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Uncompensated Respiratory Acidosis

Partially Compensated Vs. Fully Compensated Abgs Practice

Partially Compensated Vs. Fully Compensated Abgs Practice

This is an NCLEX practice question on partially compensated vs fully compensated ABGs. This question provides a scenario about arterial blood gas results. As the nurse, you must determine if this is a respiratory or metabolic problem, alkalosis or acidosis along with if it is uncompensated, partially or fully compensated based on the results. This question is one of the many questions we will be practicing in our new series called “Weekly NCLEX Question”. So, every week be sure to tune into our YouTube Channel for the NCLEX Question of the Week. More NCLEX Weekly Practice Questions. To solve ABGs problems, I like to use the Tic Tac Toe method. If you are not familiar with this method, please watch my video on how to solve arterial blood gas problems with this method. The Tic Tac Toe method makes solving ABG problems so EASY. However, if the ABG values are partially or fully compensated you must take it a step further by analyzing the values further with this method, which is the purpose of this review. My goal is to show you how to use the Tic Tac Toe method for partially and fully compensated interpretation. So let’s begin: NCLEX Practice Questions on Partially vs. Fully Compensated ABGs Problem 1 A patient has the following arterial blood gas results: blood pH 7.43, PaCO2 28 mmHg, and HCO3 18 mEq/L. This is known as: A. Partially compensated respiratory alkalosis B. Fully compensated metabolic acidosis C. Partially compensated respiratory acidosis D. Fully compensated respiratory alkalosis The first thing you want to do is to pull from your memory bank the normal values for arterial blood gases. Here they are: <-Acid Base-> pH: 7.35-7.45 (less than 7.35 ACID & greater than 7.45 ALKALOTIC) PaCO2: 45-35 (greater than 45 ACID & less than 35 ALKALOTIC)** HCO3: 22-26 Continue reading >>

Respiratory Acidosis

Respiratory Acidosis

Respiratory acidosis is a medical emergency in which decreased ventilation (hypoventilation) increases the concentration of carbon dioxide in the blood and decreases the blood's pH (a condition generally called acidosis). Carbon dioxide is produced continuously as the body's cells respire, and this CO2 will accumulate rapidly if the lungs do not adequately expel it through alveolar ventilation. Alveolar hypoventilation thus leads to an increased PaCO2 (a condition called hypercapnia). The increase in PaCO2 in turn decreases the HCO3−/PaCO2 ratio and decreases pH. Terminology[edit] Acidosis refers to disorders that lower cell/tissue pH to < 7.35. Acidemia refers to an arterial pH < 7.36.[1] Types of respiratory acidosis[edit] Respiratory acidosis can be acute or chronic. In acute respiratory acidosis, the PaCO2 is elevated above the upper limit of the reference range (over 6.3 kPa or 45 mm Hg) with an accompanying acidemia (pH <7.36). In chronic respiratory acidosis, the PaCO2 is elevated above the upper limit of the reference range, with a normal blood pH (7.35 to 7.45) or near-normal pH secondary to renal compensation and an elevated serum bicarbonate (HCO3− >30 mm Hg). Causes[edit] Acute[edit] Acute respiratory acidosis occurs when an abrupt failure of ventilation occurs. This failure in ventilation may be caused by depression of the central respiratory center by cerebral disease or drugs, inability to ventilate adequately due to neuromuscular disease (e.g., myasthenia gravis, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, Guillain–Barré syndrome, muscular dystrophy), or airway obstruction related to asthma or chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) exacerbation. Chronic[edit] Chronic respiratory acidosis may be secondary to many disorders, including COPD. Hypoventilation Continue reading >>

