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What Are Dka Patients Prone To

Diabetic Ketoacidosis: Evaluation And Treatment

Diabetic Ketoacidosis: Evaluation And Treatment

Diabetic ketoacidosis is characterized by a serum glucose level greater than 250 mg per dL, a pH less than 7.3, a serum bicarbonate level less than 18 mEq per L, an elevated serum ketone level, and dehydration. Insulin deficiency is the main precipitating factor. Diabetic ketoacidosis can occur in persons of all ages, with 14 percent of cases occurring in persons older than 70 years, 23 percent in persons 51 to 70 years of age, 27 percent in persons 30 to 50 years of age, and 36 percent in persons younger than 30 years. The case fatality rate is 1 to 5 percent. About one-third of all cases are in persons without a history of diabetes mellitus. Common symptoms include polyuria with polydipsia (98 percent), weight loss (81 percent), fatigue (62 percent), dyspnea (57 percent), vomiting (46 percent), preceding febrile illness (40 percent), abdominal pain (32 percent), and polyphagia (23 percent). Measurement of A1C, blood urea nitrogen, creatinine, serum glucose, electrolytes, pH, and serum ketones; complete blood count; urinalysis; electrocardiography; and calculation of anion gap and osmolar gap can differentiate diabetic ketoacidosis from hyperosmolar hyperglycemic state, gastroenteritis, starvation ketosis, and other metabolic syndromes, and can assist in diagnosing comorbid conditions. Appropriate treatment includes administering intravenous fluids and insulin, and monitoring glucose and electrolyte levels. Cerebral edema is a rare but severe complication that occurs predominantly in children. Physicians should recognize the signs of diabetic ketoacidosis for prompt diagnosis, and identify early symptoms to prevent it. Patient education should include information on how to adjust insulin during times of illness and how to monitor glucose and ketone levels, as well as i Continue reading >>

Diabetic Ketoacidosis

Diabetic Ketoacidosis

What is Diabetic Ketoacidosis Diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) is the hallmark of type 1 (insulin-dependent) diabetes mellitus. DKA is an emergency condition caused by a disturbance in your body’s metabolism. Extremely high blood glucose levels, along with a severe lack of insulin, result in the breakdown of body fat for energy and an accumulation of ketones in the blood and urine. Statistics on Diabetic Ketoacidosis Diabetic ketoacidosis can occur in between 16%-80% of children presenting with newly diagnosed diabetes. It remains the most common cause of death for young type 1 diabetes sufferers. Before the discovery of insulin, mortality rates were up to 100%. Today, the mortality has fallen to around 2% due to early identification and treatment. Death is usually caused by cerebral oedema (swelling of the brain). DKA is most common in type 1 diabetes sufferers but may also occur in those with type 2 diabetes mellitus. However, the latter group usually has at least some functioning insulin so suffer from another disorder called hyperosmolar non-ketotic coma (HONK). DKA tends to occur in individuals younger than 19 years, the more brittle of type 1 diabetic patients. However, DKA can affect diabetic patients of any age or sex. Risk Factors for Diabetic Ketoacidosis People with diabetes lack sufficient insulin, a hormone the body uses to metabolise glucose (a simple sugar) for energy. Therefore in diabetic patients glucose is not available as a fuel, so the body turns to fat stores for energy. However when fats are broken down they produce byproducts called ketones which build up in the blood and can be damaging to the body. In particular, accumulated ketones can “spill” over into the urine and make the blood become more acidic than body tissues (ketoacidosis). Blood gl Continue reading >>

