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Thermogenesis Ketosis

Does Ketosis Cause An Internal Rise In Body Temperature?

Does Ketosis Cause An Internal Rise In Body Temperature?

Ooh, ooh, ooh, I feel my temperature rising Help me, I’m flaming I must be a hundred and nine Burning, burning, burning And nothing can cool me I just might turn into smoke But I feel fine –Elvis Presley singing “Burning Love” Somebody’s turned up the heat up in here and it’s gotta be that low-carb diet I’m on, right? That’s what everybody does with livin’ la vida low-carb when something new happens to them after starting this way of eating–they blame it on low-carb! I mocked this notion in this blog post about an earache a couple of years ago, but what if there is merit to some rather strange side effects of following a controlled-carbohydrate nutritional approach? Hmmmmmm. There are several things we KNOW will happen to most people when they begin the low-carb lifestyle: their HDL “good” cholesterol goes up, there is a marked improvement in mental health, for women it helps with reproductive health, blood sugar levels are stabilized, they end up having less acne, triglycerides plummet (a VERY good thing!), and so much more I could spend hours sharing with you about. But there are some things that can vary from person to person as one of my readers shared with me in a recent e-mail. This 43-year old man starting cutting his carbohydrate intake beginning in January 2008 and has lost over 25 pounds so far. WOO HOO! He has really enjoyed this new low-carb lifestyle change, but was curious about an unexpected side effect that has been plaguing him with no apparent cause. Here’s what he wrote: Hey Jimmy, After lots of searches, I’m having trouble finding out if anyone experiences a sensation of a rise in body temperature while in ketosis. There are some days I feel like I am literally burning up (but I don’t have a fever or anything). Coinciden Continue reading >>

This High-fat Diet People Are Talking About Can Be Effective, But…

This High-fat Diet People Are Talking About Can Be Effective, But…

It’s the diet people are talking about. Although the ketogenic diet became a trend in the country only in the last few years, it’s actually been around since the 1900s to treat epilepsy, until it was abandoned in favor of new anticonvulsant drugs. Ketogenic, or keto, is a low-carb, moderate-protein, high-fat diet that’s often been compared to Atkins and other similar low-carb diets. The nutrient intake should be around 70 percent fats, 25 percent protein and 5 percent carbohydrate. The fat intake may sound daunting, even disheartening, but there’s a purpose to that. People normally take 45-65 percent of the calories from carbs, 10-35 from protein and 20-35 percent from fat. With this diet, the body produces glucose and insulin that are converted and used as energy. Insulin is produced to process glucose in your body. The fats you consume are therefore stored, since the body uses glucose as its primary energy source. According to the ketogenic diet, if you lower your carb intake, the body goes into a state known as ketosis, a natural process jumpstarted in our system to help us survive when food is low. We then produce ketones from the breakdown of fats in the liver. Starved of carbs Keto is not about starving the body of calories. Rather, it is about starving it of carbs so that it will force the body into ketosis. When you overload your diet with fats, it will supposedly burn ketones as its primary source of energy. Blood glucose, according to the diet, will fall by restricting carbs. This then leads to increased production of a fat-burning enzyme called hormone sensitive lipase, and releases stored triglycerides (fats) from the fat cells. Triglycerides are broken down into fatty acids and glycerol that the liver turns into ketones for energy. What to eat: meat Continue reading >>

Cold Thermogenesis 5: Biologic Magnetism

Cold Thermogenesis 5: Biologic Magnetism

Readers Summary How can cold change human biochemistry, a real world example? What are the major biochemical change induced by cold in mammals? If humans have this adaptation in their blind spot, do other species use it? Is there a ketosis training fallacy? What is the ketogenic diet advantage in mammals? My first encounter with thermoplasticity in human biology I first became aware of this seeming paradox as a neurosurgical resident in my first year of training. We were doing a real “gnarly” brain surgery case. It was a young mother who had a massive basilar tip aneurysm. Back in the mid 90’s before endovascular coiling procedures we use today, this was the most risky operation that existed in all of medicine. I spent a month prepping for this case. We had to enlist the cardiovascular surgeons to come in and surgically open the patients chest wide open to stop her heart on purpose temporarily and place her on complete cardiopulmonary bypass to stop all the blood flow to her brain. We had less than 20 minutes to then place a clip across the aneurysm to save her life. To complete this herculean surgical task, we had to fill her entire chest cavity with ice to preserve her heart muscle and cool her core temperature so that we could have 20 minutes to complete the brain surgery. Simultaneously, we would open her skull and split the Sylvian fissure in the brain and approach her basilar artery in the geographic center of her head and attempt to put a clip on it without disturbing any of her surrounding anatomy. The best mental image I can give you for this is the ultimate game of “Operation” you used to play as a kid. You must avoid hitting the sides or the nose lights up!!!! One problem in this case, in this game there was live bullets. This maneuver was deadly if Continue reading >>

