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Too Much Protein Ketosis

13 Common Keto Mistakes

13 Common Keto Mistakes

Adjusting to the Ketogenic diet and lifestyle is a process, and, like any other process, there are some learning curves and speed bumps. These curves and bumps can lead to frustration and disappointment, but they don’t have to. I’ve put together a list of what I see as the most common keto mistakes (and what you can do about them). You are obsessing over macros On the surface, this might seem a little contradictory to some of the other items on this list, but hear me out for a second. The mistake isn’t tracking your macros. The mistake is OBSESSING over your macros. The biggest psychological benefit to keto is the freedom it provides. You’re no longer shackled to the hangry, sad existence filled with constant food preoccupation. You’re free to live. So don’t shackle yourself by fretting and obsessing about macros. You aren’t eating macros, you’re eating food. Make sure your food is keto-friendly, and you’re going to be doing just fine. You are obsessing over the scale I’ve written about this before, but it’s important enough to repeat. The number on the scale is the least important metric you can use to gauge your success. This is another pet peeve of mine that is similar to the previous mistake. Enjoy the freedom of your life, don’t fret about the number on the scale. The scale is always a snap shot of what happened two weeks ago. Think about it. Aside from water, which can fluctuate many pounds in a short period of time, in order for you to gain or lose weight, it requires time. The scale doesn’t tell you important information. Don’t sweat it. You are eating too much protein Protein is, probably, the most important macro, because it is essential (we cannot manufacture all the requisite amino acids) and it is required to build and rebuild al Continue reading >>

Protein Over-consumption In Ketogenic Diets Explained

Protein Over-consumption In Ketogenic Diets Explained

Protein over-consumption is one of the main issues discussed at the Ketogains Group everyday. People are always reading, hearing and/or misunderstanding that eating protein will cause gluconeogenesis and kick you out of ketosis. Tyler Cartwright splendidly refuted the claim that protein supply activates GNG in this post, I recommend you check it out. So, if protein consumption doesn’t massively increase gluconeogenesis, then two questions remain: Why doesn’t ketogains recommend you eat tons of protein? Why does protein over-consumption lower ketones? Ketogains Protein Recommendation Of these questions, the first is easier to answer. The reason we don’t advocate the consumption of tons of protein is because beyond a certain point -arguably somewhere between .8g and 1.2g per pound of lean mass(lbm)- there’s just no benefit. Protein also carries a couple of minor inconveniences: It tends to be expensive and it can cause indigestion. If there were no other reason not to over-consume protein, this would simply be enough. There is also a minor debate over whether or not protein over-consumption prolongs the adaptation phase (irrelevant if you are already adapted). Also some people argue that it may be sub-optimal for performance, but these are secondary to the previous points: It’s unnecessary to eat more, so there’s no reason to recommend over-consumption. Protein and lower ketones The second gets a bit more complicated, and touches on something that Tyler just hinted at in his article. My soapbox is diabetes, and to a lesser extent, obesity… Diabetes has a lot to tell us about blood sugar control and precisely how and why certain food items impact blood glucose. In type one diabetes, the population of beta cells in the pancreas mostly dies, leaving the alpha c Continue reading >>

How Much Protein Should I Eat On A Ketogenic Diet?

How Much Protein Should I Eat On A Ketogenic Diet?