Diabetic Ketoacidosis In African Americans Acts Like Type 1 Diabetes

Diabetic Ketoacidosis In African Americans Acts Like Type 1 Diabetes

In African Americans, men, and other minorities, ketosis-prone diabetes appears more consistent with type 2 diabetes but responds to insulin as if type 1 diabetes. While diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) appears most often in people with type 1 diabetes, in African Americans, more than 50% of newly diagnosed cases feature metabolic characteristics more closely aligned with type 2 diabetes (T2D), according to a study in Endocrine Practice.1 This subtype of diabetes, ketosis-prone diabetes (KPD), arises in an estimated one-third of African Americans with T2D, in the United States.2 “We don’t know why it is seen particularly in African Americans and males. We also don’t know the antecedent of hyperglycemia in duration and extent that affects hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c), and we don’t know how long these patients have had diabetes before presentation of DKA,” senior author Priyathama Vellanki, MD, assistant professor in the division of endocrinology, metabolism, and lipids at Emory University School of Medicine in Atlanta, Georgia, told EndocrineWeb. Given this, Dr. Vellanki said, “I am now researching the sex differences and genetics that are affecting this presentation.” Clinical Presentation of Diabetic Ketoacidosis Primary ketosis-prone diabetes in patients with T2D may be provoked or unprovoked; and, stressors such as trauma or infection may precipitate the onset of DKA, while the etiology of unprovoked ketosis remains uncertain.3 However, severe hyperglycemia and ketosis are symptoms that appear to reflect unprovoked DKA as a clinical presentation of T2D.3 Characteristics of most patients with KPD include: Obese or overweight Acute, short-term (<4 weeks) hyperglycemic symptom - Polyuria - Polydipsia - Weight loss Highly elevated glucose (>500 mg/dL0 Mean hemoglobin Continue reading >>

Recurrent Diabetic Ketoacidosis Raises Mortality Risk In T1d

Recurrent Diabetic Ketoacidosis Raises Mortality Risk In T1d

Recurrent episodes of diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) were associated with a substantially increased risk of death in patients with type 1 diabetes, according to a retrospective cohort study. Patients with a single hospitalization for DKA during the study period had a 5.2% risk of death, compared with a 23.4% risk of death for patients hospitalized for DKA more than five times (hazard ratio 6.18; P=0.001), reported a research team led by Fraser Gibb, MBChB, PhD, of the Royal Infirmary of Edinburgh in Scotland. Patients with recurrent hospitalizations for DKA tended to be younger, poorer, have higher glycated hemoglobin levels, and to have mental health problems, Gibb and colleagues reported in Diabetologia. "Most strikingly, a greater than one in five risk of death was observed in those with the highest frequency of DKA presentation over a median 2.4 years of follow-up, compared with a one in 20 risk of death in those with a single DKA admission over a median of 4 years. This represents a substantially elevated risk of death when compared with the Scottish type 1 diabetes population," Gibb and colleagues said. "The main implications of the study are that we have identified a significant risk of death in patients with recurrent DKA, many of whom are young," Gibb told MedPage Today via email. "With this in mind, we need to build an evidence base for strategies to help prevent mortality in this at-risk group. I suspect this will focus on community-based, multi-disciplinary care for this group of patients." The deaths almost always occurred at home rather than in the hospital, the investigators noted. "In keeping with other modern cohorts, we found a low rate of inpatient mortality in patients presenting with DKA," they said. "However, the frequency of subsequent sudden death a Continue reading >>

Case Report Spontaneous Gas Gangrene Of The Scrotum In Patient With Severe Diabetic Ketoacidosis

Case Report Spontaneous Gas Gangrene Of The Scrotum In Patient With Severe Diabetic Ketoacidosis

1. Introduction Spontaneous gas gangrene of the scrotum, also known as Fournier’s gangrene (FG) is an extremely rare but life-threatening skin and soft tissue infective disease in the perineal region [1]. The infection commonly starts as cellulitis adjacent to the portal of entry, and rapidly progresses to extensive tissue necrosis. Without aggressive treatment, the patient will die from sepsis and multiple organ failure [2]. Multiple microbial infections by aerobes and anaerobes are always found in cultures from the wounds, most of which are normal commensals in the perineum and genitalia. Because of the impaired host cellular immunity, these conditional pathogens become virulent, and act synergistically to invade tissue and cause extensive damage [3]. Some comorbid systemic disorders with cellular immunity impairment, including AIDS, diabetes, alcohol abuse, leukemia, chemotherapy and chronic corticosteroid use [4] are identified in patients with FG. Diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) is an acute complication of diabetes, characterized by circulation failure and acidosis. In developing countries, even with improved healthcare systems and reliable insulin supply, mortality and morbidity from DKA remain high [5]. Although impaired tissue perfusion and defective immune response presented in DKA could be predisposing conditions for FG, there has been no previous report of specifically pinpointing the DKA with FG. In the present case, we show how a patient with severe DKA and FG recovered through prompt, accurate diagnosis and emergent intervention. 2. Case presentation A 52-year-old previously healthy man was hospitalized on account of poor health. He mainly complained about polydipsia, fever and shortness of breath for 9 days, and a swollen scrotum was found 4 days later. Fev Continue reading >>

