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Thermogenesis Ketosis

How To Increase Fat Burning During Ketosis

How To Increase Fat Burning During Ketosis

Ketosis is also known as the body's process for generating energy by producing ketones when insufficient carbohydrates are available in the diet. In other words, a low-carb diet is called ketogenic because it forces the body to use fat for energy. Ketosis is a very effective means of burning fat, but there are certain techniques for increasing fat-burning through exercise and nutrition. How many carbs should you eat per day? When is the best time to eat them? What kinds of carbs are best? And what natural supplements prevent muscle loss caused by extreme ketogenic diets? Follow a few basic rules to answer these questions and achieve your fat-burning goals. Video of the Day Take in 30 to 50 g of carbohydrates per day, depending on your individual metabolism. Typically, this carb-depletion phase lasts five days and is followed by two days of carb-loading. For example, having 100 to 200 g of carbs per day for two days. This carb-cycling strategy helps to prevent dieting plateaus in which the body stops burning fat in response to what it perceives as starvation. Stack your carbohydrates around your workouts. Carbs are needed for two reasons: muscle recovery and energy. One good strategy is to take in half of your carbs before your workout and the other half after. Some people choose to take all of them before or after. Either way, taking in your carbohydrates in the morning will allow the body to switch into ketosis during the day, burning more fat. Limit resistance training workouts to 60 minutes to control cortisol levels. The stress hormone cortisol, part of the fight-or-flight response, slows down fat-burning and metabolizes muscle tissue. After about an hour of training, muscle-building hormones plummet, and cortisol increases significantly. Sometimes, training harder Continue reading >>

Does Ketosis Cause An Internal Rise In Body Temperature?

Does Ketosis Cause An Internal Rise In Body Temperature?

Ooh, ooh, ooh, I feel my temperature rising Help me, I’m flaming I must be a hundred and nine Burning, burning, burning And nothing can cool me I just might turn into smoke But I feel fine –Elvis Presley singing “Burning Love” Somebody’s turned up the heat up in here and it’s gotta be that low-carb diet I’m on, right? That’s what everybody does with livin’ la vida low-carb when something new happens to them after starting this way of eating–they blame it on low-carb! I mocked this notion in this blog post about an earache a couple of years ago, but what if there is merit to some rather strange side effects of following a controlled-carbohydrate nutritional approach? Hmmmmmm. There are several things we KNOW will happen to most people when they begin the low-carb lifestyle: their HDL “good” cholesterol goes up, there is a marked improvement in mental health, for women it helps with reproductive health, blood sugar levels are stabilized, they end up having less acne, triglycerides plummet (a VERY good thing!), and so much more I could spend hours sharing with you about. But there are some things that can vary from person to person as one of my readers shared with me in a recent e-mail. This 43-year old man starting cutting his carbohydrate intake beginning in January 2008 and has lost over 25 pounds so far. WOO HOO! He has really enjoyed this new low-carb lifestyle change, but was curious about an unexpected side effect that has been plaguing him with no apparent cause. Here’s what he wrote: Hey Jimmy, After lots of searches, I’m having trouble finding out if anyone experiences a sensation of a rise in body temperature while in ketosis. There are some days I feel like I am literally burning up (but I don’t have a fever or anything). Coinciden Continue reading >>

The Ketogenic Diet 101: Everything You Need To Know About The Diet That’s Taking The World By Storm.

The Ketogenic Diet 101: Everything You Need To Know About The Diet That’s Taking The World By Storm.