9 Ways I Keep My Testosterone Levels High – Test Of Time

9 Ways I Keep My Testosterone Levels High – Test Of Time

I began testing my testosterone levels a couple of months after starting with ketosis (the metabolic state where fat becomes the primary source of energy). It was March 2014 and my levels ~400 ng/dL. That’s average to low for a person my age. I suspect my pre-ketosis levels were even lower because from what I’ve researched, if well-formulated, a ketogenic diet can improve testosterone levels. In a matter of months, I’ve been able to raise my levels to ~ 850ng/dL and they’ve been mostly constant ever since. See more here. I wrote about this experiment in detail in my book T-R(x) – The Testosterone Protocol, but I want to re-emphasize the 9 major interventions I made to improve my T levels. 9 Strategies I use to Keep my T Levels High Sadly, over the last few decades there’s been a declining trend in testosterone levels in men, and this is not due to the aging process. See these resources for a more in-depth view. A more simple way to know what we’re dealing with is to do this: whenever you’re in a public location, try to spot men that do not have bellies. Can you? Abdominal fat has been shown numerous times to be inversely correlated with T levels. I’ve discussed the mechanisms of this in the book. Well formulated Very-Low-Carb-Low-Calorie-Ketogenic nutrition (without carb-loading) It should be self-explicative. Ever since I started with ketosis in Sept. 2013, I purposed to maintain this state constantly. The benefits of keto-adaptation have made me become addicted to this ketosis. Carb-loading would kick me out of ketosis. Besides, I don’t need it. My lifting performance has never been better. However, it took more than 6 months of constant ketosis to recover my pre-ketosis (higher-carb nutrition) performance in the gym and with my kickboxing practice Continue reading >>

Ketogenic Low-carbohydrate Diets Have No Metabolic Advantage Over Nonketogenic Low-carbohydrate Diets1,2,3

Ketogenic Low-carbohydrate Diets Have No Metabolic Advantage Over Nonketogenic Low-carbohydrate Diets1,2,3

Abstract Background:Low-carbohydrate diets may promote greater weight loss than does the conventional low-fat, high-carbohydrate diet. Objective:We compared weight loss and biomarker change in adults adhering to a ketogenic low-carbohydrate (KLC) diet or a nonketogenic low-carbohydrate (NLC) diet. Design:Twenty adults [body mass index (in kg/m2): 34.4 ± 1.0] were randomly assigned to the KLC (60% of energy as fat, beginning with ≈5% of energy as carbohydrate) or NLC (30% of energy as fat; ≈40% of energy as carbohydrate) diet. During the 6-wk trial, participants were sedentary, and 24-h intakes were strictly controlled. Results:Mean (±SE) weight losses (6.3 ± 0.6 and 7.2 ± 0.8 kg in KLC and NLC dieters, respectively; P = 0.324) and fat losses (3.4 and 5.5 kg in KLC and NLC dieters, respectively; P = 0.111) did not differ significantly by group after 6 wk. Blood β-hydroxybutyrate in the KLC dieters was 3.6 times that in the NLC dieters at week 2 (P = 0.018), and LDL cholesterol was directly correlated with blood β-hydroxybutyrate (r = 0.297, P = 0.025). Overall, insulin sensitivity and resting energy expenditure increased and serum γ-glutamyltransferase concentrations decreased in both diet groups during the 6-wk trial (P < 0.05). However, inflammatory risk (arachidonic acid:eicosapentaenoic acid ratios in plasma phospholipids) and perceptions of vigor were more adversely affected by the KLC than by the NLC diet. Conclusions:KLC and NLC diets were equally effective in reducing body weight and insulin resistance, but the KLC diet was associated with several adverse metabolic and emotional effects. The use of ketogenic diets for weight loss is not warranted. Continue reading >>