Diabetic Ketoacidosis

Diabetic Ketoacidosis

A Preventable Crisis People who have had diabetic ketoacidosis, or DKA, will tell you it’s worse than any flu they’ve ever had, describing an overwhelming feeling of lethargy, unquenchable thirst, and unrelenting vomiting. “It’s sort of like having molasses for blood,” says George. “Everything moves so slow, the mouth can feel so dry, and there is a cloud over your head. Just before diagnosis, when I was in high school, I would get out of a class and go to the bathroom to pee for about 10–12 minutes. Then I would head to the water fountain and begin drinking water for minutes at a time, usually until well after the next class had begun.” George, generally an upbeat person, said that while he has experienced varying degrees of DKA in his 40 years or so of having diabetes, “…at its worst, there is one reprieve from its ill feeling: Unfortunately, that is a coma.” But DKA can be more than a feeling of extreme discomfort, and it can result in more than a coma. “It has the potential to kill,” says Richard Hellman, MD, past president of the American Association of Clinical Endocrinologists. “DKA is a medical emergency. It’s the biggest medical emergency related to diabetes. It’s also the most likely time for a child with diabetes to die.” DKA occurs when there is not enough insulin in the body, resulting in high blood glucose; the person is dehydrated; and too many ketones are present in the bloodstream, making it acidic. The initial insulin deficit is most often caused by the onset of diabetes, by an illness or infection, or by not taking insulin when it is needed. Ketones are your brain’s “second-best fuel,” Hellman says, with glucose being number one. If you don’t have enough glucose in your cells to supply energy to your brain, yo Continue reading >>

Cerebrovascular Complications Of Diabetic Ketoacidosis In Children

Cerebrovascular Complications Of Diabetic Ketoacidosis In Children

CLINICAL CASE REPORT Complicações cerebrovasculares da cetoacidose diabética em crianças Luis Felipe Mendonça de Siqueira Hospital das Clínicas, Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais (UFMG); Department of Pediatrics, Faculty of Medicine, UFMG, Belo Horizonte, MG, Brazil SUMMARY Neurological deterioration in children with diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) is commonly caused by cerebral edema. However, subtle cerebral injuries including strokes should also be suspected, since children with hyperglycemia and DKA are prone to thrombosis. In this paper, a case involving a 2 month-old patient that presented cerebral edema and stroke as complications of DKA is reported. In the discussion, the literature on neurological complications of DKA in children is briefly reviewed, emphasizing the prothrombotic tendency of these patients. SUMÁRIO Alterações neurológicas em crianças com cetoacidose diabética (CAD) são comuns, sobretudo em decorrência de edema cerebral. Contudo, lesões cerebrais agudas, como acidente vascular cerebral (AVC), também devem ser investigadas, já que as crianças com hiperglicemia e cetoacidose têm maior chance de apresentar essa complicação. Neste relato, descreve-se a história de um paciente de 2 meses de idade que apresentou edema cerebral e AVC como complicações de um quadro de cetoacidose diabética. Durante a discussão, será feita uma breve revisão da literatura sobre as complicações neurológicas da CAD nos pacientes pediátricos enfatizando sua tendência pró-trombótica. INTRODUCTION Children with new onset type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM) frequently have diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) as their initial presentation, a disorder that is associated with significant morbidity and mortality. In this context, neurological complications, in Continue reading >>

Ketosis-prone Type 2 Diabetes

Ketosis-prone Type 2 Diabetes

Time to revise the classification of diabetes Diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) is the most serious hyperglycemic emergency in patients with diabetes. DKA is reported to be responsible for >100,000 hospital admissions per year in the U.S. (1) and is present in 25–40% of children and adolescents with newly diagnosed diabetes (2) and in 4–9% of all hospital discharge summaries among adult patients with diabetes (3,4). DKA has long been considered a key clinical feature of type 1 diabetes, an autoimmune disorder characterized by severe and irreversible insulin deficiency. In recent years, however, an increasing number of ketoacidosis cases without precipitating cause have also been reported in children, adolescents, and adult subjects with type 2 diabetes (5–7). These subjects are usually obese and have a strong family history of diabetes and a low prevalence of autoimmune markers. At presentation, they have impairment of both insulin secretion and insulin action, but aggressive diabetes management results in significant improvement in β-cell function and insulin sensitivity sufficient to allow discontinuation of insulin therapy within a few months of treatment (7–9). Upon discontinuation of insulin, the period of near-normoglycemic remission may last for a few months to several years (10–13). This clinical presentation has been reported primarily in Africans and African Americans (6,7,14–16) and also in other minority ethnic groups (12,17,18). This variant of type 2 diabetes has been referred to in the literature as idiopathic type 1 diabetes, atypical diabetes, Flatbush diabetes, diabetes type 1 (1/2) (somewhere between type 1 and type 2 diabetes), and more recently as ketosis-prone type 2 diabetes (9). In this issue of Diabetes Care, Balasubramayam et al. (19) co Continue reading >>