The ketogenic diet is a remarkable way of eating with numerous health benefits. With the ketogenic diet, you switch your body’s preferred source of fuel from carbohydrate to stored fat, which is a cleaner fuel, more healthful fuel, that the body and the brain loves. For some people, this takes more time than others. But at most 6 weeks (if you’ve really been hitting the carbs). By then, if you stick to the diet, you can know, with all absolute certainty, that you are running on fat solely. The Keto Philosophy It is a state in which we switch our body’s prefered source of energy from sugar to fat. Of course, this is what we want to do. We want to burn excess fat off the body and get lean, right? Most people eat a carbohydrate rich diet, consistently spiking insulin and running on glucose. Glucose, in fact, is the preferred source of energy for the body. It’s easy. The body will use whatever is within easy reach—which is why when it’s starving it turns to nutrient rich muscle. It wants that immediate energy glucose gives it. Ketosis happens when we effectively switch our body’s source of energy to our fat stores instead of an instream of glucose by eating a low carbohydrate diet. We can, however, push our body to run on fat and the body thrives on fat. Let me give you the more textbook definition of the ketogenic diet before we move on: The ketogenic diet is a very low carb, high fat, moderate protein diet. Eating a diet this low in carbohydrate pushes your body into a new metabolic framework called “ketosis” – when your body finally makes that switch (which takes about 4 to 6 weeks) to burning fat for energy, it becomes very efficient at burning fat for energy and urns fat into ketones within the liver, which fuels energy to the brain (instead of gluc Continue reading >>

Water Fasting Ketosis Is Where The Fat Burn Heaven Begins

Water Fasting Ketosis Is Where The Fat Burn Heaven Begins

In this guide, you will learn everything you need to know about water fasting ketosis. I'll explain how water fasting can help you reach your absolute highest possible fat burn rates, which is easily the single biggest benefit of ketosis. You'll also see the science on how long it actually takes before you can enter ketosis during a water fast. You'll also learn about one of the most dangerous problems of water fasting ketosis. I'll also tell you why it is a very good idea to avoid one of the most common mistakes people make once they already reach ketosis during a water fast. Now that you know what you're getting yourself into, here's a quick overview of everything that's covered in this guide: The single biggest benefit of water fasting ketosis Simply put, ketosis is a state where you get to enjoy your absolutely highest possible fat burn rates. If you're on your regular diet, your body can draw energy from a couple of different sources (so not just from your body fat reserves). Those other, non-fat energy sources are the main reason why your fat burn rates stay on the low end, even if you start eating less food. But during a water fast, because you're eating no food at all, those other energy sources in your body will be completely wiped out after a while. Once that happens, your body will enter full ketosis, and in that state of full ketosis, your body will have no choice but to rely almost exclusively on your body fat reserves. With no other energy sources available, ketosis will trigger some pretty amazing fat burn rates in your body. Water fasting is one of the fastest ways to reach that state of super high fat burn. And a lot of people do a water fast just for this reason. There's only one problem with reaching ketosis through water fasting. PRO TIP: A different Continue reading >>

Ketogenic Diet – Good Or Bad?

Ketogenic Diet – Good Or Bad?

The Ketogenic Diet is based on a very low carbohydrate intake and a very high fat intake. When you do this it puts your body in ketosis, which is a state in which your body burns fat, rather than carbohydrates for fuel. The Ketogenic Diets guidelines insist for a ratio of four grams of fat for every one gram of protein or carbohydrate. The Ketogenic diet shoots for near-zero carbs and is normally around 10-15 grams of carbs a day. That amount of carbs equals 10-15 grapes… for a whole day. While the carbs are very low, the fat is very high. The diet varies in proportion of protein but is generally low. You can eat a small amount of protein- meat, poultry, fish, seafood, eggs. A large amount of high-fat foods- avocado, oils, nuts and nut butters, bacon, egg yolks, butter, and cheese. And also a small amount of low carbohydrate vegetables- leafy greens, brassicas, asparagus, cucumber, celery, tomatoes, peppers, mushrooms, and zucchini. You cannot eat most dairy (except high-fat items like butter and certain cheeses), fruit, grains, beans & legumes, starchy vegetables, slightly sweet vegetables, most processed foods (except pork rinds). Pros The main reason people go on the Ketogenic Diet is to lose weight. Ketosis may help you improve your body composition because your body burns fat in ketosis. It also increases thermogenesis- the amount of calories you burn daily. If you eat less calories, your body will burn stored body fat, not just fat from food. It reduces insulin levels and decreases insulin resistance. Ketogenic Diets were originally created for epilepsy management because ketosis produces an aid in controlling seizures. The brain normally runs on glucose, which is derived from carbohydrates, so because involves less carbohydrates it may induce a change in brain Continue reading >>

Tips For Burning More Fat With Cold Thermogenesis (and Why Icing Really Does Work).

Tips For Burning More Fat With Cold Thermogenesis (and Why Icing Really Does Work).

