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What Are Ketones

Physical Properties Of Aldehydes And Ketones

Physical Properties Of Aldehydes And Ketones

Voiceover: Before we get into the physical properties of aldehydes and ketones, I just wanted to cover where the names for those functional groups come from. So, one way to make aldehydes and ketones is to oxidize alcohol. So if we start over here on the left and we have methanol, we can oxidize that to methonal over here on the right. Also called formaldehyde. And if we analyze the atoms here, one carbon on the left and one carbon on the right, one oxygen on the left and one oxygen on the right, four hydrogens on the left and only two on the right, so a loss of two hydrogens can convert methonol to methonal, and so the name of aldehyde comes from these words here. So if I write alcohol and then dehydrogenatum, which refers to the fact that we are losing hydrogens. If you look closely you can see the name for aldehyde. If you take the name al from alcohol, and then this portion of this word, and then add an e on, you get the name aldehyde. So that's the idea. You can also make ketones. So if I oxidize this alcohol on the left to propanol, also called isopropanol or isopropyl alcohol and then finally rubbing alcohol. If you oxidize this molecule, then you get this molecule over here on the right. So there are three carbons ... So a three carbon ketone is called a propanone and of course no one usually calls this propanone. This is a famous molecule. This is acetone. And the old German word for acetone ... If you spell out the old German word for acetone, it's easy to see where the word ketone comes from, right? 'Cause if I take this right here and add an e on, I get ketone. So just a little bit of insight into those names which I think is pretty interesting. In terms of physical properties, let's use these last two molecules here to describe boiling points of aldehydes a Continue reading >>

What Are Ketones And Ketosis?

What Are Ketones And Ketosis?

Ketones, B-hydroxybutyrate (BHB), acetoacetate (ACA) and acetone, are the by-products of fat breakdown. Ketones can be used by the tissues, including the brain, in the body in much the same way as glucose, and are thought to be a superior fuel source to glucose. Being in a state of ketosis refers to having elevated blood levels of ketones. Continue reading >>

Everything You Need To Know About Ketones

Everything You Need To Know About Ketones

Ketone is an organic compound that the body produces when fats are broken down for energy. People with diabetes may not be able to regulate the level of ketones in their blood, so ketone testing is an essential part of managing their condition. There are three types of ketone, which are collectively known as ketone bodies, or ketones. In this article, we explain when to check for ketones, the types of tests available, and how to understand the results. Contents of this article: What are ketones? The body uses a range of nutrients for energy, including carbohydrates, fats, and proteins. It will use carbohydrates first, but if none are available, the body will burn fat for energy. When this happens, ketones are produced. Ketones have gained attention in recent years due to the popularity of ketogenic diets, in which people eat a low carbohydrate diet so that their body will burn fat instead of carbohydrates. There is currently a lack of clear evidence on the benefits of this diet, and there may be some risks, such as high acidity in the blood and loss of muscle. Typically, carbohydrates are broken down into different nutrients, including blood sugar (glucose), by an enzyme called amylase that occurs naturally in the body. Insulin then transports the sugar to cells to be used for energy. A person with diabetes does not produce enough insulin to transport the blood sugar, or the cells in their body may not accept it properly, which stops the body from using the blood sugar for energy. When sugar can't be used by the cells for energy, the body will start to break down fats for energy instead. Types of ketone and DKA Three types of ketones are always present in the blood: acetoacetate (AcAc) 3-β-hydroxybutyrate (3HB) acetone The levels of each of these ketone bodies will var Continue reading >>

What Are The Optimal Ketone Levels For A Ketogenic Diet?

What Are The Optimal Ketone Levels For A Ketogenic Diet?