Diabetic Ketoacidosis

Diabetic Ketoacidosis

As fat is broken down, acids called ketones build up in the blood and urine. In high levels, ketones are poisonous. This condition is known as ketoacidosis. Diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) is sometimes the first sign of type 1 diabetes in people who have not yet been diagnosed. It can also occur in someone who has already been diagnosed with type 1 diabetes. Infection, injury, a serious illness, missing doses of insulin shots, or surgery can lead to DKA in people with type 1 diabetes. People with type 2 diabetes can also develop DKA, but it is less common. It is usually triggered by uncontrolled blood sugar, missing doses of medicines, or a severe illness. Continue reading >>

Diabetic Ketoacidosis And Hyperglycaemic Hyperosmolar State

Diabetic Ketoacidosis And Hyperglycaemic Hyperosmolar State

The hallmark of diabetes is a raised plasma glucose resulting from an absolute or relative lack of insulin action. Untreated, this can lead to two distinct yet overlapping life-threatening emergencies. Near-complete lack of insulin will result in diabetic ketoacidosis, which is therefore more characteristic of type 1 diabetes, whereas partial insulin deficiency will suppress hepatic ketogenesis but not hepatic glucose output, resulting in hyperglycaemia and dehydration, and culminating in the hyperglycaemic hyperosmolar state. Hyperglycaemia is characteristic of diabetic ketoacidosis, particularly in the previously undiagnosed, but it is the acidosis and the associated electrolyte disorders that make this a life-threatening condition. Hyperglycaemia is the dominant feature of the hyperglycaemic hyperosmolar state, causing severe polyuria and fluid loss and leading to cellular dehydration. Progression from uncontrolled diabetes to a metabolic emergency may result from unrecognised diabetes, sometimes aggravated by glucose containing drinks, or metabolic stress due to infection or intercurrent illness and associated with increased levels of counter-regulatory hormones. Since diabetic ketoacidosis and the hyperglycaemic hyperosmolar state have a similar underlying pathophysiology the principles of treatment are similar (but not identical), and the conditions may be considered two extremes of a spectrum of disease, with individual patients often showing aspects of both. Pathogenesis of DKA and HHS Insulin is a powerful anabolic hormone which helps nutrients to enter the cells, where these nutrients can be used either as fuel or as building blocks for cell growth and expansion. The complementary action of insulin is to antagonise the breakdown of fuel stores. Thus, the relea Continue reading >>

Diabetic Ketoacidosis

Diabetic Ketoacidosis

Diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) is a potentially life-threatening complication of diabetes mellitus.[1] Signs and symptoms may include vomiting, abdominal pain, deep gasping breathing, increased urination, weakness, confusion, and occasionally loss of consciousness.[1] A person's breath may develop a specific smell.[1] Onset of symptoms is usually rapid.[1] In some cases people may not realize they previously had diabetes.[1] DKA happens most often in those with type 1 diabetes, but can also occur in those with other types of diabetes under certain circumstances.[1] Triggers may include infection, not taking insulin correctly, stroke, and certain medications such as steroids.[1] DKA results from a shortage of insulin; in response the body switches to burning fatty acids which produces acidic ketone bodies.[3] DKA is typically diagnosed when testing finds high blood sugar, low blood pH, and ketoacids in either the blood or urine.[1] The primary treatment of DKA is with intravenous fluids and insulin.[1] Depending on the severity, insulin may be given intravenously or by injection under the skin.[3] Usually potassium is also needed to prevent the development of low blood potassium.[1] Throughout treatment blood sugar and potassium levels should be regularly checked.[1] Antibiotics may be required in those with an underlying infection.[6] In those with severely low blood pH, sodium bicarbonate may be given; however, its use is of unclear benefit and typically not recommended.[1][6] Rates of DKA vary around the world.[5] In the United Kingdom, about 4% of people with type 1 diabetes develop DKA each year, while in Malaysia the condition affects about 25% a year.[1][5] DKA was first described in 1886 and, until the introduction of insulin therapy in the 1920s, it was almost univ Continue reading >>