A common question for people either starting or following a low-carb eating plan is how much protein should I eat on a ketogenic diet? An important distinction to make with the Ketogenic Diet is that it’s a high-fat, low-carb and moderate protein diet. There is a common misconception that low-carb, high-fat diets (LCHF) mean eating astonishing amounts of protein. This idea comes from the original Atkins Diet1 which allowed unlimited protein in the initial stages. (Current Atkins diets include a more modified protein approach). The Ketogenic Diet, however, aims for 20% protein or less (by calorie) which is in the range of 90-150g per day. The suggested amount of protein by keto researcher and expert Dom D’Agostino (Associate Professor in the Department of Molecular Pharmacology and Physiology at the University of South Florida) is 1-1.5 g of protein per kg of body weight per day to stay in ketosis. If you are highly active (particularly if you do resistance training) then your protein intake should be at the high-end of the range. Why Does Eating Too Much Protein Lead To The Keto Diet Not Working? When you eat too much protein, it gets converted by the body into glucose. This process has a fancy name called gluconeogenesis. So just while you are trying to keep carbs/sugars to a minimum, eating excess protein creates more! The liver transforms excess protein into glucose and as a result, you feel hungry. This can prevent you from getting into ketosis and burning fat. One option is to eat higher fat cuts of meat and less lean meat like chicken breast and turkey. If you keep your portion size small, this will increase your fat intake while keeping protein low. Alternatively, eat less protein overall and ensure you are getting plenty of fat from non-meat sources like avo Continue reading >>

High-protein, Low-carb Diets Explained

High-protein, Low-carb Diets Explained

High-protein, low-carbohydrate diets, like The Atkins Diet, have been widely promoted as effective weight loss plans. These programs generally recommend that dieters get 30% to 50% of their total calories from protein. By comparison, the American Heart Association, the National Cholesterol Education Program, and the American Cancer Society all recommend a diet in which a smaller percentage of calories come from protein. Normally your body burns carbohydrates for fuel. When you drastically cut carbs, the body goes into a metabolic state called ketosis, and it begins to burn its own fat for fuel. When your fat stores become a primary energy source, you may lose weight. Some experts have raised concern about high-protein, low-carb diets. High cholesterol.Some protein sources -- like fatty cuts of meat, whole dairy products, and other high-fat foods -- can raise cholesterol, increasing your chance of heart disease. However, studies showed that people on the Atkins diet for up to 2 years actually had decreased “bad” cholesterol levels. Kidney problems. If you have any kidney problems, eating too much protein puts added strain on your kidneys. This could worsen kidney function. Osteoporosis and kidney stones. When you're on a high-protein diet, you may urinate more calcium than normal. There are conflicting reports, but some experts think this could make osteoporosis and kidney stones more likely. If you're considering a high-protein diet, check with your doctor or a nutritionist to see if it's OK for you. They can help you come up with a plan that will make sure you're getting enough fruits and vegetables, and that you're getting lean protein foods. Remember, weight loss that lasts is usually based on changes you can live with for a long time, not a temporary diet. Continue reading >>

All You Need To Know About Protein On A Low-carb Ketogenic Diet

All You Need To Know About Protein On A Low-carb Ketogenic Diet

Proteins, which consist of amino acids, are essential nutrients for the human body. They are one of the building blocks of body tissue and can be used as a fuel source. Unlike carbs, which are not essential for our body, protein and fat are a vital part of our diet. Without these two macronutrients, we would simply not survive. There is a misconception that the ketogenic diet is a high-protein diet. This is a myth; the ketogenic diet is a diet high in fat, moderate in protein and low in carbs. Why moderate in protein? Too much protein can kick you out of ketosis, while too little protein may cause muscle loss and increased appetite. What is the ideal protein intake? Does quality matter? Is too much protein dangerous? Let's have a look at these frequently asked questions in more detail. Why is protein so important for weight loss? Studies show that protein is the most sating while carbs are the least sating macronutrients. In other words, if you eat enough protein, you will feel less hungry and eat fewer calories. That's why it's critical to eat adequate amount of protein if your aim is to lose fat. Protein has also been shown to increase energy expenditure. This means that by following a diet rich in protein, you will burn more calories. This metabolic advantage is not significant (around 100 kcal a day) but every little counts! Another way to burn more calories is to build muscle mass. Protein is the most important macronutrient for preserving and building muscle tissue, especially for physically active individuals. More muscles burn more calories and slightly increase your base metabolic rate. This means that you will burn slightly more calories even at rest. Although protein slightly increases insulin, there is no need to worry about negative effects on weight loss. Continue reading >>