Cold Thermogenesis: How To Freeze Your Fat Off

Cold Thermogenesis: How To Freeze Your Fat Off

Technology as a crutch The industrial age started in the late 18th century in the United Kingdom and with it, brought about technologies that now keep us in the Goldilocks zone, not too hot not too cold. In effect, we outsourced a fundamental aspect of what it means to stay alive and well temperature control Specifically, we now do very little cold thermogenesis. It’s a process mammals like us use to produce heat in order to stay warm. Our bodies keep temperature tightly regulated in the range of 36.5 to 37.5 °C (or 97.7 to 99.5 °F). If you get too cold, entering a state called hypothermia, the molecular machines (enzymes) that run you metabolism can’t function properly – all it takes is a drop of 1 to 2 °C (or 1.8 to 3.6 °F) to get you into serious trouble. You want cold thermogenesis to kick in before that. The same goes if you get too hot. You cross the fever threshold when your body temperature reaches 37.2 to 37.7 °C (or 99.0 to 99.9 °) [1]. Get above that and you’re courting risky business. Fun fact: strictly speaking, not all of your body is at the same temperature. Yes yes, your toes might be cooler than your armpits, but that’s not what I’m talking about. If you zoom into your cells and measure the temperature of mitochondria, the bean shaped factories producing the ATP you power yourself with, they can reach 50 °C (or 122 °F) – hot damn! [2] Enter The Iceman: taking back cold thermogenesis Science advances in strange ways. Progress happens in fits and starts, from glacially slow collaborations to dogged individual pursuits. The Iceman, also known as Wim Hof, embodies the latter kind. A 40min Vice documentary well worth your time details the Dutchman’s fascinating story. He holds 26 world records [3], like climbing Mount Everest in nothi Continue reading >>

What Everybody Ought To Know About Ketosis

What Everybody Ought To Know About Ketosis

Recently I wanted to explore the world of Ketosis. I thought I knew a little bit about ketosis, but after doing some research I soon realised how wrong I was. 3 months later, after reading numerous books, listening to countless podcasts and experimenting with various diets I know have a sound understanding of ketosis. This resource is built as a reference guide for those looking to explore the fascinating world of ketosis. It is a resource that I wish I had 3 months ago. As you will soon see, a lot of the content below is not mine, instead I have linked to referenced to experts who have a greater understanding of this topic than I ever will. I hope this helps and if there is something that I have missed please leave a comment below so that I can update this. Also, as this is a rather long document, I have split it into various sections. You can click the headline below to be sent straight to the section that interests you. For those that are really time poor I have created a useful ketosis cheat sheet guide. This guide covers all the essential information you should know about ketosis. It can be downloaded HERE. Alternatively, if you're looking for a natural and sustainable way to improve health and lose weight head to this page - What is Ketosis? What Are The Benefits from being in Ketosis? Isn’t Ketosis Dangerous? Ketoacidosis vs Ketosis What Is The Difference Between a Low Carb Diet and a Ketogenic Diet? Types of Ketosis: The Difference Between Nutritional, Therapeutic & MCT Ketogenic Diets Is The Ketogenic Diet Safe? Long Term Effects Thyroid and Ketosis - What You May Want To Know What is a Typical Diet/Macro Breakdown for a Ketogenic Diet? Do I Need to Eat Carbs? What do I Eat On a Ketogenic Diet? What Do I Avoid Eating on a Ketogenic Diet? Protein Consumption a Continue reading >>

