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Uncompensated Respiratory Acidosis

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Respiratory acidosis #sign and symptoms of Respiratory acidosis Respiratory acidosis ABGs Analyse https://youtu.be/L5MWy1iHacI Plz share n subscribe my chanel is a condition that occurs when the lungs cant remove enough of the Suctioning https://youtu.be/hMJGkxvXTW0 carbon dioxide (CO2) produced by the body. Excess CO2 causes the pH of blood and other bodily fluids to decrease, making them too acidic. Normally, the body is able to balance the ions that control acidity. This balance is measured on a pH scale from 0 to 14. Acidosis occurs when the pH of the blood falls below 7.35 (normal blood pH is between 7.35 and 7.45).Rinku Chaudhary NSG officer AMU ALIGARH https://www.facebook.com/rinkutch/ Respiratory acidosis is typically caused by an underlying disease or condition. This is also called respiratory failure or ventilatory failure. Suctioning https://youtu.be/hMJGkxvXTW0 Normally, the lungs take in oxygen and exhale CO2. Oxygen passes from the lungs into the blood. CO2 passes from the blood into the lungs. However, sometimes the lungs cant remove enough CO2. This may be due to a decrease in respiratory rate or decrease in air movement due to an underlying condition such as: asthma COPD pneumonia sleep apnea TYPES Forms of respiratory acidosis There are two forms of respiratory acidosis: acute and chronic. Acute respiratory acidosis occurs quickly. Its a medical emergency. Left untreated, symptoms will get progressively worse. It can become life-threatening. Chronic respiratory acidosis develops over time. It doesnt cause symptoms. Instead, the body adapts to the increased acidity. For example, the kidneys produce more bicarbonate to help maintain balance. Chronic respiratory acidosis may not cause symptoms. Developing another illness may cause chronic respiratory acidosis to worsen and become acute respiratory acidosis. SYMPTOMS Symptoms of respiratory acidosis Initial signs of acute respiratory acidosis include: headache anxiety blurred vision restlessness confusion Without treatment, other symptoms may occur. These include: https://www.healthline.com/health/res... sleepiness or fatigue lethargy delirium or confusion shortness of breath coma The chronic form of respiratory acidosis doesnt typically cause any noticeable symptoms. Signs are subtle and nonspecific and may include: memory loss sleep disturbances personality changes CAUSES Common causes of respiratory acidosis The lungs and the kidneys are the major organs that help regulate your bloods pH. The lungs remove acid by exhaling CO2, and the kidneys excrete acids through the urine. The kidneys also regulate your bloods concentration of bicarbonate (a base). Respiratory acidosis is usually caused by a lung disease or condition that affects normal breathing or impairs the lungs ability to remove CO2. Some common causes of the chronic form are: asthma chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) acute pulmonary edema severe obesity (which can interfere with expansion of the lungs) neuromuscular disorders (such as multiple sclerosis or muscular dystrophy) scoliosis Some common causes of the acute form are: lung disorders (COPD, emphysema, asthma, pneumonia) conditions that affect the rate of breathing muscle weakness that affects breathing or taking a deep breath obstructed airways (due to choking or other causes) sedative overdose cardiac arrest DIAGNOSIS How is respiratory acidosis diagnosed? The goal of diagnostic tests for respiratory acidosis is to look for any pH imbalance, to determine the severity of the imbalance, and to determine the condition causing the imbalance. Several tools can help doctors diagnose respiratory acidosis. Blood gas measurement Blood gas is a series of tests used to measure oxygen and CO2 in the blood. A healthcare provider will take a sample of blood from your artery. High levels of CO2 can indicate acidosis.

Respiratory Acidosis

What is respiratory acidosis? Respiratory acidosis is a condition that occurs when the lungs can’t remove enough of the carbon dioxide (CO2) produced by the body. Excess CO2 causes the pH of blood and other bodily fluids to decrease, making them too acidic. Normally, the body is able to balance the ions that control acidity. This balance is measured on a pH scale from 0 to 14. Acidosis occurs when the pH of the blood falls below 7.35 (normal blood pH is between 7.35 and 7.45). Respiratory acidosis is typically caused by an underlying disease or condition. This is also called respiratory failure or ventilatory failure. Normally, the lungs take in oxygen and exhale CO2. Oxygen passes from the lungs into the blood. CO2 passes from the blood into the lungs. However, sometimes the lungs can’t remove enough CO2. This may be due to a decrease in respiratory rate or decrease in air movement due to an underlying condition such as: There are two forms of respiratory acidosis: acute and chronic. Acute respiratory acidosis occurs quickly. It’s a medical emergency. Left untreated, symptoms will get progressively worse. It can become life-threatening. Chronic respiratory acidosis develops Continue reading >>