How I Fixed The Biggest Ketosis Mistakes

How I Fixed The Biggest Ketosis Mistakes

The ketogenic diet isn’t always as easy as it seems. I tried for a long time, but not until I dove deep into the research and found out how to fix all of the common mistakes was I able to enjoy the full state of ketosis. This article is to help you avoid those same mistakes. Why Try the Ketogenic Diet First, why would you want to even try ketosis? I truly enjoy trying diets and eating methodologies to research what I like and what works for me. I’ve experimented with low-carb diets, high-carb diets, and everything in between, but I’ve never cut them out to the point to achieve ketosis. What’s most exciting about the ketogenic diet to me is that, yes, it’s amazing for weight loss, but it’s not just a “diet.” Ketosis is literally a state of metabolism. You are either in or you’re out. I wanted to see and feel for myself the benefits everyone is talking about from going full Keto. My Keto Coach has a great line that goes like this: I was sold and needed to try this and commit. If you are new to researching ketosis, a quick review of the popular benefits: Mental Clarity [2] Fat Loss [2][3][4] Feeling Full [1][2] Better Sleep [1] Better Mood [1] Better Skin [4] The list goes on and on, including disease and inflammation reduction, better cholesterol, etc. For my purposes I didn’t care about weight loss or fat loss, I just cared about doing the diet the best I could, and to do that, I needed to prepare accordingly. Preparation Stage – Learning the Keto Basics Here is what I did to educate myself and prepare for six weeks of the Ketogenic Diet. I picked a start date and spent $30 at In-N-Out burger on a massive send-off to carbohydrates. A whole other post could be dedicated to the mistakes I made at In-N-Out. After this epic meal, it was officially time Continue reading >>

If You Eat Excess Protein, Does It Turn Into Excess Glucose?

If You Eat Excess Protein, Does It Turn Into Excess Glucose?

Gluconeogenesis is Demand-Driven, not Supply-Driven We have seen the claim that any protein you eat in excess of your immediate needs will be turned into glucose by spontaneous gluconeogenesis ¹. (Gluconeogenesis (GNG) is the process by which glucose is made out of protein in the liver and kidneys.) Some people think that because protein can be turned into glucose, it will, once other needs are taken care of, and that therefore keto dieters should be careful not to eat too much protein. While we believe there are valid reasons for limiting protein intake, experimental evidence does not support this one. In our opinion, it makes sense physiologically for GNG to be a demand-driven rather than supply-driven process, because of the need to keep blood glucose within tight bounds. In brief Gluconeogenesis is a slow process and the rate doesn't change much even under a wide range of conditions. The hypothesis that the rate of gluconeogenesis is primarily regulated by the amount of available material, e.g. amino acids, has not been supported by experiment. Having insufficient material available for gluconeogenesis will obviously limit the rate, but in the experiments we reviewed, having excess material did not increase the rate. We haven't found any solid evidence to support the idea that excess protein is turned into glucose. More experiments are needed to confirm that this still holds true in keto dieters. Gluconeogenesis has a Stable Rate Gluconeogenesis (GNG) is a carefully regulated process for increasing blood sugar. It is stimulated by different hormones, including glucagon — the primary hormone responsible for preventing low blood sugar. GNG produces glucose slowly and evenly ². It was once thought that the main determination of the rate of GNG was how much glucogen Continue reading >>

How Much Protein Do You Need In Nutritional Ketosis?

How Much Protein Do You Need In Nutritional Ketosis?

How Much Protein Do You Need In Nutritional Ketosis? When embarking on a well-formulated ketogenic diet and going through the process of keto-adaptation, there are necessary changes in how the body uses its incoming macronutrients to maintain (if not improve) health and function. To achieve this requires enough protein but not too much balance is important. And why for some people, this is a delicate balance Protein is a fascinating macronutrient. Of the three dietary macronutrients, protein must provide at least 9 essential components (amino acids), whereas dietary fats provide just 2, and carbohydrates none. To the uninitiated, it is tempting to think of proteins in the body as relatively stable (e.g., the structure of muscles, heart, liver, kidneys, brain) compared to the bodys use of fuel (carbohydrate and fat). But in reality the bodys protein metabolism is incredibly dynamic, and limitations in either dietary protein or energy intakes from carbohydrate or fat can tip the balance between gain or loss of important tissues or functions. When embarking on a well-formulated ketogenic diet and going through the process of keto-adaptation , there are necessary changes in how the body uses its incoming macronutrients to maintain (if not improve) health and function. To achieve this requires enough protein but not too much balance is important. And as you might expect, this balance is achieved at different recommended daily intake levels than our official government recommendations. But as you read this post, you will see that your need for dietary protein during a well-formulated ketogenic diet is not much different from what the average person in the developed world currently eats i.e., moderate protein rather than high protein (Fulgoni 2008). What follows is our best a Continue reading >>