As I write today’s post, I have just finished my usual 5 minute morning cold shower, followed by 10 minutes of morning yoga in my chilly backyard – and I’m currently wearing a cool fat burner vest. I may be no Wim Hof (the “Iceman”, who is pictured above and featured in videos like this), but this type of cold exposure has become a morning ritual for me, and I typically do it in a fasted state – trying to accumulate at least 45-60 minutes of “goose bumps” in the AM. Compared to doing a rigorous morning workout in a fasted state, this kind of cold thermogenesis achieves a similar fat burning effect, but is less stressful on my body and joints than exercise – and let’s face it: I can’t exactly write this article while I’m riding a bike, but I certainly can while wearing an ice-packed vest. And lately, my chilly adventures don’t stop with morning cold exposure… Later today, following my afternoon workout, I’ll go shut down post-workout inflammation and rapidly cool my core by jumping in the nearby 56 degree Spokane river for a 15-20 minute soak while I catch up on my daily dose of NPR’s “Science Friday” podcast. So why do I expose my body to this kind of treatment, and what are the benefits? You’re about to find out, see 3 things I’ve been using to enhance cold thermogenesis, and also get a glimpse into why the argument that “icing doesn’t work” is complete bunk. If you listened to my interview with Jack Kruse about cold thermogenesis, then you know that we discussed a host of benefits from frequent cold exposure done the right way, such as: Lowering body fat Increasing hormone levels Improving sexual performance and fertility Lowering blood sugar Cutting food cravings Improving adrenal function Fixing thyroid issues Enhancing Continue reading >>

#200: Ben Bikman, Phd: Brown Fat Tissue Activation, Insulin & The Ketogenic Diet

#200: Ben Bikman, Phd: Brown Fat Tissue Activation, Insulin & The Ketogenic Diet

Want Early Access to Our Interviews and Additional Content? Become a High Intensity Health Insider and Access Bonus Content Listen to the recording What Others Are Saying About This Episode About Ben Bikman, PhD The focus of Ben's lab (the Laboratory of Obesity and Metabolism) is twofold. First, we aim to identify the molecular mechanisms that explain the increased risk of disease that accompanies weight gain, with particular emphasis on the etiology of insulin resistance and disrupted mitochondrial function. Second, we hope to reveal novel cellular processes that are responsible for fat development. Connect with Ben FaceBook Benjamin Bikman Instagram & Twitter @benbikmanphd Products Mentioned In this Episode Not Getting Results on the Ketogenic Diet? Need Meal Plans and Recipe Ideas? Access our Real-Food Recipe eBooks, Private FB Group and Live Chat Show Notes 02:02 Dr. Bikman’s Journey: He was an exercise enthusiast, with two degrees in exercise physiology. He was fixated upon calories and the “eat less – exercise more” model. It would not work consistently. During PhD studies, he learned that insulin is the metabolic key. As insulin goes, so goes body fat. Now that he has his own lab, the relevance of insulin upon normal metabolic health is his area of study. 03:11 Insulin is needed to Grow Fat Cells: Progenitor (stem) cells in a dish need a spike in insulin of a certain size and over a certain amount of time in order for them to become fat cells. This is adipogenesis, the creation of adipocytes. 03:35 Distortion of the Fat Cell: Within the adipocytes in adult humans, insulin initiates lipogenesis, the creation or expansion of the lipid droplet or bulge of fat within the fat cell. When you look at a fat cell under a microscope, the mitochondria, nucleus and o Continue reading >>

