effects of fasting. This allows the body to remember ho Continue reading >>

How To Calculate Net Carbs On Keto

How To Calculate Net Carbs On Keto

This part can get a little bit confusing in the beginning but gets easier with practice. Net carbs are the carbohydrates that our bodies can digest and turn into sugar, where total carbs include sugar, fiber or indigestible starch. Fiber does not increase your blood sugar levels. It’s a type of carbohydrate that your body cannot digest, therefore you might subtract the fiber from the total carbohydrate (1). There are two types of fibers: Soluble fiber (dissolves in water). This type of fiber can help lower blood cholesterol and improve blood glucose control (2, 3) Insoluble fiber (does not dissolve in water). This type of fiber can help promote regularity by making food move better through your digestive system and therefore help prevent constipation. Net carbs, or the carbs you can digest, are the ones we’re concerned with since too many will inhibit ketosis and may stall weight loss efforts. Net Carbs Formula for Most Natural Foods To calculate net carbs, you would subtract Fiber from the Total Carbohydrates on the nutrition label. Net Carbs = Total Carbohydrates – Dietary Fiber Some smart companies have already begun adding a net carbs line on the label, making this far easier to track. However, sometimes you need to pay close attention to the nutrition label because it can be a bit confusing. Some food labels show total carbs whereas some show net carbs. It all depends on the country you live, the companies, and where the food is manufactured. In some countries in Europe and Australia, they separate the fiber amount from total carbs (see image 1), so you don’t have to do the calculation. The carbohydrate amount in the label is also the net carbs. In the US and Canada, most companies put the fiber included in the total carbs (see image 2), so you have to dedu Continue reading >>

The Easiest Way To Track Carbs On A Keto Diet

The Easiest Way To Track Carbs On A Keto Diet

In this day and age, technology is at an all-time high and constantly improving our lives. An example of this is an easy way to count your daily calorie and macronutrient intakes. Calorie counting tools are a fantastic way to see just exactly what you are putting into your body on a daily basis. Counting your calories, carbs, fats, and proteins can be a huge hassle when you’re transitioning into a keto diet, but we’re here to help. There are tons of benefits to knowing exactly how many calories are going into your body, but there’s even more from knowing where the calories come from. Using a simple tool, we can track our daily intake of calories, carbs, proteins, and fats – and most importantly see how many left we have in the day. Now, you want the secret sauce don’t you? MyFitnessPal easily and effectively does this for you right at the disposal of your fingertips. I’ve been using their website and mobile app for a long time now, and I have to say it’s the best I’ve come across by far. They have a built in database of almost every food, so its cake walk to maintain a daily journal of your diet. Why Track Your Carbs? You might be asking me, “What’s the point of using a calorie counter?” Well, there are numerous reasons to, including: Portion Control: As you increasingly read nutrition labels, you’ll realize that serving sizes are tiny. Manufacturers do that on purpose to get their counts low, and to get more people to buy. This app can help you follow proper portion control, resulting in proper diet control. Ninja Carbs: Some labels show that their products have 0 carbs, but you’d be surprised at how many things actually have carbs in them. Remember, 1g of carbs can really add up over a day’s worth of eating! Splenda used to be one of my fav Continue reading >>

What Are Net Carbs?

What Are Net Carbs?

Net carbs refer to the carb count that has an impact on the body’s blood sugar levels. To calculate total net carb counts, simply subtract fiber and sugar alcohols from the carb count, and the remainder will be the net carb count. These types of carbs should be limited when following a low carbohydrate diet. Commonly found in processed products, reading the labels can help you identify these carbs. Why should you track your net carbohydrates on a keto diet? Some may say a carb is a carb, but for those who want to maximize weight-loss, tracking net carbohydrates can help. When following a keto diet, tracking your net carbohydrates will allow you to eat more nutrient-dense vegetables and fruits without impacting your weight-loss gains. Each body is different and the amount of carbs necessary to keep your body fueled may vary from one person to the next. Keeping track of your intake will allow you to find the right balance of net carbohydrates for optimal weight-loss. Why do net carbs matter? Tracking the amount of carbohydrates that your body takes in is important to a keto diet. In order to hit our fat, protein, and carbohydrate macros, we need to find out the numbers our body is absorbing. Total carbs are the number of carbohydrates our body takes in throughout the day. Net carbohydrates are the total carbs minus the amounts contributed by fiber. For example, let’s say we have a food day where we took in a total of 34 total carbs. Out of that 34 total carbs, 13 of which are non-digestible. We remove 13 from 34 to get the number 21–this is our net carbohydrates for the day. Some foods that may be high in carbs, may actually be not so bad once we’ve removed the nondigestible count from the carb count. Why does fiber matter? In order to understand the role this fib Continue reading >>