#14 Ketosis And Exercise, Can You Eat Too Much Protein On Keto And More With Ryan Lowrey Phd C

#14 Ketosis And Exercise, Can You Eat Too Much Protein On Keto And More With Ryan Lowrey Phd C

To be honest, I think the ketogenic diet is showing to be the optimal human diet for health and performance. Because you have more energy, you burn more fat, you feel amazing and the science is backing it up as well What's the latest research on the ketogenic diet? How can you use keto to enhance human performance and health? Do we need a Ketogenic Bible? That's the topics of today's Body Mind Empowerment Podcast with Siim Land. We have a special guest Ryan Lowery from Tampa Florida. Ryan is the president and co-founder of the Applied Science and Performance Institute, which is one of the top athletic research labs in the world. Dr Jacob Wilson and Ryan Lowery are the leading experts and researchers in the ketogenic diet and exercise performance. They investigate the cream of the crop – the top-notch athletes from many fields – and they’re releasing a ton of fascinating studies on building muscle, burning fat and living longer. They are also the authors of The Ketogenic Bible - a recent book that's been very well-received by the community. We talk about: The latest research about keto and exercise What are the practical applications of the ketogenic diet Which type of exercise is best for boosting ketosis Can you eat too much protein on keto? How do exogenous ketones change your metabolism? What is The Ketogenic Bible? And much more... To support this podcast, then I'd appreciate if you could leave us a review on iTunes and follow me on social media. P.S. If you want to experiment with some exogenous ketones and see how they affect your ketosis, then I got a -20% discount code for you on the Perfect Keto store. They have many keto-proof products, like BHB salts, MCT powders, MCT matcha (whaaat), pre-workouts and more. Click here to get your -20% off from your orde Continue reading >>

Protein In The Keto Diet: How Much Is Too Much?

Protein In The Keto Diet: How Much Is Too Much?

Protein in the Keto Diet: How Much Is Too Much? Next Article: etosis and Diabetes: What's Their Connection? If you are following a ketogenic diet, you may be asking the question: How much protein on keto do I really need? Protein is essential for the body, but it is also a hot topic in the keto space. There is a debate about whether protein can kick you out of ketosis. We acknowledge peoples confusion, and that is why weve prepared this simple guide for you. Keep reading. To achieve nutritional ketosis, a person needs to [ 1 ]: As you can see, the keto diet requires moderate protein consumption. To be specific, 30-35% of your calories should come from dietary protein. But what if you eat too much protein? Will it increase your blood glucose levels? Yes, protein affects ketosis. According to Virta Health researchers, keeping your protein to moderate amounts in a well-formulated keto diet helps you reach ketone levels of at least 0.5 mM. A blood ketone reading of 0.5 mM -3.0mM tells you that you are in nutritional ketosis [ 2 , 3 ]. Too much protein will impair ketone body production because it stimulates an insulin response. However, take note that protein has a lower impact on insulin compared to carbohydrates [ 2 ]. Recall that your body only produces ketones when your blood glucose and insulin levels are low. You might have also heard that insulin is a fat storage hormone, and that is true. It promotes glycogen storage in your liver and provides free fatty acids to your fat cells (adipocytes). Your fat cells can then use those free fatty acids to synthesize triglycerides [ 4 ]. Remember that your body needs to use up its glycogen stores before it can enter ketosis. This process wont happen if your blood insulin levels increase. Its not just dietary protein itself tha Continue reading >>

Too Much Protein Is Bad For Ketosis – How Much Is The Perfect Amount On A Keto Diet?