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  1. RonSwansoneer

    So I tried taking these 15 min before a workout like it says to. Plus some mct, creatine, and c8. Bcaa during the workout. Ate breakfast, skipped lunch, evening exercise. Almost 5 days since last restarting keto adaptation and showing low-moderate on the sticks. What happened was after a set of intense exercise, I started to feel hypoglycemic. Got that really strong hunger pang, followed by nausea right after. Quickly recovered before it progressed to cold sweats and fainting, but I'm curious what you guys think I did wrong here. Passing out from exercise is not something I've almost done before. I thought I should get some extra energy in me since I was still in the keto flu zone, but I was careful of what I took so as not to cause an insulin release during the workout. Should I just not be exercising during that re-adaptation, or did something I took knock my blood sugar too low before I was keto adapted enough to tolerate it better?

  2. balisane

    You ran out of sodium. Return the ketones.

  3. RonSwansoneer

    I did have some low sodium high potassium salt with it, but the ketones were supposed to be sodium and calcium salts. Is there a better brand of ketones, like the sodium potassium one? Or should I have just had some regular salt?

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Chapter 8: Acid-base Imbalances Multiple Choice

Because the blood pH is acidic, the condition is an uncompensated state of acidosis. A fruity, acetone smell to the breath likely indicates the presence of ketones. People with type I diabetes may begin to form elevated levels of ketones in certain situations. Ketones are acidic, leading to Carl's state of uncompensated metabolic acidosis. Read each clinical scenario and then drag and drop the suspected acid-base imbalance that is best exemplified by that scenario. May was diagnosed with COPD 7 years ago. She presents with rapid respirations, cyanosis, and tachycardia. She recently had an upper respiratory infection. Her blood pH is acidic. Medical intervention, including respiratory stimulants and bronchodilators, helps stabilize May's breathing and arterial blood gases. Blood pH returns to the normal range. May's symptoms, lab findings and history point to ______________________. In this case, as blood pH has returned to the normal range, the acid-base disorder would be considered as "compensated." Initial pH was listed as acidic and issues such as recent upper respiratory infection and prior COPD diagnosis point to a respiratory condition. Taking all of this into account, Miche Continue reading >>

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  1. Aniala

    Which of the following is classified as a ketone body?
    a. Sorbitol
    b. Pyruvate
    c. Acetyl CoA
    d. Acetoacetate
    e. Oxaloacetate

  2. Phillip

    ANS: D

  3. Sam Bruno

    Thanks for the answer, I sent you a forum message for another one.

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http://bit.ly/1HjUiAOUncompensated Metabolic Acidosis, um weitere Informationen ber Uncompensated Metabolic Acidosis, klicken Sie bitte aufhttp://bit.ly/1HjUiAO

Uncompensated Acidosis | Definition Of Uncompensated Acidosis By Medical Dictionary

Uncompensated acidosis | definition of uncompensated acidosis by Medical dictionary Related to uncompensated acidosis: acidotic , acidemia an acidosis in which the pH of body fluids is subnormal, because restoration of normal acid-base balance is not possible or has not yet been achieved. a pathological condition resulting from accumulation of acid or depletion of the alkaline reserve (bicarbonate content) in the blood and body tissues, and characterized by increase in hydrogen ion concentration (decrease in pH). The optimal acid-base balance is maintained by chemical buffers, biological activities of the cells, and effective functioning of the lungs and kidneys. The opposite of acidosis is alkalosis . It is rare that acidosis occurs in the absence of some underlying disease process. The more obvious signs of severe acidosis are muscle twitching, involuntary movement, cardiac arrhythmias, disorientation and coma. a condition in which the compensatory mechanisms have returned the pH toward normal. a metabolic acidosis produced by accumulation of ketones in uncontrolled diabetes mellitus. may result from administration of drugs, such as urinary acidifiers, or anesthetic agents which Continue reading >>

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  1. htone

    'Grondpad', on 08 Jul 2013 - 06:39 AM, said:

    OK, I have an experiences to add that I don’t know how to put gently, so apologies if it is a bit on the umhhh sensitive side:
    My beautiful wife and I have been battling to conceive the last 3.5 years. It was really a terrible time that amounted to us spending lots and lots of money and we went through many treatments. Now I am so chuffed cause our little Peanut is 12 weeks into the pregnancy this week.
    About 6 weeks ago we started chatting about the path we took to get here. There were artificial inseminations, various doctors and we were scheduled for an invetro this September. One of the doctors we went to was a Homeopath. He was not successful in what he did but on one of the visits he did say that I should eat as much butter and fresh avo as I can find cause it helps with the little swimmers. At that time I did not even know about LCHF and didn’t pay much attention to it, but it popped into my mind during the conversation with my wife.
    Seeing that the problem was with me (low sperm count due to the mumps), I have a strange feeling that my diet might have helped here. My wife got pregnant 3 months after I started with LCHF and eating all those butter, coconut oil, avo etc. I browsed the web and cannot actually find any research done on this subject, but there must be a reason why a Homeopath would say something like that. I have to add that this is the only thing that changed in our lives, and my wife is not on LCHF. Maybe just a very very very happy coincidence. But either way, I AM GONNE BE A DAD. Fantastic!
    Fantastic news and allow me to join the chorus of CONGRATULATIONS on here !
    Now read up about LCHF during pregnancy - there's a LOT of info out there and perhaps you and your wife together can change some of your child's destiny... there's a lot of theorizing going on about our adult eating patterns and the way we favour carbs being as a result of our mothers who ate a lot of carbs when they were pregnant with us.... Just saying

  2. Marge

    'htone', on 08 Jul 2013 - 12:48 PM, said:

    I am not answering FOR helpmytrap, I am just answering in general.
    I test my BG using a blood glucose meter - In my case a Roche AccuCheck Nano - an absolutely brilliant little meter.
    (https://www.accu-che...nano/index.html) No, I don't work for them...
    You prick your finger, "suck up" the droplet of blood with a special little BG "stick" that fits into the machine and about 5 seconds later you have the reading. It can store about 500 readings and in my case I went OTT and bought the Roche 360 BG analysis software, so I have a complete database of all my blood checks since I first started measuring. I download the readings from the tester to my PC where those are then nicely graphed over time. This was where I could clearly see how I all but cured my Type 2 diabetes following a LCHF eating plan !
    The meters are relatively cheap, in fact if you can make contact with one of the reps from e.g. Roche they will give you one for free - they make their money off the BG sticks (which some medical aid plans pay for).
    Cool thanks, will have a look at the accu-check-thingy, it would be very interesting to get a more regular reading.
    I just had a glucose check at dischem and the reading was 4.8 after about 10 days into my LCHF diet. Tried to google what the ideal measurement is so if anyone can comment it would help.
    (The dischem test did cost me R35 so might as well buy the home kit. It also included an old tannie nurse who lectured me on my bad eating habits seeing that I'm only eating 3 times a day, how my insulin levels will drop, eating no fruit and carbs will give me diabetes, and how I'm not allowed to buy a home glucose test kit seeing that I don't have diabetes (yet, according to her) and a lot of other old school 'advice' on what and when to eat....)

  3. Cuppa Bru

    'htone', on 08 Jul 2013 - 12:48 PM, said:

    I am not answering FOR helpmytrap, I am just answering in general.
    I test my BG using a blood glucose meter - In my case a Roche AccuCheck Nano - an absolutely brilliant little meter.
    (https://www.accu-che...nano/index.html) No, I don't work for them...
    You prick your finger, "suck up" the droplet of blood with a special little BG "stick" that fits into the machine and about 5 seconds later you have the reading. It can store about 500 readings and in my case I went OTT and bought the Roche 360 BG analysis software, so I have a complete database of all my blood checks since I first started measuring. I download the readings from the tester to my PC where those are then nicely graphed over time. This was where I could clearly see how I all but cured my Type 2 diabetes following a LCHF eating plan !
    The meters are relatively cheap, in fact if you can make contact with one of the reps from e.g. Roche they will give you one for free - they make their money off the BG sticks (which some medical aid plans pay for).
    Interesting on the subsidised BG meters!
    Followed the link and got a certificate. Looks like the subsidy is for USA only, but worth a shot.

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