#200: Ben Bikman, Phd: Brown Fat Tissue Activation, Insulin & The Ketogenic Diet

#200: Ben Bikman, Phd: Brown Fat Tissue Activation, Insulin & The Ketogenic Diet

Want Early Access to Our Interviews and Additional Content? Become a High Intensity Health Insider and Access Bonus Content Listen to the recording What Others Are Saying About This Episode About Ben Bikman, PhD The focus of Ben's lab (the Laboratory of Obesity and Metabolism) is twofold. First, we aim to identify the molecular mechanisms that explain the increased risk of disease that accompanies weight gain, with particular emphasis on the etiology of insulin resistance and disrupted mitochondrial function. Second, we hope to reveal novel cellular processes that are responsible for fat development. Connect with Ben FaceBook Benjamin Bikman Instagram & Twitter @benbikmanphd Products Mentioned In this Episode Not Getting Results on the Ketogenic Diet? Need Meal Plans and Recipe Ideas? Access our Real-Food Recipe eBooks, Private FB Group and Live Chat Show Notes 02:02 Dr. Bikman’s Journey: He was an exercise enthusiast, with two degrees in exercise physiology. He was fixated upon calories and the “eat less – exercise more” model. It would not work consistently. During PhD studies, he learned that insulin is the metabolic key. As insulin goes, so goes body fat. Now that he has his own lab, the relevance of insulin upon normal metabolic health is his area of study. 03:11 Insulin is needed to Grow Fat Cells: Progenitor (stem) cells in a dish need a spike in insulin of a certain size and over a certain amount of time in order for them to become fat cells. This is adipogenesis, the creation of adipocytes. 03:35 Distortion of the Fat Cell: Within the adipocytes in adult humans, insulin initiates lipogenesis, the creation or expansion of the lipid droplet or bulge of fat within the fat cell. When you look at a fat cell under a microscope, the mitochondria, nucleus and o Continue reading >>

Thermogenesis – Not So Good For Health – Ron Rosedale

Thermogenesis – Not So Good For Health – Ron Rosedale

Ron Rosedale, there are about a thousand ways that a person can look at health research and a thousand details to check. It’s so confusing. To understand how we work and how our metabolism works, what if we start by figuring out what questions to ask? RON ROSEDALE: – Sorting through confusion—that’s really the way to go. Number one is to ask the right questions. If you don’t ask the right questions, you’re never going to get a useful answer. That’s why, for instance, in my blog on the “safe starch” debate, I posed four questions that really to me summarize what the debate is about, and then I answered them. People often ask the wrong questions, and so they keep getting answers that create a wild goose chase, or bad information. Getting the questions right – that’s a major key. When it comes to questions, and what “kind of animal” are we, I’m thinking about the recent debates about metabolism. One question that few people ask is, “What’s the point of seeking a high metabolism? Instead, most people simply assume that a higher metabolism is a better one. For instance, in discussions of the recent Harvard study regarding the merits of high carb/low fat, versus other ways to eat, many experts and reporters focused on how many calories the test subjects burned. As background, in the Harvard Study, people ate one of three ways. Two were higher in carbs. The third was high in protein and fat and lower in carbs. ALL the people were fed a deficit of calories that meant they lost weight, and then they were returned to a weight-stable level of calories, but rotated throughout the three different kinds of diets, keeping the calories the same on each diet. The researchers measured plenty – inflammatory markers, hormone signaling, and so on. What many Continue reading >>

5 Reasons To Use Mct Oil For Ketosis

5 Reasons To Use Mct Oil For Ketosis

Medium chain triglycerides (MCT’s) are unique fatty acids that are found naturally in coconut and palm oils. They have a remarkable ability to stabilize blood sugar and enhance ketone body production. This process makes MCT’s a powerful tool to reduce inflammation, improve metabolism and enhance cognitive function. The term “medium” is in reference to the length of the chain of fatty acids. Oils can have short, medium or long chains. Most oils are a combination of short, medium and long chain fatty acids. Medium chain fatty acids by definition are fatty acids that contain between 6 and 12 carbon chains (1). These include: C6 – Caproic Acid C8 – Caprylic Acid C10 – Capric Acid C12 – Lauric Acid MCTs Are Easily Digested: MCTs are easily digested and do not require the production and utilization of bile. Most fatty acids depend upon bile salt emulsification in order to be metabolized and absorbed. The production of bile is an energy dependent process that takes place in the liver. The body stores extra bile in the gallbladder to use for high fat meals. Individuals with a sluggish liver and gallbladder struggle to produce adequate bile. Other individuals who struggle with malnutrition or malabsorption syndromes can easily absorb and utilize these MCTs (2). This includes people with pancreatitis, cystic fibrosis & Crohn’s disease among others. MCTs have a slightly lower caloric effect than typical long-chain fatty acids (LCFA). LCFAs have 9 calories per gram while MCTs have 8.3 calories per gram (3). How MCTs Work: The mitochondria are small organs within your cells that are responsible for producing all the energy needed by your tissues. Fatty acids produce energy in the mitochondria but are dependent upon the L-carnitine compound in order for entry. MCTs Continue reading >>

