diabetestalk.net

Stevia In The Raw Keto

Sweeteners

Sweeteners

This week Richard Morris and Carl Franklin talk about sweeteners other than table sugar, the good and the bad. Errata: Carl mistakenly said that he had an insulin response to the Truvia brand sweetener (Erythritol + Stevia), but in fact it was the Fructevia brand, which combines fructose with Stevia. The creation of ketone bodies "Cholesterol - when to worry" - Ken Sikaris Everything You Wanted to Know About Artificial Sweeteners Fructose 2.0 - Robert Lustig A genetic variant near olfactory receptor genes influences cilantro preference Sweetener in Gum Is Causing Surge in Accidental Dog Poisonings Richard's Recipe: Low-Carb Chocolate Carl's Recipe: Broiled Brussels Sprouts Continue reading >>

What’s The Best Artificial Sweetener?

What’s The Best Artificial Sweetener?

One of the most popular questions asked by people who are just beginning the Ketogenic Diet and Lifestyle is about what they can use as a sweetener. Is aspartame okay? Or saccharine? What about Splenda? How about coconut sugar, it’s from a coconut, so it’s good, right? Honey is all natural, right? Make no mistake about it, there is a lot of confusing information out there about what sweeteners you can use. So I thought I’d take a few minutes to explain some things. First off, a little background information is needed. When assessing a sweeteners benefit to keto, the first thing that must be considered is what is known as the Glycemic Index (GI). The GI is a measure of how quickly certain foods will cause a spike in blood sugar. Spiking blood sugar will result in insulin spikes. Insulin spikes is the mechanism for type 2 diabetes, obesity, metabolic syndrome, and a host of other illnesses. So the idea behind keto is to keep the blood sugar low, and certainly to prevent any kind of spiking. The higher the number of the GI for any given food, the more insulin will be produced. Any food with a GI of 70 or higher is considered high. Below 55 is considered low. Everything else (56-69) is in the middle. Okay…now for a brief detour to talk about terms. The question is what “artificial” sweetener is best, but I’m also including some other sweeteners, known as natural sweeteners. And I show the lists separately. Any food with a value of 100 is, essentially, considered “pure sugar.” I included what I consider to be the most common sweeteners, and certainly the most common asked about sweeteners. Name Type of sweetener GI Maltodextrin Sugar 110 Maltose Sugar 105 Dextrose Sugar 100 Glucose Sugar 100 HFCS-42 (High-fructose corn syrup) Modified Sugar 68 Sucrose Sugar Continue reading >>

Natural Low Carb Sweeteners Guide & Conversion Chart

Natural Low Carb Sweeteners Guide & Conversion Chart

I get a lot of questions from people asking about what erythritol is, saying they want to avoid it because they think it’s artificial, or wanting to use different natural and/or low carb sweeteners that they have for my recipes. Although not every sweetener can be interchangeable for every recipe, often times they can be. I also frequently see confusion about what sweetener to use and what the various low carb sweeteners are. Which sweetener to use is largely a matter of preference. I like erythritol, or blends of it, the best, but they all have pros and cons. I hope this guide will help you understand the differences between them, their effects on blood sugar (often called glycemic index or GI), and how to convert. *This page contains affiliate links, but this did NOT impact the products I chose. Your price stays the same. 1. Sugar Alcohols Sugar alcohols can occur naturally in fruits and vegetables, or be produced by fermenting plant sugars. Because they are not well absorbed by the body, they contain fewer calories (some of them effectively close to none) and have a smaller effect on blood glucose levels. For the same reason, they can cause stomach upset if used excessively. Their impact on blood sugar and potential for side effects varies depending on the type of sugar alcohol. Contrary to what some people may believe, sugar alcohols are not artificial sweeteners. There is some processing involved to achieve the granulated sweeteners you can purchase for home use, but this is no less natural than the processing needed for coconut sugar, maple syrup, or white table sugar. You can also choose to buy ones that are guaranteed non-GMO and/or organic. a) Erythritol Erythritol is my absolute favorite natural, low carb sweetener. I use it for most recipes on this blog. It Continue reading >>

