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What Are Healthy Fats For Ketosis

Why The High Fat, Low Carb 'keto Diet' Fails The Comment Sense Test

Why The High Fat, Low Carb 'keto Diet' Fails The Comment Sense Test

Renae Gilley used to be a size 22. Through diet and exercise she is now a size 10 and doesn't plan to look back. She was pre-diabetic and needed to make changes in her life. Two years later she works out nearly every day and keeps diabetes at bay. Michael Clevenger, CJ Last week I discussed the Keto diet, high in fat and very low in carbs, and why it’s not a good choice. A much better choice is a healthy well-balanced diet loaded with complex carbs (fruits, vegetables and whole grains), protein and modest fat intake. Going hand in hand with a healthy diet is daily exercise. When it comes to comparing diets, like comparing the Keto Diet with a healthy and well-balanced diet, it’s best to examine scientific data. Both diets can help reduce weight, which in turn helps lower blood pressure and serum cholesterol. Does that mean both diets are equally good for you? No. With the Keto Diet, kidney stones and accelerated osteoporosis arising from keto-acidosis can occur, along with a host of side effects, including lack of energy, trouble with the bowels, loss of mental acuity, loss of salt which can disrupt electrolyte balance and lead to muscle cramping, etc. But, there is much more to the story, and evidence continually mounts against using a high fat, low carb diet long term. HEART DISEASE A recent interview in the Nutrition Action Newsletter with Dr. Frank Sacks, an internationally respected researcher from Harvard, provided an update on the impact of dietary saturated fat on heart disease risk. Regarding the totality of evidence to date, according to Sacks: “The evidence that saturated fat causes atherosclerosis and heart disease is compelling. Saturated fat increases LDL… and LDL is a cause of heart disease. It’s not a risk factor. It’s a direct absolute cause Continue reading >>

12 Healthy High-fat Foods Perfect For Nutritional Ketosis

12 Healthy High-fat Foods Perfect For Nutritional Ketosis

Jimmy Moore Achieves Nutritional Ketosis with High Fat Foods In my two previous CarbSmart columns, I explained what the difference is between the relatively new concept of nutritional ketosis and the traditional Atkins diet and the 5 low-carb mistakes I feel I was making that nutritional ketosis has helped fix. As many of you know, I’ve been doing my own experiment of this concept for over five months and counting (read my updates for Day 1-30, Day 31-60, Day 61-90, Day 91-120 and Day 121-150) and it’s produced some pretty remarkable weight loss and health improvement results so far as I’ve lost over 50 pounds while enjoying robust energy, mental clarity, stable d blood sugars, complete satiety, zero cravings and counterintuitive results in the gym. It’s been an amazing ride so far and I look forward to continuing this journey in the months to come. But the most popular question I’ve received from people about this by far has been “What the heck are the high-fat foods you’re eating?” It’s a fantastic question as I have consistently been over 2.0 millimolar blood ketone levels for most of this experiment. I have been reluctant to share my exact menus – they are what’s working for me. Some people may not need to eat a ketosis diet foods list exactly like me to experience the results that I have; others of you may need to be even more strict. The best thing for you to do is test to see how you respond to various foods and adjust accordingly. We are all different and require varying levels of fat, protein and carbohydrate for our specific metabolic needs. If you are like me and are metabolic deranged, it may be necessary to cut your carbohydrate intake down to the bare minimum, and reduce protein as well. One of the major keys to my success with nutrit Continue reading >>

