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Toxic Acidosis

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This is a video of how I make BONE BROTH - EASY BASIC RECIPE! Please SHARE, LIKE and COMMENT if you want to see more what I eat in a day videos and recipes! I eat a WIDE variety of nutrient and mineral rich foods, so this video is just a small sample of my menu. WORKS FOR WEIGHT LOSS OR MAINTENANCE, just increase calories or fat & protein to maintain or gain muscle! Thanks :-) Support my channel on PayPal by donating $1 or more, once or monthly up to you! - To help me justify my time & keep the videos coming and getting better as this is my job, I love helping you guys! --- : https://www.paypal.com/donate/?token=... Support my channel with $5 or more monthly on My Patreon and get featured in my credits and a big thank you in every future video! : https://www.patreon.com/alvinarayne THANK YOU SO MUCH, YOUR SUPPORT MEANS SO MUCH TO ME! Contact Me: [email protected] *** for business inquiries only *** I do not have the time to respond to personal emails or diet questions in my email, if you have a question for me, please leave it under my videos in the comment sections or on my Patreon page linked above. Thanks for understanding! My FACEBOOK Page: https://www.facebook.com/AlvinaRa

Who | Basic Analytical Toxicology

General laboratory findings in clinical toxicology Marked hypoglycaemia often results from overdosage with insulin, sulfonylureas, such as tolbutamide, or other antidiabetic drugs. Hypoglycaemia may also complicate severe poisoning with a number of agents including iron salts and certain fungi, and may follow ingestion of acetylsalicylic acid, ethanol (especially in children or fasting adults) and paracetamol if liver failure ensues. Hypoglycin is a potent hypoglycaemic agent found in unripe ackee fruit (Blighia sapida) and is responsible for Jamaican vomiting sickness. Hyperglycaemia is a less common complication of poisoning than hypoglycaemia, but has been reported after overdosage with acetylsalicylic acid, salbutamol and theophylline. Coma resulting from overdosage with hypnotic, sedative, neuroleptic or opioid drugs is often characterized by hypoxia and respiratory acidosis. Unless appropriate treatment is instituted, however, a mixed acid-base disturbance with metabolic acidosis will supervene. In contrast, overdosage with salicylates such as acetylsalicylic acid initially causes hyperventilation and respiratory alkalosis, which may progress to the mixed metabolic acidosis Continue reading >>

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Popular Questions

  1. Dave Pereira

    Almost none.. I believe a 1/3 of a serving can pop the average person out of ketosis. This really depends on how the individual’s body will uptake, process and eliminate the alcohol (sugars). These vary on size, metabolism, hormonal health, etc.

  2. Doug Freyburger

    Being in ketosis roughly doubles the impact of alcohol. Be careful and cautious how much you drink! Plan on drinking half as much because it will hit you very hard. That is your real limit. In the US a binge is 5+ drinks in the same day. Since alcohol hits us twice as hard in ketosis that means the limit is 2–3. Have 3 shots of vodka and you will definitely be hammered! That’s your limit.
    When there is any alcohol present the body will burn it to the exclusion of fat until it’s gone. On a time scale of minutes and hours there is no amount of alcohol that does not interfere with being in ketosis. The deal is, the time scale for ketosis when dieting in not hour to hour. It’s day to day.
    Your next concern isn’t being in ketosis the next day. Unless you pass out from the booze you will be in ketosis the next day. It’s how long that drink will stall you. Unfortunately that answer is different for everyone. Some only pause for a day when they have a shot or two. Some pause for 2 weeks. You have to try it and see.

    My take is if you still have 50+ pounds to lose it’s not worth it. Alcohol is a social issue not a need. It’s not a high enough priority to care about if you still have 50+ to lose. And if you are so driven to have a shot anyways, that’s a drinking problem in addition to a weight loss discussion. But later, a week of pause just isn’t a big deal since loss rates are slower as you have less to lose. Not worth drinking every month, but probably worth it about every other month. Once you figure out how long you pause from drinking.