If you’ve just started a ketogenic diet, then you’ll know that it can be really tough to figure out if you’re doing keto right. Am I eating too many carbs? Too much protein? Should I still be feeling tired? When is the fat burning supposed to start? It’s confusing, and one of the most confusing aspects is what your optimal ketone levels are supposed to be. Unlike most other diets, the ketogenic diet is designed to put your body into a state of ketosis in order to get your body to start burning ketones instead of the glucose that it usually burns when you eat a high carb standard American diet (SAD). But to know whether you’re in ketosis and whether your body has enough ketones circulating for you to use as energy instead of glucose, you have to measure your actual ketone levels and then determine whether they’re high enough for you to be reaping the benefits of the ketogenic diet. If you’ve tried searching for this information already, then you’ll know that there’s some controversy depending on which expert you follow. So in this article, we’ll tell you exactly what the different experts are suggesting are the optimal ketone levels as well as give you recommendations for what ketone levels you should be aiming for depending on your goals with a ketogenic diet. A Few Quick Notes Before We Start… If you’re looking for signs other than testing your actual body ketone levels as to whether you’re in ketosis or not, then please check out this article instead that provides you with signs you’re in ketosis. If you’re a type 1 diabetic, then this article is not for you and the optimal ketone levels suggested below are not applicable to you. Please check out the tons of other ketone level articles on the web to ensure your ketone levels do not reach Continue reading >>

What Are Ketones?

What Are Ketones?

ANSWER Everyone has ketones, whether you have diabetes or not. Ketones are chemicals made in your liver. You produce them when you don't have enough insulin in your body to turn sugar (or glucose) into energy. You need another source, so your body uses fat instead. Your liver turns this fat into ketones, a type of acid, and sends them into your bloodstream. Your muscles and other tissues can then use them for fuel. For a person without diabetes, this process doesn’t become an issue. When you have diabetes, however, you can build up too many ketones in your blood -- and too many ketones can become life-threatening. Continue reading >>

Ketone Bodies (urine)

Ketone Bodies (urine)

Does this test have other names? Ketone test, urine ketones What is this test? This test is used to check the level of ketones in your urine. Normally, your body burns sugar for energy. But if you have diabetes, you may not have enough insulin for the sugar in your bloodstream to be used for fuel. When this happens, your body burns fat instead and produces substances called ketones. The ketones end up in your blood and urine. It's normal to have a small amount of ketones in your body. But high ketone levels could result in serious illness or death. Checking for ketones keeps this from happening. Why do I need this test? You may need this test if you have a high level of blood sugar. People with high levels of blood sugar often have high ketone levels. If you have high blood sugar levels and type 1 or type 2 diabetes, it's important to check your ketone levels. People without diabetes can also have ketones in the urine if their body is using fat for fuel instead of glucose. This can happen with chronic vomiting, extreme exercise, low-carbohydrate diets, or eating disorders. Checking your ketones is especially important if you have diabetes and: Your blood sugar goes above 300 mg/dL You abuse alcohol You have diarrhea You stop eating carbohydrates like rice and bread You're pregnant You've been fasting You've been vomiting You have an infection Your healthcare provider may order this test, or have you test yourself, if you: Urinate frequently Are often quite thirsty or tired Have muscle aches Have shortness of breath or trouble breathing Have nausea or vomiting Are confused Have a fruity smell to your breath What other tests might I have along with this test? Your healthcare provider may also check for ketones in your blood if you have high levels of ketones in your urine Continue reading >>

Ketone Bodies: A Review Of Physiology, Pathophysiology And Application Of Monitoring To Diabetes.

Ketone Bodies: A Review Of Physiology, Pathophysiology And Application Of Monitoring To Diabetes.

Abstract Ketone bodies are produced by the liver and used peripherally as an energy source when glucose is not readily available. The two main ketone bodies are acetoacetate (AcAc) and 3-beta-hydroxybutyrate (3HB), while acetone is the third, and least abundant, ketone body. Ketones are always present in the blood and their levels increase during fasting and prolonged exercise. They are also found in the blood of neonates and pregnant women. Diabetes is the most common pathological cause of elevated blood ketones. In diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA), high levels of ketones are produced in response to low insulin levels and high levels of counterregulatory hormones. In acute DKA, the ketone body ratio (3HB:AcAc) rises from normal (1:1) to as high as 10:1. In response to insulin therapy, 3HB levels commonly decrease long before AcAc levels. The frequently employed nitroprusside test only detects AcAc in blood and urine. This test is inconvenient, does not assess the best indicator of ketone body levels (3HB), provides only a semiquantitative assessment of ketone levels and is associated with false-positive results. Recently, inexpensive quantitative tests of 3HB levels have become available for use with small blood samples (5-25 microl). These tests offer new options for monitoring and treating diabetes and other states characterized by the abnormal metabolism of ketone bodies. Continue reading >>

What Are Ketones?