Best Sugar Substitute For Keto? [infographic]

Best Sugar Substitute For Keto? [infographic]

We’re going to be breaking these sweeteners down into 3 distinct categories in order to choose the best sugar substitute for a keto diet. Those categories are Artificial Sweeteners, Sugar Alcohols, and Natural Sweeteners. Check out our video where we touch on everything covered in this blog post and give our recommendations for the best sugar substitute for keto. Artificial Sweeteners These tend to known as intense sweeteners because they are much sweeter than regular sugar. Based on this fact, you only need a fraction of the amount you would normally use with regular sugar. This is seen as a benefit by many. They contain synthetic chemicals that stimulate the sweet taste receptors on your tongue. So, let us break down the different types of artificial sweeteners: Aspartame You might not recognize the name, but if you’ve ever used Equal, you’ve been using aspartame. Aspartame is a low calorie sweetener that is approximately 180 times sweeter than regular sugar. The components that make up this artificial sweetener are amino acid, aspartic acid and phenylalanine, which are not only broken down completely by your body, but found in larger quantities in a great deal of foods, such as meat and vegetables. Aspartame is 0 calories and 0 gylcemic index. When combined with dextrose and maltodextrin to form Equal brand sweetener the calories and glycemic index are increased based on the added ingredients. Pros: Essentially Zero calorie additive Zero glycemic index Cons: Often mixed with high glycemic bulking agents Highly controversial/opposing studies on safety Acesulfame K This artificial sweetener is used in a variety of foods and is approximately 200 times sweeter than regular sugar. It is often found in a blend with other sweeteners, such as aspartame. Blending the tw Continue reading >>

The Ultimate Guide To Low Carb Sweeteners

The Ultimate Guide To Low Carb Sweeteners

This is my ultimate guide to low carb sweeteners. Which ones I use, and which ones I don’t. I’ll explain how to use each one and what to look for when you buy them because not all low carb sweeteners are created equally. It can be incredibly confusing when you are just starting to live sugar free. Part of the ethos of living sugar free and low carb is to give up the sweet treats on a regular basis and to reset our taste buds. But being able to make a sweet treat occasionally is a deal breaker for many of you contemplating even starting. If you do want a cake, a dessert or a sweet treat, it is better to have a few good sugar free recipes on hand than to reach for a high carb snack. With so many sweeteners now on the market, which do you choose? Always read each and every label carefully, because even sweeteners within the same brand can contain different ingredients or different bulking agents such as dextrose. It may take some time to readjust your taste buds to living sugar free, and is it any wonder? Sugar is now found in 80% of products on our supermarket shelves. What is astounding is the type of foods that have added sugar. You might expect it to be in desserts and cereals but tuna? Soup? Bacon? There are also several different types of names for sugar which just makes it even more confusing when you’re trying to understand reading food labels. When I write my recipes I will always state the amount of low carb sweeteners I have used to make the recipe but I also add “sweetener of choice, to taste”. This is the biggest variable when it comes to low carb baking. We are all on different parts of our sugar free journey, so what might taste sweet to me, might not be nearly sweet enough for you. Always add low carb sweeteners in the minimum amount that suits yo Continue reading >>