Ketosis And Athletic Performance: More Than Fat Loss

Ketosis And Athletic Performance: More Than Fat Loss

The above video is a presentation by Peter Attia, M.D. His talk is somewhat technical, but I always write blog posts hoping 20,000 people will *love* them, not that 1,000,000 will *like* them. In this presentation, you will learn (in my words, not Pete’s): – More about nutrition than most MDs learn in med school. – How ketosis-adapted performance can aid fat loss and high-altitude resilience. – Why the calorie estimates on treadmills and stationary bikes are complete BS. – The three primary systems of energy production and basic organic chemistry, both of which aid understanding of all athletics. Even if you struggle a little with vocabulary, the first 30 minutes are well worth watching a few times. This talk made me immediately want to jump back on the Cyclical (or “Cyclic”) Ketogenic Diet (CKD), which was conceptually introduced to me in 1996-1998 by the writing of Lyle McDonald, Dr. Mauro Di Pasquale, and the late Dan Duchaine. It’s incredible for simultaneous fat loss and lean muscle gain, though perhaps needlessly complicated for non-athletes. I usually limited the carb-reloading period to 12-18 hours after a glycogen depletion workout on Saturdays, though I experimented with moderate Wed night carb-ups while training for sports like kickboxing. If you’ve experimented with ketosis, what was your approach and experience? Pros and cons? For additional reading, I suggest the following posts by Dr. Attia: ### Odds and Ends: This week, I’m using my birthday to change the world with @charitywater. Please click here to take a look. You could do the same. Please check out Tribe of Mentors, my newest book, which shares short, tactical life advice from 100+ world-class performers. Many of the world's most famous entrepreneurs, athletes, investors, poker p Continue reading >>

The Ketogenic Diet 101: Everything You Need To Know About The Diet That’s Taking The World By Storm.

The Ketogenic Diet 101: Everything You Need To Know About The Diet That’s Taking The World By Storm.

The ketogenic diet is a remarkable way of eating with numerous health benefits. With the ketogenic diet, you switch your body’s preferred source of fuel from carbohydrate to stored fat, which is a cleaner fuel, more healthful fuel, that the body and the brain loves. For some people, this takes more time than others. But at most 6 weeks (if you’ve really been hitting the carbs). By then, if you stick to the diet, you can know, with all absolute certainty, that you are running on fat solely. The Keto Philosophy It is a state in which we switch our body’s prefered source of energy from sugar to fat. Of course, this is what we want to do. We want to burn excess fat off the body and get lean, right? Most people eat a carbohydrate rich diet, consistently spiking insulin and running on glucose. Glucose, in fact, is the preferred source of energy for the body. It’s easy. The body will use whatever is within easy reach—which is why when it’s starving it turns to nutrient rich muscle. It wants that immediate energy glucose gives it. Ketosis happens when we effectively switch our body’s source of energy to our fat stores instead of an instream of glucose by eating a low carbohydrate diet. We can, however, push our body to run on fat and the body thrives on fat. Let me give you the more textbook definition of the ketogenic diet before we move on: The ketogenic diet is a very low carb, high fat, moderate protein diet. Eating a diet this low in carbohydrate pushes your body into a new metabolic framework called “ketosis” – when your body finally makes that switch (which takes about 4 to 6 weeks) to burning fat for energy, it becomes very efficient at burning fat for energy and urns fat into ketones within the liver, which fuels energy to the brain (instead of gluc Continue reading >>