Chapter 8: Acid-base Imbalances Multiple Choice

Chapter 8: Acid-base Imbalances Multiple Choice

Because the blood pH is acidic, the condition is an uncompensated state of acidosis. A fruity, acetone smell to the breath likely indicates the presence of ketones. People with type I diabetes may begin to form elevated levels of ketones in certain situations. Ketones are acidic, leading to Carl's state of uncompensated metabolic acidosis. Read each clinical scenario and then drag and drop the suspected acid-base imbalance that is best exemplified by that scenario. May was diagnosed with COPD 7 years ago. She presents with rapid respirations, cyanosis, and tachycardia. She recently had an upper respiratory infection. Her blood pH is acidic. Medical intervention, including respiratory stimulants and bronchodilators, helps stabilize May's breathing and arterial blood gases. Blood pH returns to the normal range. May's symptoms, lab findings and history point to ______________________. In this case, as blood pH has returned to the normal range, the acid-base disorder would be considered as "compensated." Initial pH was listed as acidic and issues such as recent upper respiratory infection and prior COPD diagnosis point to a respiratory condition. Taking all of this into account, Michelle has compensated respiratory acidosis. Read each clinical scenario and then drag and drop the suspected acid-base imbalance that is best exemplified by that scenario. Meryl, a 72-year-old woman, presents with hyperventilation due to severe anxiety. Respirations are shallow and very rapid. Speaking is difficult for her due to an elevated respiratory rate. Her arterial blood gases reveal an elevated pH value. Meryl's symptoms, lab findings and history point to ______________________. Because the blood gases reveal an elevated pH level, uncompensated alkalosis is present. The fact that Meryl i Continue reading >>

Respiratory Acidosis

Respiratory Acidosis

Practice Essentials Respiratory acidosis is an acid-base balance disturbance due to alveolar hypoventilation. Production of carbon dioxide occurs rapidly and failure of ventilation promptly increases the partial pressure of arterial carbon dioxide (PaCO2). [1] The normal reference range for PaCO2 is 35-45 mm Hg. Alveolar hypoventilation leads to an increased PaCO2 (ie, hypercapnia). The increase in PaCO2, in turn, decreases the bicarbonate (HCO3–)/PaCO2 ratio, thereby decreasing the pH. Hypercapnia and respiratory acidosis ensue when impairment in ventilation occurs and the removal of carbon dioxide by the respiratory system is less than the production of carbon dioxide in the tissues. Lung diseases that cause abnormalities in alveolar gas exchange do not typically result in alveolar hypoventilation. Often these diseases stimulate ventilation and hypocapnia due to reflex receptors and hypoxia. Hypercapnia typically occurs late in the disease process with severe pulmonary disease or when respiratory muscles fatigue. (See also Pediatric Respiratory Acidosis, Metabolic Acidosis, and Pediatric Metabolic Acidosis.) Acute vs chronic respiratory acidosis Respiratory acidosis can be acute or chronic. In acute respiratory acidosis, the PaCO2 is elevated above the upper limit of the reference range (ie, >45 mm Hg) with an accompanying acidemia (ie, pH < 7.35). In chronic respiratory acidosis, the PaCO2 is elevated above the upper limit of the reference range, with a normal or near-normal pH secondary to renal compensation and an elevated serum bicarbonate levels (ie, >30 mEq/L). Acute respiratory acidosis is present when an abrupt failure of ventilation occurs. This failure in ventilation may result from depression of the central respiratory center by one or another of the foll Continue reading >>

Respiratory Acidosis

Respiratory Acidosis

LABORATORY TESTS The following lab tests can be used to interpret and explain acidosis and alkalosis conditions. All are measured on blood samples. 1. pH: This measures hydrogen ions - Normal pH = 7.35-7.45 2. pCO2= Partial Pressure of Carbon Dioxide: Although this is a pressure measurement, it relates to the concentration of GASEOUS CO2 in the blood. A high pCO2 may indicate acidosis. A low pCO2 may indicate alkalosis. 3. HCO3- = Bicarbonate: This measures the concentration of HCO3- ion only. High values may indicate alkalosis since bicarbonate is a base. Low values may indicate acidosis. 4. CO2 = Carbon Dioxide Content: This is a measure of ALL CO2 liberated on adding acid to blood plasma. This measure both carbon dioxide dissolved and bicarbonate ions and is an older test. Do not confuse with pCO2 Typically, dissolved carbon dioxide = l.2-2.0 mmoles/L and HCO3- = 22-28 mmoles/L Therefore, although it is listed as CO2 content, the lab test really reflects HCO3- concentration. Respiratory Acidosis .ABNORMAL pH IN THE BODY: ACIDOSIS AND ALKALOSIS: INTRODUCTION: Normal blood pH is maintained between 7.35 and 7.45 by the regulatory systems. The lungs regulate the amount of carbon dioxide in the blood and the kidneys regulate the bicarbonate. When the pH decreases to below 7.35 an acidosis condition is present. Acidosis means that the hydrogen ions are increased and that pH and bicarbonate ions are decreased. A greater number of hydrogen ions are present in the blood than can be absorbed by the buffer systems. Alkalosis results when the pH is above 7.45. This condition results when the buffer base (bicarbonate ions) is greater than normal and the concentration of hydrogen ions are decreased. Both acidosis and alkalosis can be of two different types: respiratory and metabol Continue reading >>