  3. Ron Hunter

    I think it’s an individual response. I recommend this article:

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Video lesson on the negative effects of ethanol on liver metabolism. Alcohol abuse can lead to toxic outcomes on the metabolism of the liver, including dysregulation of glycolysis, lactic acidosis, TCA cycle dysfunction, hypoglycemia, and hyperlipidemia, leading to fatty liver disease (hepatosteatosis). This lesson will explain why and how these toxic outcomes occur. Hey everyone, in this lesson you will learn what the consequences of ethanol consumption and metabolism are on the functioning of important metabolic pathways in the liver. You will learn the step-by-step pathway by which alcohol metabolism and its metabolites alters metabolism and function of glycolysis, TCA cycle, gluconeogenesis, and fatty acid synthesis and oxidation. I hope you all find this video helpful! If you do, please like and subscribe for more videos like this one :) ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- For books and other supplemental information on these topics, please check out my Amazon Affiliate Page https://www.amazon.com/shop/jjmedicine Support future lessons and lectures https://www.patreon.com/jjmedicine Follow me on Twitter! https

Toxic Alcohol Ingestion

This month, EBMedicines Emergency Medicine Practice series tackles toxic alchol ingestion: Patil N, Becker MWL, Ganetsky M (2010). Toxic Alcohols: Not Always A Clear-Cut Diagnosis. Emergency Medicine Practice, 12 (11). [ Abstract and subscription link ] The article begins with a clinical scenario and then moves rapidly into an in-depth discussion of the relevant aetiology, pathophysiology and clinical features of toxic alcohol poisoning, focusing on the three most common toxic alcohol ingestions: methanol , ethylene glycol and isopropanol . This is followed by detailed sections on diagnosis, treatment and disposition including evidence-based treatment algorithms for toxic alcohol ingestion (these are gold!) and a step-by-step approach to calculating the osmolar gap, anion gap and estimating toxic alcohol concentrations. The review concludes with a discussion of toxic alcohol poisoning in special circumstances (paediatric patients and pregnancy), recent controversies/new developments, some common pitfalls in risk management and finally a CME quiz to assess your learning. It is a huge review, so I have chosen to focus on the following topics: Aetiology, pathophysiology and clinical Continue reading >>

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Popular Questions

  1. Carolyn B

    High fasting blood sugar on keto

    Hi. I was diagnosed with pre-diabetes in November 2016. My brother has Type 2 so I knew I had to do something to stop my pre-diabetes from progressing I started to eat low carb and saw a slow reduction in my BS numbers. Then a month or so ago I started adding fat to my diet and am now eating keto. I am in low ketosis (urine test). My daily carb intake is approximately 40-60 grams.
    The results have been nothing short of miraculous! I've lost 17 pounds, my triglycerides have plummeted from 240 to 60, BP is way down, cholesterol dropped. All of my numbers look better than they have my entire adult life. My body seems to love this way of eating. It's been amazing and not difficult at all!
    My A1C went from 5.9 to 5.4. I am guessing it's around 5.2 now but I haven't tested since I went full keto. My only problem is that my morning fasting number has inched up. It was 95-99 when I was diagnosed. Then when I started to change my diet it dropped to the 88-95 range. After I started keto it's moved up to the 100-105 range. I'd like to work on getting this number down. My one and two hour post meal numbers are good, usually in the 100-120 range. Any suggestions on how I can lower the fasting number?
    Thanks so much.

  2. jdm1217

    Originally Posted by Carolyn B
    Hi. I was diagnosed with pre-diabetes in November 2016. My brother has Type 2 so I knew I had to do something to stop my pre-diabetes from progressing I started to eat low carb and saw a slow reduction in my BS numbers. Then a month or so ago I started adding fat to my diet and am now eating keto. I am in low ketosis (urine test). My daily carb intake is approximately 40-60 grams.
    The results have been nothing short of miraculous! I've lost 17 pounds, my triglycerides have plummeted from 240 to 60, BP is way down, cholesterol dropped. All of my numbers look better than they have my entire adult life. My body seems to love this way of eating. It's been amazing and not difficult at all!
    My A1C went from 5.9 to 5.4. I am guessing it's around 5.2 now but I haven't tested since I went full keto. My only problem is that my morning fasting number has inched up. It was 95-99 when I was diagnosed. Then when I started to change my diet it dropped to the 88-95 range. After I started keto it's moved up to the 100-105 range. I'd like to work on getting this number down. My one and two hour post meal numbers are good, usually in the 100-120 range. Any suggestions on how I can lower the fasting number?
    Thanks so much. I've been there at times and I don't even worry about it, especially if your A1C is still good.