This High-fat Diet People Are Talking About Can Be Effective, But…

This High-fat Diet People Are Talking About Can Be Effective, But…

It’s the diet people are talking about. Although the ketogenic diet became a trend in the country only in the last few years, it’s actually been around since the 1900s to treat epilepsy, until it was abandoned in favor of new anticonvulsant drugs. Ketogenic, or keto, is a low-carb, moderate-protein, high-fat diet that’s often been compared to Atkins and other similar low-carb diets. The nutrient intake should be around 70 percent fats, 25 percent protein and 5 percent carbohydrate. The fat intake may sound daunting, even disheartening, but there’s a purpose to that. People normally take 45-65 percent of the calories from carbs, 10-35 from protein and 20-35 percent from fat. With this diet, the body produces glucose and insulin that are converted and used as energy. Insulin is produced to process glucose in your body. The fats you consume are therefore stored, since the body uses glucose as its primary energy source. According to the ketogenic diet, if you lower your carb intake, the body goes into a state known as ketosis, a natural process jumpstarted in our system to help us survive when food is low. We then produce ketones from the breakdown of fats in the liver. Starved of carbs Keto is not about starving the body of calories. Rather, it is about starving it of carbs so that it will force the body into ketosis. When you overload your diet with fats, it will supposedly burn ketones as its primary source of energy. Blood glucose, according to the diet, will fall by restricting carbs. This then leads to increased production of a fat-burning enzyme called hormone sensitive lipase, and releases stored triglycerides (fats) from the fat cells. Triglycerides are broken down into fatty acids and glycerol that the liver turns into ketones for energy. What to eat: meat Continue reading >>

Keto-adaptation #1 – Lessons Learned From 1 Year And 5 Months Of Ketosis

Keto-adaptation #1 – Lessons Learned From 1 Year And 5 Months Of Ketosis

Intro Update: before reading this, make sure to know my current thoughts (about page) As of February 2015, I’ve been 1 year and 5 months into ketosis. I entered this metabolic state using nutrition primarily and I was able to maintain it through nutritional, as well as other interventions. More than 98% of the time I was in ketosis. It was, I believe, two or three times when I was out of ketosis for a couple of hours and this happened during the first months, back in late 2013. Be reasonable My personal nutritional approach is individualized. I do not do 80+% fat and 5% carbohydrate and I would be inclined to say that it may not be optimal for healthy adults to eat so much fat and deprive their bodies of micronutrient, vitamin, and mineral diversity that come from vegetables, leafy greens, and/or some legumes, unless a severe medical condition (such as epilepsy, for example) implies it. I do 65-70% fat, 15-18% protein and ~10-15% carbs. It keeps me in ketosis. I eat below my daily energy requirements, I consume low protein, <1g per KG of bodyweight – which fall somewhere in-between 50 – 65g of protein per day, sometimes even lower. I fast a lot, I train fasted and I feel that my lifting performance keeps getting better, contrary to popular belief. Many folks would opt-in for much higher protein intake. I find it not necessary for me. Ketones may play a crucial role in this. Ketosis is not magic. Keto-adaptation does not happen overnight (or in 2-3 weeks of ketosis)1 Eating low calorie does not make me nutrient deficient. On the contrary, I optimized my approach so that I can get as many nutrients from food as possible. I also supplement. I want to underline that this works for me (apparently) and I do not want to get more specific so that folks will immediately th Continue reading >>

Silicon Valley’s *completely Natural* Secret To More Energy & Better Focus

Silicon Valley’s *completely Natural* Secret To More Energy & Better Focus

You might already be doing it and not even know it. While biohacking may sound like something unnatural and painful that should only be conducted in a science lab, it’s actually quite the opposite. You see, humans have been biohacking forever—experimenting with diet and lifestyle in order to look and feel our best. It’s just that recently, someone assigned a name to it, and a very die-hard group of high-achieving practitioners have given it momentum (we’re looking at you, Silicon Valley). Bio-hacking is simple: a way of understanding the way the systems of your body run and how certain things like food, water, exercise, and sleep affect these systems so that you can become the best version of yourself. Something as simple as a standing desk can be considered biohacking (said to improve posture, muscle recovery, and mental focus), but other practices that have developed over the years are, shall we say, a bit more extreme. Intrigued? Us, too. Read on for some of the top ways biohackers are slowly but surely becoming superhumans. Cold thermogenesis A more DIY everyday version of chryotherapy, cold thermogenesis (aka freezing your booty off in the shower) is thought to have a bevy of health benefits, from burning a higher amount of calories throughout the day, to improved mental clarity and focus, to quicker muscle recovery, balanced hormones, and better sleep. There’s a couple ways to tap into these benefits: 1) sitting in a bath filled with ice; 2) dunking your face in a bowl of ice (the vagus nerve in your face is connected to the nervous system throughout the body); 3) chugging ice-cold water; or 4) 30 blissful seconds under freezing-cold water in the shower, followed by 30 seconds of warm water, 30 of cold, etc. Pick your poison—we mean, practice—of choi Continue reading >>