Respiratory Acidosis

Respiratory Acidosis

What is respiratory acidosis? Respiratory acidosis is a condition that occurs when the lungs can’t remove enough of the carbon dioxide (CO2) produced by the body. Excess CO2 causes the pH of blood and other bodily fluids to decrease, making them too acidic. Normally, the body is able to balance the ions that control acidity. This balance is measured on a pH scale from 0 to 14. Acidosis occurs when the pH of the blood falls below 7.35 (normal blood pH is between 7.35 and 7.45). Respiratory acidosis is typically caused by an underlying disease or condition. This is also called respiratory failure or ventilatory failure. Normally, the lungs take in oxygen and exhale CO2. Oxygen passes from the lungs into the blood. CO2 passes from the blood into the lungs. However, sometimes the lungs can’t remove enough CO2. This may be due to a decrease in respiratory rate or decrease in air movement due to an underlying condition such as: There are two forms of respiratory acidosis: acute and chronic. Acute respiratory acidosis occurs quickly. It’s a medical emergency. Left untreated, symptoms will get progressively worse. It can become life-threatening. Chronic respiratory acidosis develops over time. It doesn’t cause symptoms. Instead, the body adapts to the increased acidity. For example, the kidneys produce more bicarbonate to help maintain balance. Chronic respiratory acidosis may not cause symptoms. Developing another illness may cause chronic respiratory acidosis to worsen and become acute respiratory acidosis. Initial signs of acute respiratory acidosis include: headache anxiety blurred vision restlessness confusion Without treatment, other symptoms may occur. These include: sleepiness or fatigue lethargy delirium or confusion shortness of breath coma The chronic form of Continue reading >>

Easy Way To Interpret Abg Values

Easy Way To Interpret Abg Values

ABG values can be very intimidating! Its hard to remember all the different normal values, what they mean, and which direction theyre supposed to be going. With so much information, its super easy to get mixed up and make a stupid mistake on an exam, even when you really DO know how to interpret ABGs. In this article, Im focusing more on the How to, rather than understanding whats going on with the A&P, which Ive already done in previous articles. If you want to understand whythese steps work (which you should do anyway to become a great nurse!),take some time to review my articles on Respiratory Imbalances and Metabolic Imbalances . Heres my 7-step method to interpreting ABGs. We have three puzzle pieces to put together: B)uncompensated, partially compensated, or compensated 1) Across the top of your page, write down the normal values for the three most important ABG lab results: pH (7.35-7.45), PaCO2 (35-45), and HCO3 (22-26). 2) Underneath pH, draw arrows to remind you which direction is acidic (down), and which direction is basic (down). 3) UnderneathPaCO2, and HCO3, draw arrows to remind you what abnormally high and low values would do to the bodys pH. When youre done, your page should look something like this: So far, we havent even looked at the question yet, were just trying to prevent any stupid mistakes!! 4) Now you can finally look at the patients ABG values. Check the pH and decide if the value is normal, high, or low. 4a) If the pH is normal, check PaCO2, and HCO3. If they are both normal, then you patient is fine and you can stop here. But if one or both of these values is abnormal, then continue to step 5. 5) Identify if the patient has alkalosis or acidosis. 5a) If the pH is abnormal, then compare it to the arrows you wrote at the top of your paper and Continue reading >>

Uncompensated Acidosis | Definition Of Uncompensated Acidosis By Medical Dictionary

Uncompensated Acidosis | Definition Of Uncompensated Acidosis By Medical Dictionary