Keto Diet Food List, Including The Best Vs. Worst Keto Foods

Keto Diet Food List, Including The Best Vs. Worst Keto Foods

Unlike many fad diets that come and go with very limited rates of long-term success, the ketogenic diet or keto diet has been practiced for more than nine decades (since the 1920s) and is based upon a solid understanding of physiology and nutrition science. The keto diet works for such a high percentage of people because it targets several key, underlying causes of weight gain — including hormonal imbalances, especially insulin resistance coupled with high blood sugar levels, and the cycle of restricting and “binging” on empty calories due to hunger that so many dieters struggle with. Yet that’s not a problem with what’s on the keto diet food list. Rather than relying on counting calories, limiting portion sizes, resorting to extreme exercise or requiring lots of willpower (even in the face of drastically low energy levels), the ketogenic diet takes an entirely different approach to weight loss and health improvements. It works because it changes the very “fuel source” that the body uses to stay energized — namely, from burning glucose (or sugar) to dietary fat, courtesy of keto recipes and the keto diet food list items, including high-fat, low-carb foods. What Can You Eat On a Ketogenic Diet? Here are some examples of high-fat low-carb foods on the keto diet food list you can expect to eat lots of if you’re following the ketogenic diet: High amounts of healthy fats (up to 80 percent of your total calories!), such as olive oil, coconut oil, grass-fed butter, palm oil, and some nuts and seeds. Fats are a critical part of every ketogenic recipe because fat is what provides energy and prevents hunger, weakness and fatigue. All sorts of non-starchy vegetables. What vegetables can you eat on a ketogenic diet without worrying about increasing your carb intak Continue reading >>

Without Seeking To Induce Ketosis, Is Drinking Bulletproof-style Coffee A Healthy Source Of Fat?

Without Seeking To Induce Ketosis, Is Drinking Bulletproof-style Coffee A Healthy Source Of Fat?

I wouldn't say bulletproof-style coffee is a healthy source of fat. I wouldn't say it's a healthy anything really. A cup of bulletproof coffee is over 400 calories, 1g of protein, about 50g of fat, of which majority of that is saturated fat, and very little essential nutrients. On the other hand, you can have a double shot latte (to get the caffeine hit), and with the other 300 calories, you can have 60g of cashew nuts. From that you'll get 26g of fats, of which 14g is monosaturated, 11g of protein, 18g of carbohydrates, and a bunch of essential nutrients to boot. For your healthy fats, stick to mixed nuts (excluding peanuts), avocados, olive oil, salmon and so on. Continue reading >>

Diets Decoded: The Ketogenic Diet

Diets Decoded: The Ketogenic Diet

Is the ketogenic diet healthy? We’re going to let you in on a little secret. Most popular healthy diets that are touted for weight loss—from Paleo to Mediterranean and vegetarian—share many of the same basic principles. All involve eating whole foods (as opposed to packaged and processed) and filling your plate with quality sources of protein, healthy fats, complex carbohydrates, and vitamin-, mineral-, and fiber-rich vegetables. (Again, we’re talking about the ones that fall somewhere on the healthy spectrum, not unhealthy fad diets like, ahem, the Grapefruit Diet.) However, each proposes a slightly different path that leads to fulfilling those principles. In this column, we’ll be breaking them down for you one by one so you can figure out which (if any!) is right for you. We’ll quickly explain the facts and then provide quick, actionable tips on how to follow the diet as part of a Nutritious Life. The Ketogenic Diet: What It Is The ketogenic diet is like Atkins amplified. Instead of just low-carb, it’s “almost no carb” and lots of fat. It’s been around for a long time but has recently gotten a lot of attention. Originally developed to treat children with epilepsy, the ketogenic diet restricts carb intake to as low as two to four percent of calories, with a 4:1 ratio of fat to carbs and protein combined. (For comparison, standard diets contain about 45 to 65 percent of calories from carbs; we generally recommend sticking to the lower end of that spectrum and avoiding refined carbs.) The goal of eating this way is to move the body into a state called ketosis. During ketosis, instead of breaking down carbs (there are none!) into glucose for fuel, the liver converts fat into ketone bodies, which become the body’s primary source of energy. Advocates s Continue reading >>