What Are Ketones?

Ketones are harmful chemicals which your body produces when there is too little or no insulin Ketones are harmful chemicals which your body produces when there is too little or no insulin. When you detect ketones in your body, it is a warning sign that your blood glucose level is too high and you need to bring it down immediately. How to Check for Ketones?​​ ​The easiest way to check for ketones is to use a urine or blood ketone test. Your doctor or nurse can advise you on which ketone test to use. Most ketone test kits come in packages of strips or individually wrapped strips (which can be kept longer). To get accurate results from ketone tests, follow instructions carefully. If you are not sure, always ask your doctor or nurse to show you. ​​​​​ ​​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ Here’s how most urine ketone tests work: ​​ ​ First, check that the strips are not beyond their expiry date. ​ ​Collect a sample of your urine in a clean container. ​ Place a strip in the urine sample. Alternatively, pass it through your urine stream. ​ Shake off excess urine from the strip. ​ Wait for the strip to change colour. ​ Compare the strip to the colour chart on the strip bottle to get an indication of the amount of ketones in your urine. ​​ Record your results​​ ​​ ​ When to Check for Ketones? Check for ketones if you have any of these symptoms: your blood glucose is 14 mmol/L or higher ​​ ​fatigue ​ constant thirst or a dry mouth ​ frequent urination ​ blurry vision (as if you’re looking through a dirty window) ​ vomiting ​ diarrhoea ​ have trouble breathing ​ ​ When to Seek Help? If the ketone test shows small or trace amounts of ketones, it could mean that ketone is starting to build up in your Continue reading >>

Urine Ketones

Urine Ketones

Ketones are produced when the body burns fat for fuel. Normally these ketones will be completely broken down (metabolised) so that there are very few ketones in the urine. If for any reason the body cannot get enough glucose for energy it will switch to using body fats, causing an increase in ketones in the body. This results in more ketones present in the urine. What are ketones? Ketones are produced when the body burns fat for energy. Normally, your body gets the energy it needs from carbohydrate in your diet. But stored fat is broken down and ketones are made if your diet does not contain enough carbohydrate to supply the body with sugar (glucose) for energy or if your body can't use blood sugar (glucose) properly. Ketones are usually formed in the liver and are broken down so that very small amounts of ketones appear in the urine. However, when carbohydrates are unavailable (for example, in starvation) or can't to be used as an energy source (for example, in diabetes), fat becomes the main source of energy and large amounts of ketones are made. Therefore, higher levels of ketones in the urine indicate that the body is using fat as the major source of energy. High levels of ketones in your body can cause tummy (abdominal) pain, feeling sick (nausea), being sick (vomiting) and diarrhoea. The ketones that most often appear in the urine when fats are burned for energy are called acetoacetate and beta-hydroxybutyric acid. What are the causes of ketones in the urine? The causes of high levels of ketones and therefore ketones in your urine include: Diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA). Starvation: not eating for prolonged periods (for example, 12 to 18 hours). Ketogenic diet (high-fat, low-carbohydrate diet). This can cause an increase in body ketones but much less than DKA and not Continue reading >>

“what Are Ketones Anyways?”

“what Are Ketones Anyways?”

When your child is on the ketogenic diet for seizures, the word “ketone” is a part of your everyday vocabulary. Not only do you talk about them, chances are that you measure them regularly as well. Despite this, you may find yourself wondering, “What are ketones anyways?” In today’s post, I’ll try to answer all of your questions about ketones. Ketones, sometimes referred to as “ketone bodies”, are water-soluble compounds (meaning that they dissolve in water) that are produced as “byproducts” when the body burns fat for energy [1]. Normally, the body produces only small quantities of ketones but ketone production increases when the body is using fat as a primary source of fuel. This happens during starvation, when the liver burns stored body fat for energy, and on a ketogenic diet, when the liver burns large quantities of dietary fat for energy. As the liver burns fat, ketones build up in the blood and the body is said to be in “ketosis”. Ketones are transported from the liver through the blood to the brain, heart, and skeletal muscles where they can be used for energy[2]. Types of Ketones: There are 3 different types of ketones: beta-hydroxybutyrate, acetoacetate, and acetone. Beta-hydroxybutyrate and acetoacetate are the most abundant ketones[3]. Acetone is produced in much smaller quantities, making up just a small proportion of the total ketone levels. While beta-hydroxybutyrate and acetoacetate are transported through the blood to provide energy to other parts of the body, acetone is not. Instead, it is exhaled through the lungs, which is why individuals on the ketogenic diet may have a characteristic smell to their breath. Measuring Ketones: When the body is in ketosis, ketones can be detected in the blood, urine and even in the breath. Heal Continue reading >>

What Are Ketone Bodies And Why Are They In The Body?