Cookies, Candies, And Puddings, Oh My! – 45 Low Carb Desserts

Cookies, Candies, And Puddings, Oh My! – 45 Low Carb Desserts

Last week I shared with you a huge list of 35 low carb snacks. So many of those are either favorites of ours, or are on the list to be made soon! This week, I have an even bigger list of low carb desserts, with all of them also being vegan desserts (or having vegan options). I am not a vegan, but my son has life-threatening food allergies, so we typically don't use egg or dairy when making dishes–hence the “vegan” focus. Interestingly enough, these are all paleo desserts too. I know – paleo and vegan don't typically seem to go together, but in my home they sure do :). As I mentioned in my post of low carb snacks, we have been eating more and more low carb for several reasons, one of them being candida, and another is that we are simply eating fewer grains for gut health and overall health. However, I am not opposed to carbs. In fact, I think they are important as long as they are good carbs and not out of proportion. I'll be sharing more about that later, but just wanted to get that out there so folks know where I stand. I do think we are doing better without a bunch of carbs, but do many people are turning up research and information about thyroid and adrenal health as it relates to carbs and I think it's worth looking at. In any case, typically desserts are full of refined sugar, refined flours, and more unsavories. Several of these recipes have sweeteners that aren't low carb. If you would like, substitute stevia or xylitol, or erythritol, or your sweetener of choice to make them lower carb. Oh, and if you notice, this post is devoid of frozen desserts. If you're an ice cream lover like me and that's what you're looking for, this post of Low Carb Ice Creams will be exactly what you are looking for! (substitute 1 scoop stevia for the honey) Don't feel like mak Continue reading >>

54 Ketogenic Dessert Recipes To Satisfy Your Sweet Tooth

54 Ketogenic Dessert Recipes To Satisfy Your Sweet Tooth

You’re excited by the ketogenic diet, but you just can’t survive with some desserts? Don’t worry – we’re here to help! Check out this giant list of delicious ketogenic dessert recipes we’ve compiled. We’ve got everything from ketogenic cookies to mint chocolate chip ice cream! Just 2 quick notes before you jump into these delicious dessert recipes… Sweeteners and Dairy in Keto Dessert Recipes Many of the keto recipes use some form of non-caloric sweetener to make these desserts sweet. While we think it’s better to avoid all sweeteners on a ketogenic diet, it’s clearly not possible when it comes to creating desserts. We try to stick to pure stevia as our preferred non-caloric sweetener. None of these recipes contain dairy other butter or ghee. If you tolerate dairy ok, then feel free to use butter, but if you don’t tolerate dairy, then try to use cultured ghee instead as this removes most of the lactose and casein from butter (and so it’s not as problematic for most people). Want to download the whole Ketogenic dessert recipes list as a PDF? Just click the green button below and we’ll send it over. Table of Contents For Ketogenic Dessert Recipes Click to jump to a specific section: Ketogenic Dessert Bar Recipes Coconut Chocolate Bars – The Nourished Caveman Ingredients: unsweetened shredded coconut, stevia, vanilla extract, coconut cream, coconut oil or cocoa butter, and unsweetened cocoa powder Flaky coconut covered in smooth, rich, indulgent chocolate. This combination creates the perfect, classic, healthy candy bar – Keto-style! Homemade Sugar-Free Mounds Bars – Low-Carb, So Simple! Click here for the recipe. Ingredients: extra virgin coconut oil, coconut milk, Swerve, shredded coconut, and dark chocolate These Ketogenic mounds bars are Continue reading >>

The Truth On Truvia

The Truth On Truvia

Are Truvia and Stevia the same thing? Thanks to a false-advertising job well-done, many health conscious consumers have been tricked into believing that Truvia is the same thing as Stevia. The (disappointing) truth is that, despite the fact that Truvia is marketed as a “stevia-based sugar substitute,” it is NOT equivalent to Stevia. Not even close, actually. Get this: the ingredient list for Truvia is as follows: Erythritol, Rebiana and Natural Flavors. Just three ingredients and Stevia isn’t even one of them! That right there should tell us something (for starters, not to trust the product manufacturer…which by the way is Coca-Cola teamed up with a company called Cargill…) Let’s take a look at those three ingredients that make up Truvia: 1. Erythritol: A sugar alcohol which is made by processing genetically modified corn; this is the primary ingredient in Truvia. Sugar alcohols are notoriously known for their unpleasant side effects. Our bodies do a poor job at digesting sugar alcohols (which is why they are lower in calories), but because they aren’t completely digested, they hang out in our intestines where they are fermented by colonic bacteria. The by-products of fermentation include gastric distress, diarrhea, cramping, gas and bloating. Yuck. That’s ingredient #1. 2. Rebiana: Half of one percent of Truvia is Rebiana. The truth is that the only reason Truvia can mention anything about Stevia is because Rebiana is derived from a Stevia plant. But again, don’t be fooled. Rebiana is certainly not the same thing as Stevia. It is a molecule of the stevia plant. Furthermore, Rebiana is actually 400 times sweeter than sugar, but you’ll notice that Truvia is only twice as sweet as sugar. If you do the math, you’ll see that if a container of Truvia wa Continue reading >>