Infections In Patients With Diabetes Mellitus: A Review Of Pathogenesis

Infections In Patients With Diabetes Mellitus: A Review Of Pathogenesis

Go to: Diabetes mellitus (DM) is a clinical syndrome associated with deficiency of insulin secretion or action. It is considered one of the largest emerging threats to health in the 21st century. It is estimated that there will be 380 million persons with DM in 2025.[1] Besides the classical complications of the disease, DM has been associated with reduced response of T cells, neutrophil function, and disorders of humoral immunity.[2–4] Consequently, DM increases the susceptibility to infections, both the most common ones as well as those that almost always affect only people with DM (e.g. rhinocerebral mucormycosis).[4] Such infections, in addition to the repercussions associated with its infectivity, may trigger DM complications such as hypoglycemia and ketoacidosis. This article aims to critically review the current knowledge on the mechanisms associated with the greater susceptibility of DM for developing infectious diseases and to describe the main infectious diseases associated with this metabolic disorder. Continue reading >>

What You Should Know About Diabetic Ketoacidosis

What You Should Know About Diabetic Ketoacidosis

Diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) is a buildup of acids in your blood. It can happen when your blood sugar is too high for too long. It could be life-threatening, but it usually takes many hours to become that serious. You can treat it and prevent it, too. It usually happens because your body doesn't have enough insulin. Your cells can't use the sugar in your blood for energy, so they use fat for fuel instead. Burning fat makes acids called ketones and, if the process goes on for a while, they could build up in your blood. That excess can change the chemical balance of your blood and throw off your entire system. People with type 1 diabetes are at risk for ketoacidosis, since their bodies don't make any insulin. Your ketones can also go up when you miss a meal, you're sick or stressed, or you have an insulin reaction. DKA can happen to people with type 2 diabetes, but it's rare. If you have type 2, especially when you're older, you're more likely to have a condition with some similar symptoms called HHNS (hyperosmolar hyperglycemic nonketotic syndrome). It can lead to severe dehydration. Test your ketones when your blood sugar is over 240 mg/dL or you have symptoms of high blood sugar, such as dry mouth, feeling really thirsty, or peeing a lot. You can check your levels with a urine test strip. Some glucose meters measure ketones, too. Try to bring your blood sugar down, and check your ketones again in 30 minutes. Call your doctor or go to the emergency room right away if that doesn't work, if you have any of the symptoms below and your ketones aren't normal, or if you have more than one symptom. You've been throwing up for more than 2 hours. You feel queasy or your belly hurts. Your breath smells fruity. You're tired, confused, or woozy. You're having a hard time breathing. Continue reading >>

Diabetic Ketoacidosis

Diabetic Ketoacidosis

Summarized from Nyenwe E, Kitabchi A. The evolution of diabetic ketoacidosis: An update of its etiology, pathogenesis and management. Metabolism 2016; 65: 507-21 Diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA), which is an acute, potentially life-threatening complication of poorly controlled diabetes, is the subject of a recent comprehensive review article. The authors discuss epidemiological issues, revealing increasing incidence of DKA and decreasing mortality. Once inevitably fatal, DKA now has a reported mortality rate of <1 % in adults and 5 % in the elderly who also have one or more chronic illnesses, in addition to diabetes. They reveal that although DKA more commonly affects those with type 1 diabetes, around a third of cases occur in those with type 2 diabetes. This introductory section also reminds that DKA is characterized by the presence of three cardinal biochemical features: raised blood glucose (hyperglycemia); presence of ketones in blood and urine (ketonemia, ketonuria); and metabolic acidosis. Insulin deficiency is central to the development of these three biochemical abnormalities. The very rare occurrence of euglycemic DKA (DKA with normal blood glucose) is highlighted by reference to recent reports of this condition in patients treated with a relatively new class of antidiabetic drug (the SGLT 2 inhibitors) that reduces blood glucose by inhibiting renal reabsorption of glucose. There follows discussion of factors that precipitate DKA (omission or inadequate dosing of insulin, and infection are the most common triggers), and the possible mechanisms responsible for ketosis-prone type 2 diabetes. This latter condition, which was recognized as an entity only relatively recently, is distinguished by the development of severe but transient failure of pancreatic β-cells to m Continue reading >>

Canagliflozin-associated Diabetic Ketoacidosis

Canagliflozin-associated Diabetic Ketoacidosis

This article requires a subscription for full access. NEJM Journal Watch articles published within the last six months are available to subscribers only. Articles published more than 6 months ago are available to registered users. Continue reading >>

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