Ketogenic Diet Food List: Everything You Need To Know

Ketogenic Diet Food List: Everything You Need To Know

Not sure what to eat on a ketogenic diet? Here’s a quick food list for you to reference. Below you’ll find a brief overview of what you can eat. Scroll further down to see more details on each section. Being on a diet isn’t the easiest thing in the world, especially when you don’t know what you should eat. We’ve put together this ketogenic diet food list to help people out there make decisions on what they are eating and shopping for. Below you can find a quick visual guide to what to eat on a ketogenic diet. Let’s go over some of the commonly identifiable items that people use on keto: All of the food above sticks to the strict 5% carbohydrate allowance that we use on keto. In general, you can eat from the following food groups: Fats & Oils. Try to get your fat from natural sources like meat and nuts. Supplement with saturated and monounsaturated fats like coconut oil, butter, and olive oil. Protein. Try to stick with organic, pasture-raised and grass-fed meat where possible. Most meats don’t have added sugar in them, so they can be consumed in moderate quantity. Remember that too much protein on a ketogenic diet is not a good thing. Vegetables. Fresh or frozen doesn’t matter. Stick with above ground vegetables, leaning toward leafy/green items. Dairy. Most dairy is fine, but make sure to buy full-fat dairy items. Harder cheeses typically have fewer carbs. Nuts and Seeds. In moderation, nuts and seeds can be used to create some fantastic textures. Try to use fattier nuts like macadamias and almonds. Beverages. Stay simple and stick to mostly water. You can flavor it if needed with stevia-based flavorings or lemon/lime juice. If you scroll down, you can see in-depth breakdowns of each section along with some ideas on what types of food to eat! If you’r Continue reading >>

The Top 10 Ways To Eat More Fat

The Top 10 Ways To Eat More Fat

Flavorful, full-fat ingredients topped with creamy, satisfying sauces… Low-carb and keto eating can be decadent! Fat is an amazing flavor enhancer – it makes everything taste better. And if you eat enough fat, it’s filling, too. Get ready for a new, luscious take on deliciousness! Remember that a low-carb diet needs to be higher in fat, to make it satisfying. Don’t fear fat (natural fat is good for you). Don’t stay hungry. Add enough fat to feel satisfied after eating. This can sometimes be a challenge for people who are not used to eating natural fat. Here are the top 10 tips on how to eat more fat – plus tips on HOW much fat you should aim for. 1. Start with whole, full-fat ingredients Say goodbye to low-fat and fat-free products. Say good riddance to Egg Beaters, artificial creamers, and reduced-fat peanut butter. Banish any item labeled ‘light’ or ‘lite’ from your pantry and refrigerator. Forget nonfat and low-fat dairy. (If your grocery store doesn’t carry plain, full-fat yogurt, buy the plain low-fat version and add back the fat by stirring in heavy cream, sour cream, or crème fraiche.) Rethink your grocery list and stock your refrigerator and pantry with real whole food, including fat-rich options like avocados and eggs. Try to add natural fat rather than avoid it. Fatty cuts of meat can be more flavorful, tender and inexpensive than leaner cuts. Salmon and sardines contain plenty of healthy fats and are a terrific addition, too. Invite these delicious items back onto your plate. 2. Cook with fat No more limp steamed vegetables or dry chicken breasts. Cook your vegetables, meat, fish, and eggs in tasty natural fats like butter. Or the other ones listed under point 3, below. Use as much as you need. 3. Use different fats for different flavor Continue reading >>