6 Tips To Really Love Stevia

6 Tips To Really Love Stevia

I've been eating stevia for a long time now – ever since I knew that I had candida. I was quite the sugar-aholic but am now reformed from that habit and am glad to know that stevia is one of the more healthy sugar alternatives. If you don't LOVE stevia (and even if you do), then this is the post for you. Even if you love stevia, the following tips are great ways to love it even more and to deal with the bitter stevia taste issue.. (Note – this post was written by Candace of Candida Free Candee, but her site is now offline so all links to her site have been removed.) Are you a stevia lover? Do you wish you were? Do you wish you could enjoy all the pros of stevia without the palate-intruding cons? Well look no further! Today I am going to share with you some tips and tricks that will help you enjoy each and every trip you take to Stevia-land without the stevia taste problem that's oh so common! Read on to learn more. When I first heard about Stevia, I was ecstatic. I thought it was a godsend to my candida-ridden body. 1. Stevia is a natural sweetener derived from the Stevia rebaudiana plant and can be up to 300 times sweeter than sugar (the typical range is 200-300). As a result, depending on the recipe, stevia can be either simple, or pretty hard to use in recipes. Check out How to Use Stevia here.} 2. Stevia is a zero calorie sweetener that does not contain any sugar or carbohydrates, nor does it feed candida. 3. Easy on your digestion–stevia lacks the unpleasant tummy-lurching side effects that are a characteristic of some other non-candida feeding sweeteners (think sugar-alcohols, like xylitol). 4. Stevia comes in many forms with varying amounts of processing. Among theses are: homemade extracts, liquid or powder extracts and ground stevia. – Homemade extracts Continue reading >>

Keto Carb Free Whipped Cream

Keto Carb Free Whipped Cream

~ This post contains affiliate links to help you find the products we use. Carb free whipped cream is a go-to snack for me, and when I first started keto, it was one of the recipes that helped me beat sugar cravings. If you are looking for a great heavy whipping cream, I highly recommend using Organic Valley because it is the only zero carbs heavy whipping cream I have found. I’m sure there may be others, but like I said it’s the only brand I’ve been able to find. This carb free whipped cream couldn’t be easier to make, and it has been the base of many other recipes I will share soon. I also love using it as a topping for my mug cakes and keto pumpkin cheesecake. I usually make a big batch so I can use my whipped cream in a variety of ways without having to wash my mixing bowl multiple times (what can I say, I try to keep it simple) but you can always cut this recipe down and make single servings. This recipe makes about 20 servings, which is perfect for holiday parties. You do take keto recipes to holiday parties, right? PLEASE READ: —> Update: There is a lot of debate about whether of not this is actually carb free whipped cream. Yes, Organic Valley in large enough amounts is going to have carbs, but this brand does appear to have fewer carbs than other brands unless they have figured out a way to skew their label. With that said, yes if you eat this entire batch you are going to be eating carbs there is no way around that. If you only eat one serving you will be good to go but if you eat more half the whipped cream well… why would you do that? Whipped cream isn’t a meal, is it? Come on people! Are we babies. I mean seriously?!?! Carb Free Whipped Cream: Ingredients: 2 Cups of Organic Valley Heavy Whipping Cream 2-4 Tsp of Liquid Stevia or 1-2 itty bitty Continue reading >>