Ketogenic Diet Faq: All You Need To Know

Ketogenic Diet Faq: All You Need To Know

Below is an list of the most commonly asked questions about the ketogenic diet. Simply click on the question you're interested in and it will take you right to the answer. If you have any more questions, please let me know by leaving a comment and I'll add it to the list! KetoDiet Basic Facts Foods & Diet Plans Health Concerns Troubleshooting 3 free diet plans to help you kickstart your diet, lose weight and get healthy Recipes, giveaways and exclusive deals delivered directly to your inbox A chance to win the KetoDiet app every week KetoDiet Basic Facts Why is it that conventional diets don't work? Most of us would say we get fat simply because we get lazy and eat more. But what if it's the other way round? What if we just get fat and as a result we eat more and become lazy? For the last decades we have been given wrong advice about nutrition and effects of fatty foods on putting on weight. What if the main problem is that due to our modern diets we cannot satisfy our appetite? A study on this subject concluded with a surprising result: the fatter people get, the more inactive they become, not the other way round. And what if the interests of the authorities offering advice are influenced by economic reasons? To learn more about this, I recommend you watch The Food Revolution on Youtube Ketogenic diets are, in fact, closely related to the Paleolithic diet. Both exclude carbohydrates and aim at eating real food. Today carbohydrates make the majority of our diet and have significant implications for our health including hormone balance. For example, insulin, which is responsible for storing fat in our body, is greatly affected by excessive carbohydrate consumption. Carbohydrates are without doubt the most fattening element in our diets. Based on studies performed over th Continue reading >>

2 Shredded By Beast Helped Me Lose 10% Body Fat!

2 Shredded By Beast Helped Me Lose 10% Body Fat!

I’m writing this review whilst on the train sipping my mix of 2 Shredded. I’m approximately 3 weeks into the tub and so far I think it’s one of the best products I’ve ever tried. 2017 update: I still to this day take 2 Shredded and my body fat percentage is significantly lower at around 15% (it was around 25% when I first starting supplementing with 2 Shredded!). I still highly, highly recommend it and there’s a link to purchase it at the bottom of this review if you want to take your fat burning capabilities to the next level! My #1 most recommended thermogenic supplement 2 Shredded Effectiveness – 9.5/10 The first thing I’ll mention about 2 Shredded is that I use this supplement a little differently to the recommendations. The instructions are to mix 1 scoop in a huge amount of water and down it. Personally I use 1.5 scoops and I fill my large shaker to sip slowly throughout the day. This has the advantages of providing stable energy, thermogenesis and fat burning throughout the day without the jitters or afternoon crash. Energy I wouldn’t recommend trying to use 2 Shredded as a pre-workout supplement. There are much more effective PWO’s for similar price. I find to get optimal use of 2 Shredded I take my usual PWO first thing in the morning, get my work out done and use 2 Shredded as a matter of energy sustenance throughout the day. This was especially helpful throughout the induction phase of ketosis, ie. becoming keto-adapted, as during this process your body has no carbohydrate for fuel and hasn’t switched to using ketones yet either. So whilst running on empty, 2 Shredded’s stimulation of the central nervous system was welcome, as is the boost to my fat burning capabilities. After all, the point is to get shredded, right? Thermogenesis As a Continue reading >>