What Are Ketone Bodies And Why Are They In The Body?

If you eat a calorie-restricted diet for several days, you will increase the breakdown of your fat stores. However, many of your tissues cannot convert these fatty acid products directly into ATP, or cellular energy. In addition, glucose is in limited supply and must be reserved for red blood cells -- which can only use glucose for energy -- and brain tissues, which prefer to use glucose. Therefore, your liver converts many of these fatty acids into ketone bodies, which circulate in the blood and provide a fuel source for your muscles, kidneys and brain. Video of the Day Low fuel levels in your body, such as during an overnight fast or while you are dieting, cause hormones to increase the breakdown of fatty acids from your stored fat tissue. These fatty acids travel to the liver, where enzymes break the fatty acids into ketone bodies. The ketone bodies are released into the bloodstream, where they travel to tissues that have the enzymes to metabolize ketone bodies, such as your muscle, brain, kidney and intestinal cells. The breakdown product of ketone bodies goes through a series of steps to form ATP. Conditions of Ketone Body Utilization Your liver will synthesize more ketone bodies for fuel whenever your blood fatty acid levels are elevated. This will happen in response to situations that promote low blood glucose, such as an overnight fast, prolonged calorie deficit, a high-fat and low-carbohydrate diet, or during prolonged low-intensity exercise. If you eat regular meals and do not typically engage in extremely long exercise sessions, the level of ketone bodies in your blood will be highest after an overnight fast. This level will drop when you eat breakfast and will remain low as long as you eat regular meals with moderate to high carbohydrate content. Ketone Bodi Continue reading >>

What Are Ketones? Scientists Find 'food Group' For Better Cognition, Physical Fitness

What Are Ketones? Scientists Find 'food Group' For Better Cognition, Physical Fitness

Basic food groups, like whole grains, fruits, and dairy have been a staple of the modern diet for centuries, but could another soon be added? A team of researchers from the Federation of American Societies for Experimental Biology has revealed the physical and mental benefits of ketones, a natural chemical the body produces when it confronts periods of starvation or food scarcity. Their findings may lead to the advent of a new food group to boost endurance and memory. The body typically runs on glucose for energy, but when there isn’t enough, ketones kick in. Knowing this, researchers fed rats a blend of ketone ester supplements while they cut back on 30 percent of their daily calorie intake, while a second group of rats were only fed a diet of carbohydrates and fat. After five days on the new diet, rats ran 32 percent further on the treadmill and 38 percent faster and had a healthier, stronger heartbeat compared to rats that were not fed ketones. When placed in a maze to test the rats’ memory, researchers found the rats fed the ketone diet were able to complete the maze faster and more accurately compared to rats that weren’t taking ketone supplements. "The dramatic improvements in exercise performance and cognitive function will no doubt interest athletes and professional sports teams worldwide,” said the study’s co-author Andrew J. Murray, a researcher in the department of physiology, development and neuroscience at the University of Cambridge, in a statement. Foods that are high in fat help initiate ketone production, along with a moderate portion of protein. However, not all fats were created equal, which is why choosing your ketone-inducing food items strategically is key to getting the most out of your carb sacrifice. Nuts, avocados, eggs, cheeses, lean Continue reading >>