Net Carbs – Avoiding Common Mistakes

Net Carbs – Avoiding Common Mistakes

Are you diligent about counting your carbs? Every gram matters when you are aiming for a very low daily intake. You are probably already careful about checking food labels, weighing your food, and keeping a food diary. But even if you track all your food, your carb counting might be incorrect. Inaccurate calculations can push you well above your recommended daily limit. These common mistakes can distort your figures and derail your progress. But they are easy to avoid – as long as you are aware of them. Net carbs – quick recap Let’s start with a quick recap of the basics. Not all carbohydrates are created equal. Some of them – mostly fibre and sugar alcohols (polyols) – are not digestible. When you eat these foods, you are technically consuming carbs. But they don’t get absorbed by your body. There is no effect on your blood glucose or calorie intake. For low-carb diet purposes, we only count the carbs that are digestible. They are referred to as net carbs. Checking information about total carbs is easy. You can find it on food labels, diet tracking apps and online food databases. Problems usually arise when people start to calculate net carbs. Net carbs mistake 1 – Ignoring regional differences in food labels Different countries have different rules on food labelling – especially when it comes to carbohydrates and fibre. When we access recipes and food data online, we might be unaware of these differences. In USA, food packaging and food databases show the total count of carbohydrates for each food. Fibre count is included separately. So you can calculate the number of net carbs as follows: Total carbs – fibre = net carbs Most authors of low-carb diet books and blogs are American. So you have probably come across this formula, even if you are not Amer Continue reading >>

Ketogenic Diet Beginners Guide

Ketogenic Diet Beginners Guide

Brief Overview A ketogenic diet is a way of eating that promotes a state of ketosis in the body. Generally speaking a ketogenic diet will have the following macronutrient ratios: High Fat – 60%-80% of total calories come from fat. Moderate Protein – 15%-35% of total calories come from protein. Low Carbohydrate – 5% or less of total calories come from carbohydrates. Everyone’s macronutrient breakdown will be different and depends on a variety of factors. Reference our Keto Macro Calculator to figure out what yours are! Eating in accordance with these macronutrient ratio’s will deplete your body of glucose and force it to start producing ketones. Your body will then use these ketones for energy. What is Ketosis From Wikipedia: Ketosis is a metabolic state in which some of the body’s energy supply comes from ketone bodies in the blood, in contrast to a state of glycolysis in which blood glucose (sugar) provides most of the energy. With the abundance of high carbohydrate foods available in modern times, virtually all human beings that don’t make a concerted effort to restrict carbs are always in a state of glycolysis. There are a number of reasons why ketosis is beneficial when compared to glycolysis, which we will get into later. What are Ketones? Ketones are the fuel source your body is running on when it’s in a state of ketosis. They are produced in the liver when glycogen is depleted and are characterized as a slower burning fuel source when compared to glucose. Insulin and Keto This is where the magic happens. Eating a high carb diet means you’re always producing insulin to transport the glucose around your body. The fat can just sit around and watch because insulin is doing all the work. The fat is eventually stored, which leads to weight gain. In a Continue reading >>