7 Health Benefits Of Silicon Valley's Favorite Diet — A High-fat Fad That Has Techies Eating Bacon And Butter

7 Health Benefits Of Silicon Valley's Favorite Diet — A High-fat Fad That Has Techies Eating Bacon And Butter

The ketogenic or "keto" diet has been called the holy grail of good health and weight loss by some doctors and bloggers. On the flip side, it's a nutritionist's nightmare. The keto diet goes against conventional wisdom on health eating. It encourages eating lots of fat and limits carbohydrates to no more than 50 grams a day, the rough equivalent of a plain bagel or a cup of white rice. By comparison, dietary guidelines laid out by the US Department of Agriculture recommend consuming between 225 and 325 grams of fluffy, white carbs a day. Tech workers from internet entrepreneur Kevin Rose to podcaster Tim Ferriss swear by the keto diet. Some supporters of the diet say it gives them a mental edge in the workplace. Here's why health nuts in Silicon Valley are saying yes to fat. The keto diet reorganizes the building blocks of the food pyramid. It cuts down carbs to between 20 and 50 grams a day, depending on a person's medical history and insulin sensitivity. There are about 30 grams in an apple, for comparison. On the diet, healthy fats account for roughly 80% of a person's daily calories, while protein makes up about 20%. On average, Americans get about 50% of their calories from carbs, 30% from fat, and 15% from protein, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. The keto diet is like Atkins on steroids. It turns the body into a fat-burning machine. Shutterstock/El Nariz The human body breaks down carbohydrates into glucose, which is used for energy or stored as glycogen in liver and muscle tissue. But the body has a plan-B fuel supply. When carbs go missing from a person's diet, the body uses up its glucose reserves and then breaks down stored fat into fatty acids. When fatty acids reach the liver, they're converted into an organic substance called ke Continue reading >>

16 Foods To Eat On A Ketogenic Diet

16 Foods To Eat On A Ketogenic Diet

The ketogenic diet has become quite popular recently. Studies have found that this very low-carb, high-fat diet is effective for weight loss, diabetes and epilepsy (1, 2, 3). There's also early evidence to show that it may be beneficial for certain cancers, Alzheimer's disease and other diseases, too. A ketogenic diet typically limits carbs to 20–50 grams per day. While this may seem challenging, many nutritious foods can easily fit into this way of eating. Here are 16 healthy foods to eat on a ketogenic diet. Fish and shellfish are very keto-friendly foods. Salmon and other fish are rich in B vitamins, potassium and selenium, yet virtually carb-free (4). However, the carbs in different types of shellfish vary. For instance, while shrimp and most crabs contain no carbs, other types of shellfish do (5). While these shellfish can still be included on a ketogenic diet, it's important to account for these carbs when you're trying to stay within a narrow range. Here are the carb counts for 3.5-ounce (100-gram) servings of some popular types of shellfish (6, 7, 8, 9, 10): Clams: 5 grams Mussels: 7 grams Octopus: 4 grams Oysters: 4 grams Squid: 3 grams Salmon, sardines, mackerel and other fatty fish are very high in omega-3 fats, which have been found to lower insulin levels and increase insulin sensitivity in overweight and obese people (11). In addition, frequent fish intake has been linked to a decreased risk of disease and improved mental health (12, 13). Aim to consume at least two servings of seafood weekly. Many types of seafood are carb-free or very low in carbs. Fish and shellfish are also good sources of vitamins, minerals and omega-3s. Non-starchy vegetables are low in calories and carbs, but high in many nutrients, including vitamin C and several minerals. Vegeta Continue reading >>

Eating Fat To Lose Weight? The Ketogenic Diet Is High-fat And Low-carb

Eating Fat To Lose Weight? The Ketogenic Diet Is High-fat And Low-carb

But he didn’t start dropping the pounds until a friend who had lost a lot of weight suggested he try a ketogenic diet. Gross switched to the high-fat, ultra-low-carb diet and lost 70 pounds in seven months. And he’s kept at it for five years. Though online searches about ketogenic diets started spiking last year, the diet was created in the 1920s as a way to treat epilepsy. When you’re on a keto diet and you’re in what’s called ketosis, a metabolic process forces the body to burn stored fat because there’s not enough glucose for energy. Fans of the keto diet say they have more energy and better focus. The diet, however, is restrictive and can be difficult to maintain. A group of local nutrition experts say the diet is safe, but they were split over whether they would recommend it for everyone. Burning fat How does the diet work? Our bodies break down carbohydrates when we eat. Those carbs are turned into glucose that fuels our cells, giving us energy. Eating keto A difficult start Continue reading >>

