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Understanding Dka For Nurses

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DKA diabetic ketoacidosis nursing management pathophysiology & treatment. DKA is a complication of diabetes mellitus and mainly affects type 1 diabetics. DKA management includes controlling hyperglycemia, ketosis, and acdidosis. Signs & Symptoms include polyuria, polydipsia, hyperglycemia greater than 300 mg/dL, Kussmaul breathing, acetone breath, and ketones in the urine. Typically DKA treatment includes: intravenous fluids, insulin therapy (IV regular insulin), and electrolyte replacement. This video details what the nurse needs to know for the NCLEX exam about diabetic ketoacidosis. I also touch on DKA vs HHS (diabetic ketoacidosis and hyperosmolar hyperglycemic nonketotic syndrome (please see the other video for more details). Quiz on DKA: http://www.registerednursern.com/diab... Lecture Notes for this video: http://www.registerednursern.com/diab... Diabetes NCLEX Review Videos: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list... Subscribe: http://www.youtube.com/subscription_c... Nursing School Supplies: http://www.registerednursern.com/the-... Nursing Job Search: http://www.registerednursern.com/nurs... Visit our website RegisteredNurseRN.com for free quizzes, nursing care plans, salary information, job search, and much more: http://www.registerednursern.com Check out other Videos: https://www.youtube.com/user/Register... Popular Playlists: "NCLEX Study Strategies": https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list... "Fluid & Electrolytes Made So Easy": https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list... "Nursing Skills Videos": https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list... "Nursing School Study Tips": https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list... "Nursing School Tips & Questions": https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list... "Teaching Tutorials": https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list... "Types of Nursing Specialties": https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list... "Healthcare Salary Information": https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list... "New Nurse Tips": https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list... "Nursing Career Help": https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list... "EKG Teaching Tutorials": https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list... "Personality Types": https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list... "Dosage & Calculations for Nurses": https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list... "Diabetes Health Managment": https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list...

Dka (diabetic Ketoacidosis): Real Life In The Emergency Room

This is the first in a series from Susan Dupont RN BSN who is an Emergency Room Nurse and contributor at NRSNG.com . . . Click to View All Articles in the “Real Life in the ER Series” Every patient is a mystery that needs to be solved. Some are easy, some are complex, some aren’t solvable, but the thrill of a good challenge is what keeps me coming back for more. The emergency room is full of unsolved mystery’s. Every once in a while a mystery worth writing about comes along. Altered Mental Status? It was like any normal shift. I had just discharged a patient and walked them out of the ER to turn around and see an EMS stretcher waiting to enter my room. I hadn’t even cleaned the room yet. I grabbed a piece of paper and pen and walked into my favorite type of patient, Altered Mental Status. This patient, a 20-year-old female, had been found wandering around the streets and stumbling around. She didn’t know her name and when she attempted to talk, random words were coming out of her mouth. She would only respond to a sternal rub and her breath was fruity. Vital signs: BP 80/48 mmHg Respirations of 32 Heart rate 125 bpm (sinus tachycardia on her EKG). After getting a readin Continue reading >>

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  1. jlr820, BSN

    Yes it is. The bloodstream is absolutely full of glucose (since it isn't entering cells and being metabolized). This glucose load makes the blood HYPERosmolar and the kidneys respond by trying to remove glucose through urination. They cannot effectively deal with the large glucose load, and that's why glucose "spills" into the urine. The process of excessive urine output secondary to the large glucose load is called osmotic diuresis, and the client loses a HUGE amount of fluid through this diuretic effect, leading to profound dehydration.

  2. NRSKarenRN

    check out these prior posts:
    question about dka - nursing for nurses
    nursing interventions - nursing for nurses
    clincal articles:
    diabetic ketoacidosis: emedicine pediatrics: cardiac disease and
    diabetic ketoacidosis: emedicine endocrinology
    how do i care for a patient with diabetic ketoacidosis
    dka nursing care plan
    acccn's critical care nursing - google books result

  3. ghurricane

    Thanks so much!! Here is another oddity that makes no sense. I know there is potassium depletion due to frequent urination, but why do labs usually indicate hyperkalemia?