Uncompensated acidosis | definition of uncompensated acidosis by Medical dictionary Related to uncompensated acidosis: acidotic , acidemia an acidosis in which the pH of body fluids is subnormal, because restoration of normal acid-base balance is not possible or has not yet been achieved. a pathological condition resulting from accumulation of acid or depletion of the alkaline reserve (bicarbonate content) in the blood and body tissues, and characterized by increase in hydrogen ion concentration (decrease in pH). The optimal acid-base balance is maintained by chemical buffers, biological activities of the cells, and effective functioning of the lungs and kidneys. The opposite of acidosis is alkalosis . It is rare that acidosis occurs in the absence of some underlying disease process. The more obvious signs of severe acidosis are muscle twitching, involuntary movement, cardiac arrhythmias, disorientation and coma. a condition in which the compensatory mechanisms have returned the pH toward normal. a metabolic acidosis produced by accumulation of ketones in uncontrolled diabetes mellitus. may result from administration of drugs, such as urinary acidifiers, or anesthetic agents which depress respiration. the accumulation of lactate in the rumen in ruminants and the stomach of horses, and hence in the blood, as a result of overfeeding with readily fermentable carbohydrate. See also carbohydrate engorgement . acidosis resulting from accumulation in the blood of keto acids (derived from fat metabolism) at the expense of bicarbonate, thus diminishing the body's ability to neutralize acids. This type of acidosis can occur when there is an acid gain, as in diabetic ketoacidosis, lactic acidosis, poisoning and failure of the renal tubules to reabsorb bicarbonate. It can also res Continue reading >>

Respiratory Acidosis

Respiratory Acidosis

DEFINITION Respiratory acidosis = a primary acid-base disorder in which arterial pCO2 rises to an abnormally high level. PATHOPHYSIOLOGY arterial pCO2 is normally maintained at a level of about 40 mmHg by a balance between production of CO2 by the body and its removal by alveolar ventilation. PaCO2 is proportional to VCO2/VA VCO2 = CO2 production by the body VA = alveolar ventilation an increase in arterial pCO2 can occur by one of three possible mechanisms: presence of excess CO2 in the inspired gas decreased alveolar ventilation increased production of CO2 by the body CAUSES Inadequate Alveolar Ventilation central respiratory depression drug depression of respiratory centre (eg by opiates, sedatives, anaesthetics) neuromuscular disorders lung or chest wall defects airway obstruction inadequate mechanical ventilation Over-production of CO2 -> hypercatabolic disorders Malignant hyperthermia Thyroid storm Phaeochromocytoma Early sepsis Liver failure Increased Intake of Carbon Dioxide Rebreathing of CO2-containing expired gas Addition of CO2 to inspired gas Insufflation of CO2 into body cavity (eg for laparoscopic surgery) EFFECTS CO2 is lipid soluble -> depressing effects on intracellular metabolism RESP increased minute ventilation via both central and peripheral chemoreceptors CVS increased sympathetic tone peripheral vasodilation by direct effect on vessels acutely the acidosis will cause a right shift of the oxygen dissociation curve if the acidosis persists, a decrease in red cell 2,3 DPG occurs which shifts the curve back to the left CNS cerebral vasodilation increasing cerebral blood flow and intracranial pressure central depression at very high levels of pCO2 potent stimulation of ventilation this can result in dyspnoea, disorientation, acute confusion, headache, Continue reading >>

Acidosis

Acidosis

For acidosis referring to acidity of the urine, see renal tubular acidosis. "Acidemia" redirects here. It is not to be confused with Academia. Acidosis is a process causing increased acidity in the blood and other body tissues (i.e., an increased hydrogen ion concentration). If not further qualified, it usually refers to acidity of the blood plasma. The term acidemia describes the state of low blood pH, while acidosis is used to describe the processes leading to these states. Nevertheless, the terms are sometimes used interchangeably. The distinction may be relevant where a patient has factors causing both acidosis and alkalosis, wherein the relative severity of both determines whether the result is a high, low, or normal pH. Acidosis is said to occur when arterial pH falls below 7.35 (except in the fetus – see below), while its counterpart (alkalosis) occurs at a pH over 7.45. Arterial blood gas analysis and other tests are required to separate the main causes. The rate of cellular metabolic activity affects and, at the same time, is affected by the pH of the body fluids. In mammals, the normal pH of arterial blood lies between 7.35 and 7.50 depending on the species (e.g., healthy human-arterial blood pH varies between 7.35 and 7.45). Blood pH values compatible with life in mammals are limited to a pH range between 6.8 and 7.8. Changes in the pH of arterial blood (and therefore the extracellular fluid) outside this range result in irreversible cell damage.[1] Signs and symptoms[edit] General symptoms of acidosis.[2] These usually accompany symptoms of another primary defect (respiratory or metabolic). Nervous system involvement may be seen with acidosis and occurs more often with respiratory acidosis than with metabolic acidosis. Signs and symptoms that may be seen i Continue reading >>