  3. Nicoletti

    Originally Posted by Carolyn B
    My one and two hour post meal numbers are good, usually in the 100-120 range. Any suggestions on how I can lower the fasting number? Give it more time. Fasting numbers are usually the last to come down. It took me about a year of low-carb eating to get fastings in the 80s, and that's common for others here, too; it takes time.

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Don't Treat The Poison

Treat the patient, not the poison. If you remember just one thing about overdoses, that should be it, said Kennon Heard, MD, during a session on toxicology at the Society of Hospital Medicine's annual meeting in April. There are a lot of poisons but really only a few significant symptoms we have to worry about, said Dr. Heard, an associate professor of medicine and emergency medicine and section chief of medical toxicology at the University of Colorado School of Medicine in Denver. Probably the most important advice I've ever gotten is to treat the patient regardless of what [he] took. Kennon Heard, MD. Photo courtesy of the Society of Hospital Medicine. Supportive care is key, he added: If you can keep the patient breathing and his blood pressure stable, he will usually be fine. The symptoms to worry about in the first few hours of a patient's hospital visit are deactivation or activation of the central nervous system (CNS), with the latter manifesting as agitation or seizures; cardiac dysrhythmias; depressed cardiac function; and anion gap acidosis. Deactivation of the CNS is the most common clinical effect of drug overdose and the most common reason people die, Dr. Heard said. Continue reading >>

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Popular Questions

  1. MinaGhobrial

    1. The problem statement, all variables and given/known data
    Why does the human body spend two high energy phosphate bonds to store glucose as glycogen in muscle and liver, and not just as glucose? What is the advantage in using energy to polymerize the glucose molecule?
    2. Relevant equations
    3. The attempt at a solution
    Why is glucose stored as glycogen in muscle and liver, and not just as glucose?
    Below are some theories I proposed please correct me if I am wrong.
    Glycogen is insoluble thus, storing it as glycogen will not upset the osmotic pressure rather than glucose which is soluble in water and if it is stored as glucose it will disturb the osmotic pressure(hypertonic) that will cause the cell to lyse.
    Glycogen is a polymerized form of sugar with alpha 1,4 and alpha 1,6 that enables that can be degraded efficiently rather than free floating glucose. with that in mind wouldn't it be as efficient if glucose is stored in the liver and shipped to the desired destination if it is possible to store it in the cell without disturbing the osmotic pressure?
    Glucose is unstable and forms a ring which maturate with a predominance of beta anomers which is favored structure but also, the cell would have a alpha glucose that is unable to undergo glycolysis and it wouldn't be accessible when it is needed for breakdown.

  2. SasQuach

    MinaGhobrial said: ↑

    1. The problem statement, all variables and given/known data
    Why does the human body spend two high energy phosphate bonds to store glucose as glycogen in muscle and liver, and not just as glucose? What is the advantage in using energy to polymerize the glucose molecule?
    2. Relevant equations
    3. The attempt at a solution
    Why is glucose stored as glycogen in muscle and liver, and not just as glucose?
    Below are some theories I proposed please correct me if I am wrong.
    Glycogen is insoluble thus, storing it as glycogen will not upset the osmotic pressure rather than glucose which is soluble in water and if it is stored as glucose it will disturb the osmotic pressure(hypertonic) that will cause the cell to lyse. This is the primary reason.

    Glycogen is a polymerized form of sugar with alpha 1,4 and alpha 1,6 that enables that can be degraded efficiently rather than free floating glucose. with that in mind wouldn't it be as efficient if glucose is stored in the liver and shipped to the desired destination if it is possible to store it in the cell without disturbing the osmotic pressure?
    Glucose is unstable and forms a ring which maturate with a predominance of beta anomers which is favored structure but also, the cell would have an alpha glucose that is unable to undergo glycolysis and it wouldn't be accessible when it is needed for breakdown. Unstable is a relative term but Glucose is pretty damn stable. You can store glucose for years on your shelf without any degradation.

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