The Best And Worst Low Carb Sweeteners

The Best And Worst Low Carb Sweeteners

Most people that start a keto diet plan find that they have some intense cravings for sugar in the beginning, but will dissipate after a few weeks. Even the seasoned low carber will tell you that they have cravings every once in a while, sometimes burning inside them so deep they want to give up to temptation. That’s where sweeteners come in, where you can make or bake things you usually can’t eat. Of course, you will have to watch out because most things that say “carb free” actually still contain carbs. Make sure you take the net carbs of any impacting sweetener into consideration when tracking your macros. As a general rule of thumb, it’s always best to try to avoid sweeteners in the beginning. They’re well known to cause cravings and some may stall your progress with over-use. Stay strict and try to only occasionally consume sweet treats when you are on a low carb diet. Types of Sweeteners In general, there are a few classifications of sweeteners. There are natural sweeteners, sugar alcohols, and synthetic sweeteners (or artificial sweeteners). There are a few others that aren’t exactly classified in these categories (like glycerin based sweeteners) but they are quite uncommon and rarely used, so we’ll skip going over them. For a ketogenic diet, I personally suggest sticking with erythritol and stevia (or a blend) because they are both naturally occurring, don’t cause blood sugar or insulin spikes, and sweeten just perfectly. When used in combination, they seem to cancel out the aftertaste that each has, and work like a charm. When you purchase sweeteners, make sure to take a look at the ingredients on the packaging. You normally want the pure sweetener, rather than having fillers such as maltodextrin, dextrose, or polydextrose which can cause spik Continue reading >>

Guide To Natural & Artificial Sweeteners

Guide To Natural & Artificial Sweeteners

For hundreds of years, sugar and the delicious foods it produces hooked us good. It goes by many different names and is added to the most unlikely items. Sugar finds its way into our lives every day and will keep you coming back for more. Fortunately in more recent years, people are becoming more aware of the dangerous effects of sugar and are reducing their intake accordingly. For those of us on low-carb diets, this fact is particularly clear. Sugar is to be avoided at all costs. However, sweetness is in our nature! Sugar stimulates the “feel good” parts of our brain. We were raised on sugary sweets in reward of good behavior and associate it with birthdays, holidays and vacations in which we indulge. It’s perfectly natural to crave a sweet treat. In the search for alternatives to use in baking and beverages, artificial and natural sweeteners offer a ray of hope. As with all processed foods, it’s important to examine these critically and consider the risks and benefits they offer. Let’s take a closer look at some sugar substitutes. Natural Sweeteners Nature provides a few sweeteners that can be good for your health. They’re low in fructose and calories, and actually taste good! Here are some natural alternatives to sugar that we enjoy: Stevia Perhaps the most popular natural sweetener, stevia is extracted from the leaves of a plant called stevia rebaudiana, which is grown in South America. Gram for gram, stevia is much sweeter than sugar, so you can use a lot less of it – plus, it has virtually no calories! Stevia also contains a few beneficial micronutrients like chromium, magnesium, potassium, and zinc. Some studies have shown that stevia can lower high blood pressure by 6-14%, and lower blood sugar levels in diabetics1. There are several studies that h Continue reading >>

The Difference Between Splenda, Sweet And Low, Equal, And Stevia

The Difference Between Splenda, Sweet And Low, Equal, And Stevia

The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has deemed as many as eight kinds of artificial sweeteners to be safe for consumption. You probably recognize some of them by their brand name: sucralose (Splenda), saccharin (Sweet and Low), aspartame (Equal), and stevia (Truvia). Each has varying levels of sweetness and uses. These sugar substitutes are popular among people suffering from diabetes because they don’t spike blood sugar the same way sugar does, and among dieters who want something “sweet” without the hefty calories. Because unlike table sugar, which has approximately 16 calories per teaspoon, Splenda, Sweet and Low, Equal, and Truvia all contribute little to no calories. Here’s where they differ: Splenda (sucralose): Sucralose isn’t broken down in the body, so it has zero calories. It’s about 600 times sweeter than table sugar and can be used in anything. Since it doesn’t lose its sweetness when you apply heat to it, you can use Splenda in hot foods and baking. Sweet and Low (saccharin): Sweet and Low is one of the first available artificial sweeteners and used in foods, medicine, and even in toothpaste. Saccharin is 200 to 700 times sweeter than sugar, has no calories, and can be used in cooking, too. Equal (aspartame): Aspartame is typically found in chewing gum, diet soda, puddings, and many other “sugar-free” snacks. It’s 200 times sweeter than sugar, but it does have some calories (a measly 2 calories or so) per packet. It also loses its sweetness when heatedso it’s not ideal in baked goods. Truvia (stevia): Because the sweetness of stevia is derived from the leaves of a plant called Stevia rebaudiana, it’s often touted as a “natural sweetener.” In the U.S., the plant itself is not added to the food, just a chemical extract called Re Continue reading >>