Respiratory Acidosis: Causes, Symptoms, And Treatment

Respiratory Acidosis: Causes, Symptoms, And Treatment

Respiratory acidosis develops when air exhaled out of the lungs does not adequately exchange the carbon dioxide formed in the body for the inhaled oxygen in air. There are many conditions or situations that may lead to this. One of the conditions that can reduce the ability to adequately exhale carbon dioxide (CO2) is chronic obstructive pulmonary disease or COPD. CO2 that is not exhaled can shift the normal balance of acids and bases in the body toward acidic. The CO2 mixes with water in the body to form carbonic acid. With chronic respiratory acidosis, the body partially makes up for the retained CO2 and maintains acid-base balance near normal. The body's main response is an increase in excretion of carbonic acid and retention of bicarbonate base in the kidneys. Medical treatment for chronic respiratory acidosis is mainly treatment of the underlying illness which has hindered breathing. Treatment may also be applied to improve breathing directly. Respiratory acidosis can also be acute rather than chronic, developing suddenly from respiratory failure. Emergency medical treatment is required for acute respiratory acidosis to: Regain healthful respiration Restore acid-base balance Treat the causes of the respiratory failure Here are some key points about respiratory acidosis. More detail and supporting information is in the main article. Respiratory acidosis develops when decreased breathing fails to get rid of CO2 formed in the body adequately The pH of blood, as a measure of acid-base balance, is maintained near normal in chronic respiratory acidosis by compensating responses in the body mainly in the kidney Acute respiratory acidosis requires emergency treatment Tipping acid-base balance to acidosis When acid levels in the body are in balance with the base levels in t Continue reading >>

Respiratory Acidosis

Respiratory Acidosis

(Video) Overview of Acid-Base Maps and Compensatory Mechanisms By James L. Lewis, III, MD, Attending Physician, Brookwood Baptist Health and Saint Vincents Ascension Health, Birmingham Respiratory acidosis is primary increase in carbon dioxide partial pressure (Pco2) with or without compensatory increase in bicarbonate (HCO3); pH is usually low but may be near normal. Cause is a decrease in respiratory rate and/or volume (hypoventilation), typically due to CNS, pulmonary, or iatrogenic conditions. Respiratory acidosis can be acute or chronic; the chronic form is asymptomatic, but the acute, or worsening, form causes headache, confusion, and drowsiness. Signs include tremor, myoclonic jerks, and asterixis. Diagnosis is clinical and with ABG and serum electrolyte measurements. The cause is treated; oxygen (O2) and mechanical ventilation are often required. Respiratory acidosis is carbon dioxide (CO2) accumulation (hypercapnia) due to a decrease in respiratory rate and/or respiratory volume (hypoventilation). Causes of hypoventilation (discussed under Ventilatory Failure ) include Conditions that impair CNS respiratory drive Conditions that impair neuromuscular transmission and other conditions that cause muscular weakness Obstructive, restrictive, and parenchymal pulmonary disorders Hypoxia typically accompanies hypoventilation. Distinction is based on the degree of metabolic compensation; carbon dioxide is initially buffered inefficiently, but over 3 to 5 days the kidneys increase bicarbonate reabsorption significantly. Symptoms and signs depend on the rate and degree of Pco2 increase. CO2 rapidly diffuses across the blood-brain barrier. Symptoms and signs are a result of high CO2 concentrations and low pH in the CNS and any accompanying hypoxemia. Acute (or acutely wor Continue reading >>

Abg’s—it’s All In The Family

Abg’s—it’s All In The Family

By Cyndi Cramer, BA, RN, OCN, PCRN RealNurseEd.com 3.0 Contact Hour Self Learning Module Objectives: Identify the components of the ABG and their normal ranges Interpret ABG values and determine the acid base abnormality given Identify the major causes of acid base abnormalities Describe symptoms associated with acid base abnormalities Describe interventions to correct acid base abnormalities Identify the acceptable O2 level per ABG and Pulse Oximetry Identify four causes of low PaO2 The Respiratory System (Acid); CO2 is a volatile acid If you increase your respiratory rate (hyperventilation) you "blow off" CO2 (acid) therefore decreasing your CO2 acid—giving you ALKLAOSIS If you decrease your respiratory rate (hypoventilation) you retain CO2 (acid) therefore increasing your CO2 (acid)—giving you ACIDOSIS The Renal System (Base); the kidneys rid the body of the nonvolatile acids H+ (hydrogen ions) and maintain a constant bicarb (HCO3). Bicarbonate is the body’s base You have Acidosis when you have excess H+ and decreased HCO3- causing a decrease in pH. The Kidneys try to adjust for this by excreting H+ and retaining HCO3- base. The Respiratory System will try to compensate by increasing ventilation to blow off CO2 (acid) and therefore decrease the Acidosis. You have Alkalosis when H+ decreases and you have excess (or increased) HCO3- base. The kidneys excrete HCO3- (base) and retain H+ to compensate. The respiratory system tries to compensate with hypoventilation to retain CO2 (acid) To decrease the alkalosis Compensation The respiratory system can effect a change in 15-30 minutes The renal system takes several hours to days to have an effect. RESPIRATORY ACIDOSIS: pH < 7.35 (Normal: 7.35 - 7.45) CO2 > 45 (Normal: 35 – 45) 1. Causes: Hypoventilation a. Depressio Continue reading >>