20 Decadent Chocolate Keto Desserts Under 6 Net Carbs!

20 Decadent Chocolate Keto Desserts Under 6 Net Carbs!

Here are 20 of the most decadent chocolate keto desserts for low carb diets. These delicious sugar-free desserts are also gluten-free and 6 net carbs and under! Decadent Chocolate Keto Desserts! Choosing a low carb ketogenic lifestyle helps many gain blood sugar control, reduce insulin levels, lose weight and journey towards optimum health. It’s a lot of work to count carbs, watch macros and source healthy food and recipes. After all of the effort it would be a shame to undo any progress with a chocolate craving! These decadent chocolate keto desserts will help keep you on track. Low carb desserts are rich and satisfying. This list includes some of the best sugar-free chocolate desserts around. Not only are they delicious, they are guilt-free. While all of the desserts listed below are gluten-free, they are not necessarily nut-free. They are, however, higher in nutrition than traditional treats and very low in sugar. And because each of these delicious chocolate keto desserts is between 1 – 6 net carbs, you can indulge in the occasional treat! 20 Decadent Chocolate Keto Desserts Under 6 Net Carbs! Deliciously dark, nutty and so intensely chocolaty you’ll want the moment to last forever. – Sugar Free Londoner An easy keto hazelnut truffles recipe made from sugar free milk chocolate, heavy cream, and toasted hazelnuts. – Low Carb Maven Creamy chocolate fudge with a dreamy layer of coconut. This fudge is reminiscent of what used to be one of my favorite candy bars. – My Montana Kitchen The perfect guilt-free and decadent treat for the holidays. – Simply So Healthy Silky smooth, sinfully rich, and so simple to make! They’re the perfect low carb keto chocolate dessert. – Low Carb Maven For serious chocolate lovers only. It’s perfect with a good cup of cof Continue reading >>

Net Carbs Vs Total Carbs And What Counts On Keto

Net Carbs Vs Total Carbs And What Counts On Keto

Trying to define the carbs on nutrition facts labels can be thoroughly difficult to understand. There’s a figure for total carbs but also subheadings for dietary fiber, sugars, and sometimes sugar alcohols. You may have heard questions people ask such as, “how many carbs should you eat daily?” and “should you count net carbs or total carbs?“. Counting net or total carbs is a debatable topic with low carb dieters. People have different reasons for counting macros, calories, and net carbs. Usually to increase health, fitness and try to drop some pounds. People with diabetes particularly need to monitor carbohydrate intake. Whatever your reason and whatever diet you follow, we aim to increase your knowledge of calculating net and total carbs. Carbs For Health Carbs are a complex thing in the low carb world. People say there good and bad, make you fat or thin, healthy and unhealthy, the list goes on. For weight loss, it comes down to how soon your body can use the carbs. The more simple the carb, the faster your body can convert it to energy and the more likely it can be an obstacle to losing belly fat. The quick and simple carbs such as soda, white pasta, cereals, and rice produce insulin in the blood. You want to avoid these for sharp insulin spikes. Carbs aren’t always bad if eaten in moderation along with a healthy diet of fruits and vegetables. The acquired insulin spike isn’t inevitably a bad thing. It can effectively help power you through workouts, and even promote fat burning. Save LowCarbAlpha How your Body Manages Carbs and How Many To Eat? The first thing you need to realize there is no such thing as essential carbs. Your body uses essential fats and proteins but does not need any carbohydrates at all. You could even eat no fruits and vegetables an Continue reading >>

The Three Golden Rules Of Net Carbs

The Three Golden Rules Of Net Carbs

There’s an important milestone in your Keto journey. You’ll know you’ve arrived when you find yourself asking, “What the heck are net carbs?” It turns out; not all carbs are created equal. And, while you will be eating low quantities of carbs, it’s a good idea to learn fully what a carbohydrate is, and how to tell the difference between a net carb and a total carb. This is especially important if you monitor your blood sugar, as total carbs have a stronger impact on your insulin response than net carbs do. Total carbs are what the name suggests; they are the total number of carbohydrates in a product. Very few items, except for some meat and cheese, are naturally low carb. This is where our friend fiber steps in. When fiber is present, your body uses the total number of carbohydrates less the number of fiber. Or, to put it another way, fiber acts like a buddy system and drives the carbs home (they’re still there, but they are no longer the responsible party). If you take the total carbs and subtract the total fiber (and, where applicable, minus sugar alcohols), you are left with net carbs. In Keto we want to keep net carbs low, not necessarily the total carbs. Note: you can’t add fiber to ice cream and suddenly call it low carb, the two must be exclusive in the same product. Also, you must only subtract sugar alcohols; not sugar. Sugar alcohols are sometimes used in snack foods, and are altered in the chemical process so they act differently from carbohydrates. Most are used to artificially sweeten foods, but some are good for you and others are not. Keep reading to learn the subtle nuances of carbs, and which sugar alcohols to avoid! The Three Golden Rules of Net Carbs The reason net carbs are so important is that they enable you to eat a much wider ran Continue reading >>

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