Best Low Carb Sweetener:the Best Sweeteners & How To Choose Them

Best Low Carb Sweetener:the Best Sweeteners & How To Choose Them

(I often get asked, “What is the best sweetener for a low carb diet? I hope that my previous article about the difference between low carb sweeteners and this article answer that question for you.) In my last article, Low Carb Sweeteners: Choose What’s Best For You, I talked about the differences between artificial sweeteners, natural low carb sugar alternatives, and natural sugar substitutes. I also listed the pros and cons of each, summing up with the statement that “choosing the best sweetener for you depends on your goals and what you are most comfortable with.” I’ve done a lot of low carb baking over the years, and have tried almost every sweetener on the market. I discovered early on that mixing several sweeteners together produces the best “sugar taste” while minimizing the negatives of any one sweetener. I still mix my sweeteners, preferring to use natural low carb sugar alternatives in lieu of artificial. Why? Well, it’s MY personal preference and what I feel most comfortable doing – especially with kids in the house. But I don’t judge, use what you want. My two Favorite Low Carb Sweeteners? Erythritol and Stevia Now let me just quickly say that my very favorite sweetener is Xylitol. It has a clean sweet flavor most like sugar, but it has three strikes against it… it is lethal to dogs It has calories & the tendency to spike blood sugar in some individuals It can cause stomach upset in some individuals So, I have come to rely on the dynamic duo of Erythritol and Stevia What is erythritol? Simply put, erythritol is a sugar alcohol, named so because it’s chemical structure looks more like that of an alcohol rather than a sugar. It comes in crystalline form (looking like sugar), has 60% the sweetness of sugar, and produces a cooling effect a Continue reading >>

Is Truvia Sweetener Ok For Low-carb Diets?

Is Truvia Sweetener Ok For Low-carb Diets?

Truvia is a granulated sugar substitute. I have tried many sweetener brands, but finally settled on Truvia as my preferred option. I now use it in all of my low-carb recipes. Lately, I’ve been getting lots of questions and comments about Truvia. There seems to be some confusion on whether it is suitable for low-carb dieters. Why some of us are confused about Truvia Truvia have several products in their range. Some are great for low-carb dieters, but some aren’t. All Truvia products are sold under the same brand name, and have similar looking packaging. So it is potentially confusing for us. Double check product names and nutritional information on the labels before buying. Here’s what you need to look out for. YES – Truvia Calorie-Free Sweetener Zero net carbs, PERFECT for low-carb diets This product comes in sachets, in a spoonable plastic pack, and in a pouch. It doesn’t contain any digestible carbs, and its net carb count is zero. So we can safely use it as part of a low-carb diet. The nutritional label does show some carbs, due to FDA regulations. However, these all come from erythritol and are not digestible (otherwise it wouldn’t be marked up as zero-calorie). The exact product name varies in different markets – I have seen it called “Calorie-Free Sweetener”, “Natural Zero Calorie Sweetener”, “Nature’s Calorie-Free Sweetener” etc. The keyword to look for is “calorie-free”. There is also a “zero calories” stamp on the packaging. NO – Truvia Nectar, Truvia Brown Sugar Blend, Truvia Baking Blend Contain sugar, NOT SUITABLE for low-carb diets Truvia range also includes products that contain Stevia blended with sugar – Truvia Brown Sugar Blend and Truvia Baking Blend, and with honey – Truvia Nectar. The sugar content is clearly Continue reading >>

More in ketosis