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What is CLINICAL NURSE LEADER? What does CLINICAL NURSE LEADER mean? CLINICAL NURSE LEADER meaning - CLINICAL NURSE LEADER definition - CLINICAL NURSE LEADER explanation. Source: Wikipedia.org article, adapted under https://creativecommons.org/licenses/... license. Clinical Nurse Leader (CNL) is a relatively new nursing role that was developed in the United States to prepare highly skilled nurses focused on the improvement of quality and safety outcomes for patients or patient populations. The CNL is a registered nurse, with a Master of Science in Nursing who has completed advanced nursing coursework, including classes in pathophysiology, clinical assessment, finance management, epidemiology, healthcare systems leadership, clinical informatics, and pharmacology. CNLs are healthcare systems specialists that oversee patient care coordination, assess health risks, develop quality improvement strategies, facilitate team communication, and implement evidence-based solutions at the unit (microsystem) level. CNLs often work with clinical nurse specialists to help plan and coordinate complex patient care. The American Association of the Colleges of Nursing (AACN) delineates revised and updated competencies, curriculum development, and required clinical experiences expected of every graduate of a CNL master's education program, along with the minimum set of clinical experiences required to attain the end of program competencies. The Commission on Nurse Certification (CNC), an autonomous arm of the AACN, provides certification for the Clinical Nurse Leader. The AACN, along with nurse executives and nurse educators designed the Clinical Nurse Leader role (the first new role in nursing in 35 years) in response to the Institute of Medicine's (IOM) comprehensive report on medical errors, To Err is Human: Building a Safer Health System, released in November 1999. The report, extrapolating data from two previous studies, estimates that somewhere between 44,000 and 98,000 Americans die each year as a result of medical errors. Joint participation by education and practice leaders was instrumental in the successful creation of the CNL role. Among stakeholders joining the AACN on the Implementation Task Force (ITF) were the American Organization of Nurse Executives (AONE) and the Department of Veteran Affairs (DVA). Within the healthcare system, the need for nurses with the skill and knowledge set of the CNL had already been identified and nurses were completing both academic and clinical work without receiving recognition for the advanced competencies being acquired. The first CNL certification exam was held in April and May 2007. In July 2007, AACN Board of Directors approved the revised white paper on the Education and Role of the Clinical Nurse Leader. Currently, 2500 CNLs have been certified and are able to use the credential and title of CNL.

Diabetic Ketoacidosis: Implications For The Medical-surgical Nurse.

Abstract Diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) is an acute complication associated with type 1 diabetes mellitus. DKA accounts for a significant portion of annual health care expenditures and is considered a medical emergency. Previously treated in the ICU, DKA is now treated on general medical-surgical nursing units. To manage this crisis successfully, medical-surgical nurses must have a comprehensive knowledge and understanding of the pathophysiologic mechanisms, clinical manifestations, and treatment protocols. A critical pathway is presented to guide clinical care. Continue reading >>

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  1. TheCommuter

    You can post this question on this site's Nursing Student Assistance Forums and perhaps get an answer. One of our frequent users, Daytonite, loves to give detailed answers to these types of questions.
    http://allnurses.com/forums/f205/

  2. ICRN2008

    Here is the formula for anion gap:
    Agap = Na + K - Cl -CO2
    I would think that the doctor would be monitoring the glucose level (not the agap) to determine when to stop the insulin drip. Anyone else have an idea?

  3. P_RN

    One of our wonderful members Mark Hammerschmidt has a great FREE MICU site:
    http://www.icufaqs.org/
    Check section 4.2
    It's all acidosis/alkalosis

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A lecture on the recognition, pathogenesis, and management of diabetic ketoacidosis and the hyperosmolar hyperglycemic state. Use of the VA and Stanford name/logos is only to indicate my academic affiliation, and neither implies endorsement nor ownership of the included material.

Hyperglycemic Crises: Managing Acute Complications Of Diabetes

Authors: Kim Cathcart, MS, RN, RRT | Cheryl Duksta, RN, ADN, M.Ed | Kate Biggs, RN, MSN Hyperglycemia occurs from time to time in all people with diabetes. However, at times, hyperglycemia can lead to acute, life-threatening complications known as Hyperglycemic Crises. This course is designed to educate healthcare professionals about the emergencies associated with hyperglycemic crises, including causes, diagnosis, treatment, and prevention of Hyperosmolar Hyperglycemic State (HHS) and Diabetic Ketoacidosis (DKA). Course objectives include: Paraphrase the pathophysiology of diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) Interpret diagnostic findings related to DKA Relate the nurse’s role in caring for patients with diabetic complications About the Authors Kim Cathcart, MS, RN, RRT, started working in the field of inhalation therapy in 1976 and by 1979 had completed her first test to become a registered respiratory therapist. She earned a bachelor's degree in general studies and a master's degree in educational administration from the University of Dayton, and later she received her bachelor's degree in nursing from Wright State University. She has taught clinicals and labs in respiratory therapy an Continue reading >>

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Popular Questions

  1. TheCommuter

    You can post this question on this site's Nursing Student Assistance Forums and perhaps get an answer. One of our frequent users, Daytonite, loves to give detailed answers to these types of questions.
    http://allnurses.com/forums/f205/

  2. ICRN2008

    Here is the formula for anion gap:
    Agap = Na + K - Cl -CO2
    I would think that the doctor would be monitoring the glucose level (not the agap) to determine when to stop the insulin drip. Anyone else have an idea?

  3. P_RN

    One of our wonderful members Mark Hammerschmidt has a great FREE MICU site:
    http://www.icufaqs.org/
    Check section 4.2
    It's all acidosis/alkalosis

  4. -> Continue reading
read more

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