Ketosis

Ketosis

Not to be confused with Ketoacidosis. Ketosis is a metabolic state in which some of the body's energy supply comes from ketone bodies in the blood, in contrast to a state of glycolysis in which blood glucose provides energy. Ketosis is a result of metabolizing fat to provide energy. Ketosis is a nutritional process characterised by serum concentrations of ketone bodies over 0.5 mM, with low and stable levels of insulin and blood glucose.[1][2] It is almost always generalized with hyperketonemia, that is, an elevated level of ketone bodies in the blood throughout the body. Ketone bodies are formed by ketogenesis when liver glycogen stores are depleted (or from metabolising medium-chain triglycerides[3]). The main ketone bodies used for energy are acetoacetate and β-hydroxybutyrate,[4] and the levels of ketone bodies are regulated mainly by insulin and glucagon.[5] Most cells in the body can use both glucose and ketone bodies for fuel, and during ketosis, free fatty acids and glucose synthesis (gluconeogenesis) fuel the remainder. Longer-term ketosis may result from fasting or staying on a low-carbohydrate diet (ketogenic diet), and deliberately induced ketosis serves as a medical intervention for various conditions, such as intractable epilepsy, and the various types of diabetes.[6] In glycolysis, higher levels of insulin promote storage of body fat and block release of fat from adipose tissues, while in ketosis, fat reserves are readily released and consumed.[5][7] For this reason, ketosis is sometimes referred to as the body's "fat burning" mode.[8] Ketosis and ketoacidosis are similar, but ketoacidosis is an acute life-threatening state requiring prompt medical intervention while ketosis can be physiological. However, there are situations (such as treatment-resistant Continue reading >>

Ketosis – Advantaged Or Misunderstood State? (part Ii)

Ketosis – Advantaged Or Misunderstood State? (part Ii)

When I wrote part I of this post, I naively assumed this would only be a two-part series. However, so many great questions and comments emerged from the discussion that I realize it’s worth spending much more time on this important and misunderstood topic. In terms of setting expectations, I suspect this series will require at least four parts, after which I hope to get back to finishing up The Straight Dope on Cholesterol series. So, back to the topic at hand…. (You may want to read or maybe reread part I for a biochemistry refresher before diving into part II.) Is there a “metabolic advantage” to being in ketosis? Few topics in the nutrition blogosphere generate so much vitriolic rhetoric as this one, and for reasons I can’t understand. I do suspect part of the issue is that folks don’t understand the actual question. I’ve used the term “metabolic advantage” because that’s so often what folks write, but I’m not sure it has a uniform meaning, which may be part of the debate. I think what folks mean when they argue about this topic is fat partitioning, but that’s my guess. To clarify the macro question, I’ve broken the question down into more well-defined chunks. Does ketosis increase energy expenditure? I am pretty sure when the average person argues for or against ketosis having a “metabolic advantage” what they are really arguing is whether or not, calorie-for-calorie, a person in ketosis has a higher resting energy expenditure. In other words, does a person in ketosis expend more energy than a person not in ketosis because of the caloric composition of what they consume/ingest? Let me save you a lot of time and concern by offering you the answer: The question has not been addressed sufficiently in a properly controlled trial and, at bes Continue reading >>

Tips For Burning More Fat With Cold Thermogenesis (and Why Icing Really Does Work).

Tips For Burning More Fat With Cold Thermogenesis (and Why Icing Really Does Work).

As I write today’s post, I have just finished my usual 5 minute morning cold shower, followed by 10 minutes of morning yoga in my chilly backyard – and I’m currently wearing a cool fat burner vest. I may be no Wim Hof (the “Iceman”, who is pictured above and featured in videos like this), but this type of cold exposure has become a morning ritual for me, and I typically do it in a fasted state – trying to accumulate at least 45-60 minutes of “goose bumps” in the AM. Compared to doing a rigorous morning workout in a fasted state, this kind of cold thermogenesis achieves a similar fat burning effect, but is less stressful on my body and joints than exercise – and let’s face it: I can’t exactly write this article while I’m riding a bike, but I certainly can while wearing an ice-packed vest. And lately, my chilly adventures don’t stop with morning cold exposure… Later today, following my afternoon workout, I’ll go shut down post-workout inflammation and rapidly cool my core by jumping in the nearby 56 degree Spokane river for a 15-20 minute soak while I catch up on my daily dose of NPR’s “Science Friday” podcast. So why do I expose my body to this kind of treatment, and what are the benefits? You’re about to find out, see 3 things I’ve been using to enhance cold thermogenesis, and also get a glimpse into why the argument that “icing doesn’t work” is complete bunk. If you listened to my interview with Jack Kruse about cold thermogenesis, then you know that we discussed a host of benefits from frequent cold exposure done the right way, such as: Lowering body fat Increasing hormone levels Improving sexual performance and fertility Lowering blood sugar Cutting food cravings Improving adrenal function Fixing thyroid issues Enhancing Continue reading >>

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