Good Fats And Bad Fats

Good Fats And Bad Fats

As I explained in this article, a ketogenic diet is a very high fat diet. But, as with anything, there are good and bad choices when it comes to the kinds of fat you should eat. Essentially, the good fats are saturated and monounsaturated. They have the greatest healthy impact on body fat, cholesterol, blood triglycerides, and joint and brain health. The bad fats are trans fats and most vegetable oils. I’ll make it easier. Good fats Avocados Beef and pork fats (lard, tallow, bacon fat, etc.) Butter Cheese (cheddar, colby, feta, mozzarella, swiss, provolone, ricotta, etc…not American or Velveeta) Coconut oil Cream cheese Greek yogurt Heavy whipping cream Sour cream Olive oil Nuts (almonds, macadamia, brazil, hazelnut, pistachios, walnuts, pecans) Bad fats Any other vegetable oils (corn, vegetable, safflower, canola) Margarine Vegetable shortening Any other not on the good fats list Stick with the good list and you’ll never go wrong. Continue reading >>

What Are Good Fats On A Low Carb Diet?

What Are Good Fats On A Low Carb Diet?

Not all fats are created equal. Eating the right (healthy) fats is very important, especially on a ketogenic/low carb diet where fat makes up ~70% of your daily caloric intake. All the important facts and supporting studies are included further down in this article but here’s what you need to know about good and bad fats in a nutshell: Good Fats Saturated Fats = Good Found in red meat, butter, ghee, lard, cream, eggs, coconut oil (MCTs) or palm oil Monounsaturated Fats = Good Found in extra virgin olive oil, avocados, avocado oil and macadamia nut oil Natural Trans Fats = Good Found in meat from grass-fed animals and dairy products Bad Fats Processed Polyunsaturated Fats = Bad Avoid vegetable and seed oils including: Canola, Soybean, Corn, Sesame, Grapeseed, Peanut, Sunflower Processed Trans Fats = Bad Avoid processed foods, fast foods, margarine and commercially baked goods. IMPORTANT: Most of your daily fat intake should consist of saturated and monounsaturated fats. Fat is identified by the amount that’s dominant in the mixture. Extra Virgin Olive Oil is about 73% monounsaturated fat so it is considered monounsaturated. Butter is about 65% saturated and thus a saturated fat. Below is a breakdown of each type of fat so you can start eating the right fats immediately. Saturated Fatty Acids (SFAs) Saturated Fats Don’t Increase Chances of Heart Disease Saturated fats are great! Although the government has condemned saturated fats to fat hell, there have been many studies with extremely conclusive results (21 studies with a total of 347,747 subjects) showing that there is no significant evidence of saturated fat increasing risk of heart disease in any way.2 Saturated Fats Increase Concentrations of Larger LDL Cholesterol is extremely important to us. It is used to m Continue reading >>

Why Your Diet Should Include More Fat

Why Your Diet Should Include More Fat

Think back to the '80s and '90s when buying anything that didn't don a low-fat label was simply taboo. Back then, butter and egg yolks topped the "do not eat" list, while refined carbs and packaged foods weren't given a second thought. But times have definitely changed. These days, experts tout fat as a must-have macro and full-fat products, like whole milk, avocado, ghee and coconut oil, join the ranks of superfoods. Yet, some people still question what kinds of fat they should eat and exactly how it affects the body. That's why we called on Mark Hyman, MD, author of the "Eat Fat, Get Thin Cookbook," to help us wipe clean the greasy mess of info and lay down the facts on fat. Reality: Even though this myth is the basis for low-fat diets and food products, it's far from the truth. Eating fat won't make you fat. Completely eliminating or limiting fat from your diet can actually make you gain weight, often because it leaves you feeling so deprived. Conversely, some studies have found that fatty foods can aid in weight loss. "The problem with most diets is that they lack the key ingredient that makes food taste good and cuts your hunger," says Dr. Hyman. And you guessed it, that's fat. "Healthy fats are the best source of energy for your body, and they keep your metabolism and fat-burning mechanisms running as they're meant to," Dr. Hyman explains. Research supports this, showing that a low-fat diet could slow down metabolism. So now you have permission to enjoy a spoonful of nut butter with an apple before your next workout or a satiating piece of steak for dinner every once in a while. Reality: Not so fast. While saturated fat has long been known as public health enemy number one, recent research proves it's not so scary. Of course, you shouldn't always opt for a meal fu Continue reading >>