Respiratory Alkalosis

Respiratory Alkalosis

Respiratory alkalosis is a consequence of the rate of excretion of carbon dioxide exceeding the rate of production, leading to a decrease in PCO2. Larry R. Engelking, in Textbook of Veterinary Physiological Chemistry (Third Edition) , 2015 Steady state blood CO2 levels remain relatively constant in compensated respiratory acidosis and alkalosis (i.e., CO2 in=CO2 out). Uncompensated respiratory alkalosis is associated with an increased blood pH, and a modestly decreased HCO3 concentration. Renal compensation for respiratory alkalosis involves a decrease in HCO3 reabsorption. The blood pH may be within the normal range in some mixed acid-base disorders. A mixed acid-base disturbance is indicated when the Pco2 and blood HCO3 concentration are moving in opposite directions. Mixed acid-base distrubances can be additive, or subtractive. The bicarbonate buffer equation is shifted to the left in metabolic acidosis and respiratory alkalosis. Respiratory alkalosis can be due to either direct or reflex hypoxemic stimulation of the respiratory center, to pulmonary disease, or to excessive mechanical ventilation. Horacio J. Adrogu, Nicolaos E. Madias, in Comprehensive Clinical Nephrology (Fourth Edition) , 2010 Respiratory alkalosis is the acid-base disturbance initiated by a reduction in CO2 tension of body fluids. The secondary decrease in plasma HCO3 concentration observed in acute and chronic hypocapnia is an integral part of the respiratory alkalosis. Whole-body CO2 stores are decreased and Paco2 is less than 35mmHg (4.7kP) in patients with simple respiratory alkalosis who are at rest and at sea level. An element of respiratory alkalosis may still occur with higher levels of Paco2 in patients with metabolic alkalosis, in whom a normal Paco2 is inappropriately low for this prim Continue reading >>

Uncompensated, Partially Compensated, Or Combined Abg Problems

Uncompensated, Partially Compensated, Or Combined Abg Problems

Arterial Blood Gas (ABG) analysis requires in-depth expertise. If the results are not understood right, or are wrongly interpreted, it can result in wrong diagnosis and end up in an inappropriate management of the patient. ABG analysis is carried out when the patient is dealing with the following conditions: • Breathing problems • Lung diseases (asthma, cystic fibrosis, COPD) • Heart failure • Kidney failure ABG reports help in answering the following questions: 1. Is there acidosis or alkalosis? 2. If acidosis is present, whether it is in an uncompensated state, partially compensated state, or in fully compensated state? 3. Whether acidosis is respiratory or metabolic? ABG reports provide the following descriptions: PaCO2 (partial pressure of dissolved CO2 in the blood) and PaO2 (partial pressure of dissolved O2 in the blood) describe the efficiency of exchange of gas in the alveolar level into the blood. Any change in these levels causes changes in the pH. HCO3 (bicarbonate in the blood) maintains the pH of the blood within normal range by compensatory mechanisms, which is either by retaining or increasing HCO3 excretion by the kidney. When PaCO2 increases, HCO3 decreases to compensate the pH. The following table summarizes the changes: ABG can be interpreted using the following analysis points: Finding acidosis or alkalosis: • If pH is more it is acidosis, if pH is less it is alkalosis. Finding compensated, partially compensated, or uncompensated ABG problems: • When PaCO2 is high, but pH is normal instead of being acidic, and if HCO3 levels are also increased, then it means that the compensatory mechanism has retained more HCO3 to maintain the pH. • When PaCO2 and HCO3 values are high but pH is acidic, then it indicates partial compensation. It means t Continue reading >>

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