Too Much Protein Is Bad For Ketosis – How Much Is The Perfect Amount On A Keto Diet?

You heard it right, too much protein is bad for ketosis. The most common description of the ketogenic diet is that it’s a very low-carb, high fat (LCHF) diet. But the amount of protein you consume is every bit as important as carbohydrates and fat. Protein is an essential part of nutrition for maintaining lean mass and healthy cells, but the right amount is significant on a ketogenic diet. When beginning and maintaining an LCHF keto diet, you should calculate and track your protein consumption. Treat protein just like other macros (carbs and fat), if you want to get into ketosis and stay there. You’re not alone – too much protein on a Ketogenic Diet is a common mistake Many of the people we talk to that are complaining about not being able to achieve ketosis make the mistake of not factoring in the amount of protein they’re consuming. Their protein intake is far too high, and that’s bad for several reasons that we’ll touch on further. Protein intake on a ketogenic diet ought to be moderate and not excessive. We know that 75 percent of your keto diet should come from healthy, non-processed, fats but so many people miss factoring protein into that equation. “Low-Carb, High-Fat. NOT Low-Carb, High-Protein”. We’ve all seen people in their active wear chowing down on plain Lean Chicken Breast and Broccoli. Don’t do that! The important thing is that unlike many modern low carb diets in which protein dominates, on a ketogenic diet fat should be the dominating macro nutrient. Specifically, protein should be around 20% of your macros. Just enough to maintain lean mass and prevent cell degeneration. Not so much that it turns into your bodies primary fuel source via a process called gluconeogenesis. What is Gluconeogenesis? Gluconeogenesis is the process in you Continue reading >>

Your Macros

Your Macros

Most people aim for a specific goal on a ketogenic diet. We aim to make sure the results of the calculator are accurate and can be used by anyone. Our keto calculator uses the Mifflin-St.Jeor Formula which was the most accurate (versus the Katch-McCardle Formula or the Harris-Benedict Formula) in a few studies. In this formula, the gender, height, weight, and age are needed to calculate the number of calories to consume. Our keto calculator uses body fat percentage to calculate your lean body mass. Using this number, we’re able to calculate how much protein you need to sufficiently lose weight without losing excess muscle. Eating too little or too much protein on a ketogenic diet (or any diet) can lead to dangerous or unwanted results. DEXA scans are proven to be the most accurate measurement of body fat. They’re commonly available at gyms and some doctor offices when requested. If you don’t have access to this, you can always go the old-fashioned route and use a good quality caliper. The last resort is using a guide to visually estimate – this can sometimes be a little bit inaccurate, so try to over estimate your body fat percentage. This will give us an idea of how much the minimum amount of calories your body will burn in a day. Our keto calculator uses this to calculate your Basal Metabolic Rate (BMR). We use this number, along with your body fat percentage, to estimate how many calories you’ll need for your goals. The BMR is simply a number of calories we burn while our bodies are at rest and from eating and digesting food. Together they form what’s known as TDEE, or total daily energy expenditure. This is the keto calculator’s estimate for your total calories burned per day. If you use a heart rate monitor or third party software to monitor your calo Continue reading >>