30 Ways To Eat More Fat

30 Ways To Eat More Fat

Are you eating enough fat? If you are on a ketogenic diet, like Keto or Atkins Induction, you must eat fat to get thin. Fat is wonderful. Fat adds joy to food. You can indulge in fantastically rich and scrumptious meals while losing weight. Easy, right? But we’ve been brainwashed by decades of misguided anti-fat propaganda. Habits are hard to reverse. So you might unconsciously eat less fat than you need. How much fat is enough? On ketogenic diets, about 70-80% of all calories should come from fat. That’s huge compared to how much fat people get on “standard” diets, let alone on low-fat diets. Here’s a list of ways to get more fat, so that your ketosis is firing on all cylinders. Download printable list >> 1. Choose fatty cuts of red meat General public shuns fatty cuts of meat because of the low-fat BS. Good news for us – lower demand means cheaper prices. Supermarkets often trim fat from meat. Find a butcher – either locally or online – and ask them for untrimmed cuts. Choose pasture-raised grass-fed red meat over grain-fed, for better taste and nutrient quality. Examples of fatty meat cuts are pork belly, pork ribs, lamb neck, untrimmed lamb chops, beef short ribs, rib eye steak and sirloin steak. 2. Opt for poultry legs and wings, plus duck breasts Chicken drumsticks and wings have more fat than breast meat. Roast, slow-cook or fry them for a perfect high-fat meal. Duck breasts have a nice layer of fat under the skin. Many recipes call for scoring the skin to drain some of the fat. Skip this step to retain all the fatty goodness. Duck legs are fantastic when slow-cooked. Obviously, forget the standard diet advice of discarding poultry skin. On Keto, skin is the best part! RECIPE: Pan-fried duck breast with low-carb veggies 3. Eat oily fish for a hit Continue reading >>

A Beginner’s Guide To The Ketogenic Diet: An Effective Way Of Optimizing Your Health

A Beginner’s Guide To The Ketogenic Diet: An Effective Way Of Optimizing Your Health

Many Americans suffer from various chronic diseases such as diabetes and obesity, and the main culprit is usually the food they eat. The standard American diet contains excessive amounts of protein and carbohydrates, neither of which is good for your health because it eventually causes you to develop insulin and leptin resistance. As a result, you gain excess weight, develop inflammation and become prone to cellular damage. To avoid this problem, significant changes in your diet are necessary, and the best way is inducing your body into a state of nutritional ketosis, a condition where your body burns fat as its primary fuel instead of sugar. In order to reach nutritional ketosis, you must follow a ketogenic diet. But what exactly is a ketogenic diet? This guide will tell you everything you need to know about a ketogenic diet – how you can apply it to your lifestyle and what positives you can reap from it. The Various Benefits of the Ketogenic Diet A ketogenic diet is a dietary approach that focuses on minimal carbohydrates, moderate amounts of protein and high healthy fat consumption — the three keys to achieving nutritional ketosis. In fact, it’s what I recommend for most people who would like to optimize their health. There are many reasons why you should try a ketogenic diet. It can be very beneficial for people suffering from chronic conditions, or for people who would simply like to be healthier than their current state. You’ll be excited to know that a ketogenic diet can help with the following: • Weight loss If you’re trying to lose weight, then a ketogenic diet is one of the best ways to do it, because it helps access your body fat so that it can be shed. Obese people in particular can benefit from this method. In one study, obese test subjects were Continue reading >>

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