Diabetes And Ketones

Diabetes And Ketones

Tweet The presence of high levels of ketones in the bloodstream is a common complication of diabetes, which if left untreated can lead to ketoacidosis. Ketones build up when there is insufficient insulin to help fuel the body’s cells. High levels of ketones are therefore more common in people with type 1 diabetes or people with advanced type 2 diabetes. If you are suffering from high levels of ketones and seeking medical advice, contact your GP or diabetes healthcare team as soon as possible. What are ketones? Ketones are an acid remaining when the body burns its own fat. When the body has insufficient insulin, it cannot get glucose from the blood into the body's cells to use as energy and will instead begin to burn fat. The liver converts fatty acids into ketones which are then released into the bloodstream for use as energy. It is normal to have a low level of ketones as ketones will be produced whenever body fat is burned. In people that are insulin dependent, such as people with type 1 diabetes, however, high levels of ketones in the blood can result from taking too little insulin and this can lead to a particularly dangerous condition known as ketoacidosis. How do I test for ketones? Ketone testing can be carried out at home. The most accurate way of testing for ketones is to use a blood glucose meter which can test for ketones as well as blood glucose levels. You can also test urine for ketone levels, however, the testing of urine means that the level you get is representative of your ketone levels up to a few hours ago. Read about testing for ketones and how to interpret the results Who needs to be aware of ketones? The following people with diabetes should be aware of ketones and the symptoms of ketoacidosis: Anyone dependent on insulin – such as all people Continue reading >>

What Are Ketones And Are They Dangerous?

What Are Ketones And Are They Dangerous?

Ketones are acids made when your body begins using fat instead of carbohydrates for energy. This happens when there is not enough insulin to get sugar from the blood into the cells, and the body turns fat into energy. When fat is broken down, ketone bodies are made and can accumulate in the body. This condition is called diabetic ketoacidosis, or DKA, and is often the first sign of diabetes before diagnosis. If blood glucose is within a safe range and someone is trying to lose weight, the presence of small amounts of ketones may be perfectly normal. However, with diabetes it is critical that both ketones and blood glucose are closely monitored even if someone is trying to lose weight. Moderate to large ketones may mean that diabetes is out of control. This can be a sign of a potentially dangerous situation. Ketones alter the chemical balance of the blood. DKA does not usually occur unless there are large urine ketones or high blood ketones. If left undiagnosed or untreated, they can poison the body. This requires immediate medical attention. Do not exercise when ketones are high; it may actually increase ketones. Some of the causes of DKA are: Illness Forgetting to take one or more insulin shots Not enough insulin An insulin pump that is not delivering. This is usually due to kinked, obstructed or dislodged infusion catheter. This may result in DKA in as little as three hours. Giving “spoiled” insulin. Insulin that got too hot (over 90º F) or froze. Symptoms of ketoacidosis include those for high blood glucose plus: “Fruity” smelling breath Nausea Vomiting Stomach cramps Confusion Unconsciousness Shortness of breath Unusual thirst Illness can cause blood glucose levels to rise and lead to ketoacidosis. In order to prevent this from happening, there are importan Continue reading >>

What Are Ketones?

What Are Ketones?

© Holly Willoughby Ketones is one of those words you hear in weight loss conversations a lot but do you really know what it is? There is something of a divide in the world of keytones - honest science and diet pill nonsense. – SEEN WOMEN'S HEALTH BRANDING ON ANY KEYTONE PILLS? THIS IS A SCAM Specific recent examples are: “Skinny Pill” (including SlimGenix &Cleanse Efx) and Raspberry Keytones. Women's Health® DOES NOT retail or endorse these supplements or diet pills in any way. We have not recommended these products or featured these products in connection to weight loss stories and we are not affiliated with the criminal organisations selling them. These companies are unlawfully using the Women’s Health brand logo to make a false connection between their products and the Women's Health® . We are pursuing all of our legal rights in order to attempt to stop this activity. In the meantime, we strongly recommend that you do not purchase products from these companies and do not provide any credit card details. If you do so you will be charged indefinitely, will not receive the products, and will not be able to cancel the order. – So, while it is often associated with diet pill scams like the ones that recently featured Holly Willoughby without permission, there is some science involved. Do you remember the Atkins Diet? Then you’ll know all about the hog breath that came with it. This was down to ketones – compounds produced when your body converts fat into energy. Medium-chain triglycerides (MCTs), that are found most prominently in coconut oil, are a rich source of ketones. Unlike most fats, which are broken down in your digestive system, MCTs are naturally converted into ketones in your liver, then released into your bloodstream to be used as fuel – not Continue reading >>

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