This Is What Happens To Your Body If You Eat Too Much Protein

This Is What Happens To Your Body If You Eat Too Much Protein

Protein is a very important part of any diet. Our hair and nails depend on it to keep them in tip top condition (priorities), and we also rely on the food group to maintain the health of our bones, muscles, our skin and our blood. But as with anything - especially the good things in life, ffs - there is such a thing as too much protein. In a world full of Instagram fitspo accounts, more and more people have found themselves on the health and fitness hype, which often involves a high protein diet of lean meats and protein shakes. And this is all well and good, explains Dr Seth Rankin, founder of London Doctors Clinic, because protein can be an effective way to lose weight - but only if it's balanced properly. "Protein does help suppress the appetite. It is patently obvious that 165 calories worth of chicken (a full breast) will fill you up much more than 165 calories of bread (a single slice of toast lightly buttered). For this reason, high protein/low carbohydrate diets do certainly help weight loss," explained the doctor. But what happens when you have too high a protein intake? "If we were to solely rely on protein in our diets, this could become damaging to our bodies," said Dr Rankin, adding: "We need to eat a balanced diet to enable our bodies to function properly." So here, according to a doctor, are some of the physiological consequences of consuming too much protein: 1. Dehydration "Dehydration can occur as you lose water weight when you replace your carbohydrates with protein," explains Dr Rankin. "By not replacing your empty carbohydrate stores, the water you have lost is not replaced and this can lead to dehydration." 2. Ketosis Ketosis, the doctor explains, "is a normal metabolic process [which occurs] when a lack of carbohydrates in your diet can mean your Continue reading >>

How Much Protein Should You Eat? - Carb Manager

How Much Protein Should You Eat? - Carb Manager

Protein consumption is widely debated in the ketogenic community. Since a standard ketogenic diet encourages moderate protein intake, theres a fine line between how much is too much or too little. Some people believe too much protein can kick you out of ketosis, while others think too little can hinder your health and fitness goals and leave you feeling hungry. So how much protein should you consume on keto? In this Keto Beginners Series, youll learn exactly how much protein you need for optimal brain and body function. Protein is an essential component of every healthy diet. Of the three macronutrients -- protein, fat, carbs -- protein and fat are the only two that are essential to live. Adequate protein consumption is crucial for: On keto, its better to eat more protein than it is to eat too little. This macronutrient is one of the hardest food sources to get right on keto, but after this article, youll have a better grasp at your own individual protein requirements. Protein Sources to Eat on the Ketogenic Diet The best sources of protein on the ketogenic diet should come from animal and whole food sources. Full-fat dairy products like heavy cream and grass-fed butter Fatty fish like salmon, halibut, mackerel, and sardines If you arent hitting your daily protein intake through whole food sources, consider supplementing with whey protein. Is There Such Thing as Eating Too Much Protein on Keto? Many keto-ers believe eating too much protein is bad for keto because it can cause gluconeogenesis. Gluconeogenesis (GNG) is when your liver and kidneys make glucose from non-carb foods such as protein. Since the goal of the ketogenic diet is to deplete most glucose stores your body has, people assume that too much protein will prevent your body from running on ketones. But the Continue reading >>

How Much Protein Should You Eat On A Ketogenic Diet?

How Much Protein Should You Eat On A Ketogenic Diet?

One of the biggest mistakes people make when first adopting a ketogenic diet for weight loss is eating too much protein. A successful ketogenic diet requires strictly limiting carbohydrate consumption and upping the intake of healthy fats. This allows the metabolism to switch from primarily using glucose (sugar) for fuel to primarily using ketones (fat) for fuel. This is referred to as ketosis. When the cells begin to burn fat for fuel this includes body fat such as the fat around the belly, thighs, and hips. So to get into ketosis and shed pounds of body fat, you must eat a ketogenic diet which is a low-carb high-fat (LCHF) diet. But what about protein? Does it matter how much you eat? And what kind of protein is best for maximum weight loss? Protein and Weight Loss A common misconception is that a ketogenic diet is high in protein. The reality, however, is that a ketogenic diet is a moderate protein diet, or maybe even more accurately, an adequate protein diet. In fact, too much protein can actually inhibit your body from entering ketosis thus preventing you from experiencing the myriad of benefits of the diet. There are many reasons why adequate protein consumption is required for success on a ketogenic diet.Studies have shown that protein is the most satiating macronutrient while carbohydrate is the least satiating. Therefore, if you eat an adequate amount of protein you will feel more satisfied and be more likely to eat less calories. Protein is also the most important macronutrient for building and maintaining muscle mass. Muscles burn calories 24/7 even when you are not exercising. Protein and Ketosis Proteins are the building blocks of life, they provide the body with all of the essential amino acids. But more is not always better. When first adopting a ketogeni Continue reading >>

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