What Everybody Ought To Know About Ketosis

What Everybody Ought To Know About Ketosis

Recently I wanted to explore the world of Ketosis. I thought I knew a little bit about ketosis, but after doing some research I soon realised how wrong I was. 3 months later, after reading numerous books, listening to countless podcasts and experimenting with various diets I know have a sound understanding of ketosis. This resource is built as a reference guide for those looking to explore the fascinating world of ketosis. It is a resource that I wish I had 3 months ago. As you will soon see, a lot of the content below is not mine, instead I have linked to referenced to experts who have a greater understanding of this topic than I ever will. I hope this helps and if there is something that I have missed please leave a comment below so that I can update this. Also, as this is a rather long document, I have split it into various sections. You can click the headline below to be sent straight to the section that interests you. For those that are really time poor I have created a useful ketosis cheat sheet guide. This guide covers all the essential information you should know about ketosis. It can be downloaded HERE. Alternatively, if you're looking for a natural and sustainable way to improve health and lose weight head to this page - What is Ketosis? What Are The Benefits from being in Ketosis? Isn’t Ketosis Dangerous? Ketoacidosis vs Ketosis What Is The Difference Between a Low Carb Diet and a Ketogenic Diet? Types of Ketosis: The Difference Between Nutritional, Therapeutic & MCT Ketogenic Diets Is The Ketogenic Diet Safe? Long Term Effects Thyroid and Ketosis - What You May Want To Know What is a Typical Diet/Macro Breakdown for a Ketogenic Diet? Do I Need to Eat Carbs? What do I Eat On a Ketogenic Diet? What Do I Avoid Eating on a Ketogenic Diet? Protein Consumption a Continue reading >>

Can The Cool Fat Burner “speed Up” Low-carb Diets?

Can The Cool Fat Burner “speed Up” Low-carb Diets?

Can the Cool Fat Burner speed up acquiring ketosis? Ketosis is the metabolic state where a person burns fat, instead of glucose, for fuel. Most people eat carbohydrates, and lots of them. Breads, pastas, cereals, sugars, etc. Carbs are eventually broken down into glucose during digestion. The body then uses this glucose as fuel. As was discussed below, chronically high glucose (and insulin) levels are associated with obesity, diabetes, heart disease, and the metabolic syndrome. However, people who eat low carb diets, and thus have lower glucose incoming for fuel, may instead burn fat, via ketones, for fuel. Common examples would be the Atkins diet, as well as any very low carb (VLC) ketogenic diet. (Note: it’s a misconception that high fat intake is necessary to enter ketosis; it is in fact, a function of carbohydrate intake. Low carb intake will induce ketosis, independent of fat intake.) People who champion low carb diets, often refer to themselves as “fat adapted” and “fat burners,” Yet there is still no conclusive proof that, all things being equal (total daily caloric intake), that “fat burners” lose any more weight than regular ‘glucose burners.’ In other words, there is still not proven to be an inherent metabolic advantage to ketogenic diets in regards to fat loss. (Studies that show greater weight loss on VLC diets often don’t standardize protein intake across groups, and often don’t account for fat loss vs muscle loss… thus we still can’t draw conclusions) However, those on low carb diets espouse many other benefits to the routine. Lower cravings, especially for sweets and carbs. Lower appetite, making it easier to restrict calories for weight loss. Mental clarity; no ups and downs in mood or energy associated with carb meals. An incr Continue reading >>

Will I Lose Muscle On A Ketogenic Diet?

Will I Lose Muscle On A Ketogenic Diet?

The ability to simultaneously gain muscle and lose fat is a rather controversial topic amongst those in the fitness industry; however, this seems to be the desired goal of anyone looking to optimize body composition. One of the biggest conundrums we face is that in order to shed body fat, we tend to cut calories so much that we lose muscle mass, and in order to build muscle mass, we tend to bring along some fat gain for the ride. These changes in body composition can happen for a number of different reasons, a few of which we will touch on in this article. In any case, the evidence is clear that a properly implemented ketogenic diet exhibits a protein sparing effect, which may allow one dieting to preserve more muscle mass than if he/she hadn’t been ketogenic. This means that we can ideally shed off that pesky lower abdominal fat, all the while keeping those prized muscles we have worked so hard to build. In this article we are going to discuss some of the mechanisms of fat loss and muscle maintenance on a ketogenic diet and why a ketogenic diet may be more ideal for attaining these goals than a traditional low fat diet. One particular piece of dietary advice that people tend to give is the “calories in, calories out,” hypothesis which indicates that it doesn’t matter what you eat or how you eat it, just as long as you eat less than you expend. This is true to a certain degree, but far too often we tend to simplify what both of those equations mean without taking into account other variables (e.g. fiber, thermogenic effect of protein, brown adipose tissue, etc.). If you put yourself in a caloric deficit, it is likely that you will experience weight loss; however, it is possible that some of this weight loss will not come strictly from body fat, and that some of Continue reading >>

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